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This is a true story. The events depicted took place during the last decade in an unnamed warzone. The names and locations have been redacted to protect the security of those involved and the practices of the British Special Forces. Out of respect for the KIA and survivors, everything else has been told as it happened… Jason Fox served with the SBS for over a decade, thrivi This is a true story. The events depicted took place during the last decade in an unnamed warzone. The names and locations have been redacted to protect the security of those involved and the practices of the British Special Forces. Out of respect for the KIA and survivors, everything else has been told as it happened… Jason Fox served with the SBS for over a decade, thriving on the close bonds of the Special Forces brotherhood and the ‘death or glory’ nature of their missions. Battle Scars tells the story of his career as an elite operator, from the gunfights, hostage rescues, daring escapes and heroic endeavours that defined his service, to a battle of a very different kind: the psychological devastation of combat that ultimately forced him to leave the military, and the hard reality of what takes place in the mind of a man once a career of imagined invincibility has come to an end. Unflinchingly honest, Battle Scars is a breathtaking account of Special Forces soldiering: a chronicle of operational bravery, and of superhuman courage on and off the battlefield.


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This is a true story. The events depicted took place during the last decade in an unnamed warzone. The names and locations have been redacted to protect the security of those involved and the practices of the British Special Forces. Out of respect for the KIA and survivors, everything else has been told as it happened… Jason Fox served with the SBS for over a decade, thrivi This is a true story. The events depicted took place during the last decade in an unnamed warzone. The names and locations have been redacted to protect the security of those involved and the practices of the British Special Forces. Out of respect for the KIA and survivors, everything else has been told as it happened… Jason Fox served with the SBS for over a decade, thriving on the close bonds of the Special Forces brotherhood and the ‘death or glory’ nature of their missions. Battle Scars tells the story of his career as an elite operator, from the gunfights, hostage rescues, daring escapes and heroic endeavours that defined his service, to a battle of a very different kind: the psychological devastation of combat that ultimately forced him to leave the military, and the hard reality of what takes place in the mind of a man once a career of imagined invincibility has come to an end. Unflinchingly honest, Battle Scars is a breathtaking account of Special Forces soldiering: a chronicle of operational bravery, and of superhuman courage on and off the battlefield.

30 review for Battle Scars: A Story of War and All That Follows

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katia M. Davis

    This was a powerful book. It delves deeply into the author's military career and the emotions of his struggle with PTSD and his road to recovery. It is very raw, no punches are pulled. It's rare to find something discussed so openly, and for this, it is a wonderful accounting. I teared up several times and would recommend this book to anyone. I've never seen any of the TV shows Jason Fox has been involved in so I had no preconceived notions about him before I started reading. I felt the honesty This was a powerful book. It delves deeply into the author's military career and the emotions of his struggle with PTSD and his road to recovery. It is very raw, no punches are pulled. It's rare to find something discussed so openly, and for this, it is a wonderful accounting. I teared up several times and would recommend this book to anyone. I've never seen any of the TV shows Jason Fox has been involved in so I had no preconceived notions about him before I started reading. I felt the honesty bleed from the pages. A good read that will go a long way to helping others understand PTSD or perhaps even recognise it early in themselves and seek help. 5 stars from me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carl Upshon

    A really enjoyable read. Not so much the usual bravado war stories but the humble battle against depression, PTSD and chronic burnout.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    A brilliant read. Written with honesty about his struggle with PTSD and suicidal thoughts, Foxy tells his story of his time in the British Military. It’s a really interesting and emotional story and I read it in two sittings. I liked him already after watching SAS: Who Dares Wins, but now I like him and respect him even more.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Greenockian

    Me me me me me me me! Wow, what a self-centred *****. Okay, there is a decent book in here somewhere and, perhaps, a decent editor would have helped bring it about. But this is repetitive and quite boring in parts. I have no idea what I learned from it apart from the trite "it's good to talk and men should do more of it". Fox repeatedly states his love for his children but never illustrates it: a bit too much like parents who are so inept they have their kids taken into care - yes, they may love Me me me me me me me! Wow, what a self-centred *****. Okay, there is a decent book in here somewhere and, perhaps, a decent editor would have helped bring it about. But this is repetitive and quite boring in parts. I have no idea what I learned from it apart from the trite "it's good to talk and men should do more of it". Fox repeatedly states his love for his children but never illustrates it: a bit too much like parents who are so inept they have their kids taken into care - yes, they may love them but can't get their heads around the "mundane" tasks of feeding, clothing, cleaning, keeping house etc. Fox clearly left the child care to the mothers and that makes him a ***** in my book no matter what he says he did for "Queen and country" (or did he sign up for himself?) I have no idea what makes him tick - sadly.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Patrick White

    An interesting book. Although Jason Fox did not physically write the book the style of the prose captures his voice brilliantly — I presume the book was derived from recorded conversations and this is how the ghost-writer was able to achieve this. There is an interesting tension between Foxy and the therapist whom he credits for playing a major role in his recovery. Her style of therapy seemed to be to offer an attitude of total forgiveness, and this seemed key in Foxy coming to terms with his t An interesting book. Although Jason Fox did not physically write the book the style of the prose captures his voice brilliantly — I presume the book was derived from recorded conversations and this is how the ghost-writer was able to achieve this. There is an interesting tension between Foxy and the therapist whom he credits for playing a major role in his recovery. Her style of therapy seemed to be to offer an attitude of total forgiveness, and this seemed key in Foxy coming to terms with his trauma — perhaps she was the mother figure he longed for in the heat of battle — and yet she did not completely forgive Foxy for the things he did in war, and seemed perturbed that her therapy had played a role in enabling him to continue to promote war and violence in the form of his SAS selection programme. She was actually reluctant to see him again and I wonder whether the whole experience confronted her with something about herself, namely: that her urge to help others was not purely selfless but an attempt to create a world she wanted to live in.

  6. 4 out of 5

    magdalena dyjas

    I don't like audiobooks. But I really like Foxy, and I found his story about his road to recovery following PTSD to be both interesting and important. It's a shame I was listening to it rather than reading it myself (even though I liked the fact that he was the one reading it to me ;)). I don't like audiobooks. But I really like Foxy, and I found his story about his road to recovery following PTSD to be both interesting and important. It's a shame I was listening to it rather than reading it myself (even though I liked the fact that he was the one reading it to me ;)).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura Turner

    All my reviews can be found on my blog: https://pageturnersnook.wordpress.com Let me set the scene. It is a Sunday evening and I am sitting with my cup of tea, ready and waiting for SAS: Who Dares Wins to start on Channel 4. I absolutely love this show. It is my one ‘go to’ television programme that I will not miss for anything … ANYTHING! The grit and determination is just phenomenal and it gives me a good bite to sit and think ‘I could do that!’ even though in reality I know I never could, I am All my reviews can be found on my blog: https://pageturnersnook.wordpress.com Let me set the scene. It is a Sunday evening and I am sitting with my cup of tea, ready and waiting for SAS: Who Dares Wins to start on Channel 4. I absolutely love this show. It is my one ‘go to’ television programme that I will not miss for anything … ANYTHING! The grit and determination is just phenomenal and it gives me a good bite to sit and think ‘I could do that!’ even though in reality I know I never could, I am just not in the right place physically. Fronting SAS: Who Dares Wins are four hard kick ass SAS and SBS military guys, Jason Fox included, and looking at them, you immediately think ‘I’d rather use sand paper on my bum cheeks and sit in vinegar’ than mess with them. With muscles like Pop Eye and tattoos covering inch upon inch of their skin, they really are four individuals that lead by example. BUT, and there is a but (there always is) … under that surface and top layer of skin visible to the public eye, lies something else, and that something else is what Battle Scars; A Story of War and All That Follows is about. Now, fast forward yesterday morning when on my Audible account, I downloaded Battle Scars; A Story of War and All That Follows. I was excited. I couldn’t wait to begin. Narrated by Jason himself, I knew it was going to be real, but how real knocked me off my feet. With a headphone in each ear, what began yesterday morning and finished this afternoon was a true account of fights both on and off the battlefield, on both a physical and mental level. Nothing could have prepared me for what I spent nigh on eight hours listening to, and having Jason narrating it, made me feel like he was sitting right in front of me laying it all down on the table. So, what brought me to this opinion? Truthfully, I don’t know where to begin. I feel like a best friend has sat offloading all their anxieties on to me, handing me their life to roll up into a ball and throw out there for everyone to catch it and digest. Listening to Jason has sent my head spinning. I keep asking myself how on earth can someone come through this? How can someone go through so much (PTSD and Depression) and manage to come out the other side as the man he is now, today? With bravery and courage … that’s how he done it, and of course with the support of those who he needed surrounding him, giving him the push to realise that he is worthwhile. I was consumed by his story, his life and all that goes with it, and I was consumed to the point that nothing around me mattered, I completely zoned out. I feel like I have had an anaesthetic and time has past, but I don’t know how or where that time has gone. It is completely phenomenal, but it has taught me so much and one huge matter to come out of all of this is the good old cliché of ‘never judge a book by its cover’ because seriously, this is a perfect example of that saying. What you see on the outside is not what is on the inside. So, now you’re wondering what I heard him narrate, right? Well, I went from many ‘wows’ to ‘oh no’s’ to ‘crikey’s and ‘oh fuck’s’! I’ve been on quite a whirlwind, as has Jason. What started out as a 16 year old boy happily joining the military, soon turned into someone who had lost his identity, completely obliterating any type of relationship along the way. A civilised home life was something he felt was way beyond anything he could cope with, he just wasn’t conditioned to live a life so structured. As heart breaking as it is to learn, and hear first hand, it doesn’t come as a huge surprise. It is a no brainer that military life is the complete opposite to civilised living, it has to be, however, listening to Jason makes me wonder just how many soldiers, and military related lives are out there suffering the same, lying unheard, afraid to raise their voice. In my eyes, Jason Fox is superhuman in every sense – completely and utterly brave and courageous. He is the voice for many. It would be fantastic if just one person suffering a mental illness read this book and did something about it (of course I am hoping that number is a lot more). Honestly, Battle Scars; A Story of War and All That Follows drops the camaraderie and puts into focus the extremities that a mental illness brings along with it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sam Jones

    Food for thought

  9. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    A very good read. Sad times in parts. A brave man to say the least in combat and at home. Fought many personal wars both mind and body.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Simone

    I picked up the book about a month ago and didn’t read it until yesterday and since then I couldn’t put the book down. A real page turner. The autobiography is of a man who had to deal with the wounds from battles as a Special Forces Soldier. A very inspiring and humbling account of his mental anguish and the difficulties of trying to get the right support from services. Today, services are so stretched they expect you to fit into their systems and individuals are all different in the way they r I picked up the book about a month ago and didn’t read it until yesterday and since then I couldn’t put the book down. A real page turner. The autobiography is of a man who had to deal with the wounds from battles as a Special Forces Soldier. A very inspiring and humbling account of his mental anguish and the difficulties of trying to get the right support from services. Today, services are so stretched they expect you to fit into their systems and individuals are all different in the way they respond to treatment. Not one size fits all. It appears there are a few women in this book who have been damage limitation as a result of his life in the SAS. It would have been nice to see if there had been any change in this or amends made, instead of reading ‘my new girlfriend’ or ‘my partner then.’

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Wonderful read. It made me see PTSD in a different light to how I previously had viewed it, and gave me a insight into how we shouldn't look at fixing our mental health issues with a 'one solution for all issues' mindset. I praise the author for being brave enough to put his story out there and help dispel the image that somehow being a tough military type means that you have lost your ability to be affected by conflict and that you are invincible to mental health issues. Wonderful read. It made me see PTSD in a different light to how I previously had viewed it, and gave me a insight into how we shouldn't look at fixing our mental health issues with a 'one solution for all issues' mindset. I praise the author for being brave enough to put his story out there and help dispel the image that somehow being a tough military type means that you have lost your ability to be affected by conflict and that you are invincible to mental health issues.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jodie (whatjodiereads)

    This is a very hard review to write, and I’ve been thinking for a couple of days about what to say and how to say it. So my review isn’t going to be very long for this one. Rather than focusing too much on Foxy’s time in the military, the main focus of Battle Scars is Foxy’s battle with PTSD and chronic burnout. I felt very emotional whilst reading Battle Scars and often found it hard to read because of the emotional side of it. Battle Scars tells us about a side to the military that we don’t of This is a very hard review to write, and I’ve been thinking for a couple of days about what to say and how to say it. So my review isn’t going to be very long for this one. Rather than focusing too much on Foxy’s time in the military, the main focus of Battle Scars is Foxy’s battle with PTSD and chronic burnout. I felt very emotional whilst reading Battle Scars and often found it hard to read because of the emotional side of it. Battle Scars tells us about a side to the military that we don’t often get to hear about. However, in a way it was refreshing, as Foxy was brutally honest and opened up about his struggles and achievements. At a time when talking about mental health is so important, I think this is a very important book and should be read by many. Battle Scars was inspiring yet heartbreaking, and I can’t wait to read more from Jason Fox.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    Huge kudos to Foxy for being so open about his experiences and struggles. Was really reassuring and impactful for me to read someone else accurately describing the experience of PTSD, and EDMR & CBT therapy, where I have struggled to do the same. (Not obtained through combat)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Josh Furze

    Absolutely incredible, such an amazing account of his life and how he came through his troubles! Action right from the start with the serious undertone throughout! A must read!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Atkinson

    Enjoyed - especially the photos - but thought would have gone more into the SAS missions but understand that these are all too secret.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mick

    Really gripping and blunt account of the hardships of leaving the forces,admire the honesty that it must have took to tell the world great read!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rachel R

    Quick read, interesting book. Good to see mental health highlighted by someone who has lived in such an alpha Male world. Also interesting to hear his take on cbt and emdr. Glad he found such an effective therapist eventually, it can make the difference between life and death. Unfortunately it’s also very expensive, hence statutory services reliance on cheaper blunter tools. Cbt and emdr are both useful in the right context, but we really need to drop the ‘one size fits all’ approach. People, es Quick read, interesting book. Good to see mental health highlighted by someone who has lived in such an alpha Male world. Also interesting to hear his take on cbt and emdr. Glad he found such an effective therapist eventually, it can make the difference between life and death. Unfortunately it’s also very expensive, hence statutory services reliance on cheaper blunter tools. Cbt and emdr are both useful in the right context, but we really need to drop the ‘one size fits all’ approach. People, especially those who have had their health destroyed in service of their country, deserve better.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I found Jason Fox's biography very different from his fellow SASWhoDaresWins author Ant Middleton. I understood he was diagnosed with PTSD but the chaotic flashbacks of his time in war as he tries to fit in to a normal life whilst on leave was difficult to filter, not read, but trying to understand why there was never any therapy after ops apart from ticking boxes is a horrible thing to discover about our forces aftercare. It was an enlightening read about the strains & stresses both on family & I found Jason Fox's biography very different from his fellow SASWhoDaresWins author Ant Middleton. I understood he was diagnosed with PTSD but the chaotic flashbacks of his time in war as he tries to fit in to a normal life whilst on leave was difficult to filter, not read, but trying to understand why there was never any therapy after ops apart from ticking boxes is a horrible thing to discover about our forces aftercare. It was an enlightening read about the strains & stresses both on family & the individual when they go back on your. Although the camaderie helped, at the time Foxy was unwilling to ask for help when he was struggling. Luckily we see he is now helping others struggling with mental health, especially through schemes like Rocks to Recovery. It was a tougher book to swallow & maybe that's was a good thing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    John

    On the one hand, I liked this book because the author is very honest about his struggles with PTSD. Given the fact that he was a Royal Marine and then a member of the elite SBS, that is saying something because, as one finds in the book, being a member of the SBS is only for the few, and the few [so the notion goes] do not get PTSD because PTSD is a sign of weakness. Indeed, so ashamed was Mr. Fox of admitting that he was struggling with PTSD, that when he was discharged because of it he didn't On the one hand, I liked this book because the author is very honest about his struggles with PTSD. Given the fact that he was a Royal Marine and then a member of the elite SBS, that is saying something because, as one finds in the book, being a member of the SBS is only for the few, and the few [so the notion goes] do not get PTSD because PTSD is a sign of weakness. Indeed, so ashamed was Mr. Fox of admitting that he was struggling with PTSD, that when he was discharged because of it he didn't even tell his buddies in the SBS, he ghosted them and/or made up a story about having tinnitus. To admit all this and honestly lay out his struggles to overcome the PTSD takes great courage on Mr. Fox's part and he lays it all out honestly and bluntly. It's cool to see him, with the help of a shrink, overcome his PTSD and then go on to success on television and even set a record with some buddies, rowing across the Atlantic. Mr. Fox really is an extraordinary man. Having said that, Mr. Fox also seems to be a terrible father/partner. He goes through relationships in a manner that at least seems as hectic as his life in the SBS, first one partner and then another and then another. He has a daughter with his wife, the daughter has medical problems, but that is all we ever hear about her. Is he involved in her life? Does he carry out his fatherly duties as he wrestles with PTSD? Does he have any relationship at all with her? The reader will not know after they read this book. He has a second daughter with another partner and that is the last you hear of that daughter. For all I know, Mr. Fox may be the world's greatest father, but from reading this book, his daughters come across as an afterthought. Perhaps Mr. Fox is merely guarding their privacy, which would have been fine and indeed understandable—they certainly didn't volunteer to be in the book—but if so, Mr. Fox never mentions that. They appear only as a passing reference and then back to himself and his problems. This makes him appear self-absorbed and self-centered. I do not know if this is true and am not accusing him of being that way, just pointing out how the book makes him sound. Heck, even an admission that he was a horrible father or an absent one because of his career and/or PTSD would have made the reader sympathetic. The book makes it sound like he doesn't even think about it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    John

    Facinating book This is a great book and gives an insight into the hidden damage some of our service personnel have to endure on our behalf. I only hope they know how grateful we all our and what respect we have for them regardless of role or cap badge. I recommend this to everyone. Mental health can effect all of us in any walk of life. The more we understand the better we can deal with it. Thank you Mr Fox for your honesty. Good luck.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Adam Cook

    I found the ghostwriter jarring. The descriptions of the battlefields and dangerous locations was too much like a spy novel for me. I think this would have been better in Jason's words, even if that meant a lack of polish. Thankfully, the content was good. I've been told to avoid Ant Middleton's book because it's more biographical which doesn't interest me. I care more about the mental health side - something I suffer with excessively myself. I applaud Jason for this book. As he says, admitting I found the ghostwriter jarring. The descriptions of the battlefields and dangerous locations was too much like a spy novel for me. I think this would have been better in Jason's words, even if that meant a lack of polish. Thankfully, the content was good. I've been told to avoid Ant Middleton's book because it's more biographical which doesn't interest me. I care more about the mental health side - something I suffer with excessively myself. I applaud Jason for this book. As he says, admitting trauma is hard enough when you are a normal person - but for someone in that world of bullshit machismo, it must be even more terrifying. This may actually convince me to finally kickstart my own therapy.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rus Watts

    Don't expect to hear heroic tales of his missions while he served, however, a fantastic book showing how mental issues can affect your life, and the long hard road to recovery. Shows how in this modern day and age even with mental health being more in the spotlight, it can still be hard to admit you may need help, accept the "labels" you may get and why you should get help or advice. I did find it hard reading at times but you soon realise The author has written it holding back no punches and with Don't expect to hear heroic tales of his missions while he served, however, a fantastic book showing how mental issues can affect your life, and the long hard road to recovery. Shows how in this modern day and age even with mental health being more in the spotlight, it can still be hard to admit you may need help, accept the "labels" you may get and why you should get help or advice. I did find it hard reading at times but you soon realise The author has written it holding back no punches and with hope it may help others in a similar position get the help they need. I have read a few ex-military life stories and I will say this was one of my favorites.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Allison

    I have nothing but respect for Jason, James and the countless military and serving personnel who have gone though, PTSD, depression and a whole host of mental health and physical issues. This brutally honest book has helped me be less angry with myself for struggling at times. It highlights how easy it is to fall into the abyss but also shows there is light at the end of the tunnel. There are a few people I wish I could have given this book to before it was too late but I'm sure the countless peop I have nothing but respect for Jason, James and the countless military and serving personnel who have gone though, PTSD, depression and a whole host of mental health and physical issues. This brutally honest book has helped me be less angry with myself for struggling at times. It highlights how easy it is to fall into the abyss but also shows there is light at the end of the tunnel. There are a few people I wish I could have given this book to before it was too late but I'm sure the countless people it will help will be thankful. awesome stuff Foxy it has made me go back through your TV work. Keep it up man u are an inspiration....

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gareth Jones

    If you read this book expecting a similar work to fellow sas who dares wins star ant Middleton then you will be disappointed as this is a different type of book. It is a very interesting read wich gives interesting insights into the stresses and horrors of war and mostly covers Jason foxes battles with ptsd and depression. Anyone who has gone through ptsd or maybe even just anxiety and depression may find some relatable content although an interesting read the book can be quite repetitive at times If you read this book expecting a similar work to fellow sas who dares wins star ant Middleton then you will be disappointed as this is a different type of book. It is a very interesting read wich gives interesting insights into the stresses and horrors of war and mostly covers Jason foxes battles with ptsd and depression. Anyone who has gone through ptsd or maybe even just anxiety and depression may find some relatable content although an interesting read the book can be quite repetitive at times and I didn’t find it quite the page turner of the ant Middleton books.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    It’s alright. Nearly gave up but glad I finished it as it did get better. Good to read he actually got the help he needed and is working towards getting help for others too. Disappointingly he comes across as selfish, misogynistic and a terrible father & partner. Nevertheless, the undercurrent of the book is important! And hopefully this will help the readers, who may be in a similar place to where Foxy was, to see that they are not alone and that there are resources out there to tap into and fin It’s alright. Nearly gave up but glad I finished it as it did get better. Good to read he actually got the help he needed and is working towards getting help for others too. Disappointingly he comes across as selfish, misogynistic and a terrible father & partner. Nevertheless, the undercurrent of the book is important! And hopefully this will help the readers, who may be in a similar place to where Foxy was, to see that they are not alone and that there are resources out there to tap into and find the brand of help that will get them on the road to recovery! 🤞🏼

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    This is a deeply personal and powerful book. We desperately need more brave authors and spokemen like Jason Fox who are not afraid to be open about mental health, PTSD and suicidal thoughts. These stories are playing a big part in breaking down the stigmas and taboos surrounding mental health, helping people see that opening up and getting help is a strength, not a weakness, which saves lives. This book was also a fascinating insight into the SAS and military life.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Megan Wilkinson

    I found the first half to be a slow read and at one point I seriously considered giving up and starting a new book. I am pleased I persevered though. I found reading about Foxy's post-war experiences to be a thought-provoking and interesting read. It's incredible that he came through what he endured - hats off to him for sharing his story. I found the first half to be a slow read and at one point I seriously considered giving up and starting a new book. I am pleased I persevered though. I found reading about Foxy's post-war experiences to be a thought-provoking and interesting read. It's incredible that he came through what he endured - hats off to him for sharing his story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gary B

    Likeable man. Decent book, but became too repetitive on the central subjects. The book didn't retain my interest all the way through. Admired how open he is about mental health, and how it affects men. Likeable man. Decent book, but became too repetitive on the central subjects. The book didn't retain my interest all the way through. Admired how open he is about mental health, and how it affects men.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Craig Martin

    I’ll be honest I didn’t finish it. I found it pretty much based around PTSD. After reading Ant Middletons book prior to this. I was disappointed with this.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Seadaz

    I enjoyed Jason's personal story. I decided to read this for two reasons, one I enjoy the tv shows and documentaries that he has been a part of -Inside the Real Narcos (Netflix) and of course SAS Who Dares Win (Channel 4) and totally admit he is one of my favourites, as he seems to be with a lot of female viewers! The second reason was the PTSD-Military side of things, to have a bit more of an understanding of my grandfather's feelings from his time in the armed forces and also having PTSD (or s I enjoyed Jason's personal story. I decided to read this for two reasons, one I enjoy the tv shows and documentaries that he has been a part of -Inside the Real Narcos (Netflix) and of course SAS Who Dares Win (Channel 4) and totally admit he is one of my favourites, as he seems to be with a lot of female viewers! The second reason was the PTSD-Military side of things, to have a bit more of an understanding of my grandfather's feelings from his time in the armed forces and also having PTSD (or shellshock in those days). I decided to go with both the Kindle edition and audible version (my first audio book experience) - the narrator was Jason Fox, so it was nice to hear the story in his own words, and he has a lovely speaking voice. The beginning of the story you can tell that he is reading the words from the page - but as you get further in, you can almost hear him smile at a funny story he is telling. This really is a book about his feelings of his own depression, suicidal thoughts, chronic burnout and PTSD. If you're after a book about telling of war stories this is not it. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, I did keep reflecting back on my grandfather, wondering if he felt the same way after his military service, I know that he did have treatment for PTSD and I only hope he didn't feel at times the only way out was suicide. It was confronting to hear of Jason's feelings of wanting to end it all sitting on that cliff and feeling no-one would be overly bothered if he wasn't around. Chapters 21 and 23 were quite sad - but that is what happens in real life. It came across as an honest insight into both his past behavious (not always the best), briefly about his relationships and the hardship the separations caused, his time in the military, his friendships and bonds within 'the brotherhood', the feelings once he left the military and the quite obvious lack of after care for those leaving this career (I hope this has changed - these men and women do what they do to protect the safety and everyday lives of us civilians and the various nations around the world, they dedicate so much of their lives to the military - they deserve to be looked after so much better). It was great to hear of Jason challenging himself and the PTSD tag he didn't want to have placed on him. I thought his telling of the two therapists involvement was quite a humorous battle at times and he obviously fought the need to have a therapist and the way the therapists went about their task. This man has done so many amazing and adventurous things - he briefly touches on his involvement with the SAS WDW tv show, the treasure find and the Atlantic rowing record and being an Ambassador with Rock2Recovery. Would thoroughly recommend this book to those in a similar situation to Jason (military and civilian), and also to the family and friends of people that may be in a similar situation - might give them a bit better understanding.

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