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The Queen’s Consort: The Story of Mary Queen of Scots and Lord Darnley

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1563 Lord Darnley is a prince of the blood. He is handsome, ambitious - and an unwitting pawn in a game of thrones, played out by the rival queens of England and Scotland. As he escapes northwards, Darnley falls in love with the enigmatic Mary, Queen of Scots. But is the beautiful and regal woman all that she seems? As Darnley is drawn into Mary's web - and bed - he d 1563 Lord Darnley is a prince of the blood. He is handsome, ambitious - and an unwitting pawn in a game of thrones, played out by the rival queens of England and Scotland. As he escapes northwards, Darnley falls in love with the enigmatic Mary, Queen of Scots. But is the beautiful and regal woman all that she seems? As Darnley is drawn into Mary's web - and bed - he discovers that being a king does not mean wearing the crown. As one of the most passionate marriages in British history falters, Darnley must pit his wits against his wife. There will be blood. The end of their affair will shape their hearts - and history. Recommended reading for fans of Philippa Gregory, Alison Weir and Sarah Gristwood. Praise for Steven Veerapen: "A superb, page-turning debut. The author balances gimlet-eyed research with narrative drive and clever reveals... Danforth is a strong yet torn central character... I look forward to reading the second book in the series." Richard Foreman. Steven Veerapen was born in Glasgow and raised in Paisley. Pursuing an interest in the sixteenth century, he was awarded a first-class Honours degree in English, focussing his dissertation on representations of Henry VIII’s six wives. He then received a Masters in Renaissance studies, and a Ph.D. investigating Elizabethan slander. Steven is fascinated by the glamour and ghastliness of life in the 1500s, and has a penchant for myths, mysteries and murders in an age in which the law was as slippery as those who defied it.


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1563 Lord Darnley is a prince of the blood. He is handsome, ambitious - and an unwitting pawn in a game of thrones, played out by the rival queens of England and Scotland. As he escapes northwards, Darnley falls in love with the enigmatic Mary, Queen of Scots. But is the beautiful and regal woman all that she seems? As Darnley is drawn into Mary's web - and bed - he d 1563 Lord Darnley is a prince of the blood. He is handsome, ambitious - and an unwitting pawn in a game of thrones, played out by the rival queens of England and Scotland. As he escapes northwards, Darnley falls in love with the enigmatic Mary, Queen of Scots. But is the beautiful and regal woman all that she seems? As Darnley is drawn into Mary's web - and bed - he discovers that being a king does not mean wearing the crown. As one of the most passionate marriages in British history falters, Darnley must pit his wits against his wife. There will be blood. The end of their affair will shape their hearts - and history. Recommended reading for fans of Philippa Gregory, Alison Weir and Sarah Gristwood. Praise for Steven Veerapen: "A superb, page-turning debut. The author balances gimlet-eyed research with narrative drive and clever reveals... Danforth is a strong yet torn central character... I look forward to reading the second book in the series." Richard Foreman. Steven Veerapen was born in Glasgow and raised in Paisley. Pursuing an interest in the sixteenth century, he was awarded a first-class Honours degree in English, focussing his dissertation on representations of Henry VIII’s six wives. He then received a Masters in Renaissance studies, and a Ph.D. investigating Elizabethan slander. Steven is fascinated by the glamour and ghastliness of life in the 1500s, and has a penchant for myths, mysteries and murders in an age in which the law was as slippery as those who defied it.

30 review for The Queen’s Consort: The Story of Mary Queen of Scots and Lord Darnley

  1. 4 out of 5

    Heather York

    Although I find this period in history fascinating and love anything to do with Mary Queen of Scots, I found this a bit lacklustre. Although an ok read it failed to grab me, however it was interesting as the story was told from the perspective of Lord Darnley whereas usually you always hear it from Mary's point of view Although I find this period in history fascinating and love anything to do with Mary Queen of Scots, I found this a bit lacklustre. Although an ok read it failed to grab me, however it was interesting as the story was told from the perspective of Lord Darnley whereas usually you always hear it from Mary's point of view

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mercedes Rochelle

    In The Queen’s Consort, the author has taken on the unenviable task of defending the indefensible. Well, defending isn’t exactly the right word; it might be better to say he was explaining the indefensible. Or am I being too hard on Lord Darnley? Obviously things went very wrong for him, and it seems that he didn’t quite know what “hit him”. The honeymoon with Queen Mary didn’t last very long; it’s kind of hard to say why she married him in the first place since she didn’t seem all that enthusia In The Queen’s Consort, the author has taken on the unenviable task of defending the indefensible. Well, defending isn’t exactly the right word; it might be better to say he was explaining the indefensible. Or am I being too hard on Lord Darnley? Obviously things went very wrong for him, and it seems that he didn’t quite know what “hit him”. The honeymoon with Queen Mary didn’t last very long; it’s kind of hard to say why she married him in the first place since she didn’t seem all that enthusiastic. They both pretended to be madly in love but it really came across as pretense from the beginning. Mary soon tired of his clumsy insistence at being granted the Crown Matrimonial (making him king in fact as well as titular). He thought he deserved the honor; she most certainly did not. He soon took to drinking and carousing to console himself, which naturally made things worse. Poor young Darnley (he was still under twenty when the trouble started) was no match for the scheming, unscrupulous magnates surrounding the queen. They sought to bring her down along with her pesky Italian secretary and Darnley was perfectly expendable. Ultimately he was like a football being tossed back and forth between warring factions; Darnley had no supporters of his own except for his discredited father. He was alone in a hostile world and I really did feel sorry for him—while at the same time I scorned his foolishness. Because we, as readers, were only focused on Darnley’s point of view, I think the story suffered somewhat by not knowing what motivated Mary. Nonetheless, the pace was very good and I enjoyed the book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Marie Macpherson

    The Lad who would be King History and fiction have not been kind to Henry Stewart, Lord Darnley, second husband of the ill-fated Mary, Queen of Scots. Ridiculed as a foolish fop, a beardless lady-faced lad or maligned as a debauched drunkard and scheming murderer, it’s difficult to find anyone with a good word for him. In The Queen’s Consort Steven Veerapen delves deeper into Darnley’s mindset, to give his side of the story in his own words and thoughts. We’re reminded that young Harry was still The Lad who would be King History and fiction have not been kind to Henry Stewart, Lord Darnley, second husband of the ill-fated Mary, Queen of Scots. Ridiculed as a foolish fop, a beardless lady-faced lad or maligned as a debauched drunkard and scheming murderer, it’s difficult to find anyone with a good word for him. In The Queen’s Consort Steven Veerapen delves deeper into Darnley’s mindset, to give his side of the story in his own words and thoughts. We’re reminded that young Harry was still a wet-behind-the-ears teenager when thrown into front-line politics – totally unprepared for the bear pit of the Scottish court, inexperienced in their Machiavellian machinations and completely outmanoeuvred by his more savvy royal wife reared in the French court. This refreshing and well-researched interpretation of the boy who believed he should be king and not play second fiddle to a mere woman forces the reader to reappraise Darnley’s role in Scottish history. Given more slack, would this callow youth have matured into a capable king? We’ll never know. This account of his life, nasty, brutish and short, certainly succeeded in making me feel sorry for the lang lad.

  4. 5 out of 5

    MISS M MCCLOSKEY

    Mary Queen of Scots story through the eyes of her husband Darnley. Good take on the story reminds you that Darnley was little more than a teenager when all this was taking place.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Superb book. This is a wonderful study of the fascinating personalities of two troubled people. Brilliantly written historical fiction based on historical facts. I highly recommend this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rosie Lee

    This was a gripping read the story of Mary Queen of Scots and Lord Darnley. Life hasn’t been good for Lord Darnley a fool easily led and taken in I think he deserved what he got

  7. 5 out of 5

    ann white

    Wow! What a great read. I could not put this book down. I have become fascinated with Darnleys character and look forward to reading more.

  8. 5 out of 5

    June Jackson

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeri van Leeuwen

  10. 4 out of 5

    Claire Nasa El-Rassy

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Sutton

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marion Larochelle

  13. 4 out of 5

    Muspratt

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rose Lethbridge

  15. 4 out of 5

    Linda Biltz

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jacky Clifton

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bob Petersen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lynda McNicholl

  19. 4 out of 5

    J Dean

  20. 4 out of 5

    Natasha Saunders

  21. 5 out of 5

    Howard Bramall

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Hodgson

  23. 5 out of 5

    liz leckie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Andrews

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deirde Fitzgerald

  26. 5 out of 5

    janette c hitchings

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Wilcox

  28. 4 out of 5

    Fiona McKie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Arina

  30. 5 out of 5

    Patty D

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