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Dazzling space battles, intergalactic politics, and rogue AI collide in Velocity Weapon, the first book in this epic space opera by award-winning author Megan O'Keefe. Sanda and Biran Greeve were siblings destined for greatness. A high-flying sergeant, Sanda has the skills to take down any enemy combatant. Biran is a savvy politician who aims to use his new political positi Dazzling space battles, intergalactic politics, and rogue AI collide in Velocity Weapon, the first book in this epic space opera by award-winning author Megan O'Keefe. Sanda and Biran Greeve were siblings destined for greatness. A high-flying sergeant, Sanda has the skills to take down any enemy combatant. Biran is a savvy politician who aims to use his new political position to prevent conflict from escalating to total destruction. However, on a routine maneuver, Sanda loses consciousness when her gunship is blown out of the sky. Instead of finding herself in friendly hands, she awakens 230 years later on a deserted enemy warship controlled by an AI who calls himself Bero. The war is lost. The star system is dead. Ada Prime and its rival Icarion have wiped each other from the universe. Now, separated by time and space, Sanda and Biran must fight to put things right.


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Dazzling space battles, intergalactic politics, and rogue AI collide in Velocity Weapon, the first book in this epic space opera by award-winning author Megan O'Keefe. Sanda and Biran Greeve were siblings destined for greatness. A high-flying sergeant, Sanda has the skills to take down any enemy combatant. Biran is a savvy politician who aims to use his new political positi Dazzling space battles, intergalactic politics, and rogue AI collide in Velocity Weapon, the first book in this epic space opera by award-winning author Megan O'Keefe. Sanda and Biran Greeve were siblings destined for greatness. A high-flying sergeant, Sanda has the skills to take down any enemy combatant. Biran is a savvy politician who aims to use his new political position to prevent conflict from escalating to total destruction. However, on a routine maneuver, Sanda loses consciousness when her gunship is blown out of the sky. Instead of finding herself in friendly hands, she awakens 230 years later on a deserted enemy warship controlled by an AI who calls himself Bero. The war is lost. The star system is dead. Ada Prime and its rival Icarion have wiped each other from the universe. Now, separated by time and space, Sanda and Biran must fight to put things right.

30 review for Velocity Weapon

  1. 5 out of 5

    Petrik

    ARC provided by the publisher—Orbit—in exchange for an honest review An incredibly entertaining start to a new space opera series. Velocity Weapon is the first book in The Protectorate series by Megan E. O’Keefe. This was my first experience reading O’Keefe’s work and I had a fantastic time with it. isn’t an easy book for me to review. It’s not because I found the book to be disappointing or not up to my preference, but I honestly think that many components of the storyline or what makes this boo ARC provided by the publisher—Orbit—in exchange for an honest review An incredibly entertaining start to a new space opera series. Velocity Weapon is the first book in The Protectorate series by Megan E. O’Keefe. This was my first experience reading O’Keefe’s work and I had a fantastic time with it. isn’t an easy book for me to review. It’s not because I found the book to be disappointing or not up to my preference, but I honestly think that many components of the storyline or what makes this book truly great can be considered a spoiler that the task of reviewing this book ended up being more difficult than usual. “Being offended by facts is a long human tradition.” The story in Velocity Weapon begins with Sanda finding herself awake 230 years in the future inside a sentient spaceship who calls himself Bero, shortened from The Light of Berossus. Bero is an enemy spaceship and he tells Sanda that the war has ended; the star system is completely dead now. Then, we have Biran—Sanda’s younger brother—as the second main POV character; his story takes place in the present timeline as he tries to find Sanda’s location. Separated by distance and time, both Sanda and Biran will have to do everything they can to survive or unveil the truth. Velocity Weapon tells a story of survival and intergalactic politics. I found the pacing and the tone of this book to be refreshing to read. O’Keefe’s storytelling style has a way of keeping things fun and gripping without ever making the tone of the story too dark; the right balance of varying emotions in this book was achieved through its charming characters. ‘In the upper right of her HUD, text flashed: :-P “Oh my god. They taught you emoticons.”’ I do believe that Velocity Weapon is a cleverly crafted novel. The usage of dual timelines in this book exhibited a strong sense of mystery; it made me intrigued to find out what happened within that 230 years differences. It was awesome to see how Biran’s and Sanda’s story connects with each other despite the differences in the timeline. O’Keefe cloaked revelations that should’ve been easily spotted in plain sight by making sure that the reader will be too immersed in the specific scene they’re reading; I was too absorbed to theorize about anything else. The characters, especially Sanda, was so easy to root for. A heroine like Sanda is hard to find in current SFF market; she’s a badass with no overpowered skills and she’s not a damsel in distress who’s hopelessly waiting to be saved. Not only that, reading her banter and dialogues with Bero and other side characters were super immersive, funny, and most importantly, hard to put down. The characterizations, their sexuality, their interactions, and the world of the series itself felt natural. Admittedly, there was actually another prominent POV—Jules—other than Sanda’s and Biran’s. Although I found Jules’s storyline to be full of well-written actions, I didn’t find myself feeling invested in her story as much as I did for Sanda’s and Biran’s. This doesn’t mean that Jules’s story was lacking per se, it’s just that the sibling’s story was too good that every time the narrative shifted to Jules, I just wanted to go back to reading Sanda or Biran’s POV as fast as possible. Luckily, Jules’s last chapter in this book shows good promises on connectivity to the overarching storyline and more great things to come in the next installment. I’m going to close my review here. In order to make this review spoiler-free, please know that I purposely left out some factors that, in my opinion, made the quality of the book even better. Imbued with exhilarating twists and turn, Velocity Weapon was a purely entertaining reading experience. If you’re a fan of sci-fi, space opera and the Mass Effect video game series by Bioware, your decision to purchase and read this delightful book should be settled already. Official release date: June 11th, 2019 You can pre-order the book from: Amazon UK | Amazon US | Book Depository (Free shipping) The quotes in this review were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication. You can find this and the rest of my reviews at Novel Notions

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    4.5 stars I can’t remember the last time I read a book that got me with so many ‘Excuse, me, WHAT?’ moments. This is one tricksy author. And she’s put together more than just a well crafted story, it’s a genuinely fun reading experience that has you smiling at your own shock as much as what’s happening on the page. And therein lies the problem for any kind of review, because you really don’t want to be spoiled by any of the specifics before you start. Even more so than usual I mean. This is the k 4.5 stars I can’t remember the last time I read a book that got me with so many ‘Excuse, me, WHAT?’ moments. This is one tricksy author. And she’s put together more than just a well crafted story, it’s a genuinely fun reading experience that has you smiling at your own shock as much as what’s happening on the page. And therein lies the problem for any kind of review, because you really don’t want to be spoiled by any of the specifics before you start. Even more so than usual I mean. This is the kind of novel that extends a welcoming hand, one loaded with the promise of honesty and friendship, when all the while the other grips a knife just out of sight. You think you can imagine what comes next in this scenario….? Not if this author’s writing it. Nope, no way, not a chance. Maybe the whole damn world explodes. Maybe they whip out the blade and carve a wooden statue of your favourite sea creature. WHO KNOWS. So… I’m going to avoid anything that could give the game away and talk about some of the other stuff that makes this book a damn good time. At least 5 of the top 10 most awesome things are all Sanda. This MC is brave, capable, funny, inventive, vulnerable, and that perfect level of snarky. I hate falling back on the Ripley thing each time I find an awesome female in space, but that’s the kind of strength she’s channelling here. She takes zero shit, but isn’t one of those characters whose attitude is a shorthand for badassery. It’s her actions, not a big mouth, that show who she really is. The appeal is that she’s so very human, but trying to be the best of version of it she can be. It feels honest and real. Her emotional experiences are right there, making it so very clear why she battles on. Despite being knocked down more times and in more ways than most people could take, she comes back fighting. Every time. And I cheered. Every time. I flat out loved her. When an author can work creatively with perspective and narrative structure but also give readers characters who can hold all the pieces together, it makes for a thrilling mix. Surprises can come from anywhere, and in this case, they really do. But that’s far from the only positive. High energy action scenes are balanced by quieter moments of emotional reflection, just as the humour holds its own against the tragedy. The past clashes brutally with Sanda’s present, allowing for how-the-hell-we-got-here as much as the-hell-we’re-in-now. Within that space, there’s room for all kinds of voices. Diversity, in particular, is done with such exquisite assuredness that it makes a liar of all those who say it doesn’t work. Notions of personal morality and identity, be it self expressed or imposed, underlie every characterisation, whether human, spaceship, or anything in-between, offering a multifaceted and complicated world with no easy answers. It’s especially evident when it comes to the AI, developed here through the smartship The Light of Berossus (Bero for short). It's a Frankensteinesque story, with all the associated themes. As good sci fi always does, this book asks the big questions: what it means to be human, what it means to live, what it means to be free…. Each individual must work out what really matters to them, what they’re willing to lie about, forgive, fight, or die for, and it’s all set against a backdrop of dystopian inequality, political machinations, and world ending weapons. Most of all though, it’s about family, whether blood or created, and how those bonds can hold strong across space and time. This is space opera with a high wow factor, full of heart and humour, twisty enough to have you reading sentences twice over, desperate to see if it really said what you thought it did… It's going to be big. Don't miss it. ARC via Netgalley

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nils | nilsreviewsit

    ‘Ada Prime’s Casimir Gate filled the sky. Only from this position, she thought, can one truly appreciate the gate’s beauty. It was massive beyond her ability to articulate — even Keeper Station, so large it housed hundreds of thousands, barely managed to eclipse a small stretch of the ring that was the frame of the gate. The light of it had always been Ada’s guiding star.’ ~ Velocity Weapon is the first book in the Protectorate series by Megan O’Keefe. Hailed as a book that will provide ‘dazzling ‘Ada Prime’s Casimir Gate filled the sky. Only from this position, she thought, can one truly appreciate the gate’s beauty. It was massive beyond her ability to articulate — even Keeper Station, so large it housed hundreds of thousands, barely managed to eclipse a small stretch of the ring that was the frame of the gate. The light of it had always been Ada’s guiding star.’ ~ Velocity Weapon is the first book in the Protectorate series by Megan O’Keefe. Hailed as a book that will provide ‘dazzling space battles’ and ‘intergalactic politics’, you can see why this one has been on my radar for quite some time now. So, was it all that I hoped it would be? Hell yes, and it was so much more. It’s hard for me to describe the plot of Velocity Weapon, because I don’t want to unwittingly give away any spoilers or even any clues as to how the narrative unfolds. Let it be known now though, O’Keefe will take you down paths you were never expecting! So, I’ll just mention that the book begins with our main protagonist, Sanda, waking up onboard an enemy spaceship 230 years into the future. Sanda is not alone though, not by any means. You see, the ship is actually a sentient AI, who calls himself Bero. Our second main protagonist is Biran, Sanda’s younger brother, his timeline focuses back to the moments when the enemy Icarion declare war upon his homeland planet, Ada Prime. As Icarion unleashes their attack on Prime, Biran searches desperately for his sister. I have stated before that I’m not a big fan of space opera, and that I’m also not overly fond of long scenes where characters are confined onboard a spaceship. I tend to prefer my sci-fi to be centred around a planet, and have culture, religion and alien life explored; if you think in terms of the Dune saga, which is one of my favourites, then you’ll understand the type of sci-fi I mean. However, Megan O’Keefe made me eat my words, because I adored this little gem of a space opera! Yes we do explore intergalactic politics through the conflict between Icarion and Ada Prime, and also through the concept of Keepers, who held the secret of intergalactic travelling through gates. We also touch upon philosophy shown through the nature of AI’s, but ultimately Velocity Weapon is a space-romp which revels in its hundred percent fun-factor. I believe that O’Keefe creates a fantastic balance between an intriguing plot which constantly keeps you on your toes, and a fantastic array of charismatic characters. Take Sanda, for example. She is a character that drips with charm and fiestyness. She’s not one who wallows in self-pity or gives in to despair. No, not our Sanda. She sees a problem, she finds a solution, even if that solution may be ludicrous. Damn the risks, damn the consequences, LET’S DO THIS! I have to say, I hold such a soft spot for these ballsy type of characters. In the early chapters, Sanda and the AI Bero, and even the repair bot, Grippy, form quite an endearing bond, which proved to be humorous and simultaneously thought-provoking. I wish I could discuss Bero in more detail but I think I would hit spoiler territory which I’m trying to avoid. What I will say though, is that Bero will make you feel many feelings. Nonetheless, these scenes often held Razor-sharp wit, and cleverly laced dialogue, so even though they were confined, they were always entertaining. In fact, all of Sanda’s interactions with other characters were a complete delight. ~ “Maybe I should have flown,” Tomas said. She glared at him. “One leg is better than one arm in the command chair. Anyway, we’re not dead yet.” “Yet.” “Keep talking, might speed things up.” ~ Then as we are introduced to Biran, we see that he is more the intellect, the diplomat, the one who strives for peace rather than warfare. Seeing Biran navigate his way through politics, but also truly trying to help the people of Ada Prime, and his sister, well, you couldn’t help but root for him to succeed. There was a third POV too - Jules. I was less invested in her character and narrative, much of it was quite the mystery throughout. I kept trying to decipher where Jules’ story was leading, but couldn’t quite hit the mark. However, I did appreciate the way her character represented the seedy underworld on Atrux. I suspect Jules’ character has a lot more to offer in the sequel too after the way her narrative revealed its true nature at the end! Often with the sci-fi genre, I find myself struggling to fully immerse myself because I get tied in knots over trying to understand and visualise all the world-building, particularly the technology. Did I understand all of the tech-y space terms in Velocity Weapon? Nope. Did I care? Not one bit. When a book is this well done, then not understanding every single detail ceases to matter. So, although I may have had certain terms go over my head, O’Keefe never left me bewildered either. I found the prose created a cinematographic read. Every scene was so well crafted, there was this ultra-real feeling, you could visualise it, like a film playing out on the page. Speaking of well crafted. I love it when authors pay attention and include little details, especially in their chapter titles. Naturally, I very much enjoyed the humorous chapter titles that were included; ‘Surviving day forty would be super‘, ‘Naps are never long enough’ and ‘The wisdom of repair bots’ were ones that really stood out to me. So, to sum up, reading Velocity Weapon felt like being strapped into our very own spaceship and being on one exhilarating, fun ride. Megan O’Keefe, I salute you, you are one damn deliciously thrilling, tricksy author! Thank you to Brit E. B. Hvide at Orbit for providing this review copy in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    This one started out well, but . . . . kind of tailed off, like she had run out of ideas? And I didn't really connect with any of the characters except the ship AI. Which is pretty cool. But, 500+ pages! For Book #1 of a new series, by a new author! I'd read something else by her, after she gets her writing chops down, but I gave up on this one about 1/4 in. If you are thinking about reading it, I'd suggest reading some of the other 2 and 3-star reviews. My rating: 2.5 stars for what I read, rou This one started out well, but . . . . kind of tailed off, like she had run out of ideas? And I didn't really connect with any of the characters except the ship AI. Which is pretty cool. But, 500+ pages! For Book #1 of a new series, by a new author! I'd read something else by her, after she gets her writing chops down, but I gave up on this one about 1/4 in. If you are thinking about reading it, I'd suggest reading some of the other 2 and 3-star reviews. My rating: 2.5 stars for what I read, rounded down for lack of promise of improvement. Big Plus: great cover art!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Niki Hawkes - The Obsessive Bookseller

    [3.5/5 stars] Overall, Velocity Weapon was an entertaining read. Probably in the upper half of scifi novels I’ve read lately. It’s very character-driven and political, involving two worlds on the brink of war. I appreciated the slightly more complex ideas and thought the non-human characters were handled especially well. I also liked the initial suspense – it had a lot of interesting and dynamic plot points to keep the pages turning. If I can say nothing else about the book, it was consistent fr [3.5/5 stars] Overall, Velocity Weapon was an entertaining read. Probably in the upper half of scifi novels I’ve read lately. It’s very character-driven and political, involving two worlds on the brink of war. I appreciated the slightly more complex ideas and thought the non-human characters were handled especially well. I also liked the initial suspense – it had a lot of interesting and dynamic plot points to keep the pages turning. If I can say nothing else about the book, it was consistent from start to finish… … which may have been why the novel ultimately left me feeling underwhelmed. I definitely don’t mind a slow-burn plot that takes a while to unfold all of its mysteries. I do mind, however, when that slow burn doesn’t eventually escalate, as was the case with Velocity Weapon. It kept the same plodding pace through the entire novel when everything about the story supported a careening finish. Unfortunately, the height of interest for me hit at about the halfway point and never really went back up from there. The good news is, at least it was consistently good. If you like the book right from the beginning and know what to expect, chances are you’ll continue to like it well into the second novel. Series status: I set down the second book in favor of other series I was more impassioned about. However I can see myself picking it back up eventually because the series is written well and has a lot of merit. Recommendations: pick this scifi up for a slow-burn, character-driven political novel. Via The Obsessive Bookseller at www.NikiHawkes.com Other books you might like:

  6. 5 out of 5

    Liz Barnsley

    I inhaled Velocity Weapon in a few hours, it was so much fun, also brilliantly written, dark and beautiful and a rollicking good adventure. Sanda is a purely wonderful character, having woken up on an intelligent ship years into the future, everyone lost to her. Said ship Bero is a melancholy companion, a kind of virtual Eeyore, their growing relationship is compellingly clever. Meanwhile back before Bero, Sanda’s brother searches for her… I loved all the many layers to Velocity Weapon, it is a pro I inhaled Velocity Weapon in a few hours, it was so much fun, also brilliantly written, dark and beautiful and a rollicking good adventure. Sanda is a purely wonderful character, having woken up on an intelligent ship years into the future, everyone lost to her. Said ship Bero is a melancholy companion, a kind of virtual Eeyore, their growing relationship is compellingly clever. Meanwhile back before Bero, Sanda’s brother searches for her… I loved all the many layers to Velocity Weapon, it is a proper, sprawling epic with many intricate levels, the world building and political landscape wonderfully imagined and cleverly woven. A highly addictive storyline, quality storytelling and a cast of characters you’ll love this is just the ticket when you need pure escapism and a new world to explore. Loved it. Cannot wait for more… Highly Recommended.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Veronique

    Very cinematographic read, full of twists and turns! The narration is divided mostly between the siblings, gunnery sergeant Sanda stranded alone on an enemy ship controlled by an AI with attitude some 230 years in the future, and her brother Biran, in the present, who tries everything he can, now that he has just joined the powerful Keepers, to find out what happened to his sister and save her. O’Keefe serves up a real space opera, full of action, yes, but also charismatic characters. Sanda and Very cinematographic read, full of twists and turns! The narration is divided mostly between the siblings, gunnery sergeant Sanda stranded alone on an enemy ship controlled by an AI with attitude some 230 years in the future, and her brother Biran, in the present, who tries everything he can, now that he has just joined the powerful Keepers, to find out what happened to his sister and save her. O’Keefe serves up a real space opera, full of action, yes, but also charismatic characters. Sanda and Biran bring different angles of the same story, a somewhat convoluted one, which are both compelling. I particularly appreciated how the author portrayed their tight relationship, with each other as well as with their fathers. And let’s not forget the brilliant Bero, who brings to the fore questions on the nature of sentience and ‘human’ rights.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/07/25/... Velocity Weapon by Megan E. O’Keefe was a book I picked up on a recommendation from several reviewers whose descriptions of the book sounded like something I would really love—and I’m glad I decided to check it out! As space operas go, it was highly entertaining with some fantastic character development and world-building, and I couldn’t have asked for more. As the story opens, our protagonist Gunnery Sergeant Sanda Greeves 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/07/25/... Velocity Weapon by Megan E. O’Keefe was a book I picked up on a recommendation from several reviewers whose descriptions of the book sounded like something I would really love—and I’m glad I decided to check it out! As space operas go, it was highly entertaining with some fantastic character development and world-building, and I couldn’t have asked for more. As the story opens, our protagonist Gunnery Sergeant Sanda Greeves finds herself waking up naked and alone on an unfamiliar ship. Exploring her surroundings in shock and confusion, she manages to access the ship’s sentient AI, discovering that she has been asleep for more than two centuries. The war she had been fighting in is over, with both sides having destroyed themselves. The ship Sanda is on now is The Light of Berossus, an enemy ship. Bero, as it calls itself, informs her that the two of them are now alone in a dead star system, her home world of Ada Prime and their rivals from the planet Icarion having wiped each other out. In a separate thread, we also get the story from the perspective of Biran, Sanda’s brother. When the news arrives that his beloved sister’s gunship had just been blown up in the Battle of Dralee, Biran barely has time to grieve before he is swiftly whisked off by the Keepers of Ada Prime to discuss their next step. And in another star system, a young smuggler inadvertently stumbles upon something she shouldn’t have while on what was supposed to be a routine job—a deadly secret that will have serious repercussions for the galaxy if it is discovered. While it’s going to be difficult to review Velocity Weapon without revealing any spoilers, I’m going to try my best because some things are simply best experienced firsthand, including all the twists and shocking surprises in this book. As we alternate between the different character perspectives, more details of the plot are gradually laid bare, allowing the reader to piece together the clues and find out just what is going on. I won’t lie, the beginning will be confusing at first, and the big picture will be hazy and vague—but stick around if you can, for it will be worth it. Each character’s point-of-view will present a conundrum, a conflict to be solved. Sanda is in the biggest bind of all, lost in space with a ship that seems to have its own personality and agenda, and it’s anyone’s guess what it has in mind for them both as they try to find their way back to civilization. Biran is in the process of being groomed to be the next Keeper of Ada Prime, though the only thing on his mind is his sister and how he will be able to get her back. What anyone could possibly do to help her is anyone’s guess, separated as the characters are by space and time, but eventually all will be answered. Kudos to O’Keefe for being able to juggle all these moving parts while keeping her cards close to the vest so by the time the revelations come, you will be floored. Still, I have to say, one key aspect of the book I did not really care for was Jules’ part of the story. Although she ended up playing an important role in the overall plot, I thought her early sections detracted from the overall mystery and the tensions surrounding the siblings’ predicament. I think the author knew this might happen, because Jules’ chapters were packed full of intrigue and fast-paced action in order to tide us over while the character’s own arc was being developed. It’s not that I didn’t like Jules or enjoyed her chapters, but while Sanda and Biran’s threads were unfolding, all I really wanted was to get back to their part of the story to find out what happened next! The Greeves were hands down the most interesting characters, and I always felt a thrill especially whenever I returned to Sanda’s POV. One of the reasons for that is Bero. Now don’t get me wrong because I loved reading about Sanda—she’s strong, spirited, and tenacious. But as you know, I am also a sucker for ship AI characters, and Bero was a real trip. And that’s all I’m going to say on that subject! In sum, I had a lot of fun with Velocity Weapon, and I was pretty excited to learn that there’s likely more to come as this looks to be the first book in a new series. Not much else really to say about this novel, except that it was entertaining and satisfying. I also think it opens up doors for many other possibilities, and I will be waiting with great anticipation for what Megan E. O’Keefe has in store for us next.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura (crofteereader)

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the free ebook! All thoughts/opinions are my own. It's best to consider this book based on the three perspective characters we follow: Sanda (arguably the main character), Biran (Sanda's brother and a secondary force in her storyline), and Jules (off on her own and completely separate from the rest of the story). Sanda, despite being a military officer, is rather undisciplined and not particularly believable in that capacity. As a person and the hero o Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the free ebook! All thoughts/opinions are my own. It's best to consider this book based on the three perspective characters we follow: Sanda (arguably the main character), Biran (Sanda's brother and a secondary force in her storyline), and Jules (off on her own and completely separate from the rest of the story). Sanda, despite being a military officer, is rather undisciplined and not particularly believable in that capacity. As a person and the hero of this story, she does very well: between her need for distraction, the pain (physical and emotional) that she experiences, and even the way she interacts with other people (until near the end, which really goes back to her supposed military background) are very authentic. The timeline is a little wonky because of the kind of work she has to do and there's a bit of a forced romance plot. The conspiracy is all a little convoluted and I'm left, at the end, not really understanding who was right - or even if it matters. The enemy nation (planet? empire?) didn't feel like a real threat and when we did meet them, it felt more like posturing than actual threats. Biran is shot straight to stardom and power in a structure we never quite understand. The Keepers (essentially the government of the Prime intergalactic empire) are never fully explained: their reach, their power, the political red tape. Instead, we focus on Sanda and skip over most of that. Without this background information, Biran's story is irrelevant outside of Sanda and indeed draws the plot out well beyond the necessary. And then we come to Jules. She's the one I personally was the most interested in. I guess I like the scrappy ones who take the fight into their own hands. But she has a history that we get hints of (and, like the Keeper structure, we don't ever get an explanation). She's living a conspiracy and a tragedy (not unlike Sanda) that continues to get more and more complicated. The real problem with Jules, however, is that, relative to Sanda and Biran, she gets almost no "screentime" and therefore we get no real answers. Perhaps she'll factor more into future books, but because we get no real payoff in connection with the larger story, she felt unnecessary (and, once again, the weird timeline in this book made this worse). I think this book was too ambitious. There was simply too much to balance: a complex system of planets connected by proprietary technology, two storylines (across three characters) that are not given anything like equal weight, a massive conspiracy that we never really get to understand, and a whole lot of hints to a bigger conspiracy that never comes into focus.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    This is a story I picked up on recommendations from friends on Twitter and as part of Space Opera September, and I am very glad that I have discovered a new author who I really enjoy, who is female, and who writes awesome books. I tend to favour fantasy over sci fi, but this is great and I found lots to love in the characters and the plot of this. In this story we follow a few PoV characters, but the main ones are Sanda and Biran Greeve, one is a Sergeant in the army and the other is a Keeper of This is a story I picked up on recommendations from friends on Twitter and as part of Space Opera September, and I am very glad that I have discovered a new author who I really enjoy, who is female, and who writes awesome books. I tend to favour fantasy over sci fi, but this is great and I found lots to love in the characters and the plot of this. In this story we follow a few PoV characters, but the main ones are Sanda and Biran Greeve, one is a Sergeant in the army and the other is a Keeper of information. They come from a society where they live in Space and they frequently have access to gates to fly through Space but these are controlled by the main power, Ada Prime. They are both part of Ada's society, and they believe in their people and the power struggle against the moon Icarians. However, when the Icarians begin to strike at Prime they both become mixed up in things and have no clue what has happened to the other or how to fight back. Each of their stories is insightful and fascinating, and I liked them both. The other main character that I enjoyed learning about is Bero, an AI who is quite incredible in comparison to most of the tech that Ada Prime have previously had. He has a strong personality and a sarcastic but fun side too. There's one further character, Jules, who we also get as a PoV but I found her harder to connect with and I didn't think her story was quite as compelling or engaging. I have a feeling we have more to come from the plotline she sets up here however, and maybe book #2 is where this will play out. Megan O'Keefe is a quality writer becuase she manages to surprise the reader at multiple points over the course of the book with big reveals I didn't see coming and interesting facets of information and twists. I really liked lots of the plot points and I feel like she really kept me on my toes and kept me guessing up to the end of the story about where everything was heading. There is LGBTQ+ rep and that was a nice thing to see as a part of the story. I really liked Biran and Sanda's dads :) I definitely want to read book #2 soon as there's clearly a whole lot more to come, and I really feel like i want to follow the plot and characters further and find out where they are heading. Certainly a solid first read by her, and I will also be interested in picking up her other work too. 4*s

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kelsea

    Update upon reread: somehow, even more awesome than I remembered! Can’t WAIT to dive into Chaos Vector next!! ____________________________________________________________ New favorite: ACQUIRED. This book was a whirlwind of plot twists, adventure, interesting characters, politicking, and AWESOME. I loved the diversity (disabled MC, siblings raised by two dads, etc.), the sibling relationship, the sentient ship, the epic story scope, and all of the TWISTS! Yes, I’ve mentioned the twists twice, beca Update upon reread: somehow, even more awesome than I remembered! Can’t WAIT to dive into Chaos Vector next!! ____________________________________________________________ New favorite: ACQUIRED. This book was a whirlwind of plot twists, adventure, interesting characters, politicking, and AWESOME. I loved the diversity (disabled MC, siblings raised by two dads, etc.), the sibling relationship, the sentient ship, the epic story scope, and all of the TWISTS! Yes, I’ve mentioned the twists twice, because they really made the book for me. I love pretty much everything about Sanda. Her grief at finding herself aboard a sentient enemy ship, the sole survivor of a war, was palpable. I found myself considering how I’d feel in her position -- and being so glad I didn’t have to experience it in my own lifetime. I love her practical attitude, her compassion, and her anger. I love that she was smart and competent, as all of my favorite characters are. I love how much she missed her family. I love that she chose to keep going anyway and channel her grief toward something productive. I enjoyed the other storylines as well, but more for the pieces of worldbuilding and background they brought to Velocity Weapon than for the subplots themselves. Sanda’s was my favorite storyline, but I enjoyed seeing the rest of the puzzle pieces snap into place. The book ends with so much progress and yet so many questions, but in a good way. The way that makes me wish I had the second book in my hands RIGHT NOW. I’m ready to dive back into Sanda’s story! Recommended for anyone interested in: diverse adult SFF, space operas, badass female MCs, books with physical disability rep, psychological thrillers, and epic stories! Advanced copy provided by Orbit Books through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Gunnery Sergeant Sanda Greeve wakes up on an enemy ship, alone, naked and missing a leg. The shocks don't stop there, as the ship she's on is controlled by an AI who tells her that she's slept for two hundred and thirty years and both her civilization of Ada Prime and the enemy civilization of Icarion that the ship is from have both been destroyed in the war between them. In an alternate story thread in the distant past, Sanda's brother Biren has just found out that Sanda has been lost in a space Gunnery Sergeant Sanda Greeve wakes up on an enemy ship, alone, naked and missing a leg. The shocks don't stop there, as the ship she's on is controlled by an AI who tells her that she's slept for two hundred and thirty years and both her civilization of Ada Prime and the enemy civilization of Icarion that the ship is from have both been destroyed in the war between them. In an alternate story thread in the distant past, Sanda's brother Biren has just found out that Sanda has been lost in a space battle with the enemy Icarians, and he has to struggle against the Keepers of Ada Prime to mount a rescue. And in a neighboring star system a young criminal stumbles across a deadly secret. Twist upon twist that doesn't let up until the last page ... If at any point you think you understand what's happening, just read a few more pages and you'll be lost again. Sanda and Biren really shine, with Sanda's grief and devotion to her family being the keystone of the first part of the book and Biren's almost fanatical pursuit of mounting a rescue of his sister. Their fathers are also a great addition. The political mess that Biren finds himself navigating is fascinating, as is the relationship that Sanda has with the AI Bero. And the AI is well realized as well, complete with personality quirks and trauma. It all makes for a wonderful first part of the series, and I will be reading on.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Rogue AI! Plot twist after plot twist after plot twist! Interstellar, centuries-old mysteries! Smart characters doing lots of action-y things! Spies and politics! MC with a disability! A maintenance robot friend! VELOOOOCCIIIIITTTYYYYYYYYYYY WWWEEEEAAAAPPPOOOOONNNN

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    3.5 Stars Video Review: https://youtu.be/dz0GG6yuIJs As someone obsessed with space opera, I was eager to read Velocity Weapon, the first book in a brand new space opera series. My excitement only grew when I learned that it was written by a female author with a predominant female protagonist. Further to that, this novel shares the same publisher as my all time favourite science fiction series, The Expanse. Needless to say, my expectations when picking up this new release were incredibly high. No 3.5 Stars Video Review: https://youtu.be/dz0GG6yuIJs As someone obsessed with space opera, I was eager to read Velocity Weapon, the first book in a brand new space opera series. My excitement only grew when I learned that it was written by a female author with a predominant female protagonist. Further to that, this novel shares the same publisher as my all time favourite science fiction series, The Expanse. Needless to say, my expectations when picking up this new release were incredibly high. Now that I've read it, I can say that Velocity Weapon does not quite live up to the perfection of the Expanse series, but it was still a fun start of new space opera adventure. The biggest strength of this novel was the author's ability to surprise me as a reader. There were some great twists and turns in this novel that I absolutely did not see coming. I can usually predict stories so I was delighted when I realized that I had been blindsided. Given the nature of this novel, it would be best going into this one without knowing too much of the plot. Since this book is told in multiple perspectives, I found myself more interested in certain chapters than others. Sandra’s perspective was easily the most entertaining and intriguing of the three main characters. I also enjoyed reading from Biran's point of view which provided some necessary backstory. I struggled most with Jules’ chapters simply because she was not obviously connected to the two other storylines. While I generally liked all the main characters in this novel, I felt that they were underdeveloped and even flat at times. Some of their reactions, or lack of reactions, simply felt unrealistic. For instance, the main protagonist apparently had no emotional response to losing one of her legs, which struck me as quite odd. In terms of tone, this novel was more light-hearted than I expected. The best humour came from the banter between Sandra and the artificial intelligent ship. While this novel certainly involved some epic stakes, the humour tended to cut the tension of the situation. Personally, I prefer a slightly more serious narrative, but the lighter tone certainly made for a fun story. Overall, the narrative within the novel was well paced. The balance of political intrigue and action kept me engaged throughout most of the story. Despite being over five hundred pages, this was a quick read. Once I hit the halfway point, I flew through the rest book in just over a day because I really wanted to see how it would all come together. This book is the start of a new space opera series and I am interested to see where it will go from here. Additional books will provide more time for character development so this may be a case where the series that just gets stronger with each book. I would recommend this book to science fiction readers that love space opera series filled with actions, plot twists and a healthy dose of humour. Disclaimer: I requested a copy for review from the publisher Orbit Books.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Hugely enjoyable space opera, with fantastic worldbuilding, some great characters and an intriguing starship AI. I really enjoyed the way in which the novel develops - it's twisty and exciting - and while there is a dark foreboding over much of the events, it's also light and fun. I loved Sanda. What a brilliant main character! Review to follow shortly on For Winter Nights. Hugely enjoyable space opera, with fantastic worldbuilding, some great characters and an intriguing starship AI. I really enjoyed the way in which the novel develops - it's twisty and exciting - and while there is a dark foreboding over much of the events, it's also light and fun. I loved Sanda. What a brilliant main character! Review to follow shortly on For Winter Nights.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Draper

    More half-baked than hard SF. So, it turns out that the technology that would be at the very heart of the story in a classic hard-SF novel doesn't have much to do with how things actually play out in this one (strange that the book was categorized as military or hard SF in the first place). The star-gate plans so valuable that they're split up into bio-chips implanted in multiple "Keepers" are just a classic McGuffin. Ms. O'Keefe doesn't care how the Casimir Gates work, and it matters not the sli More half-baked than hard SF. So, it turns out that the technology that would be at the very heart of the story in a classic hard-SF novel doesn't have much to do with how things actually play out in this one (strange that the book was categorized as military or hard SF in the first place). The star-gate plans so valuable that they're split up into bio-chips implanted in multiple "Keepers" are just a classic McGuffin. Ms. O'Keefe doesn't care how the Casimir Gates work, and it matters not the slightest to the plot, except that maybe the fact that they're built following the model planted in an asteroid by unknown aliens will lead to some kind of "aha, it was all a trap to lure foolish humans into our clutches!" moment. But for now, the top-secret plans could easily be replaced with the coordinates to humanity's long-lost home planet, a single ring with the ability to control all others, or the list of herbs and spices in a famous fried-chicken recipe. So the next question is, does the story work anyway? And my answer is no. Not because I'm opposed to interchangeable McGuffins, but because Ms. O'Keefe didn't seem to invest much in the story or the world(s) she was building. Each chapter begins with a date, 3541, that seems to imply that the action takes place about 1500 years from now. Fine, great; interstellar travel and civilization should be a ways off. But there are so many here-and-now elements that I couldn't settle into a futuristic mode, with mentions of Velcro (with capital letter), Apple watches (without the brand, but with the swipe-and-pinch navigation), ping-pong balls, duct tape, Newton, Einstein, disdaining Beethoven for music with guitars, denim jackets, newscasters with cheesy sign-ons, a slacks-blouse-and-blazer combo in a world of tailored jumpsuits, semi-smart houses with voice assistants, CamCasts (are video calls so new they are trademarked?), a tech geek who goes by "they/them" (but doesn't use the royal We), My Two Dads (the big, tough one and the little, loves-to-cook one) ... So much NOW! It would've worked better in a "20 minutes into the future" setting. That lack of care in crafting a believably or even engagingly future world are particularly obvious when Ms. O'Keefe starts throwing in just about every cyberpunk thing she can think of (except for omnipresent corporate advertising): the aforementioned star gates, pervasive online credit and tracking, video calls, brain-implant chips (though none that connect to an Internet-like web), instant interplanetary communication (no lag time), spaceships, emergent AIs with personalities, nanotechnology, medical suspended animation, individuals with multiple identical bodies, blaster guns, villains with super-enhanced healing factors, etc., etc., etc. Nothing seems deeply integrated, or growing logically out of the society; it's just a bunch of cool stuff to play with. And, for me, the players weren't very interesting. The two tough-chick point-of-view characters were pretty much interchangeable. The other point-of-view character was the smart-boy Keeper whose cute hair and devotion to his sister were his primary characteristics. The super-spy guy filled the "girl" role, a hottie for the sergeant to be attracted to and the smart-person source of plot-convenience solutions. The rest of the Keepers seemed qualified for nothing more than petty political games--whatever the criteria are, they don't measure actual leadership or intelligence. The AI ship was so traumatized about being created a weapon and used to kill his creator's enemies that he murdered his own crew--what? Why? At least HAL 9000 turned murderous because he'd been given contradictory instructions and couldn't resolve them.... This felt very much like a first effort, and there were salvageable elements, but this should've been a preliminary draft, not the final product.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (A Life Bound By Books)

    This book was a beast of a read. Took me forever to get through it but mainly because I was a bit too busy I read for about a week. It’s a great first book in a series. Or maybe part of a duo? Not sure but it’s thrilling and so interesting and I was lost within the pages every time I was reading. This book is written in multi-points of view over different times - the past and the present. And the story has multiple threads that weave in and out of each other, that at first I was put a bit off. I This book was a beast of a read. Took me forever to get through it but mainly because I was a bit too busy I read for about a week. It’s a great first book in a series. Or maybe part of a duo? Not sure but it’s thrilling and so interesting and I was lost within the pages every time I was reading. This book is written in multi-points of view over different times - the past and the present. And the story has multiple threads that weave in and out of each other, that at first I was put a bit off. I mean it’s lots of info but I kept reading because the more I read the quicker I found myself engrossed in these characters and this sci-fi adventure. Also, I think I have a thing for books with space ships who end up to be a main character of the book. In this one it’s Bero. Along with a main character who’s a ship, there’s action and adventure. There’s thrilling bits and politics and layers upon layers of history to round out such a great book! Now, when’s the next book coming out?? What’s the next book even called?? Because I NEED MORE MORE MORE NOW please and thank you. Highly recommend.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Justine

    I'm putting this aside for now at 18%. I'm not ready to completely DNF it, but I'm just not feeling it at the moment. I'm pretty sure that this is on me though, and not the book, so I'll probably give it another go sometime later. I'm putting this aside for now at 18%. I'm not ready to completely DNF it, but I'm just not feeling it at the moment. I'm pretty sure that this is on me though, and not the book, so I'll probably give it another go sometime later.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Acqua

    I really couldn’t get into this. While Sanda’s storyline was – as far as I read – straightforward enough and easy to follow, the book is made of really short chapters, and between two Sanda chapters you always get one or more set “before”, following other characters. I understood nothing of what happened in those. My threshold for putting up with initially confusing worldbuilding and fictional societies in adult sci-fi usually isn't this low, but nothing about this book made me think the effort I really couldn’t get into this. While Sanda’s storyline was – as far as I read – straightforward enough and easy to follow, the book is made of really short chapters, and between two Sanda chapters you always get one or more set “before”, following other characters. I understood nothing of what happened in those. My threshold for putting up with initially confusing worldbuilding and fictional societies in adult sci-fi usually isn't this low, but nothing about this book made me think the effort would be worth it. (Which is also probably due to the fact that it really doesn’t seem to be my kind of sci-fi.) But let’s talk about what I liked: - While I don’t know if there are any queer main characters, I did like that from the first chapter we get to know that the main character has two fathers, and that (I think) queerness isn’t in any way an issue in this future. - Sanda is an amputee, which should be far more common when it comes to stories about war and characters surviving improbable disastrous situations. - Tension and stakes were definitely there, in Sanda’s storyline. Mysterious enemy ship, and the enemies really might have designed a planet-destroying weapon they aren’t fully able to control… it’s a lot (and I wish the other chapters were as interesting and less “I have no idea what this means or how anyone and anything looks like, and most of all, why I should care”) What I didn’t like: - apart from the confusion, multi-PoV books with really short chapters tend to take me out of the story continuously, so I paradoxically end up reading them more slowly.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    4.5 stars. Did you ever fall in love with a dangerous, somewhat murderous sentient spaceship suffering from trauma? Well, I did, and his name is The Light of Berossus, Bero to his friends. Or friend, who in this case is Sanda Greeve, gunnery sergeant. Sanda's on board Bero, who tells her it's a few hundred years after a conflict between Ada, her home planet, and Icaria. She's lost everyone she cares for: her younger brother Biran and her two fathers. This space opera moves fast, and serves up lot 4.5 stars. Did you ever fall in love with a dangerous, somewhat murderous sentient spaceship suffering from trauma? Well, I did, and his name is The Light of Berossus, Bero to his friends. Or friend, who in this case is Sanda Greeve, gunnery sergeant. Sanda's on board Bero, who tells her it's a few hundred years after a conflict between Ada, her home planet, and Icaria. She's lost everyone she cares for: her younger brother Biran and her two fathers. This space opera moves fast, and serves up lots of action, interesting relationships, and asks you to think about who has rights in society. The characters are interesting, with Bero being my favourite. With multiple PoVs (Sanda, Biran, and Jules, an individual whose story takes place far from Ada Prime, but who is bound to have an impact on the main action and characters), multiple storylines and deepening mysteries about the political situation and technologies, I'm on board for the next book in this series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hicks

    All the time I was reading this I was thinking three stars, but in the end I'm giving two. Not because of the "oh, did you think there wouldn't be more volumes?" ending, just from a general feeling of dissatisfaction. Early on I read "gunnery sergeant"and I thought "oh no, not another ridiculously capable female gunny" because there are so many such books out there, all military procedure and pompous officers. But to her credit, O'Keefe didn't go there. Sanda is good but credible. Sanda's brothe All the time I was reading this I was thinking three stars, but in the end I'm giving two. Not because of the "oh, did you think there wouldn't be more volumes?" ending, just from a general feeling of dissatisfaction. Early on I read "gunnery sergeant"and I thought "oh no, not another ridiculously capable female gunny" because there are so many such books out there, all military procedure and pompous officers. But to her credit, O'Keefe didn't go there. Sanda is good but credible. Sanda's brother looked promising, but his sudden, unlikely promotion felt as if it only happened because the plot needed it to. The slow unroll of what was going on with Bero was mostly well done. I didn't care for the chapter headers, which were more of an attempt to mislead than anything. Bero's personality issues were a good idea, if perhaps slightly overdrawn at times as he went from highly capable to toddler, but there was a bit of an explanation for that so OK. The Nazca seem to have more leverage than I could accept. Tomas was not bad, but did we really need them to get it on? I wonder if the publisher insisted. Enter Lavaux, who didn't quite twirl his mustache and go "nyah-hah-HAH" but certainly could have. In a group of fairly ordinary Keepers, he suddenly produces (from his cloak?) what appears to be the spaceship equivalent of a Bugatti Veyron, a ship in which is quite comfortable challenging an enemy general's ship. And as for what his story turned out to be, well, we haven't heard most of it but it feels like a "hey, you know what? What if we made Lavaux a (withheld)?" So Lex did all this much earlier with two spinning rings, huh? That's short-cut worldbuilding. Has anyone used that one since the pulp era? OK, let's talk irregular verbs. When writing it past tense, you can I suppose say "she sweat" and the like, but not if you later say "she gritted her teeth." And we can't have "spit" for "spat." And don't get me started on "stepped foot," which appears so often it felt as if O'Keefe knew I hate it and was pulling my chain. Don't bother with the "writers have been using it for centuries," I know they have; it's still redundant, awkward and flow-stopping. Might as well say "touched hand to" instead of "touched." At the end, just when I thought O'Keefe had made it without my least favourite SFF cliché, here it was. Sanda woke up from unconsciousness and immediately played the "how long?" card. I'm still waiting for an author to have someone ask, "What happened?" or "Where am I?" or "Can I have a bucket?" or "Did we win?" or "Is my brother OK?" or really ANYthing except "how long was I out?" It's only a step from that to steaming mugs and crisp white shirts. And the punk thieves? Somehow I knew all along that they weren't going to matter, that they would be important in the next book. Finally, here's Rainier. Not only is she a clone, but also ... well. let's just say that felt like another "hey, what if we made her a (withheld)?" Hint: not the same as the other (withheld). I'll skip the next one, but I will go and look for #1 of her other series just to see.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    DNF @ 44% I tried with this book. I really tried. I wanted to like it, I wanted to at least finish it. But I just don't care about the characters enough to keep reading. I enjoyed the concept and the worldbuilding, which is why I read as much as I did and why I'm giving this a 2 star rating regardless of the fact that I'm not finishing it. I think this story has merit, but I also think it's not for me. My favorite books are those where I connect with the characters in some way, and so their storie DNF @ 44% I tried with this book. I really tried. I wanted to like it, I wanted to at least finish it. But I just don't care about the characters enough to keep reading. I enjoyed the concept and the worldbuilding, which is why I read as much as I did and why I'm giving this a 2 star rating regardless of the fact that I'm not finishing it. I think this story has merit, but I also think it's not for me. My favorite books are those where I connect with the characters in some way, and so their stories matter to me. This one, even with the great setting and concept, didn't have characters I can relate to and so I don't care what happens to them. If the blurb sounds interesting to you, and you are the type who doesn't need to connect to the characters — or if you do connect to these characters where I did not — then I think you would probably enjoy this book. I didn't have any problem with the actual writing (though keeping the timelines straight was a bit confusing at first since the years in the chapter headings meant nothing to me yet). I do hope Bero — the smartship — has a happy ending, though. He's the one character I even started to connect with. Sadly that just wasn't enough for me. (I received an advance copy from a Goodreads giveaway. All opinions are my own.)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Holly (The GrimDragon)

    "Fuck." "You say that a lot, Sanda." "It's a fuck-y kind of day, Bero." Velocity Weapon is the first book in The Protectorate series by Megan E. O'Keefe. Stars smiled on me as I unhinged my jaw and devoured this glorious space opera! Taking place roughly 1500 years in the future, Velocity Weapon follows three point of views during the aftermath of an attack on an Ada Prime fleet by rivals from Icarion, a neighboring planet. In a spaceship far, far away awakes Gunnery Sergeant Sanda Greeve. Naked, alon "Fuck." "You say that a lot, Sanda." "It's a fuck-y kind of day, Bero." Velocity Weapon is the first book in The Protectorate series by Megan E. O'Keefe. Stars smiled on me as I unhinged my jaw and devoured this glorious space opera! Taking place roughly 1500 years in the future, Velocity Weapon follows three point of views during the aftermath of an attack on an Ada Prime fleet by rivals from Icarion, a neighboring planet. In a spaceship far, far away awakes Gunnery Sergeant Sanda Greeve. Naked, alone and missing half a leg. Realizing that she is on an unknown ship, she explores further, discovering that the ship is being run by a sentient AI. The Light of Berossus, aka Bero, is a cheeky interstellar smartship and the first of its kind. Bero catches her up on what she has missed while asleep in her evacuation pod. Turns out, it's an enemy ship that had rescued her after the Battle of Dralee. Unfortunately, the war devastated both planets, leaving Sanda as (possibly) the only living being left. Oh, and that tragedy? Yeah, that was 230 years ago. TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY YEARS AGO!! Sanda's lost over two centuries, which she struggles to come to terms with. It's an intensely emotional time, having lost everyone she knows and loves, including her brother Biran and her dads, Ilan and Graham. But Sanda is a survivor and she isn't about to give up just yet.. even if the thought of waking up 230 years in the future boggles the fucking mind! Told through a parallel narrative, the second storyline takes place 230 years before Sanda's and highlights her brother Biran just prior to the attack. Biran Aventure Greeve is climbing the ranks of the military on Ada Prime, finding himself in the Keeper role. Keepers are political leaders with a responsibility to uphold important information, including details about the Casimir Gate and how it works.. through a chip implanted in their head. Cool. Cool cool cool. What's so special about gates, you may ask? Well, gates are a bridge from one interstellar system to another, allowing travel between distant planets. This causes trouble between Icarion and Ada Prime, who owns the technology and won't allow them to use it. Icarion is hoping to build their own gate, so they develop smartships and a super weapon, the Fibon Protocol, in retaliation. Biran learns that his sisters gunship has been shot down during battle, but refuses to believe that she is dead. The flashbacks weave in and out of the story, alternating chapters between the past and the present. We see how this war has affected Biran and just how much he is willing to sacrifice in order to have Sanda return home safely. As if those dual timelines aren't bonkers enough, then we are introduced to a third perspective - Jules, a poor thief on the planet Atrux. She is playing a dangerous game, but it's one that we won't fully realize the impact of until later in the series. Although she is seemingly thrown into the mix and doesn't have many chapters to develop, there's enough that I'm super curious about! I feel as though I've gone on and on about the plot, but I'm honestly just skimming the surface. There is a lot to unpack here! It doesn't take long though, as plot twists start threading together, clicking into place as the story surges through the short, punchy chapters. "Shit, shit, shitshitshit." Velocity Weapon has it all - interstellar travel, space battles, ultimate technology advancements, comfortable humor, political intrigue, a radical supporting cast. Each character truly felt like they had a place and that they were useful to the story. When a story is populated with this many, that is often a difficult thing to achieve. Not so for O'Keefe and this compulsively readable first installment. I absolutely loved Sanda and Bero and Grippy, the maintenance bot that looks like a crutch of sorts and is essentially a pet puppy! As the map would seem to indicate, there is still plenty of planets to visit within this universe that O'Keefe has created. She has used the well-worn plot of a ragtag group in space and given it some much-needed fresh and boisterous energy! This was a delightfully fun adventure, but with very real stakes at hand. It's a bleak, yet hopeful examination on grief, PTSD, accountability, family and fighting to survive. Velocity Weapon is a geeky, immersive science fiction novel that you can sink your teeth into with major Mass Effect vibes.. which I AM HERE FOR ALWAYS!! Dios, this was bloody damn addictive. I was completely engrossed from cover to cover! (Endless thanks to Orbit Books for sending me a copy! Sorry for the delay!)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Trike

    Almost 5 stars, 3 because it just stops rather than come to a satisfying conclusion, with none of the stories having any resolution at all. I suspect once all is said and done this will be a terrific story, but as it stands this is merely the first part. Waiting a year or more for the next installment is annoying. If only she had finished one of the many threads here I would’ve been more pleased. That said, what is here is terrific. It feels like classic Niven with smart, capable people doing coo Almost 5 stars, 3 because it just stops rather than come to a satisfying conclusion, with none of the stories having any resolution at all. I suspect once all is said and done this will be a terrific story, but as it stands this is merely the first part. Waiting a year or more for the next installment is annoying. If only she had finished one of the many threads here I would’ve been more pleased. That said, what is here is terrific. It feels like classic Niven with smart, capable people doing cool stuff in difficult situations, with a solid sense of humor and hints of deeper worldbuilding below the surface. I like the characters, I like the plot, I like the prose, I like the pacing... basically everything except the lack of a resolution. That lack is kind of surprising, too, given that despite its 500+ page count the story is lean and propulsive. It zips right along, in fact. I hope I can remember to come back to this world in 2024 or whenever the final book comes out.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Velocity Weapon is a fast-paced three-act play of intrigue, moral ambiguity, and science fiction fun. It contains everything I look for in Scifi… a future that is futuristic in every way: Tech, culture, and space. O’Keefe has real talent for describing spacey stuff with everyday metaphors, easy ways of explaining things to laymen like me. Highly Recommended for fans of space operas. This one is very good and deserves great praise. I grabbed ahold of this book and for two day, I didn’t let go. 4. Velocity Weapon is a fast-paced three-act play of intrigue, moral ambiguity, and science fiction fun. It contains everything I look for in Scifi… a future that is futuristic in every way: Tech, culture, and space. O’Keefe has real talent for describing spacey stuff with everyday metaphors, easy ways of explaining things to laymen like me. Highly Recommended for fans of space operas. This one is very good and deserves great praise. I grabbed ahold of this book and for two day, I didn’t let go. 4.5 out of 5 stars For my full review: https://paulspicks.blog/2019/05/16/ve... For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog

  26. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    I was the wrong audience for this book because I am not usually a fan of space opera, and I abandoned this book at the 35% mark, soon after Sanda made one too many references to Tomas’s dimples. Up to that point, I had been given very little description of what this world looked like or felt like, and the political structure was very unclear. All of this might improve later in the book, but I wasn’t interested enough to keep going. I did skip to the end and discovered that the book ends with a c I was the wrong audience for this book because I am not usually a fan of space opera, and I abandoned this book at the 35% mark, soon after Sanda made one too many references to Tomas’s dimples. Up to that point, I had been given very little description of what this world looked like or felt like, and the political structure was very unclear. All of this might improve later in the book, but I wasn’t interested enough to keep going. I did skip to the end and discovered that the book ends with a cliffhanger, so you need to be prepared to spend a lot of time with this saga. It just wasn’t for me. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeanny

    Audible version. The book was well written & the narrator did a decent enough job but I couldn’t get into this book. The only character that interested me was the spaceship Bero. I was completely uninterested in the Aliens species, the humans, or politics at play. The story arc just fell flat bc I couldn’t muster up any interest one way or another. Will not be reading the next book. DNF 50% skipped ahead to the final chapters & it ends in a cliffhanger. 1 Yawn inducing star ⭐️

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vigasia

    3,5 stars This book kept me interested from start to finish. It has some interesting ideas and a few twist and turns that can catch us off guard. I think it could be a little shorter, because some chapters were mostly fillers. Characters were likeable, but I haven't felt a special connection with any of them and probably that disturbed a little my enjoyment. But I will continue with the series, because I am courious what will happen next. 3,5 stars This book kept me interested from start to finish. It has some interesting ideas and a few twist and turns that can catch us off guard. I think it could be a little shorter, because some chapters were mostly fillers. Characters were likeable, but I haven't felt a special connection with any of them and probably that disturbed a little my enjoyment. But I will continue with the series, because I am courious what will happen next.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    DNF at 43%. It was a good book but way too long, and got boring as a result. It was a really interesting concept and honestly, I am very very interested to find out how it ends, but it was taking way too long to get there. At times it felt like the plot wasn't moving forward at all. DNF at 43%. It was a good book but way too long, and got boring as a result. It was a really interesting concept and honestly, I am very very interested to find out how it ends, but it was taking way too long to get there. At times it felt like the plot wasn't moving forward at all.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    This is an extremely fun, space opera with a fast pace that is maintained throughout 500+ pages. I really enjoyed all the POV characters, but especially the interaction between Sanda the stranded Gunnery ship pilot and Bero the A.I. of the enemy ship she is stranded on. I also enjoyed the treatment of Sanda's disability as something that needed to be dealt with, but not as something that she would allow to hold her back. The other POVs were interesting too, but it wasn't clear how all those stor This is an extremely fun, space opera with a fast pace that is maintained throughout 500+ pages. I really enjoyed all the POV characters, but especially the interaction between Sanda the stranded Gunnery ship pilot and Bero the A.I. of the enemy ship she is stranded on. I also enjoyed the treatment of Sanda's disability as something that needed to be dealt with, but not as something that she would allow to hold her back. The other POVs were interesting too, but it wasn't clear how all those story threads were all going to tie together until the end, which they did very nicely. I'm kind of being cagey about saying too much the story here because this book has a ton of huge plot twists, and you really do not want to have them spoiled for you. The bottom line is, this was a great book, and I really want more.

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