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Daughter of the Sun (The Solara Trilogy Book 1)

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Princess Gabriella of Astadia enjoys nothing more than talking to the stars. They have voices but they do not use words, or at least not in any conventional sense. She never understood how or why this was possible, until one day she receives a visit from Ja-Ded, an unusual wizard from the Distant East. His only possessions are a dirty old cloak and a crooked staff with an Princess Gabriella of Astadia enjoys nothing more than talking to the stars. They have voices but they do not use words, or at least not in any conventional sense. She never understood how or why this was possible, until one day she receives a visit from Ja-Ded, an unusual wizard from the Distant East. His only possessions are a dirty old cloak and a crooked staff with an unremarkable brown rock dangling at its end. He begins to teach her of Magic she never knew existed, and he hints that the secret to her abilities may have to do with a past life she lived four thousand years earlier. But before he can explain any further, he vanishes in a flash of light. Gabriella must search for Ja-Ded in a town no one seems to have heard of. Along the way she must confront a witch who would offer her great power, a circle of faery who would trap her in their music for all of time, and an eerie red-eyed shadow creature who whispers creepy chants into her ear late at night. Worst of all, she will have to defeat the Asura, a horrific, six-armed, winged beast who aims to enslave all of human kind by turning their own hatred and lust for violence against them. But in order to succeed against the Asura, Gabriella must first find herself, her true self, before it is too late….. DAUGHTER OF THE SUN


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Princess Gabriella of Astadia enjoys nothing more than talking to the stars. They have voices but they do not use words, or at least not in any conventional sense. She never understood how or why this was possible, until one day she receives a visit from Ja-Ded, an unusual wizard from the Distant East. His only possessions are a dirty old cloak and a crooked staff with an Princess Gabriella of Astadia enjoys nothing more than talking to the stars. They have voices but they do not use words, or at least not in any conventional sense. She never understood how or why this was possible, until one day she receives a visit from Ja-Ded, an unusual wizard from the Distant East. His only possessions are a dirty old cloak and a crooked staff with an unremarkable brown rock dangling at its end. He begins to teach her of Magic she never knew existed, and he hints that the secret to her abilities may have to do with a past life she lived four thousand years earlier. But before he can explain any further, he vanishes in a flash of light. Gabriella must search for Ja-Ded in a town no one seems to have heard of. Along the way she must confront a witch who would offer her great power, a circle of faery who would trap her in their music for all of time, and an eerie red-eyed shadow creature who whispers creepy chants into her ear late at night. Worst of all, she will have to defeat the Asura, a horrific, six-armed, winged beast who aims to enslave all of human kind by turning their own hatred and lust for violence against them. But in order to succeed against the Asura, Gabriella must first find herself, her true self, before it is too late….. DAUGHTER OF THE SUN

47 review for Daughter of the Sun (The Solara Trilogy Book 1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ann-Marie

    I have decided to stop reading this book for personal ethical reasons. Some people may accuse me of political correctness, but my complaint deals with my own comfort level and cultural appropriation. There is a race of people in this book called the Afrans. They are a dark skinned race from the south, a simple, somewhat primitive people, who believe in the power of spirits and magic. But, hey, magic exists in this world. Nothing wrong there. They also speak in a sort of Afro-Caribe dialect. Can I have decided to stop reading this book for personal ethical reasons. Some people may accuse me of political correctness, but my complaint deals with my own comfort level and cultural appropriation. There is a race of people in this book called the Afrans. They are a dark skinned race from the south, a simple, somewhat primitive people, who believe in the power of spirits and magic. But, hey, magic exists in this world. Nothing wrong there. They also speak in a sort of Afro-Caribe dialect. Can you guess that this book was written by a white guy? Jeez Louise, no wonder people of color are getting bent out of shape about Caucasians trying to write non-white characters. We have to stop thinking in caricatures. Kudos to the author for creating a multicultural world. It was a good effort, but clumsy. Did Tamko have any African American friends he could have had read this before he published? There is a movement afoot, which I believe is wrong, to get white people to stop attempting to write from the point of view of members of other races. Do we want segregated books now? I don't know. Maybe the Afrans end up being the absolute heroes of this book in the end, but if my little white shiny butt can't make it to that end, will a non-white person be able to? I don't know. I don't presume to think for a non-white person, only for a plain old white reader. P.S. Even I know Africa is not a culture. Africa is a continent, with a multitude of different ethnicities, cultures and traditions. I received this book free in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Finley

    I received a free digital copy of this book through a giveaway hosted on GoodReads. Daughter of the Sun is the story of Princess Gabriella, the sheltered second daughter of King Rutherford III. All her life, Gabriella has been fond of stories of magic, of talking to the stars, and of questioning the world around her. She has also loved spending time with her older sister, the next in line for the throne, who encouraged her wonder and curiosity. When Cassandra falls ill, however, Gabriella gets h I received a free digital copy of this book through a giveaway hosted on GoodReads. Daughter of the Sun is the story of Princess Gabriella, the sheltered second daughter of King Rutherford III. All her life, Gabriella has been fond of stories of magic, of talking to the stars, and of questioning the world around her. She has also loved spending time with her older sister, the next in line for the throne, who encouraged her wonder and curiosity. When Cassandra falls ill, however, Gabriella gets her first taste of the true magic in the world, only to be forced to give up her dreams and be responsible when her sister dies and she must step up to take her place as future High Queen. Not all is well in Astadia, however, and Gabriella soon realizes that she, as well as the whole world, is in danger, and she may be the only one who can bring light and love back to a world that has already begun to fall to corruption. This novel was beautiful. Not only was the story interesting and engaging, but it also raised many questions about the way out own world is slowly falling into its own darkness. Although Gabriella was raised to be a polite, subservient princess, she learns very quickly how to be strong and brave, and she knows from the beginning how to think for herself, even if she is discouraged from doing so in the beginning. Through all this, however, she also is able to remain feminine and sweet, presenting a pleasant alternative to the frightening image of the feminist that many detractors try to build. Gabriella is proof that you can be pretty and smart, powerful and caring, and can be brave and fight for what’s right without having to give up what makes you happy. Furthermore, Gabriella views the way that many different people live once she begins her journey, realizing that the poor often struggle to obtain basic necessities that she, as a rich princess, took for granted and often left to be disposed of, and that people are often treated differently based on the pigment of their skin. She also learns that her understanding of the world as heavily shaped by those in power, and that “evil witches” are often just women who were too powerful for the ruling males’ liking, and that the pursuit of power and money often leads to the innocent and powerless to be hurt or even killed. Gabriella decides quickly that she wants to change the status quo when she is queen, though also becomes aware that doing so will take a lot more than just commanding it to be so. While doing so, however, she also learns that loving one another and helping out your neighbor, even when you have little to give, can often brighten up faster than waiting around for bigger changes, even if just for one person. Hopefully, reading this book will encourage others to see injustice in our own world, and spread a little kindness to those who need it. Although I have such high praise for this book, though, I am still willing admit that it is not perfect. Most notably, there are a few small spelling and grammar mistakes littered throughout the novel, and some moments where words were forgotten or an extra word was left it. The book was still understandable, as I could almost always assume that was intended right away, though it does point to further proofreading in the future. Also, although I can understand why it was done, and can therefore chalk it up to a well-meaning mistake, the part of me that hangs out in SJW circles felt a bit worried over how well Gabriella’s transformation at the beginning of her journey may be received. Since I’m white, my personal opinion on the matter does not hold much weight, but if I were Tamko, I likely would have discussed the implications of having a pale-skinned blonde girl being magically made black temporarily with POC and diversity group, to make sure it was being handled properly, and that there were no better alternatives. This, is of course, assuming that this was not a step that was already done. Given that it was used to help Gabriella understand how the poor and the Afran people lived within her country, and that there were numerous dark-skinned characters around her that were just as important and plot-powerful (if not literally powerful) as she was, there wasn’t any specific aspect of it that stuck out to me as inappropriate, other than a general awareness of how it could have gone bad or been badly received. Again, however, an actual person of color could likely give a better opinion on this than a person like me, who is learning most of the impacts of these sort of things on real life people of color secondhand. Other than the minor issues mentions, however, the book was great, and while I am not giving it 5 stars, I will say that it would be very close to being 5 stars is I was able to give partial stars, likely a 4.5 or even a 4.75. I highly recommend this book, especially to teen readers who like fantasy, and who may have an interest in how fictional elements can be used to open conversations on real-life issues. I fell that a lot of important discussion could be started by using this book (and most likely its future sequels) as a jumping-off point, and therefor wish the author luck having his novel reach as many hands as possible. Even if the political aspects are brushed aside for a time, however, it was a fun book and can easily be enjoyed without needing to think about all the problems we are dealing with. In definitely offers a more optimistic outlook on the future of the world than most people can offer.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amy Ahern

    Great story, interesting story and easy read. Looking forward to book 2.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Daughter of the Sun is the first book in The Solara Trilogy and introduces us to Gabriella, a princess that must search for answers. Her quest will lead her to understand her true identity and the very nature of the universe. The book was full of action and unexpected twists that kept me wanting to read more. The vivid descriptions of Princess Gabriella’s world and the people and creatures that inhabit it made the book a joy to read. I especially appreciated the overarching themes in the book ab Daughter of the Sun is the first book in The Solara Trilogy and introduces us to Gabriella, a princess that must search for answers. Her quest will lead her to understand her true identity and the very nature of the universe. The book was full of action and unexpected twists that kept me wanting to read more. The vivid descriptions of Princess Gabriella’s world and the people and creatures that inhabit it made the book a joy to read. I especially appreciated the overarching themes in the book about love and light conquering fear and darkness. It was an uplifting tale with a message of positivity and hope. I recommend this book highly and look forward to the next books in the series.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Necropenguin

    Goodreads Giveaway win #...um, I forget, 5? Maybe? I'm giving this one a solid 3-3/4 stars. I liked it, but the MC came off as a bit of a spoiled little bitch more times than I care to remember. But I guess it would be tough for someone born as a princess to immediately take up the commoner act. When I say that she was a spoiled little bitch, I don't mean that she was mean, just disagreeable and uncooperative. Even though this dealt with royals, there wasn't a lot of political stuff. I appreciate Goodreads Giveaway win #...um, I forget, 5? Maybe? I'm giving this one a solid 3-3/4 stars. I liked it, but the MC came off as a bit of a spoiled little bitch more times than I care to remember. But I guess it would be tough for someone born as a princess to immediately take up the commoner act. When I say that she was a spoiled little bitch, I don't mean that she was mean, just disagreeable and uncooperative. Even though this dealt with royals, there wasn't a lot of political stuff. I appreciate that. I hope book 2 delves more into the villains.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brinton Berg

    Daughter of the Sun was a fun read. The novel follows the adventures of Princess Gabriella, a young woman who has lived a sheltered life in a castle but is sent on a quest by the mysterious wizard Ja Ded. Along the way, she discovers another side to the kingdom her governess taught her about. The book almost feels like C.S. Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia, as Gabriella discovers that the world is far more magical than she ever imagined, in ways both wonderful and terrifying. The story has many surpr Daughter of the Sun was a fun read. The novel follows the adventures of Princess Gabriella, a young woman who has lived a sheltered life in a castle but is sent on a quest by the mysterious wizard Ja Ded. Along the way, she discovers another side to the kingdom her governess taught her about. The book almost feels like C.S. Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia, as Gabriella discovers that the world is far more magical than she ever imagined, in ways both wonderful and terrifying. The story has many surprising twists and turns, making me want to read on. A great debut novel from A.J. Tamko. I am eager to see what he does next.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Immersive storytelling and engaging dialogue. I am excited to continue reading about Gabriella’s adventures, Daughter of the Sun was a great start and I can’t wait for the next book!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tena

    I won this KINDLE edition in a GOODREADS giveaway.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  10. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

  11. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

  12. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kyleyla

  16. 4 out of 5

    Trey

  17. 5 out of 5

    Meg

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jana Woodson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Jessula-Clark

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pgwen

  21. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  23. 4 out of 5

    Judy

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kara Lauren

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charissa Rate

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Fry

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ann Ellis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alena Anderson

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jaslyn

  31. 4 out of 5

    Fran Whitley

  32. 5 out of 5

    Joy

  33. 4 out of 5

    Joel

  34. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  35. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  36. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  37. 5 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

  38. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Isaacs

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jolene

  40. 5 out of 5

    TheLoveW1tch

  41. 5 out of 5

    Mandy Wultsch

  42. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Wilson

  43. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

  44. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Weinberger

  45. 5 out of 5

    carla clifton

  46. 5 out of 5

    Marianne Simeone

  47. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

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