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Tech Humanist: How You Can Make Technology Better for Business and Better for Humans

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The world becomes more tech-driven every day, and with it, the experiences we as humans have are increasingly shaped by algorithms, automation, and machine learning. Moreover, anyone who creates experiences for humans is inherently amplifying the values they encode far beyond whatever decisions they address. The implications of these experiences stand to shape human relati The world becomes more tech-driven every day, and with it, the experiences we as humans have are increasingly shaped by algorithms, automation, and machine learning. Moreover, anyone who creates experiences for humans is inherently amplifying the values they encode far beyond whatever decisions they address. The implications of these experiences stand to shape human relationships, business expectations, culture, politics, and beyond for generations to come. At the same time, business leaders are also struggling with how to guide their businesses through the maze of digital transformation and the impact of digital disruption. A great deal of investment is now going into developing technology that will scale the company and the experiences it creates for humans who interact with it. The future is uncertain, but so are the impacts on the future from today’s decisions. So the moment is right, argues experience strategy expert Kate O’Neill, to make technology better for business and better for humans. This means an honest assessment that goes far beyond traditional profit motives and looks more deeply at the humanity-defining consequences of everyday human experience design within our increasingly tech-driven culture. Business leaders have the greatest influence on human experience and the greatest opportunity to gain from doing it right, so finding an integrated approach that benefits business and society is nothing short of critical to the future of humanity.


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The world becomes more tech-driven every day, and with it, the experiences we as humans have are increasingly shaped by algorithms, automation, and machine learning. Moreover, anyone who creates experiences for humans is inherently amplifying the values they encode far beyond whatever decisions they address. The implications of these experiences stand to shape human relati The world becomes more tech-driven every day, and with it, the experiences we as humans have are increasingly shaped by algorithms, automation, and machine learning. Moreover, anyone who creates experiences for humans is inherently amplifying the values they encode far beyond whatever decisions they address. The implications of these experiences stand to shape human relationships, business expectations, culture, politics, and beyond for generations to come. At the same time, business leaders are also struggling with how to guide their businesses through the maze of digital transformation and the impact of digital disruption. A great deal of investment is now going into developing technology that will scale the company and the experiences it creates for humans who interact with it. The future is uncertain, but so are the impacts on the future from today’s decisions. So the moment is right, argues experience strategy expert Kate O’Neill, to make technology better for business and better for humans. This means an honest assessment that goes far beyond traditional profit motives and looks more deeply at the humanity-defining consequences of everyday human experience design within our increasingly tech-driven culture. Business leaders have the greatest influence on human experience and the greatest opportunity to gain from doing it right, so finding an integrated approach that benefits business and society is nothing short of critical to the future of humanity.

41 review for Tech Humanist: How You Can Make Technology Better for Business and Better for Humans

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dorin

    It's a little strange to read this kind of book. In theory, if you read a brief description of what this book wants to be, it sounds great. You follow the author on Twitter and she's reasonable and insightful. However, reading the book gave me the feeling of obscured vision: it reads like a modern communist manifesto and it's strange to taint the idea of humanism with the socialist-progressive of the internet outrage culture. And don't get me wrong, I can empathize with the contents of the book - It's a little strange to read this kind of book. In theory, if you read a brief description of what this book wants to be, it sounds great. You follow the author on Twitter and she's reasonable and insightful. However, reading the book gave me the feeling of obscured vision: it reads like a modern communist manifesto and it's strange to taint the idea of humanism with the socialist-progressive of the internet outrage culture. And don't get me wrong, I can empathize with the contents of the book - the book is filled with the usual corporate optimism that emanates from Silicon Valley. However, it doesn't answer to several questions, like „what do you do with the people that disagree with your views?”, or „how will this be weaponized?” And it's strange to see that. Because while Kate O'Neill approaches at times issues and fears that might occur in real life, she never asks herself the question „what if what I suggest can be weaponized?”. It is naïve to say the least - under the pretense of „what I propose is good”, it's easy to forget the reverse of the medal. It's short-sightedness at its best and it made me really sad. I guess that's the Silly-con (oh, such a cheap pun) Valley thinking that becomes so proeminent these days. It's easy, it's good intentions but it's also totalitarian in subtle ways, punishing by omission. The definition and the qualities of the Tech Humanist sound to me not unlike the socialist „New man”, the murderous ideology that killed 90 million people during peace time. And the fact that someone who seems intelligent and open minded like the author doesn't see this simile scares me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jorge Campos

    Long phylosophical essay on things that are already happening This book is a collection of thoughts from the author that appears to me like a long self-indulgent monologue. If you know that technology is changing the way humans live, interact, work, etc. Skip this book. It seems to be written for old CEOs that are stuck in the 80s.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Miloš Belčević

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chad Grundy

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gretchen

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  7. 4 out of 5

    Meghan Keaney

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell

  9. 5 out of 5

    Calum Dixon

  10. 4 out of 5

    James J.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo Costa

  14. 4 out of 5

    Filippo Galassini

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andy Webb

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kitty

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  18. 5 out of 5

    K10hernandez

  19. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Zarra

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Allon

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marc

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alex Cabral

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kate O'Neill

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erica Eastman

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brynne Schweigel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  31. 4 out of 5

    Michael Greer

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Bushman

  33. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  34. 5 out of 5

    Ben Ramsey

  35. 5 out of 5

    Justin Abrahms

  36. 4 out of 5

    John

  37. 5 out of 5

    Robert Neer

  38. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed Mansur

  39. 4 out of 5

    Ali

  40. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Burleson

  41. 5 out of 5

    Marcia

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