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From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, a vibrant portrait of one of the most accomplished and prolific American screenwriters, by an award-winning biographer and essayist He was, according to Pauline Kael, “the greatest American screenwriter.” Jean-Luc Godard called him “a genius” who “invented 80 percent of what is used in Hollywood movies today.” Besides tossing off d From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, a vibrant portrait of one of the most accomplished and prolific American screenwriters, by an award-winning biographer and essayist He was, according to Pauline Kael, “the greatest American screenwriter.” Jean-Luc Godard called him “a genius” who “invented 80 percent of what is used in Hollywood movies today.” Besides tossing off dozens of now-classic scripts—including Scarface,Twentieth Century, and Notorious—Ben Hecht was known in his day as ace reporter, celebrated playwright, taboo-busting novelist, and the most quick-witted of provocateurs. During World War II, he also emerged as an outspoken crusader for the imperiled Jews of Europe, and later he became a fierce propagandist for pre-1948 Palestine’s Jewish terrorist underground. Whatever the outrage he stirred, this self-declared “child of the century” came to embody much that defined America—especially Jewish America—in his time.   Hecht's fame has dimmed with the decades, but Adina Hoffman’s vivid portrait brings this charismatic and contradictory figure back to life on the page. Hecht was a renaissance man of dazzling sorts, and Hoffman—critically acclaimed biographer, former film critic, and eloquent commentator on Middle Eastern culture and politics—is uniquely suited to capture him in all his modes. About Jewish Lives: Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present. In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award. More praise for Jewish Lives: "Excellent" –New York Times "Exemplary" –Wall St. Journal "Distinguished" –New Yorker "Superb" –The Guardian


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From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, a vibrant portrait of one of the most accomplished and prolific American screenwriters, by an award-winning biographer and essayist He was, according to Pauline Kael, “the greatest American screenwriter.” Jean-Luc Godard called him “a genius” who “invented 80 percent of what is used in Hollywood movies today.” Besides tossing off d From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, a vibrant portrait of one of the most accomplished and prolific American screenwriters, by an award-winning biographer and essayist He was, according to Pauline Kael, “the greatest American screenwriter.” Jean-Luc Godard called him “a genius” who “invented 80 percent of what is used in Hollywood movies today.” Besides tossing off dozens of now-classic scripts—including Scarface,Twentieth Century, and Notorious—Ben Hecht was known in his day as ace reporter, celebrated playwright, taboo-busting novelist, and the most quick-witted of provocateurs. During World War II, he also emerged as an outspoken crusader for the imperiled Jews of Europe, and later he became a fierce propagandist for pre-1948 Palestine’s Jewish terrorist underground. Whatever the outrage he stirred, this self-declared “child of the century” came to embody much that defined America—especially Jewish America—in his time.   Hecht's fame has dimmed with the decades, but Adina Hoffman’s vivid portrait brings this charismatic and contradictory figure back to life on the page. Hecht was a renaissance man of dazzling sorts, and Hoffman—critically acclaimed biographer, former film critic, and eloquent commentator on Middle Eastern culture and politics—is uniquely suited to capture him in all his modes. About Jewish Lives: Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present. In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award. More praise for Jewish Lives: "Excellent" –New York Times "Exemplary" –Wall St. Journal "Distinguished" –New Yorker "Superb" –The Guardian

30 review for Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

  1. 5 out of 5

    SueKich

    “A kind of hard-boiled, Middle American Scheherazade” Child of the (last) century, Ben Hecht, was a legendary teller of tales and writer of movies who never – in his own mind – lived up to his own idealised stature as “a man of letters”. According to Jean-Luc Godard he “invented 80% of what is used in Hollywood movies today”, casually bashing out scripts for such films as Scarface and Notorious with an insouciance that he employed for all writing projects save books; it seems as though writing ‘t “A kind of hard-boiled, Middle American Scheherazade” Child of the (last) century, Ben Hecht, was a legendary teller of tales and writer of movies who never – in his own mind – lived up to his own idealised stature as “a man of letters”. According to Jean-Luc Godard he “invented 80% of what is used in Hollywood movies today”, casually bashing out scripts for such films as Scarface and Notorious with an insouciance that he employed for all writing projects save books; it seems as though writing ‘the great American novel’ always eluded him. Perhaps he was just too good at plots and quips to be considered with the gravitas he yearned for? In any event, he was also an ace journalist and celebrated playwright but perhaps the most startling thing about Hecht was his belated discovery of his Jewish identity, something that had remained hidden deep inside him until the exact nature of Hitler’s Holocaust finally came to light later on in the course of the Second World War. He had no sympathy for ‘Jews on their knees’ and disapproved of the way the Zionist movement was taking shape. Rather, he admired the fighting spirit of the Jewish terrorist underground, the Irgun, and became a fierce advocate for their cause. It was always going to be a controversial stand to take and it outraged Jewish America. This is an absorbing story of a man and an era, beautifully told by Adina Hoffman as part of the Jewish Lives series of ‘interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity...[in which] subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience…” This Ms Hoffman has done admirably.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bill Tyroler

    Part of the "Jewish Lives ... series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity." To be sure, you don't have to be Jewish, or care a whit about Jewish identity, to enjoy the book. Not only is Adina Hoffman's prose a genuine pleasure to read, her account of Hecht's life is fast-paced, breezy, occasionally breathless. A bit like Hecht's own stylings for that matter (Exhibit A would be, "The Front Page.") Ultimately, though, there's an unsolved mystery at Hec Part of the "Jewish Lives ... series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity." To be sure, you don't have to be Jewish, or care a whit about Jewish identity, to enjoy the book. Not only is Adina Hoffman's prose a genuine pleasure to read, her account of Hecht's life is fast-paced, breezy, occasionally breathless. A bit like Hecht's own stylings for that matter (Exhibit A would be, "The Front Page.") Ultimately, though, there's an unsolved mystery at Hecht's core: just how did an irrevocably secularized, if not-quite deracinated, Jew become a full-throated supporter of Jewish national liberation? Sure, the Holocaust had a lot to do with it, but then again, other Jews such as Arthur Sulzberger took a much different direction. Hecht seems to have been born pugnacious and disputatious, and maybe that had something to do with it too. Or maybe the answer is found in Herman Mankiewicz's epigrammatic wit: "It's very simple. You see, six years ago Ben found out he was a Jew, and now he behaves like a six-year-old Jew." But most likely, the origin of Hecht's tribal impulse (which is what it plainly seems) is, and must remain, a mystery. (Favorable take by NYT Book Review for the Hoffman book, as well as another Hecht bio, "The Notorious Ben Hecht," Julien Gorbach (https://www.israpundit.org/the-remark...). Full review, which may be behind paywall, here: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/17/bo... ("Gorbach may be the weaker stylist, at times insightful while at other times too reliant on academic jargon and theory, but his is the deeper dive, and he comes up with a surprising amount of fresh material on Hecht’s activism."). Informative, if you can access the full review.)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Will

    "When Hecht was called in at the last minute as a kind of emergency-room script doctor, he hadn’t read the fat best seller by Margaret Mitchell on which the movie was based. With no time to spare—the picture was already well into costly production—Fleming and his boss acted out the parts while Hecht lay on the couch and took in what must have been the remarkable spectacle of the very Jewish, very boyish David O. Selznick batting his eyelashes and fiddle-dee-deeing as Scarlett O’Hara." "When Hecht was called in at the last minute as a kind of emergency-room script doctor, he hadn’t read the fat best seller by Margaret Mitchell on which the movie was based. With no time to spare—the picture was already well into costly production—Fleming and his boss acted out the parts while Hecht lay on the couch and took in what must have been the remarkable spectacle of the very Jewish, very boyish David O. Selznick batting his eyelashes and fiddle-dee-deeing as Scarlett O’Hara."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Good introduction/overview to the life of Ben Hecht, a man of many accomplishments as a playwright (co-author of "The Front Page"), screenwriter ("Scarface," "Notorious," many others), novelist, journalist, and -- to his surprise -- Jewish activist. Good introduction/overview to the life of Ben Hecht, a man of many accomplishments as a playwright (co-author of "The Front Page"), screenwriter ("Scarface," "Notorious," many others), novelist, journalist, and -- to his surprise -- Jewish activist.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Theodore Fischer

    Good biography of a difficult, interesting guy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carl Rollyson

    Ben Hecht is one of those American writers who seems to have had a hand in everything. He was a Chicago newspaperman who also had designs on becoming a modernist artist published in Harriet Anderson’s prestigious Little Review (1914-1929). He authored an acclaimed sexually explicit first novel, Erik Dorn (1921) about the rise of a Chicago newspaper reporter modeled on himself. Called the greatest screenwriter by no less than the revered Pauline Kael, this Shakespeare of Hollywood became the most Ben Hecht is one of those American writers who seems to have had a hand in everything. He was a Chicago newspaperman who also had designs on becoming a modernist artist published in Harriet Anderson’s prestigious Little Review (1914-1929). He authored an acclaimed sexually explicit first novel, Erik Dorn (1921) about the rise of a Chicago newspaper reporter modeled on himself. Called the greatest screenwriter by no less than the revered Pauline Kael, this Shakespeare of Hollywood became the most controversial propagandist for a Jewish homeland and the nascent state of Israel. Everyone read Hecht and read about Hecht and all sorts of writers and movie stars wanted to work with him. “Can you get me Count Bruga?” William Faulkner, writing from home in Oxford, Mississippi, asked his editor Hal Smith. Published in 1926, the novel, a satire based on Hecht’s friend, the flamboyant poet/critic Maxwell Bodenheim, featured a sendup of the bohemian Greenwich Village that Faulkner and a generation of writers sampled and savored. Hecht came with the imprimatur of publisher Horace Liveright, then signing on America’s literary greats like Theodore Dreiser and Eugene O’Neill, not to mention that notable first novel, Soldiers’ Pay. Hecht was still a force in the 1950s when Marilyn Monroe turned to him to ghost her autobiography. Starting as a fledgling reporter making up some of his stories, Hecht, with the encouragement of his friend, screenwriter Herman Mankiewicz, led a generation of writers to Hollywood and often collaborated with many of them. He worked, it seems, on hundreds of films—credited and uncredited so long as he remained highly paid. His great successes include The Front Page (1931), which became the very template of the newspaper movie, Scarface (1932), which set a high style bar for gangster movies, Twentieth Century (1934), one of the first superb screwball comedies), and many other historical epics and dramas such as Gunga Din (1939) and Wuthering Heights (1939), and important work with Alfred Hitchcock: Spellbound (1945) and Notorious (1946). Through all these heady years Hecht never stopped complaining about Hollywood’s meretricious values. Hecht, by his own lofty literary standards, was whoring and he wanted the world to know it—to know he was better than that. He set the tone for writers with literary aspirations who did not come to Hollywood unless they were desperate or deluded—like F. Scott Fitzgerald who thought he could employ his superior style to uplift Hollywood scripts and cash in at the same time. Hecht’s story is hardly new to biography, and Adina Hoffman gives full credit to her predecessors. Since her book is part of the Yale University series about Jewish lives, she focuses on his virtually demonic drive to awaken America’s conscience as millions of Jews perished in the Holocaust. His story remains important not only for what it says about America at the time but about the role Hecht thought a writer as propagandist could play. He did not simply point out the evils of fascism, he excoriated his fellow Jews in Hollywood and elsewhere for not making the Holocaust their main concern and basis of action. A goad, a Jeremiah, Hecht simply would not let up and, as a result, developed a reputation as a dangerous zealot. He damaged his reputation in Hollywood and abroad and suffered blackballing in England and, for a time, in Hollywood as well. Hoffman tells this story with verve and empathy, not neglecting Hecht’s faults but also exposing how pusillanimous many American Jews were in their efforts to assimilate and not to offend their fellow Americans by aggressively working on behalf of the dying Jews in Europe and the Zionists fighting for a homeland. For many of his fellow Jews, Hecht went too far, supporting Jewish terrorists working to expel Britain from Palestine. Hoffman prefers not to judge Hecht but to fairly present the evidence that readers can assess for themselves. Hoffman’s narrative portrays a man given to extremes in a world of extremity. His Jewishness did not seem to mean that much to him until the ascent of fascism in the 1930s. By 1939, Hecht knew where Hitler was headed. By 1943, Hecht understood that millions of Jews were being exterminated. He did not have to wait to see newsreel footage of the liberated concentration camps. Hecht, Hoffman might have emphasized, was a witness to a history that others simply did not want to confront. She might have spared a sentence for his heroism, although an argument can be made for, again, letting readers form their own judgments. Hecht was most seriously a Jew when Jews were attacked. But he was not religiously observant and never visited Israel. His devotion to the Zionist cause deserves, perhaps, even more attention than Hoffman allots. As a biographer, she might have gone beyond the question of character, to ask why Hecht was so driven to risk his Hollywood paycheck. Did his Zionism, his politicking, become a way of asserting his authenticity, of proving that he was indeed more than the sum of the Hollywood fantasy productions he had written into existence? Was his propagandizing a way for him to script himself into real events? There is probably no way for a biographer to answer such questions. But why not raise them? Why not say Hecht’s Zionism may have been his way of making his life count beyond confines of Hollywood scripts? Hecht remained, into the 1950s, a force, becoming a television personality taking on important personages and issues on his own interview show. As in Hollywood, he was sometimes frustrated. He was forbidden, for example, to discuss Norman Mailer’s controversial essay, “The White Negro.” Mailer and Hecht might have broken new ground in a new medium. To be sure, Mailer learned a good deal from Hecht, paying an amusing tribute in Marilyn (1973) to “Marilyn ben Hecht.” Mailer knew that behind the scenes Hecht had worked with Monroe on her autobiography. The project began as a much more candid story than most Hollywood biographies of the time—so candid in fact that after her marriage to Joe DiMaggio, Monroe withdrew from her collaboration with Hecht since she was revealing more than just the cleavage that Joe DiMaggio wanted for himself. As a result, Hecht never was able to finish the job of separating fantasies from facts in her life. It might well have done her some good to continue working with Hecht who had such a good bullshit detector—a device that Hemingway said all good writers had to possess. But a short biography slotted into a publisher’s series, does not have the luxury of pursuing such speculations. Hoffman does exceptionally well in what might be called a made to order biography. She writes with a fluency and sensitivity that makes her book one of the very best in the Jewish lives series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Glasser

    Ben Hecht grew up during the tumult and creativity of the 1920s; it was a great time to be a writer, and Hecht knew he wanted to write from a very young age. He associated with many important names from the era, and took himself very seriously. He began in journalism, but his work on The Front Page brought him to the attention to Hollywood, which recruited him and brought him fame and financial success. During WWII and its lead-up, Hecht became incensed by the plight of the Jews in Europe, and s Ben Hecht grew up during the tumult and creativity of the 1920s; it was a great time to be a writer, and Hecht knew he wanted to write from a very young age. He associated with many important names from the era, and took himself very seriously. He began in journalism, but his work on The Front Page brought him to the attention to Hollywood, which recruited him and brought him fame and financial success. During WWII and its lead-up, Hecht became incensed by the plight of the Jews in Europe, and started to identify himself as Jewish. He and a committee began advertising to bring awareness to the United States about the holocaust, racism and a push for a Jewish state in Israel. This aspect of his life is the main focus of this book, although it serves as a biography as well. Author Adina Hoffman reads the audiobook. She injects her opinions and criticisms about her difficult subject, a man who put on a show in his personal life as much as he did on the page. The writing is very intellectual and sometimes difficult to wade through. Hecht was a wordy writer, and Hoffman sometimes breathlessly breezes through the sentences in a way that seems flippant and the result is that the words don't register with the listener. Usually I would say that having the author read an audiobook is the best way to experience it, but this is an exception. #classicfilmreading

  8. 4 out of 5

    Judy G

    This book didnt work for me. So I ask myself Why. She did research and she told the reader about his life as a writer. I was interested in the beginning and then I decided to just go through the pages many without reading it. I think she did a good telling of the life of this man. For me he was flat one dimensional. Yet he was a fighter for the Jewish people when it was right to do that. Something tho about Ben Hecht that personally I disliked from reading this biography. And he was a good writer This book didnt work for me. So I ask myself Why. She did research and she told the reader about his life as a writer. I was interested in the beginning and then I decided to just go through the pages many without reading it. I think she did a good telling of the life of this man. For me he was flat one dimensional. Yet he was a fighter for the Jewish people when it was right to do that. Something tho about Ben Hecht that personally I disliked from reading this biography. And he was a good writer and was well connected Judy

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    Ben Hecht was an extraordinary character and talent--journalist, novelist, playwright, film screenwriter, director, script doctor, and active Zionist, among other things. This biography, though relatively brief, manages to do him full justice. (His autobiography, written in his middle age, is a significantly longer book, and I really want to read it--but I appreciate the bigger, more objective picture here, since Hecht was known to play fast and loose with the truth in the interests of a lively Ben Hecht was an extraordinary character and talent--journalist, novelist, playwright, film screenwriter, director, script doctor, and active Zionist, among other things. This biography, though relatively brief, manages to do him full justice. (His autobiography, written in his middle age, is a significantly longer book, and I really want to read it--but I appreciate the bigger, more objective picture here, since Hecht was known to play fast and loose with the truth in the interests of a lively narrative.) This narrative is lively enough, as Ms. Hoffman writes with great verve. The long, breathless sentences gallop along nicely. She's obviously done boatloads of research (much of it at the Newberry Library, which houses Hecht's papers, and where I heard Ms. Hoffman speak about the book). But her impressive scholarship is worn lightly. Hecht's "1001 Afternoons in Chicago," a collection of newspaper columns, is one of the best things I've ever read, so I knew a bit about his journalism days. But I was very interested to learn much more about his sometimes complicated personal life, his great friendships, his numerous literary and political collaborations, and his other work, particularly his kazillion screenplays. Hoffman's not afraid to venture opinions; she's obviously read the novels and seen the movies. She's quite a good film critic: funny, sharp, and insightful! This book is part of a Jewish Lives series, so there is an emphasis on Hecht's passionate activism on behalf of Jewish causes; he "discovered" his Jewish identity in the days before WWII, and it informed the rest of his life and work to a large degree. The historical context is explained in clear and critical detail, so I learned a great deal. Ms. Hoffman's excellent bibliography led me to some intriguing additional sources. A fascinating, knowledgeable, entertaining book!

  10. 5 out of 5

    M A

    Ms Hoffman delivers a succinct study of a complicated man living in a complicated time. She shares the many high points of his life, briefly shining the spotlight on each of the vast number of professional relationships that interweave in and out of his career, a who’s who of the early days of Hollywood. His arcs were many, swinging between artist and supplicant to the studios, faithful husband to philanderer, egotist to anonymous ghost writer, but most powerfully and less self-involved was his e Ms Hoffman delivers a succinct study of a complicated man living in a complicated time. She shares the many high points of his life, briefly shining the spotlight on each of the vast number of professional relationships that interweave in and out of his career, a who’s who of the early days of Hollywood. His arcs were many, swinging between artist and supplicant to the studios, faithful husband to philanderer, egotist to anonymous ghost writer, but most powerfully and less self-involved was his evolution from secularism to a proud claiming of his Jewish identity and defender of his people’s very existence. Here, the biography achieves it’s strongest resonance. Hecht’s passions are ignited. “The man who had once been the highest-paid screenwriter in Hollywood” springboards off his fame, channeling his enormous talents and relentless energies, to take center stage as a defender against the multiple attacks on the Jewish world and advocate for a Jewish homeland. The book teases the reader to want to know more about this “preternaturally facile wordmeister.”

  11. 5 out of 5

    John

    One of my favorite movies is The Front Page (Jack Lemmon version, 1974). Adapted from a play by Charles MacArthur, sole playwright, or so I thought, but now I know better. Ben Hecht was a co-writer and probably even could be considered principal writer. Play (and movie) draws from both writers' experiences as newspaper reporters in the heyday of Chicago's rough and raucous newspaper era circa the early 1900s: "The whiplash phrase, the flashing and explosive sentence, the sonorous syntax and bull One of my favorite movies is The Front Page (Jack Lemmon version, 1974). Adapted from a play by Charles MacArthur, sole playwright, or so I thought, but now I know better. Ben Hecht was a co-writer and probably even could be considered principal writer. Play (and movie) draws from both writers' experiences as newspaper reporters in the heyday of Chicago's rough and raucous newspaper era circa the early 1900s: "The whiplash phrase, the flashing and explosive sentence, the sonorous syntax and bulls' eye epithet." Who needs journalism school? Later, Hecht was attracted to Hollywood. Script for his first movie (gangland setting) reflects his newspaper days, characterized by glib wit and knowing indifference. As a screenwriter, he loved the buncombe of Hollywood and its clap-trap splendors. Between 1937 and 1940 screenplays poured out of him, nearly two dozen he wrote, rewrote and co-wrote including Gone With the Wind. Later he was a ferocious propagandist for establishment of the nation of Israel. A fascinating life, an impresario of whom I was only previously vaguely aware.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I was curious to read about Ben Hecht, whom I knew as the screenwriter of classics such as "Scarface" and "Notorious", as well as the script doctor for many other famous films. I hadn't known about his background in the Chicago Renaissance of the 1920's, and his association with writers such as Carl Sandburg and Sherwood Anderson. This brief biography is part of the Yale University Press "Jewish Lives" series, and I was surprised to learn the extent of Hecht's efforts on behalf of European Jews d I was curious to read about Ben Hecht, whom I knew as the screenwriter of classics such as "Scarface" and "Notorious", as well as the script doctor for many other famous films. I hadn't known about his background in the Chicago Renaissance of the 1920's, and his association with writers such as Carl Sandburg and Sherwood Anderson. This brief biography is part of the Yale University Press "Jewish Lives" series, and I was surprised to learn the extent of Hecht's efforts on behalf of European Jews during WWII and beyond. His efforts in these pursuits almost overshadow his writing career. The prose can be a bit stilted with a cataloging feel to it - takes a bit away from the life of a fascinating man.

  13. 5 out of 5

    JUDITH S.

    Uninspiring This book was a disappointment to me. Perhaps Ben Hecht is a disappointment. In this book I see him as an opportunist, a person with more negative traits than positive. I had no idea what his connection to the Jews or the state of Israel was. From this book I deduce that it was tangential and perhaps accidental. He appears to be a dilettante, flitting from serious writer to hack, and similarly from his championing of Israel to simple disinterest. However, I found most interesting the Uninspiring This book was a disappointment to me. Perhaps Ben Hecht is a disappointment. In this book I see him as an opportunist, a person with more negative traits than positive. I had no idea what his connection to the Jews or the state of Israel was. From this book I deduce that it was tangential and perhaps accidental. He appears to be a dilettante, flitting from serious writer to hack, and similarly from his championing of Israel to simple disinterest. However, I found most interesting the discussion in the book regarding Rabbi Steven S. Wise. I was impatient to finish the book and “get it overwith “.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Someone gave me a copy of this book. I knew about Ben Hecht, playwright and screenwriter but not about his activism for Jewish causes. I found it very interesting and well written.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Miriam Holmes

    Was familiar with his name but knew little about him. Enjoyed learning about him.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

  17. 4 out of 5

    Allen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gillian

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  20. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eli

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jodeebee

  23. 5 out of 5

    Robert A

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark Rozeen

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ian Mcasey

  27. 4 out of 5

    David

  28. 4 out of 5

    Conor Murphy

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christopher R Woods

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nadine Epstein

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