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Metaconcert

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All over the world, the metapsychics are honing their skills, learning to stretch their incredible minds far beyond the ken of ordinary humans. Most are dedicated to the harmony of the human soul. But some have darker intentions... If the metapsychics succeed in uniting Earth's minds to take the next step up in human evolution, a place awaits humanity among the alien people All over the world, the metapsychics are honing their skills, learning to stretch their incredible minds far beyond the ken of ordinary humans. Most are dedicated to the harmony of the human soul. But some have darker intentions... If the metapsychics succeed in uniting Earth's minds to take the next step up in human evolution, a place awaits humanity among the alien peoples of the fabulous Galactic Milieu. But if evil minds prevail in their bid for power, Earth will be cut off...and mankind forever doomed!


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All over the world, the metapsychics are honing their skills, learning to stretch their incredible minds far beyond the ken of ordinary humans. Most are dedicated to the harmony of the human soul. But some have darker intentions... If the metapsychics succeed in uniting Earth's minds to take the next step up in human evolution, a place awaits humanity among the alien people All over the world, the metapsychics are honing their skills, learning to stretch their incredible minds far beyond the ken of ordinary humans. Most are dedicated to the harmony of the human soul. But some have darker intentions... If the metapsychics succeed in uniting Earth's minds to take the next step up in human evolution, a place awaits humanity among the alien peoples of the fabulous Galactic Milieu. But if evil minds prevail in their bid for power, Earth will be cut off...and mankind forever doomed!

30 review for Metaconcert

  1. 4 out of 5

    AndrewP

    Continues the story of build up to Earth's first contact as seen through the eyes of Rogatien Remillard. More and more psychic operands are emerging and various factions, both good and evil, try to organize and control them. Most of this book, and the preceding book (if read as the split 2 book edition) is social and political and was slow reading at times. Nevertheless I never stopped wanting to read on. In the last 60 or so pages it turned into a real page turner and I had to finish it in one Continues the story of build up to Earth's first contact as seen through the eyes of Rogatien Remillard. More and more psychic operands are emerging and various factions, both good and evil, try to organize and control them. Most of this book, and the preceding book (if read as the split 2 book edition) is social and political and was slow reading at times. Nevertheless I never stopped wanting to read on. In the last 60 or so pages it turned into a real page turner and I had to finish it in one sitting. No spoilers but there is a stunning revelation at the very end of the book. Now I have read this link between the two sets of books it's on to the Galactic Milieu trilogy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael Battaglia

    If you haven't read the first part of this yet, then it might be a good idea to go back and get that done, unless you're one of those people that like to read the conclusions of novels first. Although even here that's not going to help you since the ending is really just setting us up for the trilogy to follow and doesn't conclude so much as get us to where we need to be. It's still entertaining though. As literally the second half of a novel that was split in two (you could read the first part a If you haven't read the first part of this yet, then it might be a good idea to go back and get that done, unless you're one of those people that like to read the conclusions of novels first. Although even here that's not going to help you since the ending is really just setting us up for the trilogy to follow and doesn't conclude so much as get us to where we need to be. It's still entertaining though. As literally the second half of a novel that was split in two (you could read the first part and stop but it wouldn't be very satisfying) this in theory should be like all those young adult series adaptations where the last book somehow suddenly has a story too big for one movie and must be split into two, which generally means that the first book contains all the setup and the second all the action packed resolutions. Since May is a better writer than most young adult novelists and the book was structured to be split in two this isn't quite as big a problem as you'd think since the first book had plenty of interesting sequences but there was also a sense that it was holding back slightly so that the big scenes would come later. That's mostly the case. Rogi is still narrating the story in parts, specifically the parts involving his family and their increasing roles in world affairs, but the plot still whips around the globe and features the other characters. The difference is here that the two evil characters, his nephew Victor and the ruthlessly persuasive Kieran O'Connor take center stage more as they try to influence events to give themselves more power and keep the other operants (all the people with mental powers) from figuring out what they're doing and attempting to stop them. In the meantime the world is gradually coming apart as various pockets of unrest both home and aboard start to get explosive, causing lines to be unwillingly be drawn between regular people and operants (eerily, the scenes of Middle-Eastern extremist terrorism and the various US-based "get the psychic (read: foreigners) out" groups have uncomfortable parallels to events going on today, despite the book being written in the eighties, making you wish that people with fantastic mental powers would swoop in to save us or at least simply our problems immensely). For the most part, May moves things along nicely although the book does suffer somewhat from not being able to regale us with the shock of the new (taking the mental break in the middle of the story probably doesn't help, even though I read one after the other it still feels like two separate books). With the powers more or less established she can't really find new uses for them although she gets a lot of decent mileage out of the coercive abilities of both Victor and O'Connor, especially the latter's tendency to "bond" his compatriots to his own mind, which really boils down to a creepy form of brainwashing. We do get the concept of the "metaconcert" which while it sounds like a Neil Young-esque exercise in rock and roll irony tends to point the way toward her version of Arthur C Clarke's "Childhood's End". And since you know that we're moving into another trilogy after this one its not like the machinations of the dastardly characters are cause for tension beyond which characters will survive the book (and since there's a detailed family tree at the end with birth and death dates even that takes some of the suspense out). Fortunately for her the main characters are detailed enough and the potential for the epic historical sweep interesting enough that she makes you want to stick around to at least see how this chunk of it turns out and her intense interest in focusing on both the big picture political and the intimacies of family drama (and where they intersect) gives you an idea on how of little changes can make a big difference in either direction. But you definitely feel like the second volume is being carried more by the concept than anything else. While the villains are clever and diabolical, we never really get a sense of Victor's manipulations beyond Rogi telling us how he takes over the family one by one and while O'Connnor gets far more disturbing scenes (including where he messes with his only daughter) he also gets saddled with a crazy version of nihilism that makes him sound like a less eloquent Thanos at times, only without the fabulous sparkly glove of power. When May wants to be effective she's certainly more than capable of it, and a couple scenes stand out as real corkers (for my money, a bold assassination attempt that ends poorly for almost everyone involved nearly takes the cake, as well as a farewell note told with an aching desire to sketch around the edges). To some extent the aliens once again hold the story back slightly, even when you discount the blatant meddling on the part of one of them with Rogi (either essentially telling him what to do or interfering to ensure the plot heads where its supposed to . . . it makes you wonder why he even bothers at times) the times they do appear they sort of dawdle about and chat and seem to exist merely to pad the page count. Their presences may be crucial for those moving onto the next series but for the most part here they distract from the hot mind zapping action going on everywhere else. I will say this, though, the chapter where two aliens come down to get a feel for the mood is one of the most effective scenes in the book, managing to convey hope and curiosity and horror and despair in a very short space and in a way that feels very relevant to today. Which is good, because when the climax does come it basically ends where other climaxes would start and marks the book as essentially a two volume prelude to the Galactic Milieu series. It has plenty of moments that work fine on their own but as a standalone novel its clear that most of its real power is derived from its proximity for what comes afterwards. There's enough to whet your appetite but if you decide to stop here you're probably missing out to an extent, in fact its probably safe to say you're missing out enough that it isn't worth starting in the first place.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Devlin

    Simply the best space opera, and the best series of novels I've ever read. This is the first of the nine, and while the last three show signs of fatigue, these novels capture a cast of characters, and one in Marc Remillard, that are truly memorable. From the worlds and milieu May imagines to her evocative themes, the novels capture humanity with all its foibles and promise, and if you stick around for #6, you'll get the best plot twist in all of bookdom. Simply the best space opera, and the best series of novels I've ever read. This is the first of the nine, and while the last three show signs of fatigue, these novels capture a cast of characters, and one in Marc Remillard, that are truly memorable. From the worlds and milieu May imagines to her evocative themes, the novels capture humanity with all its foibles and promise, and if you stick around for #6, you'll get the best plot twist in all of bookdom.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris Branch

    Elegant and engaging, this is a confident continuation of the Remillard saga, told by Rogi but focusing on Denis, the first true mental giant in the line, and an appropriately cool and studious character. It's also the story of Kieran and Shannon O'Connor, fascinating and relatable characters in spite of their darker natures, and Victor, a less relatable but certainly believable villain. Once again May tells a masterful near future story - written in '87 but extending through 2013, plenty of ele Elegant and engaging, this is a confident continuation of the Remillard saga, told by Rogi but focusing on Denis, the first true mental giant in the line, and an appropriately cool and studious character. It's also the story of Kieran and Shannon O'Connor, fascinating and relatable characters in spite of their darker natures, and Victor, a less relatable but certainly believable villain. Once again May tells a masterful near future story - written in '87 but extending through 2013, plenty of elements ring true, including the speculation of increasing Islamist violence in the Middle East. She overextends her predictions of advances in transportation and space technology while underestimating those in communications, but that's easily forgiven. The world she depicts is clearly recognizable as our own, or what it could be with mental powers growing among the population. The climax comes up rather abruptly, after the fairly leisurely pace of the rest of the story, but it's well crafted and satisfying. An enjoyable read, moving on to the next one soon!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I think I am being generous with a two star review. Absolutely nothing happens until the last twenty pages of this book. Everything else is nothing but political discussions regarding the manifestation of mental powers in people around the world. Mind-numbingly boring is all you really need to know about this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    Rogi Remillard is the entire reason for reading all of Julian May's saga of the Remillard family. Very few other characters are likable at all, but Rogi makes it all fall together, and somehow, always saves the day. Rogi Remillard is the entire reason for reading all of Julian May's saga of the Remillard family. Very few other characters are likable at all, but Rogi makes it all fall together, and somehow, always saves the day.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    An enjoyable part of the Galactic Milieu series...or perhaps part 2 of the prequel to that!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Devlin

    A fine ending to the prequel trilogy to one of the best science fiction series ever. As well as having by far the best ending twist out of any in the series, and likely the best I've ever seen. A fine ending to the prequel trilogy to one of the best science fiction series ever. As well as having by far the best ending twist out of any in the series, and likely the best I've ever seen.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fatbaldguy60

    Good series that gives a lot more background to the prior series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Xabi1990

    8/10. Media de los 7 libros leídos de la autora : 8/10 Las siete novelas que he leído suyas se agrupan en dos series. La de La Intervención (3 libros) y la Saga del exilio en el Plioceno (4 libros). Autora poco conocida pero que se lee (o que leí) con auténtico frenesí. Recomiendo ambas, tal vez la del Plioceno baja un poco en los dos últimos, pero ambas son joyas que tiene Ultramar en su colección de Grandes éxitos de Bolsillo (Ciencia Ficción).

  11. 4 out of 5

    tatterpunk

    Whatever genius guides the majority of May's work is just not here. DNF. Whatever genius guides the majority of May's work is just not here. DNF.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    I love coming across a series of books that I can get all wrapped up in. This series has done that for me. Certainly a keeper in my library, to be read again. Welcome to a new earth.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andy Goldman

    The ending is strangely rushed but otherwise an enjoyable continuation of the saga.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    This is the second and last book of the Intervention series. We find out if humanity is accepted into a Galactic civilization or are quarantined to stay on Earth. Political and social unrest come to a final conclusion here.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Allen Garvin

    Uncle Rogi is a likeable, and sometimes interesting, protagonist, but the sweep and wonder of the earlier books is not to be found at all here.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jutta

    not as good as the preceding or following sets, but still good. read spring 2011 read 7/2005 red fall 1999

  17. 5 out of 5

    Collin Reremoana

    A GREAT READ!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Metaconcert (Intervention, No 2) by Julian May (1989)

  19. 4 out of 5

    CD

    One more in the whole Human Polity, Intervention, Remillard clan tale. 5 stars even if one of the slighter weaker books in the series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cherylitchfieldward

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brian Brus

  22. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Lichtenstein

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jackofbeets

  24. 4 out of 5

    Neil Mulholland

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tammy Sotela

  26. 4 out of 5

    JT

  27. 5 out of 5

    Keith Grassick

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bobbyd

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Kirschbaum

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mara Ness

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