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The Chancellor and the Citadel

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The world is over. All that remains is the Citadel, and the Chancellor who protects it from the hostility beyond its walls. But what can she do when a fearful and angry mob is convinced she brought the world to ruin in the first place, and are determined to make her pay for it by destroying the one bastion of hope the world has left?


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The world is over. All that remains is the Citadel, and the Chancellor who protects it from the hostility beyond its walls. But what can she do when a fearful and angry mob is convinced she brought the world to ruin in the first place, and are determined to make her pay for it by destroying the one bastion of hope the world has left?

30 review for The Chancellor and the Citadel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    Though much about The Chancellor and the Citadel is intriguing, there's not enough meat to those bones to actually make me like this graphic novel. This feels like the skeleton of a story, rather than a full story. Reading the whole thing took less than 30 minute, placing it in the length of an early reader book and not allowing sufficient time for the complex moral points it tries to make. Frantz puts forward powerful messages, but there's not enough behind them. For the most part, I'm left with Though much about The Chancellor and the Citadel is intriguing, there's not enough meat to those bones to actually make me like this graphic novel. This feels like the skeleton of a story, rather than a full story. Reading the whole thing took less than 30 minute, placing it in the length of an early reader book and not allowing sufficient time for the complex moral points it tries to make. Frantz puts forward powerful messages, but there's not enough behind them. For the most part, I'm left with questions. What happened in this world? Who is the chancellor? The people in the citadel refer to humans as different from themselves, but I am not sure who they are. Without an understanding of the world, it's hard to know how to take anything that happens within.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    The story of some kind of protector for a city after the world has ended. There is some potential here but I think a lot of the elements were left too shadowy and confused. The people trying to break into the city were repeatedly referred to as humans, but the people in the citadel looked exactly the same. I was confused because I kept thinking to myself, "Aren't you human as well?" There's no explanation why some of the people are afraid of the Chancellor other than she has magic, but so do the The story of some kind of protector for a city after the world has ended. There is some potential here but I think a lot of the elements were left too shadowy and confused. The people trying to break into the city were repeatedly referred to as humans, but the people in the citadel looked exactly the same. I was confused because I kept thinking to myself, "Aren't you human as well?" There's no explanation why some of the people are afraid of the Chancellor other than she has magic, but so do the people as we find out later. The story just needed a clearer narrative. Received a review copy from Iron Circus Comics and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt Parker

    So beautiful, but felt like an abridged version of itself.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maia

    I follow the author of this book on instagram and I had seen so much of the character development art and sneak peeks of panels that as I read it I almost felt like I had read it before. Not in a bad way! It felt like reading something I had previously read in a dream. It's a slim book but every page is textury and dark and rich. It's a novella in the vein of Tillie Walden's On A Sunbeam. It's set in a strange future in which most of the world has gone wild and uninhabitable except the Citadel, I follow the author of this book on instagram and I had seen so much of the character development art and sneak peeks of panels that as I read it I almost felt like I had read it before. Not in a bad way! It felt like reading something I had previously read in a dream. It's a slim book but every page is textury and dark and rich. It's a novella in the vein of Tillie Walden's On A Sunbeam. It's set in a strange future in which most of the world has gone wild and uninhabitable except the Citadel, which is protected by the Chancellor. This mysterious and powerful being never shows her face- her expressive eyes show out from the shadow of her hood. Her closest friend is a baker and healer named Olive, who defends the Chancellor against those in the city who mutter than she has too much power and can't be trusted. A surprise attack by a ragged band of outsiders sets in motive a series of events that threaten the safety of the whole city. I'm not sure how widely available this book is, but I highly recommend it. I bought it because I knew I wanted to pour over the art and think about it for a long time. Frantz has a technique of combining digital colors over feathery traditional inks that I absolutely love (and want to learn myself someday).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jill Kenna

    While I absolutely ADORED this story and the amazing artwork I was a little bit disappointed by how short this graphic novel was. I read it in about 20 minutes and I was left wanting so much more. That being said, this was a fantastic graphic novel. The story was great (even if it left me feeling like I needed more) but the real shining star to me was the illustration. It was so beautiful. I would recommend this if you are looking for a quick read with some stunning visuals.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    The Chancellor and the Citadel by Maria Frantz. 130 pages. GRAPHIC NOVEL. Iron Circus Comics, 2018 $15 Language: G ; Mature Content: G; Violence: PG BUYING ADVISORY: EL – NOT RECOMMENDED AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE Everyone lives in the Citadel and humans live outside of it. The mysterious Chancellor, a clocked and hooded woman, protects the Citadel. But even she needs healing on occasion and has a trusty friend Olive. When humans outside of the Citadel rebel, they Chancellor is in danger and uses viol The Chancellor and the Citadel by Maria Frantz. 130 pages. GRAPHIC NOVEL. Iron Circus Comics, 2018 $15 Language: G ; Mature Content: G; Violence: PG BUYING ADVISORY: EL – NOT RECOMMENDED AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE Everyone lives in the Citadel and humans live outside of it. The mysterious Chancellor, a clocked and hooded woman, protects the Citadel. But even she needs healing on occasion and has a trusty friend Olive. When humans outside of the Citadel rebel, they Chancellor is in danger and uses violence to resolve the situation. She starts to question who is good and who is evil. I put this as elementary since the publisher recommends it for 8-12 year olds but the book has an older feel with more of a political spin that might be better for older readers. That being said, I thought it was incredibly boring, confusing (humans live outside but the characters that live inside look human to me too), strange rather than mysterious or intriguing, and just depressing. I can imagine the cover appealing to young readers, but the content was not up to par. I am not saying there shouldn’t be graphic novels that question violence, but this one just doesn’t accomplish that goal for young readers. Reviewer: Stephanie MLS & Author https://kissthebookjr.blogspot.com/20...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This work feels unfinished. While the premise is intriguing and the art captures your attention, the story itself is merely a set-up for something that could be bigger. An entire world, a shadowed past, and the guardian of both are shrouded in mystery with no hope of readers discovering answers. Rather than feeling philosophical and poignant, this makes the all-too-short graphic novel feel like the first part of a fantasy adventure rather than a stand-alone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    ⠀n. ♡

    this was cute. i read it in about ten minutes at work, haha. the art was adorable and the underlying messages are important for anyone of any age.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Too simplistic to be a YA graphic novel. We didn’t get to delve deeply enough into this world in terms of world building / the past, the different groups living in the Citadel and those roaming the forests, and the magic systems. I found it odd that the main accusation thrown at the Chancellor is “witch,” when everyone in town seems to be able to sling magic. So many questions! - What are the adorable little ghost spirits? - Can the rescued boy speak or do the roaming humans have a different langu Too simplistic to be a YA graphic novel. We didn’t get to delve deeply enough into this world in terms of world building / the past, the different groups living in the Citadel and those roaming the forests, and the magic systems. I found it odd that the main accusation thrown at the Chancellor is “witch,” when everyone in town seems to be able to sling magic. So many questions! - What are the adorable little ghost spirits? - Can the rescued boy speak or do the roaming humans have a different language and can’t communicate with Citadel-dwellers? - What differentiates Citadel-dwellers and humans? Magic? Are the former supposed to be faery creatures who survived after humans wiped themselves (almost) out, almost doomed to follow a similar path? - Who is the Chancellor? Why would she be recognizable if she’s that old, having seen other adult characters grow up? What I liked: - Drawing style and color palette were very well done and looked wonderful. I liked how figures were drawn and didn’t seem to follow traditional body types and forms. -The minimal expressions from the Chancellor that managed to portray so much -The atmosphere of the book - Olive and the Chancellor It might’ve just been this book was too subtle for my jet-lagged brain, but after peeking at other reviews, it seems others were just as confused at the lack of details and explanation as I was. I’d try more from the author though, as the basic ideas were enjoyable and entertaining!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    There's a lot to like here, but this really felt like the second volume in the series. A lot isn't explained, apparently by design, but it made it more difficult to understand and connect to the world. There's a lot to like here, but this really felt like the second volume in the series. A lot isn't explained, apparently by design, but it made it more difficult to understand and connect to the world.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paul Decker

    *I received this book as an eARC from Iron Circus Comics via Edelweiss. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.* This middle grade graphic novel deals with some pretty cool concepts and plays with interesting moral quandaries. Pretty deep topics of morality and death. Although I was intrigued by the subject matter, I was confused for a majority of the book. I didn't quite understand exactly what was going on. I give this book a 3/5. Coo *I received this book as an eARC from Iron Circus Comics via Edelweiss. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.* This middle grade graphic novel deals with some pretty cool concepts and plays with interesting moral quandaries. Pretty deep topics of morality and death. Although I was intrigued by the subject matter, I was confused for a majority of the book. I didn't quite understand exactly what was going on. I give this book a 3/5. Cool art and interesting concepts, but I could not follow the story.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Fei

    3.5 Looove the art, love the treatment of the characters but it's true that it's so short that you would think it's just an introduction to the universe. 3.5 Looove the art, love the treatment of the characters but it's true that it's so short that you would think it's just an introduction to the universe.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Burkhart

    Rather weird and quirky. I enjoyed the illustrations. That being said, I think a lot of kids would love it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'The Chancellor and the Citadel' by Maria Capelle Frantz is a graphic novel that takes place in a mysterious citadel guarded by a mysterious Chancellor. A hooded figure known as the Chancellor is tasked with protecting the people who live in a Citadel. The story takes place some time after the world has ended. The humans outside the city don't trust the Chancellor and see her as some kind of witch. There is something to be said about that, but Olive, a healer in the city sees otherwise. I really l 'The Chancellor and the Citadel' by Maria Capelle Frantz is a graphic novel that takes place in a mysterious citadel guarded by a mysterious Chancellor. A hooded figure known as the Chancellor is tasked with protecting the people who live in a Citadel. The story takes place some time after the world has ended. The humans outside the city don't trust the Chancellor and see her as some kind of witch. There is something to be said about that, but Olive, a healer in the city sees otherwise. I really loved this story for so many reasons. The first and foremost is the art which I adored. The second is the way gender stereotypes are reversed but not in a confrontational way. Women are in charge, and men are the ones that are sensitive and emotional in this world. The point is made gently, like the story. I can't wait to read more by this creator. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Iron Circus Comics in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tory

    This was a nice, quick read with very pretty art, but it didn't really feel complete. This felt like being dropped right at the end of a longer story, but it was a little confusing without much explanation of the what had happened in-world previously or any details to explain the worldbuilding. If this was expanded to explain some of the references that the characters made throughout (What's the conflict between the humans and whatever beings live inside the citadel? Why would the townspeople rec This was a nice, quick read with very pretty art, but it didn't really feel complete. This felt like being dropped right at the end of a longer story, but it was a little confusing without much explanation of the what had happened in-world previously or any details to explain the worldbuilding. If this was expanded to explain some of the references that the characters made throughout (What's the conflict between the humans and whatever beings live inside the citadel? Why would the townspeople recognize Chancellor without her mask? Who was the magical being that Chancellor consulted in the middle of the story? (view spoiler)[Who is Eve, and what even was her problem? (hide spoiler)] ) As it is there's too much left unexplained to really enjoy this story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    ellis

    this was lovely, what amazing art with a visually diverse cast. a comic doesn't have to be long to have a nice story - and just because a comic is short doesn't mean it's just for children (at least, it was shelved in children's at my library!) this was lovely, what amazing art with a visually diverse cast. a comic doesn't have to be long to have a nice story - and just because a comic is short doesn't mean it's just for children (at least, it was shelved in children's at my library!)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    ARC provided by Letter Better Publishing Services Olive and the Chancellor live in a dystopian, Medieval type world where danger lurks around every corner. The shadowy, masked and hooded Chancellor keeps everyone safe by securing the Citadel, but when it is breached by humans, others start to doubt her. Olive remains steadfast, even when the Chancellor brings an injured human boy into their inner sanctum and the resident healer wants Olive's help in healing him. WHen the community finds out about ARC provided by Letter Better Publishing Services Olive and the Chancellor live in a dystopian, Medieval type world where danger lurks around every corner. The shadowy, masked and hooded Chancellor keeps everyone safe by securing the Citadel, but when it is breached by humans, others start to doubt her. Olive remains steadfast, even when the Chancellor brings an injured human boy into their inner sanctum and the resident healer wants Olive's help in healing him. WHen the community finds out about the boy, they are angry and threaten the Chancellor, who tries to show them that "there are no bad guys". A commander, Eve, demands to know who the Chancellor is, and to see her unmasked face, but is refused. Angered, she slays the Chancellor. However, the Chancellor comes back, Eve is exiled, and a fragile peace returns to the Citadel. Strengths: This gets points for its attempt (mentioned in the letter sent with the ARC) for pointing out that everyone needs to be understood, and society should not wall itself off and think of people as "others". The artwork is quite pleasing, and the picture-to-text ratio is a good one for middle grade readers. Weaknesses: Overwhelmingly sad. There is a lot of agonizing angst, and the graphic novel format does not provide the amount of background information that would make this story easier to understand. What I really think: This is not a great fit for my students. Those who like graphic novels prefer ones like Babymouse and those by Raina Telgemeier, and higher quality, more philosophical tomes like Nimona or Estranged are not their cup of tea. I will pass on purchase, but can see this being popular in high school libraries where manga are popular.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Overall I loved this story, it was simply done, yet not lacking in anyway with a powerful message - one of acceptance for each other simply as we are. Olive and the Chancellors friendship was touching and helps to underscore that theme, reiterated to the final page. The art was mature and detailed, without taking away from the story itself or what the characters were doing, with all visuals compelling the reader along. I especially enjoyed the little ghosts that exist in the citadel, such charmi Overall I loved this story, it was simply done, yet not lacking in anyway with a powerful message - one of acceptance for each other simply as we are. Olive and the Chancellors friendship was touching and helps to underscore that theme, reiterated to the final page. The art was mature and detailed, without taking away from the story itself or what the characters were doing, with all visuals compelling the reader along. I especially enjoyed the little ghosts that exist in the citadel, such charming creatures! The only complaint I have is that it was too short! Obviously with independent published comics, there’s a certain number of pages to fill - no more, no less. However I came away with little hints of a deeper story and context, that I desperately hoped to have answered; what happened to the world outside? What IS the citadel? What are the characters if not human? How did the Chancellor fall into her role?? For these reasons and from Maria Capelle Frantz’s fantastic world building, I hope it’s not the last we see of the Chancellor, or her citadel.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    A short and rather simple story, but what really pulled me in was the intensely atmospheric artwork, somewhere between spooky and fairytale. It tells a story of how fear and prejudice can tear a community apart, and follows a mysterious magical protector who takes care of a walled town, but people outside the wall fear and hate them as a witch, and some people inside the wall are uneasy that one person should have so much power, and fear what they might someday do with it. The magic and the reas A short and rather simple story, but what really pulled me in was the intensely atmospheric artwork, somewhere between spooky and fairytale. It tells a story of how fear and prejudice can tear a community apart, and follows a mysterious magical protector who takes care of a walled town, but people outside the wall fear and hate them as a witch, and some people inside the wall are uneasy that one person should have so much power, and fear what they might someday do with it. The magic and the reasons the world got this way are not fully explained, but that struck me as more dreamlike than frustrating in this case (the art helped world-build a fair bit where blatant explanations were absent), and anyway the point of this short story is the message, not the mechanics of this magic system. I recommend this for anyone looking for a short yet immersive fantasy or paranormal story with a positive message.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joseph R.

    An isolated medieval-looking walled town is holding off outsiders in an attempt to preserve themselves. The Chancellor is the citadel's guardian, though even she has doubts about her role and her efficacy. She confronts one group of squatters just outside the citadel, only to have the situation spiral out of control. In a moment of guilt or compassion, she brings one of the injured enemy children inside in hopes of healing. In the whole situation, so many things need to be healed. The book is an An isolated medieval-looking walled town is holding off outsiders in an attempt to preserve themselves. The Chancellor is the citadel's guardian, though even she has doubts about her role and her efficacy. She confronts one group of squatters just outside the citadel, only to have the situation spiral out of control. In a moment of guilt or compassion, she brings one of the injured enemy children inside in hopes of healing. In the whole situation, so many things need to be healed. The book is an amazingly fast read, like ten minutes. Unfortunately, it also lacks depth. The situation has a lot of potential that is glossed over in a quick resolution. The art is surprisingly apropos of the story. Simplicity and directness in the art make it easy to understand the emotions of the characters. I just wish it had more depth or more to say. Mildly recommended.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    As a librarian, I'm always looking for new graphic novels for my students. And since the author of this book actually went to my elementary school, I was more than intrigued. The Chancellor and the Citadel did not disappoint. Although some of the thematic elements of the story may go over the heads of younger readers, they will all be drawn in by the lush and magical artwork. Older kids will find much to ponder about the use and misuse of power, compassion, and the vagaries of right versus wrong As a librarian, I'm always looking for new graphic novels for my students. And since the author of this book actually went to my elementary school, I was more than intrigued. The Chancellor and the Citadel did not disappoint. Although some of the thematic elements of the story may go over the heads of younger readers, they will all be drawn in by the lush and magical artwork. Older kids will find much to ponder about the use and misuse of power, compassion, and the vagaries of right versus wrong. I'm sure this book will be a hit anywhere fantasy graphic novels are popular. This is Frantz' first published work and I hope we'll be seeing more from her in the near future. P.S. I shelved this as both middle grade and YA because I feel like it kind of rides the line between the two.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dani Scott

    Beautifully drawn, but I'm not sure I totally get the story. Maybe I'm just a bit overwhelmed with work and school... Essentially, the Chancellor is a "witch" of some kind that protects those from the Citadel. What I loved about the book and the story was the gender neutral way in which a lot of the characters were drawn and the relationship between Olive and the Chancellor. It was so touching and, though we got only a glimpse in this quick graphic novel, it felt real and important. I can't say Beautifully drawn, but I'm not sure I totally get the story. Maybe I'm just a bit overwhelmed with work and school... Essentially, the Chancellor is a "witch" of some kind that protects those from the Citadel. What I loved about the book and the story was the gender neutral way in which a lot of the characters were drawn and the relationship between Olive and the Chancellor. It was so touching and, though we got only a glimpse in this quick graphic novel, it felt real and important. I can't say I recommend the book either way, but it was a quick, fun read, if nothing else. It certainly felt deeper than the surface story, but I'm not sure the author gave us enough to really draw us in.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    The Chancellor and the Citadel is a short and sweet meditation on the nature of good and evil, right and wrong. The Chancellor is a super-powered being who watches over the last of humanity (or something like humanity) in the Citadel. One day, after destroying a band of feral humans outside the Citadel, she brings a dying human within the walls. Arguments ensue! Character development is light, mostly due to the short nature of the book, but the few main protagonists make tough choices. Maria Fra The Chancellor and the Citadel is a short and sweet meditation on the nature of good and evil, right and wrong. The Chancellor is a super-powered being who watches over the last of humanity (or something like humanity) in the Citadel. One day, after destroying a band of feral humans outside the Citadel, she brings a dying human within the walls. Arguments ensue! Character development is light, mostly due to the short nature of the book, but the few main protagonists make tough choices. Maria Frantz's art is simple and pleasant, very fitting to the gentle nature of the story. The Chancellor and the Citadel is a nice surprise, a 20-minute read that stuck with me.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    The main character, Olive, was plenty intriguing: her latent healing magic, her non-feminine-conforming appearance, her relationship with the Chancellor. But I felt I was missing the backstory that would have helped me get invested in some of the other characters. There is the distinct possibility that I simply read this too fast and missed out on some of these details, but if that's true, it looks like I'm not the only one. There's a difficult balance to strike between showing too much and show The main character, Olive, was plenty intriguing: her latent healing magic, her non-feminine-conforming appearance, her relationship with the Chancellor. But I felt I was missing the backstory that would have helped me get invested in some of the other characters. There is the distinct possibility that I simply read this too fast and missed out on some of these details, but if that's true, it looks like I'm not the only one. There's a difficult balance to strike between showing too much and showing too little, and I think this book fell a little too hard on the side of showing too little. But I would definitely be interested in more of Olive's world.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

    There is some beautiful artwork in this story about a mystical city which is proteced by a mystical figure known as the chancellor. The city is at peace and a safe place to be but all this is jeopardised when the city is attacked by outsiders. Then the Chancellor finds her actions questioned and fear starts to grip the city and the chancellor has to reach into herself to bring peace again. This is a quick easy to read story with great graphics. I wish it had a bit more of a back story but I still There is some beautiful artwork in this story about a mystical city which is proteced by a mystical figure known as the chancellor. The city is at peace and a safe place to be but all this is jeopardised when the city is attacked by outsiders. Then the Chancellor finds her actions questioned and fear starts to grip the city and the chancellor has to reach into herself to bring peace again. This is a quick easy to read story with great graphics. I wish it had a bit more of a back story but I still enjoyed it. Copy provided by Edelweiss+ in exchange for an unbiased review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Graphic novel with a theme that touches on the fact that the line isn't easily divided into right and wrong, black and white, and that if you work at it and try, you can overcome the bad things you did in the past. This is an important theme to impart upon young readers as they are discerning, but the story tells the theme instead of showing it, which defeats the purpose of a story. I liked the soft illustrations, but as with many graphic novels, I wasn't really able to follow the story because Graphic novel with a theme that touches on the fact that the line isn't easily divided into right and wrong, black and white, and that if you work at it and try, you can overcome the bad things you did in the past. This is an important theme to impart upon young readers as they are discerning, but the story tells the theme instead of showing it, which defeats the purpose of a story. I liked the soft illustrations, but as with many graphic novels, I wasn't really able to follow the story because of the lack of narration.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Duncan Baumgarten

    Frantz's intimate and self contained novel speaks to her intricate storytelling. The messages housed within this cozy volume resonate far further than the Citadel; acceptance, love, and the healing touch of compassion. This book may be the balm to the wounds that mar the hearts of many. Frantz's deeply personal art style, with loving care taken to her character design, to staggering detail fleshing out a world clouded by darkness grasping for light, set her indie debut apart from many others. Fr Frantz's intimate and self contained novel speaks to her intricate storytelling. The messages housed within this cozy volume resonate far further than the Citadel; acceptance, love, and the healing touch of compassion. This book may be the balm to the wounds that mar the hearts of many. Frantz's deeply personal art style, with loving care taken to her character design, to staggering detail fleshing out a world clouded by darkness grasping for light, set her indie debut apart from many others. Frantz is a name to watch out for; Chancellor and the Citadel is a title to seek out.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hanna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really enjoyed this story. The passing was even and well done. The backbone of the story may have been familiar but the twist to it were excellently executed. The fact that almost all the fighters identified as female was really nice. But I did have one issue, it felt like there was a lot of backstory the author had created but was unable to share that would have answered some questions. (No I don't need the exact answer of who the chancellor is/was or how the world ended more like if the main I really enjoyed this story. The passing was even and well done. The backbone of the story may have been familiar but the twist to it were excellently executed. The fact that almost all the fighters identified as female was really nice. But I did have one issue, it felt like there was a lot of backstory the author had created but was unable to share that would have answered some questions. (No I don't need the exact answer of who the chancellor is/was or how the world ended more like if the main cast is not human than what are they sorta answers)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    Much left unexplained in the world, but I enjoyed the character story and was intrigued by what was left mysterious for future tellings. I liked the relationship between the chancellor and her best friend, and what they liked in each other that was unlike themselves that they admired and valued despite the difference. Liked the art - nice touch to have kind of a rainbow foil on part of the cover too. Appreciated that many of the characters were larger. Would happily read a second volume if there Much left unexplained in the world, but I enjoyed the character story and was intrigued by what was left mysterious for future tellings. I liked the relationship between the chancellor and her best friend, and what they liked in each other that was unlike themselves that they admired and valued despite the difference. Liked the art - nice touch to have kind of a rainbow foil on part of the cover too. Appreciated that many of the characters were larger. Would happily read a second volume if there ever was one.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Spencer

    2.5 stars would be more accurate.The Chancellor and the Citadel had a lot of potential, but there simply wasn’t enough of it. The artwork is dreamy and the world it takes place in had me intrigued, but I was left with too many questions to be truly satisfied after finishing it. I can handle open-ended stories, but this did not feel like one; instead, it felt like entire parts of it was missing. I hope the author revisits this world in the future, because I would love a fully fleshed out version 2.5 stars would be more accurate.The Chancellor and the Citadel had a lot of potential, but there simply wasn’t enough of it. The artwork is dreamy and the world it takes place in had me intrigued, but I was left with too many questions to be truly satisfied after finishing it. I can handle open-ended stories, but this did not feel like one; instead, it felt like entire parts of it was missing. I hope the author revisits this world in the future, because I would love a fully fleshed out version of this book.

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