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Dark Sacred Night: Free Preview (A Ballard and Bosch Novel)

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LAPD Detective Renée Ballard teams up with Harry Bosch in the new work of fiction from #1 NYT bestselling author Michael Connelly. Renée Ballard is working the night beat again, and returns to Hollywood Station in the early hours only to find a stranger rifling through old file cabinets. The intruder is retired detective Harry Bosch, working a cold case that has gotten LAPD Detective Renée Ballard teams up with Harry Bosch in the new work of fiction from #1 NYT bestselling author Michael Connelly. Renée Ballard is working the night beat again, and returns to Hollywood Station in the early hours only to find a stranger rifling through old file cabinets. The intruder is retired detective Harry Bosch, working a cold case that has gotten under his skin. Ballard kicks him out, but then checks into the case herself and it brings a deep tug of empathy and anger. Bosch is investigating the death of fifteen-year-old Daisy Clayton, a runaway on the streets of Hollywood who was brutally murdered and her body left in a dumpster like so much trash. Now, Ballard joins forces with Bosch to find out what happened to Daisy and finally bring her killer to justice.


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LAPD Detective Renée Ballard teams up with Harry Bosch in the new work of fiction from #1 NYT bestselling author Michael Connelly. Renée Ballard is working the night beat again, and returns to Hollywood Station in the early hours only to find a stranger rifling through old file cabinets. The intruder is retired detective Harry Bosch, working a cold case that has gotten LAPD Detective Renée Ballard teams up with Harry Bosch in the new work of fiction from #1 NYT bestselling author Michael Connelly. Renée Ballard is working the night beat again, and returns to Hollywood Station in the early hours only to find a stranger rifling through old file cabinets. The intruder is retired detective Harry Bosch, working a cold case that has gotten under his skin. Ballard kicks him out, but then checks into the case herself and it brings a deep tug of empathy and anger. Bosch is investigating the death of fifteen-year-old Daisy Clayton, a runaway on the streets of Hollywood who was brutally murdered and her body left in a dumpster like so much trash. Now, Ballard joins forces with Bosch to find out what happened to Daisy and finally bring her killer to justice.

30 review for Dark Sacred Night: Free Preview (A Ballard and Bosch Novel)

  1. 4 out of 5

    James Thane

    Dark Sacred Night unites Michael Connelly's long-running protagonist, Harry Bosch, with newcomer Renee Ballard, whom Connelly introduced in The Late Show. Ballard is a detective working the night shift--the late show--and late one night she encounters Bosch rifling through the filing cabinets at the Hollywood station where she works. Bosch, who is now working cold cases as a reserve for the San Fernando P.D., is looking for records relating to the murder of Daisy Clayton, a fifteen-year-old runa Dark Sacred Night unites Michael Connelly's long-running protagonist, Harry Bosch, with newcomer Renee Ballard, whom Connelly introduced in The Late Show. Ballard is a detective working the night shift--the late show--and late one night she encounters Bosch rifling through the filing cabinets at the Hollywood station where she works. Bosch, who is now working cold cases as a reserve for the San Fernando P.D., is looking for records relating to the murder of Daisy Clayton, a fifteen-year-old runaway who was killed nine years earlier. After some initial sparring, the two join forces to work the case in their spare time. Bosch is also investigating an old gang murder for the San Fernando department while Ballard is otherwise occupied by the usual calls that come in on her shift. But in and around their other responsibilities, the two will try to find justice for Daisy Clayton. I'm a huge fan of Michael Connelly's novels, but this book just did not work as well for me as most of his others. For some reason, I'm having trouble warming up to Renee Ballard. After two books, I still don't find the character as interesting or as compelling as most of Connelly's other protagonists. The structure of the story didn't help either. It's told in alternating sections, one from Ballards P.O.V. and then the next from Bosch's. I found it disorienting, and it also seemed to drain some of the tension out of the story. Just as things were heating up from one character's P.O.V., it switched to the other's and the tension was dissipated. Another problem was the fact that the two detectives were working this case in and around their other responsibilities. So, in effect, the search for Daisy's killer is constantly interrupted, particularly by the other incidents that Ballard is sent out to investigate. Some of these are interesting in and of themselves, but again they distract the reader's attention away from the main story. The end result is that, at least for me, the book is not nearly as compelling as most of Connelly's other novels. Once one of his books gets its hooks into me, I usually can't bear to put it down until I've finished it. I had no problem putting this book down fairly frequently, though, because Connelly gave me plenty of opportunities to do so with all the breaks he inserted into the action. Dark Sacred Night is really not a bad book; I certainly enjoyed reading it, but it won't rank as one of my favorites among Connelly's many great books.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Unfortunately, I have read better Bosch books.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    What a thrill, as well as an honour to be kicking off the blog tour today for Michael Connelly’s latest book, Dark, Sacred Night! In this police procedural, Connelly teams up his well-known and familiar detective Harry Bosch, who’s now left the police force, with his fairly new character, LAPD detective Renée Ballard. After a run-in with her previous superior, Ballard’s now working the ‘late show’ i.e. the night shift, at the Hollywood Station. One night she’s sitting at her desk, minding her own What a thrill, as well as an honour to be kicking off the blog tour today for Michael Connelly’s latest book, Dark, Sacred Night! In this police procedural, Connelly teams up his well-known and familiar detective Harry Bosch, who’s now left the police force, with his fairly new character, LAPD detective Renée Ballard. After a run-in with her previous superior, Ballard’s now working the ‘late show’ i.e. the night shift, at the Hollywood Station. One night she’s sitting at her desk, minding her own business when she hears a noise, indicating that someone else is nosing around in the work area. It’s nobody she recognises, but it turns out to be none other than Harry Bosch … and so begins what we hope will be a long-standing and successful partnership. Bosch is looking into a cold case that he just can’t let go of. Nine years ago a young girl was murdered and her body left on a trash heap. Her murderer was never apprehended and there’s just something about this case that’s latched onto Harry’s psyche. So much so, that the victim’s mom, a recovered addict is now living with him, temporarily, a contentious issue which has caused his own daughter to keep her distance. I haven’t read a Harry Bosch book for quite some time and it seems that the aging cop is mellowing slightly. That said though, he also seems to have had quite enough of propriety and structure and is quite ready to go out and do his own thing, free of the constraints that being part of the police force brings. While Ballard is at first not too sure what to make of Bosch, she slowly comes to understand him and his work ethic and admires and respects where he’s coming from. This promises to be a stellar tag team, complete with witty, sharp banter and underlying care and admiration. There’s a lot of cop-speak and terminology that might not be familiar to those who don’t read this genre often. But it’s not lost in translation and pretty easy to know exactly what’s being said. Although this is the second of Connelly’s books featuring Renée Ballard, there’s enough background given to provide the reader with sufficient information as to why she’s landed up working the late shift in this particular division … it’s also plenty info to make one go back and read that first book if you haven’t already done so! Michael Connelly doesn’t disappoint in Dark Sacred Night. He describes society’s underbelly – a dark pit that’s inhabited only by a particular type of individual, to whom the night is sacred, as that’s when they’re able to commit their most disturbing, deranged, delusional deeds. That’s when their madness comes alive – in the midst of the dark, sacred night!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    FANTASTIC BOOK! Could not put it down. Another Michael Connelly winner...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Stewart

    Once again Harry Bosch didn't disappoint. The Harry Bosch parts were read by Titus Welliver himself. I thoroughly enjoyed! Once again Harry Bosch didn't disappoint. The Harry Bosch parts were read by Titus Welliver himself. I thoroughly enjoyed!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kennetha Stringer

    I love Bosch. And Bosch and B as ll as ed together is a bonus. Looks like we'll see them together again. I love Bosch. And Bosch and B as ll as ed together is a bonus. Looks like we'll see them together again.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bobby Nash

    I finished the latest Michael Connelly novel today. As always, a great read. In 'Dark Sacred Night', Connelly teams up veteran character Harry Bosch with his latest character, Renee Ballard, who we met in 'The Late Shift' novel last year. Bosch and Ballard make a good team and the ending of the novel leaves me fairly confident that they will cross paths again. In addition to telling a good story, I like the dynamic Connelly creates between Bosch and Ballard. They are both driven detectives with I finished the latest Michael Connelly novel today. As always, a great read. In 'Dark Sacred Night', Connelly teams up veteran character Harry Bosch with his latest character, Renee Ballard, who we met in 'The Late Shift' novel last year. Bosch and Ballard make a good team and the ending of the novel leaves me fairly confident that they will cross paths again. In addition to telling a good story, I like the dynamic Connelly creates between Bosch and Ballard. They are both driven detectives with a strong sense of justice, but their experiences makes them wildly different people. It's in those difference where the two really come together and make a great team. This is another great entry into the series and I look forward to see what happens next. 4 STARS.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Another great Bosch mystery! I missed the descriptions of LA to start each chapter like all the other Bosch books - the city was like another character.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Loved it! Sounds like we have a new team of detectives!! Love Bosch and Ballard.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    Harry is getting older but still a great guy! Books always got a bit out of reality, but that's ok with me! Harry is getting older but still a great guy! Books always got a bit out of reality, but that's ok with me!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Tanton

    Another winner by Connelly. Bosch and Ballard team up on a cold file case that ties into Bosch’s last mystery. The devastation of the murder of a child and opioid additiction make a sobering story. Gang allegiances and the murder of street women are also added to make this an up to date mystery.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    So, why is the night sacred? Lots of things happen at night, murder, rape, abduction, but these are not sacred, or are they? Too many subplots. I appreciate that the main plot itself was a fragile frame upon which to develop a story and book, but was bored and confused. Perhaps the purpose of the book was to loosen Bosch from the chains and bureaucracy, with its rules and regulations to protect the innocent, and enable Bosch (with Ballard) to become a Lone Ranger, galloping in to apprehend and p So, why is the night sacred? Lots of things happen at night, murder, rape, abduction, but these are not sacred, or are they? Too many subplots. I appreciate that the main plot itself was a fragile frame upon which to develop a story and book, but was bored and confused. Perhaps the purpose of the book was to loosen Bosch from the chains and bureaucracy, with its rules and regulations to protect the innocent, and enable Bosch (with Ballard) to become a Lone Ranger, galloping in to apprehend and punish the evil doers. We'll soon learn.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steve Powell

    Another great Harry Bosch novel. Couldn't put it down. Another great Harry Bosch novel. Couldn't put it down.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tamara McKinney

    He did it again! Loved it ❤️

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dana McReynolds

    Although I'm not yet a fan of the Renee Ballard character, she was a bit more tolerable in this book. Harry Bosch always makes everything better. But I was really disappointed with his "encounter" with Elizabeth, a former addict, so many issues with that poor decision. Overall the book had too many subplots going on and a highly coincidental meeting that led to solving the main crime. But I will always love Harry Bosch, so I'm hoping he stays around with Ballard a long time. Although I'm not yet a fan of the Renee Ballard character, she was a bit more tolerable in this book. Harry Bosch always makes everything better. But I was really disappointed with his "encounter" with Elizabeth, a former addict, so many issues with that poor decision. Overall the book had too many subplots going on and a highly coincidental meeting that led to solving the main crime. But I will always love Harry Bosch, so I'm hoping he stays around with Ballard a long time.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Connie Donnelly

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Another great Harry Bosch novel. Michael Connelly never disappoints.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christine Tarullo

    Connelly never disappoints, couldn’t put this one down!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This book was awful. The first Renee Ballard book was so damn good. This one pales by comparison. I barely got through it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bennett

    Connelly does what he's known for and provides us with a great murder plot that has plenty of action along the way and shakes things up with a two-person POV throughout the novel. For some the change in his writing, addition of Renee Ballard (her second feature I'm sure not her last), some internal and external changes in Bosch, and other details in this novel might really pull the total stars down, for me it was a breath of fresh air. If you've read enough Bosch novels then you're well aware of Connelly does what he's known for and provides us with a great murder plot that has plenty of action along the way and shakes things up with a two-person POV throughout the novel. For some the change in his writing, addition of Renee Ballard (her second feature I'm sure not her last), some internal and external changes in Bosch, and other details in this novel might really pull the total stars down, for me it was a breath of fresh air. If you've read enough Bosch novels then you're well aware of Harry's personality and how he handles his cases, and while there are plenty of broken rules, pushy moments between Harry and a superior, and Harry knuckling a suspect under; Bosch's own POV plays a striking second fiddle to that of Ballard. So there is a firm juxtaposition from the outset (Part 1 starts with Ballard) that the novel revolves more around her than around Harry and even though the main case they are focusing on is one that Harry brings to the table; it's Ballard that does a LOT of the heavy lifting. In Ballard, Connelly is giving us an even Bosch-ier Bosch. She's not the typical partner we've seen Harry saddled with before. She's as driven as Harry is and as qualified if not more-so with an even keener sixth sense. This all falls into place in the epilogue as Connelly writes it all out, but from the first case you get a sense she's just a step above a good detective and maybe even a step above Harry. The novel does have some problems, most of which are some incongruities in terms of how Ballard bends rules, and does some pretty dumb stuff and then gets out of the jams, while previously being far too savvy for that type of thing. To this reader there is a pretty big portion of the book that was removed by the editor or author that kind of left me feeling like the action had been forcibly removed. If Harry's POV had been given a lesser spotlight throughout the earlier parts of the book it wouldn't have felt so abrupt but this was rather jarring. The near absence of Maddie and J Edgar was also a let down, but this is supposed to be relatively far in the future (if you're also watching the Amazon Prime series this book takes place a few years after the last season but as always the timelines in the books and in the show are pretty off). My biggest issue with the book is that before this, Connelly has always written some pretty rich characters. Despite his genre of choice, he's been able to place a lot of emotion and depth to his characters including his antagonists. They've always felt real and had some great flaws that came out and often we got segues into their inner lives. He attempts that with Ballard some towards the middle and final portion of the book, but it just doesn't work. Part of the issue is that with writing two POVs everything is sped up. The extra cases Ballard and Bosch are working are not fleshed out and resolve MUCH faster than I can remember any previous cases being featured in previous books. Not only that interpersonal communications and relationships are truncated and feel really forced. This gives Ballard an almost sociopathic bend to her driving purpose. Connelly wants there to be a LOT of emotion in her especially. He puts a LOT of opportunities for her to immerse herself in sadness, anger, fear, resentment. But they all fall pretty flat and I'm left wondering if that's because the pace of the novel due to his two POVs. Publishers of mystery/suspense books likely have a page cap count even for Connelly. And his decision to write the novel in this manner i think hamstrings his ability to really get the reader to connect to the characters. The end of the main case is somewhat of a letdown BUT I think that's on purpose because the entire novel is Connelly slowly letting go of Bosch as his "go-to" protagonist and I imagine we will see that played out in future Ballard/Bosch novels. The whole case and surrounding plot is very much like the climax of a tragedy. You know nothing good is going to come at the end, it's just more sadness and letdown. But the book is still solid, and a quick read. Connelly is still a master story teller and if not for the faults I've listed this would have been a 5 star review. Personally I think Connelly is one of the most gifted of the genre so I also give him some leeway for mistakes and miscues, which this book has quite a lot of and as a whole might be his biggest mistake. BUT it's also likely how he best envisioned getting Bosch where he needed him as a supporting character while bringing in Harry's replacement. We shall see in October when he releases the next in the the Ballard/Bosch series. Hopefully that puts Connelly back into the drivers seat writing killer mysteries once again.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bobby D

    I am new to Michael Connelly as I have only read his last three books although I am surrounded by a history collection of his works because my wife is a big fan. For me the jury is still out although I think this the best of the three Connelly books I have read. I enjoy the Los Angeles setting because I live there but I am not sure those unfamiliar with the city will visualize it better from Connelly’s descriptions. There is certainly an entertainment quality to the books but the writing is like I am new to Michael Connelly as I have only read his last three books although I am surrounded by a history collection of his works because my wife is a big fan. For me the jury is still out although I think this the best of the three Connelly books I have read. I enjoy the Los Angeles setting because I live there but I am not sure those unfamiliar with the city will visualize it better from Connelly’s descriptions. There is certainly an entertainment quality to the books but the writing is like the fuzz on a peach, smooth and soft without any dark punches of violence. The three books I have read are all police procedurals following the clues wrapped up by coincidence. The last two books introduce a new woman detective Renee Ballard who works the Last Show and in this book she meets and works with retired detective Harry Bosch. The story is in part a sequel to the last Harry Bosch book TWO KINDS OF TRUTH as he is searching for the daughter of a woman who lives with him now whom he met on this previous case. Harry meets up with Ballard when he is trying to sneak into police headquarters to review old cold case notes. The story is then told from the two main characters individual perceptive with each part of the book is introduced by the characters last name. Normally I am not a big fan of this technique but it works very well here. The characters do grow on you (and I am sure Bosch has grown on many readers over the years). I am rather new to reading Mysteries and/or Detective novels so my opinions about individual books are at best based on very few comparable. These are a few I enjoyed t00: FALL DOWN DEAD, BY STEPHEN BOOTH (This part of the long running Copper and Fry series, THE DRY, BY JANE HARPER, THE SHADOW DISTRICT BY ARNALDUR INDRIDASON. My favorite recent Mystery is SHARON BOLTON’S LITTLE BLACK LIES. I am sure I will be back reading the next Ballard Bosch book by Connelly and I think I will know what I will get… a relaxed entertaining read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John McDonald

    Connelly keeps the mystery of the crime moving in what may yet be the best in the Harry Bosch series, and looks like he has added a new Watson--Renee Ballard--as a keeper partner for his future novels. This, one hopes, will take the weight off Bosch, who I personally think is the type of cop who makes people really dislike police officers--chip on his shoulder, smoldering anger, an inability to follow protocols that give his job some security, forcing confessions, committing crimes like B&E to o Connelly keeps the mystery of the crime moving in what may yet be the best in the Harry Bosch series, and looks like he has added a new Watson--Renee Ballard--as a keeper partner for his future novels. This, one hopes, will take the weight off Bosch, who I personally think is the type of cop who makes people really dislike police officers--chip on his shoulder, smoldering anger, an inability to follow protocols that give his job some security, forcing confessions, committing crimes like B&E to obtain evidence. Somewhere in this novel, Connelly gives us a peek at Bosch's age by telling us that he was 19 or 20 in 1969 which make him at least 69 and maybe 70 years old. This made me think this is one cop who bears all the horrors of serving in Nam and then spending another 45 or 50 years of seeing the worst humanity has to offer. And given the diet he maintains--diner food and burrito carts--and not a day at the gym, it's a wonder he hasn't been sidelined by diabetes, heart problems, and other ailments that make a 70-year-old less interested in going to work. I think Connelly recognizes his protagonist's personal problems that intrude on Bosch being a good, if not great, cop. Toward the end of the book, Bosch stages one of his set up confessions, involving the threat of torture. Don't get me wrong, the perp was a waste as a human being and a coldblooded murderer. The confession Bosch obtained, I could tell from the second paragraph would have been inadmissible in court and thus worthless as evidence. Bosch, to his credit, recognized this, telling Ballard, at least the police will have a basis to build a case even if the recorded confession isn't the core of it. Old age is mellowing Harry Bosch and it doesn't hurt that his new partner is at least conscious of the rules and protocols. Then, there's the jokes: 'What happens when you eat too much alphabet soup? (Remember alphabet soup?) 'You have a vowel movement.'

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    It is amazing how Michael Connelly keeps churning out great reads. Another excellent Harry Bosch novel, and better yet it is shared with another newer great character Renee Ballard. Harry Bosch working unsolved cases for the San Fernando police department is working a case that he needs info on from the LAPD, and Harry letting nothing stop him when he’s on a case is caught in the act of trying to rifle through old files in the middle of the night at Hollywood division when Detective Ballard who It is amazing how Michael Connelly keeps churning out great reads. Another excellent Harry Bosch novel, and better yet it is shared with another newer great character Renee Ballard. Harry Bosch working unsolved cases for the San Fernando police department is working a case that he needs info on from the LAPD, and Harry letting nothing stop him when he’s on a case is caught in the act of trying to rifle through old files in the middle of the night at Hollywood division when Detective Ballard who works the late show catches him. Harry makes a lame excuse and leaves but it piques Ballard’s curiosity so she does some detective work of her own to see what Harry was up to and is drawn into helping and working together to help solve Harry’s unsolved case. All while the two do that they are also working other cases in their respective departments so there are several other subplots going on through the book all of which to me were as good of stories as that of the two of them working together. Another great story that I have to meter myself from finishing too quickly and having to impatiently wait for the next Connelly novel to drop.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Mackay

    Thank you to Allen and Unwin for my special edition reading copy. Once again Michael Connelly manages to pump out another Harry Bosch book and it's as good as all the others and does not disappoint. I like that Harry's age has not been swept under the carpet and it's acknowledged that he is getting old and has aches and pains, but it does not stop him. He still has what it takes and still cares for the unsolved cases and their families left behind not knowing what's happened to their loved one. A Thank you to Allen and Unwin for my special edition reading copy. Once again Michael Connelly manages to pump out another Harry Bosch book and it's as good as all the others and does not disappoint. I like that Harry's age has not been swept under the carpet and it's acknowledged that he is getting old and has aches and pains, but it does not stop him. He still has what it takes and still cares for the unsolved cases and their families left behind not knowing what's happened to their loved one. As usual there is more than one case being worked and I love the new detective Renee Ballard. I think she is a female budding version of Harry and given a few more years of dealing with the same things Harry has dealt with she will be more like him. Plenty going on in this book and a couple of tense, dangerous moments for both detectives. Looking forward to the next one. Everybody counts, or nobody counts!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rainer F

    Michael Connelly still can't let go of his flagship detective Hieronymus "Harry" Bosch. However, Connelly lets Bosch team up with Renée Ballard, the next generation detective, pretty much an outsider in the LAPD like Harry once was. There is a cold case in the center, but there are lots of other cases that need to be solved by the two. Plots are still strong and the description of police work is very procedural although I suspect that much is against all rules and some things even impossible, hope Michael Connelly still can't let go of his flagship detective Hieronymus "Harry" Bosch. However, Connelly lets Bosch team up with Renée Ballard, the next generation detective, pretty much an outsider in the LAPD like Harry once was. There is a cold case in the center, but there are lots of other cases that need to be solved by the two. Plots are still strong and the description of police work is very procedural although I suspect that much is against all rules and some things even impossible, hopefully. Ballard, for example, works "hobby cases" when her nights are quiet. Do all police officers have their hobby cases? And with what authority do they investigate them. I was a bit surprised that Harry has a pretty detailed described sex act with a woman, haven't read that earlier in Connelly's fiction (?) and think it s not necessary for the story. There are few other authors who are able to drag me into a plot with just a few paragraphs. Michael Connelly. Peter Robinson. Giles Blunt.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hamlen

    By book's end, Bosch is freed from the constraints of structured policing. In future books he will get to go rogue outside departmental regulations. Connelly has multiple options for Harry's character. He could go Travis Bickle, deranged psycho, Paul Kersey, mild mannered businessman turned vigilante or even Batman, Caped Crusader. I'm sure Michael Connelly will find an incentive approach for this new phase of Bosch tales. He's already laid the groundwork by introducing and developing the characte By book's end, Bosch is freed from the constraints of structured policing. In future books he will get to go rogue outside departmental regulations. Connelly has multiple options for Harry's character. He could go Travis Bickle, deranged psycho, Paul Kersey, mild mannered businessman turned vigilante or even Batman, Caped Crusader. I'm sure Michael Connelly will find an incentive approach for this new phase of Bosch tales. He's already laid the groundwork by introducing and developing the character of Renee Ballard. Renee remains in the Late Show, so there should be a continuation of the police procedural aspects of the novels. She provides a nice contrast in age, gender and background to Harry. At some point, we'll have to deal with our intrepid Vietnam vet tunnel rat becoming an octogenarian. Maybe that's when Renee will do all the heavy lifting in the field and then visit Harry on his deck while he muses over the evil that people do, rocking softly under his coverlet to the soft tones of Billy Strayhorn.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Angus Mcfarlane

    The new Connelly installation with a new character to accompany Bosch. Perhaps it was the distraction of the new kid on the block, but Bosch seemed more likable in this one - mellowing with the age perhaps? As for the new kid, a young policewoman marginalized to the night shift after a run in a former supervisor. It was a good perspective, female protagonist and the goings on of the LA at night - seemed to work well enough for me. As for the plot - a cold case initiated by Bosch but quickly a pa The new Connelly installation with a new character to accompany Bosch. Perhaps it was the distraction of the new kid on the block, but Bosch seemed more likable in this one - mellowing with the age perhaps? As for the new kid, a young policewoman marginalized to the night shift after a run in a former supervisor. It was a good perspective, female protagonist and the goings on of the LA at night - seemed to work well enough for me. As for the plot - a cold case initiated by Bosch but quickly a partnership, alongside an existing case....with miscellaneous night shift incidents thrown in. I'm not sure if two weeks after reading I can't remember the key points of the story, but I do remember enjoying it. The definition of a good holiday read maybe? Not likely to read it again in any case, but curious enough to read what comes next.

  27. 4 out of 5

    ROBERT

    I am a Bosch fan. I am enjoying Renee Ballard as well. For those of you who are like me and have read all the Bosch Universe books, you will enjoy it. A Friday night reading Bosch is as much fun to me as going to a concert, movie or out to dinner. It is just good entertainment. I don't even notice the blemishes in the story telling. I just enjoy being in the Bosch Universe again. I am noticing that the Bosch world is getting smaller as his role with the LAPD and SFPD keeps getting smaller. It is c I am a Bosch fan. I am enjoying Renee Ballard as well. For those of you who are like me and have read all the Bosch Universe books, you will enjoy it. A Friday night reading Bosch is as much fun to me as going to a concert, movie or out to dinner. It is just good entertainment. I don't even notice the blemishes in the story telling. I just enjoy being in the Bosch Universe again. I am noticing that the Bosch world is getting smaller as his role with the LAPD and SFPD keeps getting smaller. It is clear Connolly is slowly passing the baton to Renee Ballard. I like her but she is not Bosch for me yet. Better enjoy Bosch while you can. One thing that I do like about Ballard is that I enjoy the peripheral characters and background stories that she brings to the story. Again though, it is at a price of less Bosch periphery characters.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brian V

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Classic Bosch. A attractive, new female cop adds intrigue and dimensions to the story. Renée Ballard is working the night beat again, and returns to Hollywood Station in the early hours only to find a stranger rifling through old file cabinets. The intruder is retired detective Harry Bosch, working a cold case that has gotten under his skin. Ballard kicks him out, but then checks into the case herself and it brings a deep tug of empathy and anger. Bosch is investigating the death of fifteen-year- Classic Bosch. A attractive, new female cop adds intrigue and dimensions to the story. Renée Ballard is working the night beat again, and returns to Hollywood Station in the early hours only to find a stranger rifling through old file cabinets. The intruder is retired detective Harry Bosch, working a cold case that has gotten under his skin. Ballard kicks him out, but then checks into the case herself and it brings a deep tug of empathy and anger. Bosch is investigating the death of fifteen-year-old Daisy Clayton, a runaway on the streets of Hollywood who was brutally murdered and her body left in a dumpster like so much trash. Now, Ballard joins forces with Bosch to find out what happened to Daisy and finally bring her killer to justice.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nic Jones

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Really loved this. Although I guessed Daisy’s killer early on, I still enjoyed the suspense, the different cases and how they interlinked the narrative and made it interesting. I didn’t understand why Elizabeth offered herself up as a sex plate - this just didn’t make sense to me. I enjoyed Ballard as a protagonist but also didn’t understand why back up was always held up- yes she’d made a sexual harassment complaint somewhere else but why would other women not want to do the back up and risk Ba Really loved this. Although I guessed Daisy’s killer early on, I still enjoyed the suspense, the different cases and how they interlinked the narrative and made it interesting. I didn’t understand why Elizabeth offered herself up as a sex plate - this just didn’t make sense to me. I enjoyed Ballard as a protagonist but also didn’t understand why back up was always held up- yes she’d made a sexual harassment complaint somewhere else but why would other women not want to do the back up and risk Ballard getting hurt? A long book, but kept me interested, I cared about Bosch and Ballard (and Ballard’s dog). Definitely worth a read 👍

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marya

    Another great, fast-reading, thrilling, nail-biter book by Michael Connelly. He never disappoints. He always has a crime to solve that takes you to the last pages before you find out who the culprit is. In the meantime, he has little cases that have to get taken care of on a daily basis and keeps the rapid pace of the story going. Of course, this time there were twice as many “little cases” and not so little ones because Connelly put Harry Bosch together with the author’s new hero of the LAPD, R Another great, fast-reading, thrilling, nail-biter book by Michael Connelly. He never disappoints. He always has a crime to solve that takes you to the last pages before you find out who the culprit is. In the meantime, he has little cases that have to get taken care of on a daily basis and keeps the rapid pace of the story going. Of course, this time there were twice as many “little cases” and not so little ones because Connelly put Harry Bosch together with the author’s new hero of the LAPD, Reneé Ballard. So this doubled the intensity of the story. And now he’s partnered the two heroes up for future novels, inside and out of police protocol. Stay tuned.

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