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The Diary of Anaïs Nin Volume 2 1934-1939

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Beginning with Nin's arrival in New York, this volume is filled with the stories of her analytical patients. There is a shift in emphasis also as Nin becomes aware of the inevitable choice facing the artist in the modern world. "Sensitive and frank...[Nin's] diary is a dialogue between flesh and spirit" (Newsweek). Edited and with a Preface by Gunther Stuhlmann; Index. Beginning with Nin's arrival in New York, this volume is filled with the stories of her analytical patients. There is a shift in emphasis also as Nin becomes aware of the inevitable choice facing the artist in the modern world. "Sensitive and frank...[Nin's] diary is a dialogue between flesh and spirit" (Newsweek). Edited and with a Preface by Gunther Stuhlmann; Index.


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Beginning with Nin's arrival in New York, this volume is filled with the stories of her analytical patients. There is a shift in emphasis also as Nin becomes aware of the inevitable choice facing the artist in the modern world. "Sensitive and frank...[Nin's] diary is a dialogue between flesh and spirit" (Newsweek). Edited and with a Preface by Gunther Stuhlmann; Index. Beginning with Nin's arrival in New York, this volume is filled with the stories of her analytical patients. There is a shift in emphasis also as Nin becomes aware of the inevitable choice facing the artist in the modern world. "Sensitive and frank...[Nin's] diary is a dialogue between flesh and spirit" (Newsweek). Edited and with a Preface by Gunther Stuhlmann; Index.

30 review for The Diary of Anaïs Nin Volume 2 1934-1939

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rowena

    "Writing more and more to the sound of music, writing more and more like music. Sitting in my studio tonight, playing record after record, writing, music, a stimulant of the highest order, far more potent than wine. In the interior monologue there is no punctuation. James Joyce was right. It flows like a river.” — The Diary of Anais Nin, Vol. Two I loved Anais Nin’s first diary and I enjoyed this one too. Yes, she’s extremely self-absorbed and it does get a bit trying reading about how great pe "Writing more and more to the sound of music, writing more and more like music. Sitting in my studio tonight, playing record after record, writing, music, a stimulant of the highest order, far more potent than wine. In the interior monologue there is no punctuation. James Joyce was right. It flows like a river.” — The Diary of Anais Nin, Vol. Two I loved Anais Nin’s first diary and I enjoyed this one too. Yes, she’s extremely self-absorbed and it does get a bit trying reading about how great people say she is but one can’t help but admire her for how unapologetic she is, and also for the unique way in which she views life. Her writing is like nothing I have never read before; it’s beautiful, thoughtful and poetic. She truly makes diary-writing an art form. In this diary, Ms. Nin is a little restless: should she stay in Louveciennes or should she go to New York? She ends up going to New York where she becomes a psychoanalyst, a point that I found very surprising as she didn’t have any training as such. The part when she was in New York seemed a bit surreal; I can’t imagine Anais Nin at Madison Square Garden watching a hockey game! The diary was written prior to World War Two so this diary therefore has several political mentions in it: “A war is going on which people doubt will become a real war. It may be a mock war to satisfy those who clamoured for it. We are being deceived, and what is happening is a mystery. Scant news.” The diary was full of Nin’s interesting observations. Like Proust, Nin also wrote about memory: “Some portions of my life were lived as if under ether, and many others under a complete eclipse. Some of them cleared up later, that is, the fog lifted, the events became clear, nearer, more intense, and remained as unearthed for good. Why did some of them come to life, and others not? Why did some remain flavourless, and others recover a new flavour and meaning?” Overall, I felt more sadness surrounding Nin in this volume. She seemed to have given so much of herself to people around her, and you could tell that the news of the war took a lot out of her. Looking forward to Volume Three.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    New York and Paris. Gonzalo the hunky Spaniard--guitarist, revolutionary, gigolo--and his awful crippled wife, who move in with Anais on the houseboat in the Seine (not a spoiler!) The Spanish Civil war. The end of Anais and Henry. The advent of the outrageously young, the dizzily intelligent Laurence Durrell. The visit to Fez and the publication of House of Incest. Oh, the older I get, the better these Diaries are--now that I've heard of Brassai and Artaud and James Laughlin the publisher, I've New York and Paris. Gonzalo the hunky Spaniard--guitarist, revolutionary, gigolo--and his awful crippled wife, who move in with Anais on the houseboat in the Seine (not a spoiler!) The Spanish Civil war. The end of Anais and Henry. The advent of the outrageously young, the dizzily intelligent Laurence Durrell. The visit to Fez and the publication of House of Incest. Oh, the older I get, the better these Diaries are--now that I've heard of Brassai and Artaud and James Laughlin the publisher, I've read Proust. It just gets richer with time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aubrey

    3.5/5 I want to introduce you to Ivan. He is just out of jail for stealing a set of Dostoevsky's works. The French judge was sympathetic. He had good taste in literature. He said: 'If you had stolen a bad writer's books I would have given you sixty days. No I will give you only a week.' And the day he left jail he received from the judge a set of Dostoevsky wrapped in brown paper. [U]ltimately analysis will reveal that the rationalizations of man are a disguise to his personal bias, and that wo 3.5/5 I want to introduce you to Ivan. He is just out of jail for stealing a set of Dostoevsky's works. The French judge was sympathetic. He had good taste in literature. He said: 'If you had stolen a bad writer's books I would have given you sixty days. No I will give you only a week.' And the day he left jail he received from the judge a set of Dostoevsky wrapped in brown paper. [U]ltimately analysis will reveal that the rationalizations of man are a disguise to his personal bias, and that woman's intuition was nothing more than a recognition of the influence of the personal in all thought. This was a less engaging text than the first diary, but that may be a combination of sequel syndrome as well as the disillusionment Nin fell into with most of the figures who had until now powered her creatively, mentally, and sexually. I wasn't a fan of most of these mentors (Henry Miller is a trip, to put it politely), so while I did agree with most of her criticisms, it became harder to keep track of all the replacements she filled her days with subsequently, as well as increasingly aggravating to watch when her new bedroom obsessions quickly because utterly useless once assured of a generous patron. However, it's always interesting to watch the world as framed by Nin's valuing of inner health over outer pretensions, such evaluations become especially pointed and fraught with the onset of WWII. In closing, I was more sympathetic to the text than I had been while reading it, as unlike Nin, I know what was coming, and the author, for all her romantic stereotypes, was not nearly as much as a bigot as most of her compatriots. All in all, I may adjust the rating of this to a less generous tier later on, but I'm still committed to continuing my newfound yearly ritual of reading this volumes of autobiography in sequence: the space of a break between two-thousand-and-xx and the next seems to be the perfect span of time during which to alternate between deep diving into a strange, yet compassionate, yet obtuse, yet incisive world, and sitting back and reflecting. When Henry [Miller] wrote a fan letter to Kay Boyle she thought it was a letter from a very young writer, who, while admiring and praising her, could not help imitating her own style. Men think they live and die for ideas. What a divine joke. They live and die for emotional, personal errors, just as women do. I most like this work at the beginning and the end. The middle included some interesting, almost voyeuristic pictures of a few famous names, Miller a familiar face while Lawrence Durrell definitely took center stage, leastwise in my own recognition. However, it all became too repetitive and contradictory at times, which is honestly what a diary usually ends up being, but it was rather ridiculous to read Nin saying the poor were blocked off from propagating revolutionary humanity by their very poverty, and then a few dozen pages later rhapsodizing over how her own poverty raised her artistry and human feeling to new heights. The usual Orientalisms and Rromanisms cr(o/a)p up every so often, and Nin's new mestizo boy toy Gonzalo brought indigenous Americana into the picture cut out mix. It was heartening, though, when true feeling stemming from this disgraced first born hailing from Latinx plantations broke through Nin's hypocritical facade and forced her to recognize that the rich exigencies of a few at the expense of the many was no longer excusable to her, a change of mind likely exacerbate by Miller's objectifying world view that Nin grew increasingly tired of. So, a bit lagging after such a tightly wound beginning and not at all foreshadowing the menacing clarity of the end, but that is a side effect of the drastic editing pre-publication as much as the genuine record Nin created at the time, and I am admittedly very keen on seeing the next five war years, the oh so historically ripe time of 1939-1944, through the mind of this anything but boring woman. An intermission, of sorts, but I did drop in on some juicy gossip, and the knowledge of how Nin and her friends' history of publication would eventually play out gives the reader an interesting perspective on even the banal of tangentially related comments. To some American writers anything but paradise was [u]nacceptable. To the European it was part of the human condition, and something shared with other human beings. Nin and I will always have a weird relationship that's informative and entertaining enough for me so long as I don't take her too seriously. She's no de Beauvoir, but if I had to choose someone's brain to ride around in in order to get a glimpse of all those white boy (and the odd girl) writers who I'm not sure are worth my time, it'd have to be her. Politics aside, her turn of phrase is always impeccable, and she has a talent for transforming the 20th century into the better of the existing nostalgically artistic portraits of yesteryear, obscene wealth and abject poverty living side by side long before the age of Instagram. Speaking of such, that's one 21st century tool I can imagine Nin loving, although she'd have a hard time coping with the 'Chinese' of the place where I call home. Now that this entry is done, as I said before, I don't plan on touching the next volume till sometime during 2020, at minimum. One thing both Nin and I require is space, and I've already binged my fill of inordinately lengthy compositions for the current fin-de-décennie. And I asked myself if the artist who creates a world of beauty to sustain and transcend and transmute suffering is wiser than those who believe a revolution will remove the causes of suffering. The question remains unanswered.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ciara

    the thing about anais nin's diaries is that they are all drawn from a much larger work--that of nin's life-long diaries. so each volume is just an excerpt, & as such, it's not like one volume really stands out thematically from the pack that much. history/politics-wise, i think this is the one where the going is getting rough in europe, & world war two is about to get started. nin is participating a lot in cafe/salon culture, making friends with various artists, reading manuscripts, still financ the thing about anais nin's diaries is that they are all drawn from a much larger work--that of nin's life-long diaries. so each volume is just an excerpt, & as such, it's not like one volume really stands out thematically from the pack that much. history/politics-wise, i think this is the one where the going is getting rough in europe, & world war two is about to get started. nin is participating a lot in cafe/salon culture, making friends with various artists, reading manuscripts, still financially supporting henry miller, etc. she is starting to get very interested in psychology & analysis & i think this is the one where she starts analysis with dr. otto rank. when i told jared i was reading these books, he was kind of critical. he said he didn't like them because they are just all about the famous people that anais nin knows & it's like she is name-dropping & luxuriating in how utterly fabulous her star-studded life is. i can see that perspective now that we are seventy years removed & many of the events & people that nin mentions in her diaries have been given an official historical context, but the thing is, we are living in our own historical context right now. we just don't know how it's all going to play out in seventy years because none of us has a time machine. & it's entirely possible that i am friends with someone who could go on to be a culturally relevant writer, theorist, filmmaker, whatever. even if it's just in a small way. i write about the people i know in my diaries, & the things they do, & the projects i admire, etc etc. why not? that's what's on my mind. nin had no way of predicting which of her friends would become famous. & sometimes she spilled a lot more ink on the people who toiled in obscurity than the people who are really well-known now. i guess a lot of people find her diaries interesting to read because they are full of famous people, artists, events, historical moments, & that's fine. but you have to consider that she probably didn't really realize what she was recording while she was living it. it was just luck & circumstance, right?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    The book falls apart in my hands. Its as if no one has read it for 40 years. The pages have turned yellow brown with age and stiffened with coldness. It’s brittle and frozen. It comes undone in my hands as if the sheer touch of it is too much to handle. It is overwhelmed. Has it waited out death for 4o years to die in warmth? But I cannot allow this. I will not aid in the murdering of something once so beautiful and filled with a thousand lives. The pages fall off like the hair of a chemo patien The book falls apart in my hands. Its as if no one has read it for 40 years. The pages have turned yellow brown with age and stiffened with coldness. It’s brittle and frozen. It comes undone in my hands as if the sheer touch of it is too much to handle. It is overwhelmed. Has it waited out death for 4o years to die in warmth? But I cannot allow this. I will not aid in the murdering of something once so beautiful and filled with a thousand lives. The pages fall off like the hair of a chemo patient. Death is staring right at it and humiliates by making it shed its beautiful veil. Luxurious with organic flow that never had seized to grow until the day black forced itself upon it and stayed. I am the doctor, not Death’s accomplice. I hold together the fallen pieces. I find hope among the torn flesh-bound and discolored skin-pages. If it has lived this long harboring a silent killer it will fight what has now become visible, shown its ugliness. For what you can see is easier to kill than what you cannot. This I find to be an improvement. Now I can begin to help it heal and stop the quiet suffocation it has endured. With the turn of each page a breath is taken. Air is beginning of Life. It will live. And I too, will grow.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shasta McBride

    I completely fell in love with Anais Nin and gobbled up her first three diaries. And then, just like that, I saw the movie Henry and June a few weeks ago, and, well, her Diaries were off-loaded to the guy at the Goodwill Donation center this past weekend (along with All the Sad, Young Literary Men, Then We Came To The End, and How to Lose Friends and Alienate People). How could I fall so hard and then feel so duped? I don't know. What does that say about moi? I don't know. I think what got to me I completely fell in love with Anais Nin and gobbled up her first three diaries. And then, just like that, I saw the movie Henry and June a few weeks ago, and, well, her Diaries were off-loaded to the guy at the Goodwill Donation center this past weekend (along with All the Sad, Young Literary Men, Then We Came To The End, and How to Lose Friends and Alienate People). How could I fall so hard and then feel so duped? I don't know. What does that say about moi? I don't know. I think what got to me in the movie--and she is played by a really amazing actress--was that it just portrayed her as some rich, bored housewife who wanted to explore sex and psychology all day long just because she hadn't until Henry swooped in with all of his neato Bohemian friends and lovers. And this somehow painted her as a selfish (cheating on her husband), mind-absorbed (not in her sexual-feeling like her writing so well-illustrates or seems to illustrate), out-of-touch aristocrat type... Ah so des ka. But the movie is one thing and Nin's writing is another. I do idolize her ability to convey emotion on the page and I have yet to read Delta of Venus and all her other letters, and I'm sure I will at some point. For now, I have to let the memory of how the movie painted her fade. XO

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

    For some reason I enjoy "hanging out" with Anais during the summer. So to keep in form, I read Diary 2. Not as good as the first, I still enjoyed her artistic writing style (even the mundane is viwed as art) and her colorful life. It is hard to imagine doing some of the impulsive things she does (e.g. leaving her home to purchase a riverboat, etc). In addition she continue to play the "savior" role for people around her, often at the expense of her own physical comfort. These types of experience For some reason I enjoy "hanging out" with Anais during the summer. So to keep in form, I read Diary 2. Not as good as the first, I still enjoyed her artistic writing style (even the mundane is viwed as art) and her colorful life. It is hard to imagine doing some of the impulsive things she does (e.g. leaving her home to purchase a riverboat, etc). In addition she continue to play the "savior" role for people around her, often at the expense of her own physical comfort. These types of experiences make for a fun, interesting read. Her books aren't life altering, but they do tend to grab my attention and Anais haunts me. It may be her willingness to just live fully, her unwillingness to conform, her ability to see beauty in everything....I am not sure. I guess I will need to wait until next summer.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Legion

    Rather than talk about what I learned, I just wanted to warn people that before buying these books they should check to see whether it is the "censored" or "unexpurgated" version. I didn't know and bought 3 "censored" volumes (this was because people she mentioned were still living at the time of publication. Republishing was the full version. These are still worth reading if you can find the uncensored ones... Rather than talk about what I learned, I just wanted to warn people that before buying these books they should check to see whether it is the "censored" or "unexpurgated" version. I didn't know and bought 3 "censored" volumes (this was because people she mentioned were still living at the time of publication. Republishing was the full version. These are still worth reading if you can find the uncensored ones...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emily Gallagher

    This ought to be read in the fall, sitting on a bench in Thompkins Square Park (in the East Village), while sipping on an Americano from 9th Street Espresso. Ideally you'll be resting your feet on a skateboard. Or maybe that's just me. This ought to be read in the fall, sitting on a bench in Thompkins Square Park (in the East Village), while sipping on an Americano from 9th Street Espresso. Ideally you'll be resting your feet on a skateboard. Or maybe that's just me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennie Rogers

    Staying deeply rooted to intuition, sensations, feelings rather than the intellect, premeditation, ideas.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pariskarol

    People criticize Nin for, among other things, her self-absorption, but I think any diary of anyone, literary or not, has at its central character the diarist. Maybe I’m self-centered too, but I’m the main character in my life and journal as well. What makes Nin’s diary meaningful to me is not so much the meanderings of a 1930s woman’s self-exploration. Instead it is the incredible time and place she documents — the Paris alive with creativity and forward thinking (avant garde)before WWII. This v People criticize Nin for, among other things, her self-absorption, but I think any diary of anyone, literary or not, has at its central character the diarist. Maybe I’m self-centered too, but I’m the main character in my life and journal as well. What makes Nin’s diary meaningful to me is not so much the meanderings of a 1930s woman’s self-exploration. Instead it is the incredible time and place she documents — the Paris alive with creativity and forward thinking (avant garde)before WWII. This volume documents the final days of that period, as writers, artists, and thinkers who were able left Paris one by one before the Nazis marched in. It is so worth reading this book to be introduced to Brassai, Hilaire Hiler, Jean Carteret, Lawrence Durrell, Waldo Frank, Sir Richard Burton, Carlos Suares, and dozens of other fascinating people Nin mentions or meets.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rebe

    There are a lot of thoughts in this diary that I loved, and those gems made this book well worthwhile. However, I found I lacked interest in her life, and this being a diary, there were a lot of entries about her problems mothering her friends with their various problems and vices. It was a struggle for me to finish this, but I did enjoy her insights.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Knowing about the life of Anais Nin, I can only regard this work as utter fiction. Her adolescent and arrogant delusions are at times amusing, other times embarrassing. Yet there is something interesting.....

  14. 4 out of 5

    finn

    giving this four stars even though i found all her ruminations on the differences between women & men annoying. not sure if i overlooked that in the first volume or if it was heavier in this one. anyway, her writing is magic & reading the diaries always inspires me to write more in mine.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Corman

    I spread out on my bed all the gifts I brought from New York. A set of wooden dishes with astrologic symbols against blue-painted edges. We will have a dinner and invite Antonin Artaud. -Anais Nin, The Diary of Anais Nin

  16. 5 out of 5

    l.

    underwhelming. nice writing at times but she doesnt seem like a particularly insightful, intelligent or interesting individual tbh

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    had the whole set and read them all at 17 or 18. Enthralled then, would probably be less enthralled and more irritated were I to read them now.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vicky

    Nearly breathless, I will write something in here soon.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Karen Aleta

    Read all about her affair with Henry Miller.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gennadiy Pribaltov

    Anais is a dancer, writer and basically an angel. She made the publication of first Henry Miller’s novel possible. She was an assistant to Otto Rank and one of the first females in psychoanalysis. She took care of a lot of artists, was an inspiration and muse. She kept diaries about all that. The ones that I’ve read start in 1934 and end in 1939. Anais comes back to New York and works as Otto Rank’s assistant. Rank is one of the godfathers of psychoanalysis and misogynist because of that. Nevert Anais is a dancer, writer and basically an angel. She made the publication of first Henry Miller’s novel possible. She was an assistant to Otto Rank and one of the first females in psychoanalysis. She took care of a lot of artists, was an inspiration and muse. She kept diaries about all that. The ones that I’ve read start in 1934 and end in 1939. Anais comes back to New York and works as Otto Rank’s assistant. Rank is one of the godfathers of psychoanalysis and misogynist because of that. Nevertheless, Anais adores him, helps with his clients, translates his works into English. But translation takes too much time; she gets disappointed in psychoanalysis: she struggles with its objectivity. She flees to Paris making a small stop in Morrocco. In Paris Henry Miller getting his first fruits of fame. ‘Tropic of Cancer’ is published and well-received. But he still same Henry - no empathy and cares only about food and his books. Anais writes a warm and heartfelt diary of Henry’s days in Paris for him. She is capable of true love of life, compassion, empathy. Anais documents their, talks, remarks on books (e.g. Miller’s obsession with Balzac’s Seraphita), letters. Another centre of gravity in the diary is Gonzalo and Helba. They are a couple. They fled from Peru. She is an Inca dancer, but now deaf, ill and not dancing; he is a revolutionary wannabe, hanging around Pablo Neruda. As Miller obsessed with writing as Gonzalo obsessed with Spain, Marxism and revolution. That’s more of the general rule - passionate people, artists and revolutionaries attract Anais. All of them carefully preserved. Andre Breton advises Anais going to a random place, getting together and then engaging in an unplanned action as true surrealist. He never did it himself. Evreinoff teaches her secrets of Moscow Art School. The bohemian Parisian life slowly crashes over reality. Spain is ravaging in a civil war, fascism is rising, the book ends with the start of the war. Diaries capture different modes of escapism of the artist; the world that is about to fall. The diary is the character too. It is discussed, reviewed, commented, praised, criticised. But Anais says that the diary is like breathing to her. Artaud said that she inhales carbon dioxide and exhales oxygen when breaths. Same with this diary. It’s a thing that breathes and lives on its own. I love that airy quality to it. Events come very fast, immediate. It never gets boring.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Sentimental, airy, sometimes mystical and symbolic. Nin's method of writing is difficult to get through, I kept find myself looking at the page numbers to make sure I was making progress, but there are valuable ideas sprinkled throughout. This volume begins in New York City where Nin interned under the psycho-analyst Otto Rank. It shifts between observation, introspection, and notes about the personal life she led outside of the office. Over time you can see her attitudes shift towards those arou Sentimental, airy, sometimes mystical and symbolic. Nin's method of writing is difficult to get through, I kept find myself looking at the page numbers to make sure I was making progress, but there are valuable ideas sprinkled throughout. This volume begins in New York City where Nin interned under the psycho-analyst Otto Rank. It shifts between observation, introspection, and notes about the personal life she led outside of the office. Over time you can see her attitudes shift towards those around her. She seems entranced by Rank in the beginning, but later exclaims that it was a relief to be away from him and that she doesn't miss him. This is natural and a journal is the best place to observe these shifts in feeling over time. When Nin returns to Louveciennes she notes the difference in energy from New York. She misses its jazz, noise, speed, newness. But she's energized by her acquaintance with Henry Miller, Gonzalo, and Helba. They stimulate each other creatively and support each other financially and professionally for a number of years. But again, the feelings shift -you see Nin fall further into Gonzalo's orbit as she describes him from a closer perspective. Nin is the constant and everything around her changes slowly. Later you notice more critical descriptions of Gonzalo and Helba. Even though she is still close to them and she cares for them immensely it seems like her patience with their disorderly lifestyle is getting thinner. Nin writes about other people later in the book. By then end I'm still not sure of their relationship to her. The political world starts to intrude into their lives with the end of the Spanish Civil War and the resultant refugees, then finally the beginnings of WWII. All her friends and lovers scatter, everything becomes undone and I can't wait to get out the next volume of Nin's diary.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leanne

    It’s tempting to portray Anaïs Nin as a sort of proto-Lena-Dunham – a woman who spun a career out of dramatizing her own life, including her sex life. Like Dunham, she’s been accused of narcissism, sociopathy and sexual perversion time and again. Yet even that comparison undercuts the strangeness and bravery of her work, for Nin was the first of her kind. And, like all truly unique talents, she was worshipped by some, hated by many, and misunderstood by most.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra Litten

    Anaïs Nin’s diaries are essentials in my collection. They are treasures. I read them over and over, I turn to them when I feel lost, when I have questions, when I second guess myself as a writer. Anaïs and her words are vital to my existence.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Boring.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gea.

    Review here: https://corridoiolaterale.wordpress.c... Review here: https://corridoiolaterale.wordpress.c...

  26. 5 out of 5

    ariella

    I waited so long. I don’t want to talk about it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Y

    Firstly, thank you. Secondly, the cover is blue.... what is this??? Lastly, thank you.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chelsey

    Anais takes the webs of my soul and unravels them. She is a brilliant artist and author

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lily Blackburn

    always a trip

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ankua Teodoro

    Truly the best read

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