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FIRSTLY: don’t touch the hands of your cuckoo-clock heart. SECONDLY: master your anger. THIRDLY: never, ever fall in love. For if you do, the hour hand will poke through your skin, your bones will shatter, and your heart will break once more. Edinburgh, 1874. Born with a frozen heart, Jack is near death when his mother abandons him to the care of Dr. Madeleine—witch doctor, FIRSTLY: don’t touch the hands of your cuckoo-clock heart. SECONDLY: master your anger. THIRDLY: never, ever fall in love. For if you do, the hour hand will poke through your skin, your bones will shatter, and your heart will break once more. Edinburgh, 1874. Born with a frozen heart, Jack is near death when his mother abandons him to the care of Dr. Madeleine—witch doctor, midwife, protector of orphans—who saves Jack by placing a cuckoo clock in his chest. And it is in her orphanage that Jack grows up among tear-filled flasks, eggs containing memories, and a man with a musical spine. As Jack gets older, Dr. Madeleine warns him that his heart is too fragile for strong emotions: he must never, ever fall in love. And, of course, this is exactly what he does: on his tenth birthday and with head-over-heels abandon. The object of his ardor is Miss Acacia—a bespectacled young street performer with a soul-stirring voice. But now Jack’s life is doubly at risk—his heart is in danger and so is his safety after he injures the school bully in a fight for the affections of the beautiful singer. Now begins a journey of escape and pursuit, from Edinburgh to Paris to Miss Acacia’s home in Andalusia. Mathias Malzieu’s The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart is a fantastical, wildly inventive tale of love and heartbreak—by turns poignant and funny—in which Jack finally learns the great joys, and ultimately the greater costs, of owning a fully formed heart.


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FIRSTLY: don’t touch the hands of your cuckoo-clock heart. SECONDLY: master your anger. THIRDLY: never, ever fall in love. For if you do, the hour hand will poke through your skin, your bones will shatter, and your heart will break once more. Edinburgh, 1874. Born with a frozen heart, Jack is near death when his mother abandons him to the care of Dr. Madeleine—witch doctor, FIRSTLY: don’t touch the hands of your cuckoo-clock heart. SECONDLY: master your anger. THIRDLY: never, ever fall in love. For if you do, the hour hand will poke through your skin, your bones will shatter, and your heart will break once more. Edinburgh, 1874. Born with a frozen heart, Jack is near death when his mother abandons him to the care of Dr. Madeleine—witch doctor, midwife, protector of orphans—who saves Jack by placing a cuckoo clock in his chest. And it is in her orphanage that Jack grows up among tear-filled flasks, eggs containing memories, and a man with a musical spine. As Jack gets older, Dr. Madeleine warns him that his heart is too fragile for strong emotions: he must never, ever fall in love. And, of course, this is exactly what he does: on his tenth birthday and with head-over-heels abandon. The object of his ardor is Miss Acacia—a bespectacled young street performer with a soul-stirring voice. But now Jack’s life is doubly at risk—his heart is in danger and so is his safety after he injures the school bully in a fight for the affections of the beautiful singer. Now begins a journey of escape and pursuit, from Edinburgh to Paris to Miss Acacia’s home in Andalusia. Mathias Malzieu’s The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart is a fantastical, wildly inventive tale of love and heartbreak—by turns poignant and funny—in which Jack finally learns the great joys, and ultimately the greater costs, of owning a fully formed heart.

30 review for La mecanique du coeur Audiobook PACK [Book + 1 CD MP3]

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    If you're a fan of this book then stop reading now! You won't like what I'm about to say... Maybe it's the writing or maybe it's the translation but I really did not like the way this book was written. The entire way through it was as though Malzieu was telling me a story instead of showing me one, and that is a writing style which I personally can only ever tolerate in short stories. The plot felt far too predictable to me; the outcast and the school bully fight over the same beautiful girl. I've If you're a fan of this book then stop reading now! You won't like what I'm about to say... Maybe it's the writing or maybe it's the translation but I really did not like the way this book was written. The entire way through it was as though Malzieu was telling me a story instead of showing me one, and that is a writing style which I personally can only ever tolerate in short stories. The plot felt far too predictable to me; the outcast and the school bully fight over the same beautiful girl. I've seen it too many times before to enjoy it. I also didn't find any of the main characters particularly likeable; Little Jack and Miss Acacia irritated me beyond belief and everyone else felt more like caricatures than characters. I wanted to read about people, not ideas. Let's not even mention the scene in which Jack the Ripper made an appearance because it was laughable. I didn't despise the entire book. Some of Malzieu's descriptions were very pretty, but the majority of them made me cringe. All in all for me it was a story with a very interesting idea that simply wasn't written very well.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jo-anne Dulla

    The title says: The Boy with a Cuckoo-clock Heart. While I don't speak french much less understand it, I was able to find an english version of this book. Hurray for translations! So there I was, on my sickbed, just finished reading a sad book but with a happier ending, thinking on what to do and where to go where my feet can't take me. I was scanning ibooks for a 3rd book to read for the day and stumbled upon "The Boy with a Cuckoo-clock Heart". Now who would not be interested to read it with a ti The title says: The Boy with a Cuckoo-clock Heart. While I don't speak french much less understand it, I was able to find an english version of this book. Hurray for translations! So there I was, on my sickbed, just finished reading a sad book but with a happier ending, thinking on what to do and where to go where my feet can't take me. I was scanning ibooks for a 3rd book to read for the day and stumbled upon "The Boy with a Cuckoo-clock Heart". Now who would not be interested to read it with a title like that. The book took me to Edinburgh during the late 1800's with a boy named Jack being born during the coldest day of the earth. A different setting, a more historical plot. I was hooked. Mathias Malzieu took me on an emotional roller coaster ride with this adult fairy tale of love and heartbreak that made me think of Pinocchio, Hugo and Book of A Thousand Days (why? because it was the only other fairy tail-esque book I own). It was bitter sweet but I felt it...the wooden heart. I felt it like it was mine. It took me back to my time when my heart was fragile, in a sense - wooden, easy to love, easily burned. And it made me cry...for Jack and his Cuckoo-clock heart. So pardon me while I bawl my eyes out but I definitely recommend this. For those who love, who knew love and who are knowing love all over again. Excerpts: "Firstly: don't touch the hands of your cuckoo-clock heart. Secondly: master your anger. Thirdly: never, ever fall in love. For if you do, the hour hand will poke through your skin, your bones will shatter, and your heart will break once more." " I love you crookedly because my heart's been unhinged from birth. The doctors gave me strict instructions not to fall in love: my fragile clockwork heart would never survive. But when you gave me a dose of love so powerful - far beyond my wildest dreams - that I felt able to confront anything for you, I decided to put my life in your hands."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sam Grove

    Very disappointed in this. The premise seemed very intriguing and I'm a sucker for love stories with a bizarre/dark twist to them (think Edward Scissorhands and you'll be on the mark!) But this, well suffice to say doesn't even come close to Tim Burton's genius. The reason why this falls so very short is the writing. One of my pet hates is when writers use that lazy technique of jumping forward in time with no explanation of what happened during the skipped part. Usually it reads 'so and so did Very disappointed in this. The premise seemed very intriguing and I'm a sucker for love stories with a bizarre/dark twist to them (think Edward Scissorhands and you'll be on the mark!) But this, well suffice to say doesn't even come close to Tim Burton's genius. The reason why this falls so very short is the writing. One of my pet hates is when writers use that lazy technique of jumping forward in time with no explanation of what happened during the skipped part. Usually it reads 'so and so did this and then two years later he found himself doing this'. You can't even understand how much I hate that! Just stop being lazy and let us know a full story please! You want us to invest in the characters so tell us the suffering and joy and every other emotion they feel in the timeline of the book. This is unfortunately full of it :( The second reason I didn't attach myself to this book was the very strange descriptive style used throughout. Bearing in mind the book starts in 1874 Edinburgh, some descriptions of events that happen cannot possibly be known by the characters in this time period. For example, during the operation on his heart as a baby (don't even get me started on how as the first person narrator, he'd be aware of his own birth!) he says the surgeon/midwife has "her arms in the air like she's just scored a penalty in a World Cup final." Now correct me if I'm wrong but didn't the World Cup begin in the 1930s? How could he possibly know what that is? And it continues all the way through with references to prostitutes in spindly stilettos and animal print (really?) and Jack the Ripper (how could he be in Edinburgh when at the same time he was in London committing murders and why would he confess to a little boy?) Arrrggghhhh!! Honestly now, this was a really promising storyline that fell quite unfortunately into a bad writers hands and suffered because of it. I had high hopes but I guess I'll have to stick with Tim Burton in the future!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ylenia

    This book was okay. Good but not amazing. I liked some parts but overall it wasn't anything special. This book was okay. Good but not amazing. I liked some parts but overall it wasn't anything special.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emily Just Emily*~*

    I thought this was an incredible love story. First love. Imagine being 14 again and "falling in love" for your first time. Remember? It almost turns into obsession, crossing countries and whatever just to get to be around that person even in it's awkwardness. Tragic ending. Fantastic imagery and descriptions. "..you destroyed your heart in front of Miss Acacia. You wanted to show her how much you were suffering, and at the same time how much you loved her. It was a rash and desperate act. But you I thought this was an incredible love story. First love. Imagine being 14 again and "falling in love" for your first time. Remember? It almost turns into obsession, crossing countries and whatever just to get to be around that person even in it's awkwardness. Tragic ending. Fantastic imagery and descriptions. "..you destroyed your heart in front of Miss Acacia. You wanted to show her how much you were suffering, and at the same time how much you loved her. It was a rash and desperate act. But you were just a boy then-worse, a young man with childish dreams, who survived by muddling dreams and reality."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Born on the coldest day ever recorded, Jack's heart is frozen and replaced with a cuckoo-clock. Abandoned by his mother and raised by the witch doctor, Dr. Madeleine who installed the clock, Jack is warned that he must never fall in love because it could overwhelm his unusual pacemaker. Jack does well for about ten years, until he meets Miss Acacia, a street performer who wears glasses and has a pretty voice. Jack is in love and sets out to find Miss Acacia. Thus begins the story of "The Boy With Born on the coldest day ever recorded, Jack's heart is frozen and replaced with a cuckoo-clock. Abandoned by his mother and raised by the witch doctor, Dr. Madeleine who installed the clock, Jack is warned that he must never fall in love because it could overwhelm his unusual pacemaker. Jack does well for about ten years, until he meets Miss Acacia, a street performer who wears glasses and has a pretty voice. Jack is in love and sets out to find Miss Acacia. Thus begins the story of "The Boy With the Cuckoo-Clock Heart." The journey Jack goes on--both geographically and emotionally--is a compelling one. The story relies heavily on magical-realism. So your enjoyment of the book will depend heavily on how willing you are to jump on board with that. I was willing to do so and found the novel to be magical at some points. However, it's a bit disappointing in the final pages. Several key revelations late in the story ring false and the story ends on a bit of a down note. I can see what Mathias Melzieu was trying to do, but I don't think the story was necessarily successful in achieving it. (And yes, I am being deliberately vague here to avoid SPOILERS). The first three quarters of "Cuckoo Clock Heart" are compelling, fascinating and magical. The last quarter is a bit of a letdown.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Martini

    What a pity! With a different ending this would have gotten four stars. (view spoiler)[And I don't mean a happy ending! No, actually I think that a not-so-happy ending really fits the story's atmosphere. But as it was, it was simply illogical: First, Jack repeats his mistake to hide something from Acacia, and when she finds out about it and leaves him, he does nothing. Why doesn't he tell her that he has been in a coma for three years, and lets her talk to Jehanna, the nurse who has cared for hi What a pity! With a different ending this would have gotten four stars. (view spoiler)[And I don't mean a happy ending! No, actually I think that a not-so-happy ending really fits the story's atmosphere. But as it was, it was simply illogical: First, Jack repeats his mistake to hide something from Acacia, and when she finds out about it and leaves him, he does nothing. Why doesn't he tell her that he has been in a coma for three years, and lets her talk to Jehanna, the nurse who has cared for him all the time, to prove it? (hide spoiler)]

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I expected that Mathias Malzieu's novel of magical realism, The Boy With the Cuckoo-Clock Heart, would be both quirky and charming, and full of whimsy. It is described as 'a dark and tender fairytale spiced with devilish humour.' I have had the novel on my to-read list for years, and was very excited when my slim hardback copy arrived. However, my overwhelming feeling about the novel is one of disappointment. The Boy With the Cuckoo-Clock Heart has been translated from its original French by Sara I expected that Mathias Malzieu's novel of magical realism, The Boy With the Cuckoo-Clock Heart, would be both quirky and charming, and full of whimsy. It is described as 'a dark and tender fairytale spiced with devilish humour.' I have had the novel on my to-read list for years, and was very excited when my slim hardback copy arrived. However, my overwhelming feeling about the novel is one of disappointment. The Boy With the Cuckoo-Clock Heart has been translated from its original French by Sarah Ardizzone, and opens in Edinburgh in 1874. A baby named Jack is born to a very young mother, and is found to have a frozen heart. He is given an operation, in which the unconventional Dr Madeleine 'surgically implants a cuckoo clock into his chest.' The novel's first sentences set the initial tone, although they do give a feeling of fairytale and wonder, which is not carried through the entire book: 'Firstly: don't touch the hands of your cuckoo-clock heart. Secondly: master your anger. Thirdly: never, ever fall in love. For if you do, the hour hand will poke through your skin, your bones will shatter, and your heart will break once more.' The novel is narrated by Jack, and follows his infatuation with an Andalusian girl made of fire: 'Almost without realising it, I'm falling in love. Except I do realise it too. Inside my clock, it's the hottest day on earth.' Dr Madeleine, who becomes his guardian after his mother abandons him, worries that love will be a dangerous experience, and that his heart will be quite unable to take the strain. She tells him: 'Your cuckoo-clock heart will explode. I was the one who grafted that clock on to you, and I have a perfect understanding of its limits. It might survive the intensity of pleasure, and beyond. But it is not robust enough to endure the torment of love.' Jack's narrative voice rarely feels authentic when he is supposed to be a child, and there is little change within it as he reaches adulthood. There is next to no character development within the novel, which is a real shame. The initial descriptions which Malzieu gives of Edinburgh are highly sensuous: 'Edinburgh and its steep streets are being transformed. Fountains metamorphose, one by one, into bouquets of ice. The old river, normally so serious, is disguised as an icing sugar lake that stretches all the way to the sea.' Other descriptions too verge upon the breathtaking: '... the hoarfrost stitches sequins on to cats' bodies. The trees stretch their arms, like fat fairies in white nightshirts, yawning at the moon...'. Whilst the descriptions of both place and people are by turns lively and inventive, it did not seem to me as though the rest of Malzieu's writing quite stood up. It is when the narrative moves from Scotland to Spain that such descriptions start to suffer; they become relatively few and far between, and feel a little repetitive in what they pinpoint and express. On initially viewing the dustjacket's design and reading the blurb, I would have thought that The Boy With the Cuckoo-Clock Heart would be a suitable book for a child to read. It seems not, however; there are several marked references to sex, and some quite coarse language at times too. One of the fundamental flaws of the novel for me was that it did not appear to know exactly what it wanted to be, and there was too much going on at some points, and not enough at others. It felt inconsistent, and did not hold my interest once its initial few chapters had passed. I had qualms with the modern feel of the dialogue, which did not fit with the chosen time period at all; the historical detail was also rather patchy, and there are a few clumsy mistakes to be found for the eagle-eyed reader. There are certainly some interesting ideas at play here, and I particularly admired the inclusion of Georges Melies, a real-life figure whose playful short films I love. It did not quite come together in my opinion, however, and felt markedly peculiar. It was difficult to immerse myself within the story, and it certainly loses momentum at points due to its inconsistent pacing. The fairytale elements which are emphasised within the book's blurb are relatively non-existent. The translation was fluid, but regardless, I ended up disliking more about the novel than I liked. The Boy With the Cuckoo-Clock Heart is what I imagine literary steampunk would be like; of marked interest to the right reader, but not really of appeal to this one.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    This book really annoyed me because it could've been quirky and sweet, and there were even some beautiful lines that I could cut out and keep, but the tone kept vacillating and throwing me out of the story. It never quite settled down to being humour, or a fairytale, or a serious work of fantasy, or... anything. I felt jerked around by it and just ended up resentful. Also, if you read the blurb and think it might be a children's book, it definitely isn't that. It is an adult book, with references This book really annoyed me because it could've been quirky and sweet, and there were even some beautiful lines that I could cut out and keep, but the tone kept vacillating and throwing me out of the story. It never quite settled down to being humour, or a fairytale, or a serious work of fantasy, or... anything. I felt jerked around by it and just ended up resentful. Also, if you read the blurb and think it might be a children's book, it definitely isn't that. It is an adult book, with references to sex and prostitution and all sorts of things like that, and without any maturity to go with it, too. Anyway, I got about three quarters of the way through and just didn't care. There are some lovely lines, lovely ideas, but it doesn't come together to be anything I could honestly say I liked.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    A hurricane in a skirt named Miss Acacia, a pet hamster named Cunnilingus, tiny bottles filled with one's own tears, and a cameo appearance from Jack the Ripper... What's not to like?! In "The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart," Jack's life depends on a clock installed in his chest. But Jack must be careful, because anger or love will break his fragile heart. Still, he journeys from Edinburgh to Andalusia in search of his beloved Miss Acacia. Mathias Malzieu paints delightfully gorgeous and grotesq A hurricane in a skirt named Miss Acacia, a pet hamster named Cunnilingus, tiny bottles filled with one's own tears, and a cameo appearance from Jack the Ripper... What's not to like?! In "The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart," Jack's life depends on a clock installed in his chest. But Jack must be careful, because anger or love will break his fragile heart. Still, he journeys from Edinburgh to Andalusia in search of his beloved Miss Acacia. Mathias Malzieu paints delightfully gorgeous and grotesque pictures with words. His lush, fruity, sugar-adorned imagery leaves me hungry for more of his pretty words. Jack's unwavering adoration of Miss Acacia is so fairy-tale perfect that it is rather uninteresting, but Malzieu's lustrous images and amusing supporting characters make up for the dull romance. I love journeying with Jack through laboratories filled with small mysterious bottles, a twinkling 19th century Andalusian circus, and a ghost train decorated with bones dragged up from the catacombs. Tim Burton fans will especially love the balance of frightening and romantic imagery. The Mechanics of the Heart, an animated film based on the book, comes out in October 2011 (and no, Burton wasn't involved).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rubi

    Una historia hermosa, con un final de vida real; está llena de bellas e ingeniosas metáforas que nos cuentan las búsqueda del amor por parte de Jack. Muestra ambos extremos del amor: el delirio de la felicidad y las brumosa oscuridad del egoísmo con personajes que se quedan en tu corazón. A beautiful story, with a real life ending; is full of beautiful and ingenious metaphors that tell us the Jack´s search for love. It shows both ends of love: the delirium of happiness and the hazy obscurity of se Una historia hermosa, con un final de vida real; está llena de bellas e ingeniosas metáforas que nos cuentan las búsqueda del amor por parte de Jack. Muestra ambos extremos del amor: el delirio de la felicidad y las brumosa oscuridad del egoísmo con personajes que se quedan en tu corazón. A beautiful story, with a real life ending; is full of beautiful and ingenious metaphors that tell us the Jack´s search for love. It shows both ends of love: the delirium of happiness and the hazy obscurity of selfishness with characters that remain in your heart.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Linds

    I'd tell Malzieu to stick to music, but his music is god-awful and pretentious too. Okay, that's harsh, but seriously. This book has a great premise and is based on a really cute music video. But the book is just plain bad. I read it in French, and then in English thinking I was missing something. I wasn't. The characters are boring, the story is boring. In the hands of someone who could write this might have been a good story. It is full of absolute French storytelling cliches (how many French p I'd tell Malzieu to stick to music, but his music is god-awful and pretentious too. Okay, that's harsh, but seriously. This book has a great premise and is based on a really cute music video. But the book is just plain bad. I read it in French, and then in English thinking I was missing something. I wasn't. The characters are boring, the story is boring. In the hands of someone who could write this might have been a good story. It is full of absolute French storytelling cliches (how many French people have been raised by prostitutes, anyway? Based on the novels I've read, most of them). The only people I could see liking this book are people who are fans of his music and have no taste. And if they're fans of his music they probably don't. Whoops, being mean again.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Actual rating 3.5 stars. This is quite a difficult book for me to rate and review. On the one hand, it was a quirky little fable with an intriguing central concept that had the potential to be both affecting and thought provoking. Some of the writing was beautiful and the story had some really charming moments peppered throughout. And don't even get me started on the cover! I mean, just look at it! However, despite these positive attributes, I can't help feeling that this book never quite lived u Actual rating 3.5 stars. This is quite a difficult book for me to rate and review. On the one hand, it was a quirky little fable with an intriguing central concept that had the potential to be both affecting and thought provoking. Some of the writing was beautiful and the story had some really charming moments peppered throughout. And don't even get me started on the cover! I mean, just look at it! However, despite these positive attributes, I can't help feeling that this book never quite lived up to the sum of its parts. I didn't fully connect with any of the characters and I never felt like I became truly immersed in the story and as a result, the central love story fell somewhat flat for me. I felt as though I was an outsider, observing the events from a distance rather than being up close and personal with the characters. I think it could have done with being a bit longer in order to develop the characters and the plot line a little more. As it is, things seem to move and develop a bit too quickly which I think added to my overall feeling of detachment. It was still enjoyable and I am glad that I read it but it just didn't quite work for me. I would still recommend checking it out though, especially if you like fables or books that offer up a good dose of magical realism. Just be warned that although it may look and sound like a childrens book, it is actually aimed at an adult audience with sexual references and other adult content throughout.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lilian

    I wish I could give this book a higher rating but I just can't. I picked this book up because its premise sounded really intriguing - a tragic story about a boy with a cuckoo-clock heart who is not allowed to fall in love but meets a girl who seems to be the love of his life? Sign me up! It started out very promising: the writing style was beautiful, a great atmosphere was created and one sympathizes with the characters. But the further I got into the story, the more I got annoyed at the writing I wish I could give this book a higher rating but I just can't. I picked this book up because its premise sounded really intriguing - a tragic story about a boy with a cuckoo-clock heart who is not allowed to fall in love but meets a girl who seems to be the love of his life? Sign me up! It started out very promising: the writing style was beautiful, a great atmosphere was created and one sympathizes with the characters. But the further I got into the story, the more I got annoyed at the writing style and the characters. The writing style started to sound very pretentious as if the author was trying too hard to let his words sound meaningful and poetic. This could also be an issue because of the original language that this book was written in. I talked to a friend of mine, whose father grew up in France, and she said that's just how the French language is. Still, it didn't change anything for my reading experience. But let's move on to Jack: he started out as a cute little boy one feels pity for. That quickly changes though when he first lays eyes on Miss Acacia. If you don't enjoy instalove, you shouldn't read this because that's exactly what happens after Jack meets Acacia. His feelings were exaggerated and unfounded, often resulting in incomprehensible actions. What really bothered me is that his adoration/ love was almost exclusively based on Acacia's outward appearance. Even though Jack doesn't want to appear like a “skirtchaser“, he almost only mentions how pretty she is and how full and curvy her breast and bottom are. In general, this novel was surprisingly sexual. It actually made me really uncomfortable. Because of the writing and the behavior and mindset of the characters, I couldn't form an emotional connection to the characters. I did not care one bit about what happened or was going to happen to them. Especially, because some characters and parts of the story seemed so random and felt like they weren't adding to the plot at all. The ending felt rushed and was unsatisfying. One of the few things that I actually liked about this novel was its moral that our flaws make us unique and lovable. All in all, this novel was an easy and fast but very frustrating read, which does not deserve the hype it got (at least in my opinion).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lauren (Northern Plunder)

    My review was first posted on Northern Plunder, you can read more of my reviews there too. Initially I had mixed feelings on how I felt about this book, but at my book club discussion I found out that it is actually a prequel for a different book that Mathias Malzieu has written and with that knowledge it has helped me realise exactly what I felt was wrong with the book. Basically I can’t help but comment on how this book was a lovely read and completely well written, almost poetical in some place My review was first posted on Northern Plunder, you can read more of my reviews there too. Initially I had mixed feelings on how I felt about this book, but at my book club discussion I found out that it is actually a prequel for a different book that Mathias Malzieu has written and with that knowledge it has helped me realise exactly what I felt was wrong with the book. Basically I can’t help but comment on how this book was a lovely read and completely well written, almost poetical in some places (but what do you expect when the author is in a band) and the story was also very interesting! The fault, however, comes right at the end (why have I read so many books with weak endings?). I felt that the book did round off well without leaving too many questions but it just ended so abruptly that you’re left for wanting more and being pretty confused as to why the end was so drab. But as mentioned it’s a prequel so really it does makes sense. In a way? I guess he must have written this to add more of a background to the other book so in that case it does exactly what it was supposed too, unfortunately the other book hasn’t been translated so I can’t read it, yet. This book is very good and as soon as I know the other book is available I will likely read it, mostly in hope that it will improve my opinion on this dull ending. Okay, I really need to stop focusing on that because the rest of the book WAS good, I promise. The whole idea, concept and storyline was well written and strung together.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laurie –Read Between The Skylines–

    I read this book in french and I really liked it. Mathias Malzieu is so poetic, his words struck me deep down. "Firstly: don't touch the hands of your cuckoo-clock heart. Secondly: master your anger. Thirdly: never, ever fall in love. For if you do, the hour hand will poke through your skin, your bones will shatter, and your heart will break once more." I haven't tried in English, but I guess that any translation can't worth the original book, that is why I always enforce myself to read books I read this book in french and I really liked it. Mathias Malzieu is so poetic, his words struck me deep down. "Firstly: don't touch the hands of your cuckoo-clock heart. Secondly: master your anger. Thirdly: never, ever fall in love. For if you do, the hour hand will poke through your skin, your bones will shatter, and your heart will break once more." I haven't tried in English, but I guess that any translation can't worth the original book, that is why I always enforce myself to read books in the language they have been written in. This book was an emotional roller coaster ride, it was bittersweet, it made me sad and made me smile at the same time. This wooden heart... I know what Mathais means by that. We all went through something tough one day and we all felt how our heart began to be fragile and how it started to fade away, while trying to protecting it from being hurt again. It made me think of that time where I decided to have a wooden heart to not being hurt again, and it reminded me of how I also was happy before that with my beating heart. Anyway, hiding my heart deep down was my choice, and it made me cry for Jack stuck with his Cuckoo-clock heart. This book is about love, how to protect ourselves from love and how to love without fear. This is a great life lesson. Anyone can be touched by it one way or another, because I don't know a single soul who have never been touched by love nor hurt by it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    A hurricane in a skirt named Miss Acacia, a pet hamster with a very naughty name, and a cameo appearance by Jack the Ripper make this a memorable book. In Mathias Malzieu's "The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart," Jack's damaged heart functions with the aid of a cuckoo-clock installed in his chest. But Jack must be careful, because anger or love will break the fragile mechanism. In spite of the risk to his life, he journeys from Edinburgh to Andalusia in search of his beloved Miss Acacia. Malzieu p A hurricane in a skirt named Miss Acacia, a pet hamster with a very naughty name, and a cameo appearance by Jack the Ripper make this a memorable book. In Mathias Malzieu's "The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart," Jack's damaged heart functions with the aid of a cuckoo-clock installed in his chest. But Jack must be careful, because anger or love will break the fragile mechanism. In spite of the risk to his life, he journeys from Edinburgh to Andalusia in search of his beloved Miss Acacia. Malzieu paints delightfully gorgeous and grotesque pictures with words. His lush, fruity, sugar-adorned imagery leaves me hungry for more of his pretty prose. Jack's unwavering adoration of Miss Acacia is so fairy-tale perfect that it's not very interesting, but Malzieu's lustrous images and amusing supporting characters make up for the dull romance. I love journeying with Jack through laboratories filled with small mysterious bottles, a twinkling 19th century Andalusian circus, and a ghost train decorated with bones dragged up from the catacombs. Tim Burton fans will especially love the balance of eerie and romantic imagery.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mademoizelleflo (flowlessbooks)

    It's a really cute and well written story ( I don't know if this book is published in another language than French, though) ! This book is written with songs lyrics, and the songs actually exists, which is wonderful ! Mathis Malzieu is the leader of a French rock band called dyonisos and he created Jack as a little doppleganger. Jack is this child which was born during a really cold night. So cold, that his heart stopped beating. Madeleine saved him by creating an artificial heart, made of a clock It's a really cute and well written story ( I don't know if this book is published in another language than French, though) ! This book is written with songs lyrics, and the songs actually exists, which is wonderful ! Mathis Malzieu is the leader of a French rock band called dyonisos and he created Jack as a little doppleganger. Jack is this child which was born during a really cold night. So cold, that his heart stopped beating. Madeleine saved him by creating an artificial heart, made of a clock. One day, Madeleine decides to take him in town, his very first time. He fell irrevocably in love with Miss Acacia, a cute singer that doesn't see very well without her glasses. He decides to go to school, despite Madeleine's opinion to seduce Miss Acacia. But the school's "bad boy" is Miss Acacia ex boyfriend ... Miss Acicia moves away. He decides to go after her. He is a cute Don Quichotte. The story is cute, sad, and fun, so well written, and the songs are perfect. This book was my birthday's gift from my (male) best friend and last year we went to see the movie together, so this book has a lot of meanings to me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sue Smith

    I'm being very generous when I give this 2 stars. I'm going to give it the benefit of the doubt that, because it's a 'translation', something is lost between the original and the translated version. Actually a lot is lost, but that may be neither here nor there. I still think that despite the loss of the subtlety of languages, one still has to have an ability to write in the first place. Mathias Malzieu doesn't have that. A singer he may be. Creative he may be. But a writer he is not. Least ways I'm being very generous when I give this 2 stars. I'm going to give it the benefit of the doubt that, because it's a 'translation', something is lost between the original and the translated version. Actually a lot is lost, but that may be neither here nor there. I still think that despite the loss of the subtlety of languages, one still has to have an ability to write in the first place. Mathias Malzieu doesn't have that. A singer he may be. Creative he may be. But a writer he is not. Least ways, not beyond lyrics. To sum it up - this book is totally Emo. Badly written Emo. Lots of angst and a million metaphors to paint a portrait of heart felt love and emotions. Blechhh. I'll fess up that I was completely sucked into the front cover. I have a artistic weakness for that kind of drawing. It lures me like a bee to honey. I am one of those readers that often will pick up a book because of that lure.. *sigh*. The biggest positive this book has - beyond the front cover - is that it is blessedly short.

  20. 4 out of 5

    DeAnna Rigney

    This book screams, “Make a movie out of me Tim Burton!” It is hard to describe, but is basically a fairy tale for grown-ups that doesn’t lose its ability to be imaginative and odd. The story begins on the coldest day of the world in Edinburgh, Scotland. A midwife named Doctor Madeleine has just delivered a baby named Jack. It is so cold when he is born, that his heart freezes. To save him, Madeleine, who is a bit of mad-scientist, grafts a cuckoo-clock to Jack's heart to start it beating. This m This book screams, “Make a movie out of me Tim Burton!” It is hard to describe, but is basically a fairy tale for grown-ups that doesn’t lose its ability to be imaginative and odd. The story begins on the coldest day of the world in Edinburgh, Scotland. A midwife named Doctor Madeleine has just delivered a baby named Jack. It is so cold when he is born, that his heart freezes. To save him, Madeleine, who is a bit of mad-scientist, grafts a cuckoo-clock to Jack's heart to start it beating. This move ultimately saves his life, but Madeline warns him that he should avoid love because it could damage his fragile clock heart. Of course the boy flips for a gal…I mean who didn’t see that coming. I loved some of the language and the author’s creative descriptions. It sometimes got too syrupy sweet, but not too often. Apparently the writer is in a French rock band & there is a concept album that the story is based upon…très interesting, no?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Heather Brush

    It wasn't easy to read this story, for I have lived it. I adored it and hated it because that's what certain truths do to a person. The book is about love, loving too much, loving just enough, loving with abandon of fear, and what happens when you do. But what happens if you don't? At times painful to experience, the truths in the text are full of understanding and present themselves with simplicity and a bit of disguise. Oh that we all had a cuckoo bird in our hearts to speak our love for us or It wasn't easy to read this story, for I have lived it. I adored it and hated it because that's what certain truths do to a person. The book is about love, loving too much, loving just enough, loving with abandon of fear, and what happens when you do. But what happens if you don't? At times painful to experience, the truths in the text are full of understanding and present themselves with simplicity and a bit of disguise. Oh that we all had a cuckoo bird in our hearts to speak our love for us or warn us in the silence that another just doesn't return your feelings, no matter how very much they wish and you wish that they could. In this, this book was a slap in my face. In this, I adore it. The steampunk fairy tale quality of the novella is hot for the market and reaches out to a certain audience, but it is not so steampunk as to be a deterrent to those who are more straightlaced. It crosses genres and that is a sign of a talented writer.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Irenelazia

    Soporifero. Noioso. Proprio non mi ha detto nulla. Per reggere la lettura me lo sono immaginato come un film di Tim Burton, in stop motion, tipo la sposa cadavere o the nightmare before christmas. Così ha acquisito un altro sapore.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kelda Giavaras

    I didn't dislike this book, but as I was listening to the hypnotic voice of Jim Dale I kept thinking that I would have enjoyed this more if it had been presented as linked Short Stories. I enjoyed the metaphor of a clock representing a heart and not breaking the hands of the clock or not getting your heart broken in love. This might be an interesting readalike for those that liked The Night Circus. I didn't dislike this book, but as I was listening to the hypnotic voice of Jim Dale I kept thinking that I would have enjoyed this more if it had been presented as linked Short Stories. I enjoyed the metaphor of a clock representing a heart and not breaking the hands of the clock or not getting your heart broken in love. This might be an interesting readalike for those that liked The Night Circus.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    http://www.hipsterbookclub.com/review... “All love’s pleasures and joys are paid for one day with suffering.” Such is the daunting message conveyed in The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart by Mathias Malzieu. The deceptively whimsical book tells the story of a naïve and starry-eyed boy whose obsession with love breaks his already damaged heart. Rich prose, eccentric characters, and fantasy elements create a stunning presentation for a relatively simple plot. Though the author dazzles the senses wit http://www.hipsterbookclub.com/review... “All love’s pleasures and joys are paid for one day with suffering.” Such is the daunting message conveyed in The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart by Mathias Malzieu. The deceptively whimsical book tells the story of a naïve and starry-eyed boy whose obsession with love breaks his already damaged heart. Rich prose, eccentric characters, and fantasy elements create a stunning presentation for a relatively simple plot. Though the author dazzles the senses with his lush storytelling, a gloomy message lies at the heart of the story. At once whimsical and gothic, the story is an adult fairy tale straight from a Tim Burton-esque universe. On the coldest day in the history of the world, an unwanted child is born in Victorian Edinburgh. Little Jack has a curious defect—he is born with a frozen heart. Dr. Madeleine, the alleged witch/midwife who delivers the boy from his destitute mother, mends his frail heart by grafting it to a cuckoo clock. Pitying the child, Madeleine adopts Jack as her own son. A dark side surfaces as the story progresses. Concerned by the frailty of Jack’s heart and influenced by her own disappointments in life, Madeleine shelters him from the world below their wooden hilltop house. On his tenth birthday, Madeleine finally allows Jack an excursion into town—but not without warning. From birth, Madeleine tells Jack that love is dangerous for his mechanical heart. She instructs him, “Never, ever fall in love. For if you do, the hour hand will poke through your skin, your bones will shatter, and your heart will break once more.” Unsurprisingly, Jack instantly falls in love. He sees a young Spanish flamenco dancer named Acacia perform on stage and his cuckoo-clock heart noisily rattles in his chest. Jack’s fixation with Acacia drives the narrative forward. His obsession leads him on a journey across Europe to find the tiny dancer. When they finally and passionately unite, Jack learns a painful lesson about love and identity. Malzieu, a French art-rock musician, injects a lyrical quality to his words. His distinct writing style relies heavily on elaborate metaphors and flowery prose, reading much like poetry. While this lends a sense of whimsy and emotion to the story, it straddles the line between emotional and melodramatic. Though beautifully conveyed, Jack’s sentiments and motivations never quite engage the reader, who is left feeling detached from the characters. Jack’s delicate clock heart becomes a symbol for the boy’s whirlwind of emotions while growing from a boy to a man: love, desire, anger, regret. Oftentimes, Malzieu uses the clock as a thinly veiled allusion for Jack’s sexual awakening. Describing a dream of Acacia, Jack relates, “Gently, she starts licking my minute hand. She’s gathering my nectar; something clockwork starts whirring into action, and I’m not sure it’s just my heart… TICK-TOCK DING!” Malzieu depicts the relationship between Jack and Acacia as sexual and passionate, but never fully believable. What drives Jack’s obsession with Acacia? Is their love founded on more than physical attraction? If not, why are they both destroyed at the thought of losing one another? In a book so full of dreamy surrealism, the love story requires a hint of realism. Unfortunately, Malzieu focuses too much on creating an arty story than a convincing one. Nonetheless, the author’s creativity and poetic style are enjoyable to read, and the emotion clearly shines through the words. The tragic ending may not have readers in tears for poor Jack, but the contrast between the enchanting story and heartbreaking moral will strike a chord with anyone who has experienced the tumult of love.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cecelia

    Expectations are funny things. They can influence almost any experience to a large extent – for example, they can make you more or less satisfied with a particular outcome, depending on what you anticipated. This is a major reason why I enter voluntary blackout when I’m waiting for an event, book or film. I don’t want to raise expectations and set myself up for disappointment. I was not tempted as a child to open my Christmas presents early. Santa was safe at our house (well, at least from me). B Expectations are funny things. They can influence almost any experience to a large extent – for example, they can make you more or less satisfied with a particular outcome, depending on what you anticipated. This is a major reason why I enter voluntary blackout when I’m waiting for an event, book or film. I don’t want to raise expectations and set myself up for disappointment. I was not tempted as a child to open my Christmas presents early. Santa was safe at our house (well, at least from me). But even beyond setting expectations, when I believe a book fits in a particular category and then learn differently, I almost always have to step back, reevaluate and then tell myself to keep reading. To not to give up because it wasn’t what I wanted or thought I was getting. It may sound silly, but it’s an important system, because my brain is a funny place. What to say? I expected a young adult novel, possibly a steampunk-influenced story, featuring a young man. I got instead an adult tale, an allegory of sorts, written mostly in a detached prose with moments of beauty and lyricism. These were contrasted with other moments of clunky description and obfuscation. The trouble is that I don’t know whether to attribute the text’s bipolar tendencies to bad translation or a confusing original text. My favorite part of this little book was the characterization of Madeleine, the guardian and savior of the ‘Boy’ in the title. She is described with spare precision, her actions and words helping to create a picture of a strange woman who is able to craft and implant such a wondrous thing as a cuckoo-clock heart, and then to nourish the boy afterwards. Unlike Madeleine, the rest of the book didn’t win me over. Jack did not feel much like a little boy or a young man, and the sudden love (lusting) at age ten shocked me a bit. Heck, let’s be honest: it surprised me right out of my good mood. Some of the other characters were interesting, but the reader wasn’t given enough time with them to feel anything beyond vague curiosity. I do wonder, though, if I had had different expectations going in if I would have appreciated the text to a greater extent. After all that…I recommend this to: fans of Mathias Malzieu, and anyone who is still curious about a cuckoo-clock heart after reading my review. You’re hardy – and you’ll probably like the book!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Roof Beam Reader (Adam)

    The Boy With the Cuckoo-Clock Heart by Mathias Malzieu Final Verdict: 3.5 out of 4.0 YTD: 53 Plot/Story: 4 – Plot/Story is interesting/believable and impactful Malzieu’s The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart is a fantastical tale of one boy’s struggle to love “normally” and not “crookedly.” The reader meets the boy, Jack, at birth, where a strange confluence of events results in his infant heart being fused with a cuckoo-clock, in what would be a 19th Century makeshift-pacemaker. We ride along with h The Boy With the Cuckoo-Clock Heart by Mathias Malzieu Final Verdict: 3.5 out of 4.0 YTD: 53 Plot/Story: 4 – Plot/Story is interesting/believable and impactful Malzieu’s The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart is a fantastical tale of one boy’s struggle to love “normally” and not “crookedly.” The reader meets the boy, Jack, at birth, where a strange confluence of events results in his infant heart being fused with a cuckoo-clock, in what would be a 19th Century makeshift-pacemaker. We ride along with him to witness his first encounter with Miss Acacia and his discovery of the idea of love (or perhaps, more correctly and eerily, a ten-year old boys discovery of “lust”) and how that love grows, painfully and tragically, over time. The story is told in the style of, perhaps, the Brothers Grimm or Lewis Carroll, a phantasmagorical-type whimsy which shares an innate fatalism as the likes of Hans Christian Andersen. The tale certainly bears more relationship to the original story of The Little Mermaid than it does to the Disney version, which means there is no happy ending – so do not be expecting one. When I say the prose was believable, I am not being literal in any sense. The story on its surface is completely bizarre, imperfect and, at times, hard to follow. Still, it is magical in the old-school sense of literary-wizardry. There is something of Cormier’s I am the Cheese in the looped and revelatory ending, coupled with the almost scary fantasy of Spenser’s epic tale, The Fairie Queene (referring largely to the employment of allegory and symbolism, and not to imply that this book is written in verse). The reader is led to believe, right up to the end, that Jack may finally get the girl and learn to live with his new heart but, alas, only one of these realities may come to pass. There is something truly great and real about this, though, and though we learn some disturbing things about Dr. Madeline, the witch-doctor who places that cuckoo-clock in Jack’s chest, we also can understand and appreciate her sad motivation. Read the full review at http://roofbeamreader.com/2010/09/27/...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    Featuring a chance meeting with Jack the Ripper, a beloved pet hamster named Cunnilingus, and an encounter with Georges Méliès, the quirky filmmaker featured in The Invention of Hugo Cabret, this is an odd, and often NSFW romance that will likely appeal to young adults. The titular character is named Jack (not related to the aforementioned serial killer) and he survives a traumatic birth only through the mystical efforts of Dr. Madeleine, a highly suspect midwife who delivers the illegitimate ch Featuring a chance meeting with Jack the Ripper, a beloved pet hamster named Cunnilingus, and an encounter with Georges Méliès, the quirky filmmaker featured in The Invention of Hugo Cabret, this is an odd, and often NSFW romance that will likely appeal to young adults. The titular character is named Jack (not related to the aforementioned serial killer) and he survives a traumatic birth only through the mystical efforts of Dr. Madeleine, a highly suspect midwife who delivers the illegitimate children of prostitutes and teenagers. She is considered a witch by others in Edinburgh, but saves Jack's life through her unconventional methods, raises him as her own, and tries to insulate him from the hurts of the world. As Jack grows older, he is determined to learn more about the world and to find his true love, Acacia. He knows that his mechanical heart is fragile, but is compelled to seek her out. The story is likely to appeal to young adults and I would be surprised if it is not a commonly banned book due to the risqué content. Still, it's a quirky and sincere tale of love and loss and has a wry, sophisticated humor that would likely sail right over a younger reader's head. I must confess that one of the main reasons that I picked this book to read centers on the fact that the narrator for the audiobook is Jim Dale, famous for his narration of the Harry Potter series. He is such a great reader and I love his ability to portray different characters using different voices. Overall, it's a fast read and entertaining, but very strange. interesting quotes (page numbers from paperback edition with ISBN13 978-0307472137): "You only ask for strawberries with sugar every day once you've discovered a taste for them." (p. 27)

  28. 5 out of 5

    AnaΣtaΣia

    Light some candles, put some instrumentals in the background and start reading this book and I'm sure that travelling towards its last chapters will make you want to drink a glass of cool wine or a cup of hot chocolate. As soon as I read the title and saw the cover, I knew something interesting would ensue..and I was right. What a story! A combination of reality and make-belief results into a heart warming/breaking chronicle. This is not just a romantic story, this is the memoir of two people pa Light some candles, put some instrumentals in the background and start reading this book and I'm sure that travelling towards its last chapters will make you want to drink a glass of cool wine or a cup of hot chocolate. As soon as I read the title and saw the cover, I knew something interesting would ensue..and I was right. What a story! A combination of reality and make-belief results into a heart warming/breaking chronicle. This is not just a romantic story, this is the memoir of two people paying a high price in the name of wanting someone as they are or as they believe they are... because some things are unable to change. I think that what Mathias Malzieu was trying to accomplish here is give a version of some general truths through somewhat of a fairytale, like, for example, Dr. Seuss does in his children stories. And in my point of view, he succeeds. Moreover, I searched the IMDB database to see if anyone has claimed this magnificent story and they have. I hope they make it enchanting but I daresay that since the book is a bit ''Gothicish'', I was hoping to see the names of Tim Burton in direction/ Animation department, Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter for the voices of the leading characters...but since the writer is French, it is only fair that the film is of French production. Anyway, here are some of my favorite lines and believe me there are a lot more but I don't want to spoil the fun! : The moonlight tinges the streets of the town centre with a sugary halo, which I dream of tasting. ‘If you could only see yourself in the mirror as you talked about what happened last night, you’d know from your eyes that your heart’s barometer is showing fair weather. When adults get involved, a new threshold of ugliness is always crossed. I’m travelling over the rails of my own fear. ‘How to tame a shooting star. That’s the instruction manual I need,’ I tell Méliès.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cloie Rainilla

    The movie was a lot better. I hardly recognised anything in this book, it was just so different. Different in a bad way too. Everything about this story made me sad. Jack was born in Edinburgh, 1874, and with a frozen heart. His mother leaves him and the midwife, Madeleine gives him a cuckoo clock heart so that he can live. He remains there with the woman and she becomes his mother. Madeleine tells Jack three rules, so that he can continue to live with his odd little heart. "FIRSTLY: don’t touch The movie was a lot better. I hardly recognised anything in this book, it was just so different. Different in a bad way too. Everything about this story made me sad. Jack was born in Edinburgh, 1874, and with a frozen heart. His mother leaves him and the midwife, Madeleine gives him a cuckoo clock heart so that he can live. He remains there with the woman and she becomes his mother. Madeleine tells Jack three rules, so that he can continue to live with his odd little heart. "FIRSTLY: don’t touch the hands of your cuckoo-clock heart. SECONDLY: master your anger. THIRDLY: never, ever fall in love. For if you do, the hour hand will poke through your skin, your bones will shatter, and your heart will break once more." However, Jack soon breaks the third rule, and falls in love with a little singer girl. He's 10 at the time. In order to see her again, he goes to her school, only to find out that she's moved away. Instead, he meets a boy named Joe, who is also in love with the singer-Miss Acacia. Eventually, Jack sets out to find Miss Acacia, despite the warnings of danger. My first main problem is that the love between Miss Acacia and Jack (later on in the book) was all lust. The love was completely physical and full of excitement and giddiness. It didn't feel real or like it was worth risking your life over for. My next big issue, is that I hated Miss Acacia. She was irrational and constantly making Jack feel insecure and jealous. Several of the conflicts in this book were caused by her running off and not fully listening. She was so rash and hysterical. Surely these problems aren't because the book was translated? I really hope not. This book was a disappointment for me and ended completely differently than what I was expecting. Left me feeling empty inside.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Taste it Taste me

    Bueno, la verdad que se me ha hecho bastante PESADO, hubo momentos en los que me planteaba abandonarlo. En cierto modo me ha decepcionado, sin embargo, el final me ha gustado muchísimo, cómo en las últimas páginas se desarrolla todo tan deprisa, mientras que el resto del libro ha sido TAAAANNN LEEENTTTTTOOOOO. Mi crítica en mi blog: http://tasteittasteme.blogspot.com/20... ---- Well, the true is that I thought to give up the book many times. I found it so boring... that I really thought to abandone Bueno, la verdad que se me ha hecho bastante PESADO, hubo momentos en los que me planteaba abandonarlo. En cierto modo me ha decepcionado, sin embargo, el final me ha gustado muchísimo, cómo en las últimas páginas se desarrolla todo tan deprisa, mientras que el resto del libro ha sido TAAAANNN LEEENTTTTTOOOOO. Mi crítica en mi blog: http://tasteittasteme.blogspot.com/20... ---- Well, the true is that I thought to give up the book many times. I found it so boring... that I really thought to abandone it. In fact, I really hoped much more that I found, but, being honest, last pages were exciting and I really enjoyed them! The story upside down in the last part and it was a surprise after one of the slowest stories I've read until now.

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