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Duncton Found Limited Edition

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VG condition book with dust jacket. DJ is clean, has fresh colours and has little wear to edges. Book has clean and bright contents.


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VG condition book with dust jacket. DJ is clean, has fresh colours and has little wear to edges. Book has clean and bright contents.

30 review for Duncton Found Limited Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer (the_pumpkin_reads)

    It took me nearly a year. But I finished the book. I was sad to finish it. I look fondly on the trilogy as a whole. Horwood did a great job.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Brace, I'm about to get scathing. Oh boy, I'm about to give my lowest rating of the entire year. And what book deserves this dubious honour? Duncton Found, by William Horwood, the third book in the Duncton Chronicles trilogy. In this book the Stone Mole has come, to lead moledom back to grace and the Silence of the Stone. My biggest impression of this book is: dull, dull, dull. Gosh, this is a long book. My edition has close on 1000 pages (and this following two other books of approximately 700 p Brace, I'm about to get scathing. Oh boy, I'm about to give my lowest rating of the entire year. And what book deserves this dubious honour? Duncton Found, by William Horwood, the third book in the Duncton Chronicles trilogy. In this book the Stone Mole has come, to lead moledom back to grace and the Silence of the Stone. My biggest impression of this book is: dull, dull, dull. Gosh, this is a long book. My edition has close on 1000 pages (and this following two other books of approximately 700 pages each - honestly, how can someone write so damn much about moles?!) And the storyline of this book can be summed up thus: Stone Mole grows up in Duncton; Stone Mole wanders briefly around moledom, chatting to other moles; Stone Mole dies and is martyred (in a scene suspiciously reminiscent of the crucifiction of Christ), thereby saving the mole kingdom. How on earth is this all that happens? Within the story I found myself skipping whole passages or even pages when one of the moles (usually Tryfan or the Stone Mole, Beechen) started talking about the nature of faith in the Stone. The particular passage where Tryfan introduces his rule for mole systems to abide by is a massive low point amongst low points. It literally went on for pages and said nothing much at all. The characters on the side of the Stone introduced in this story were, in the most part, insipid and immensely boring to read about. Unfortunately this includes Beechen, the mole you are supposed to care the most about in this story. His mate Mistle was just as bad. On the side of the Word we had irredeemable and hateful characters who committed atrocities for the fun of it (and Horwood's lavish descriptions of these were sickening to the point where I was hard put to read them - at least in this book we didn't have graphic and inappropriate mole sex!) Horwood spent much of the end of Duncton Quest concentrating the story on Wharfe and Harebell, the two youngsters born of Henbane and Tryfan - in this book, their stories seemed unnecessary filler to the rest of the story. There were a couple of interesting moments, and Mayweed remained a highlight (although he is off-screen for much of the story), but altogether a reader might as well skip Duncton Wood, enjoy - to an extent - Duncton Quest, and forget that Duncton Found even exists. The worst book I have read this year by a long long way. Avoid at all costs.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I was disappointed by the Duncton Found, compared to the former two books there was just something lacking, there was not the same energy. Considering I love Horwoods writing, this one just seemed to ramble on ever so slowly. It did not help of course that my copy was missing about 60 some pages and while I was able to figure out what may have happened, it is not the same. If you have read the trilogy up to this point, I would still suggest finishing with this one, but dont expect the same level I was disappointed by the Duncton Found, compared to the former two books there was just something lacking, there was not the same energy. Considering I love Horwoods writing, this one just seemed to ramble on ever so slowly. It did not help of course that my copy was missing about 60 some pages and while I was able to figure out what may have happened, it is not the same. If you have read the trilogy up to this point, I would still suggest finishing with this one, but dont expect the same level of writing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Meiklejohn

    This a meaty finisher to a big trilogy, but one that kept me enthralled through its length. After the previous two books, the moles of the Word are ascendant and the moles who follow the Stone are being systematically destroyed. We hear about a new ruler, Lucerne, who tightens the noose, and we follow the growth of the Stone Mole, who was born at the end of book two. There are many journeys, lots of encounters with friends old and new and some big set pieces, including some deadly battles. Superb This a meaty finisher to a big trilogy, but one that kept me enthralled through its length. After the previous two books, the moles of the Word are ascendant and the moles who follow the Stone are being systematically destroyed. We hear about a new ruler, Lucerne, who tightens the noose, and we follow the growth of the Stone Mole, who was born at the end of book two. There are many journeys, lots of encounters with friends old and new and some big set pieces, including some deadly battles. Superbly written and with a huge scope, yet Horwood points us at individual characters and their journeys throughout the book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kerri Davis

    It's the bitterest of disappointments when a great series ends with a truly crap book. Nothing happens, it's long winded and too "preachy", and while the characters retain their complexity- they are dull dull DULL. I made it about a third of the way before giving up on it and I have no desire to finish it. The first two books in this series truly blew me away and those will remain some of my favourite books ever written.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Candace

    Unlike the second book in the trilogy, Duncton Quest, I found this one tedious. The second book imo was by far one of the best fantasy books I've ever read. I recommend it as a stand-alone. However, if you're into the entire chronicles and want to see how it all ends, then read this third book, but be prepared for a sloggish trek.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Haya Dodokh

    Classic Fiction for everyone! Amust read epic saga.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sally-W

    Not the best of the three books but still a good closing novel to the epic saga. The Duncton Chronicles total 2445 pages - so glad I read books 2 and 3 on Kindle!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lenore

    Whoops. Horwood missed on this one. Ran out of story and reverted to lifting content from the New Testament. Not good. I loved the first two, like many others here.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mel Murray

    I read this in my teens and was so glad I did. Once I got over the fact they were moles...I just fell into the story. I am on the lookout for copies of these books again so I can do a reread =)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Harding

    Good book This was a very enjoyable book series. I highly recommend theses books to anyone interested in escaping to a different world for awhile:

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael Ho

    I loved the first two books. They were sad but beautiful. This book seemed to lack focus and story. I didn't feel connected to the characters no did I want to finish it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Holt

    This long and winding tale had moments of all emotions. Joy, comfort, horror, love, fear, anger and many more. The author lays down so much groundwork throughout the book that all culminates at the end of this glorious series. I was somewhat frustrated by the sense of preaching I got in the middle section relating to Beechen. It was very much a Jesus story in his part of the telling and I'm not so sure I appreciated that piece of the book. Some of the characters seemed to be a repeating of chara This long and winding tale had moments of all emotions. Joy, comfort, horror, love, fear, anger and many more. The author lays down so much groundwork throughout the book that all culminates at the end of this glorious series. I was somewhat frustrated by the sense of preaching I got in the middle section relating to Beechen. It was very much a Jesus story in his part of the telling and I'm not so sure I appreciated that piece of the book. Some of the characters seemed to be a repeating of characters earlier in the stories, but the reality of life is that each story plays it's part in the history and Horwood does an incredible job of getting that message across. No matter how small, each mole played a part in the development of the plot. It took me a very long time to read this book, over two and a half weeks. Despite the tough going in the middle, it was well worth all the work. So many touching moments, words that have helped me at a tough time for myself personally. That is what I look for in books, and this book did not fail to deliver. Looking forward to the next series!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marlise

    This book was such a disappointment. It makes me sad that after reading the first 2 books in this Trilogy, book 3 has been such a let down. 980 pages which, other than 50 pages at most, were boring, flat and left me with no closure at all. I almost didn’t finish it. But I trudged through it hoping for a spectacular ending and.... no. I will not be reading the second trilogy. And I will not be keeping these books on my shelf; off to the bookstore for a trade-in these will go.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    William Horwood can be an extraordinarily powerful writer, but failed to deliver in Duncton Found. It is a lengthy, tedious narrative where the author tells everything and shows little. I almost feel like this is the outline of the story and not the story at all. It will be difficult for any reader to finish. I gave up.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    As much as I love the trilogy, this isn't my favourite although I loved it. The Christian imagery can get a bit annoying at times but I can get past it, I enjoyed it although it took me ages to get through and it seemed to drag on towards the end as it started to wrap itself off. I still love the first two books but this is my least favourite of the series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carol Lawrie

    Excellent third book in the Duncton series.. Takes you on an epic journey of good versus evil. Makes the reader go through a cast range of emotions. Despite this book being written about moles, in the early 90's, it's story/ moral dilemmas are just as relevant today, 2016... This is the second time I've read this book and would recommend it very highly indeed.

  18. 4 out of 5

    R. Lawrence

    OMG. This book is fantastic. The Battles between the Stone beleivers and the Word beleivers are amazing. The story of the Stone Mole is interesting. This book along with the first two (Duncton Wood and Duncton Quest)are well worth reading.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I have read this book so many times, and I still weep at some points. This is Watership Down meets the gospels meets Easter philosophy - with moles instead of rabbits. Just so wonderful.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

    The final piece where it all came together! Even then I got some of the references. I wonder what will occur to me next time.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Dixon

    I wondered when I started this if I might be reading too much of Duncton in a row, and whether it might begin to be less. But no - I love this series. The characters are well-written, etc. etc.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    as with the rest of the series great book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Grant

    I absolutely love this series. Although this book does go through a bit of a dull patch in the middle, the rest is lovely.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    That took FOREVER to get through, but it was well worth it. I can't say I loved this book, but I would be lying if I said I didn't enjoy it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    Clever. Entertaining.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

    Yes my enthusiasm for this trilogy declined...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Clark Bayles

    Still not as good as book one but fun stories and good writing. Got a little Wordy (Robert Jordanish) but still enjoyed it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patrik Sahlstrøm

    Obnoxius (though quite well-written) tale that drowns in an overdose of christian propaganda. Sad that this series collapses so totally, as the first book is brilliant :-(

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leaflet

    This trilogy was a long and engrossing read filled with memorable anthropomorphic moles with a religion based heavily on the Gospels with a dash of Buddhism and a sprinkling of M. Scott Peck. And moles have Libraries! Onward to the next mole trilogy...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Frida

    A brilliant book!

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