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From three of the organisers of the International Women's Strike US: a manifesto for when 'leaning in' is not enough. Recent years have seen the emergence of massive feminist mobilizations around the world, offering an alternative to the liberal feminism that has become the handmaiden of capitalism and of Islamophobia. These new movements have taken aim at neoliberalism's e From three of the organisers of the International Women's Strike US: a manifesto for when 'leaning in' is not enough. Recent years have seen the emergence of massive feminist mobilizations around the world, offering an alternative to the liberal feminism that has become the handmaiden of capitalism and of Islamophobia. These new movements have taken aim at neoliberalism's economic violence, the violence of xenophobic migratory policies, as well as the violence of imperialist military interventions and of environmental disasters. In this short book, three of the organisers of the international women's strike in the US lay out a manifesto for an alternative. Looking to women mobilizing in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Poland, Italy, Spain, Turkey, and other countries, who have recast feminist, anti-racist, environmentalist struggles in creative ways, the authors lay out a compelling set of demands. It is a manifesto that seeks to retrieve a radical and subversive feminism, for the emergence of an international anticapitalist feminist network. Against the 'Lean In' corporate feminism of Hilary Clinton and Sheryl Sandberg, - a feminism that is useful only for the women of the 1% - this manifesto outlines a feminism for the rest of us: a feminism for the 99%.


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From three of the organisers of the International Women's Strike US: a manifesto for when 'leaning in' is not enough. Recent years have seen the emergence of massive feminist mobilizations around the world, offering an alternative to the liberal feminism that has become the handmaiden of capitalism and of Islamophobia. These new movements have taken aim at neoliberalism's e From three of the organisers of the International Women's Strike US: a manifesto for when 'leaning in' is not enough. Recent years have seen the emergence of massive feminist mobilizations around the world, offering an alternative to the liberal feminism that has become the handmaiden of capitalism and of Islamophobia. These new movements have taken aim at neoliberalism's economic violence, the violence of xenophobic migratory policies, as well as the violence of imperialist military interventions and of environmental disasters. In this short book, three of the organisers of the international women's strike in the US lay out a manifesto for an alternative. Looking to women mobilizing in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Poland, Italy, Spain, Turkey, and other countries, who have recast feminist, anti-racist, environmentalist struggles in creative ways, the authors lay out a compelling set of demands. It is a manifesto that seeks to retrieve a radical and subversive feminism, for the emergence of an international anticapitalist feminist network. Against the 'Lean In' corporate feminism of Hilary Clinton and Sheryl Sandberg, - a feminism that is useful only for the women of the 1% - this manifesto outlines a feminism for the rest of us: a feminism for the 99%.

30 review for Feminism for the 99%: A Manifesto

  1. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    This is a short manifesto about how liberal feminism and capitalism are destroying democracies, the lives of people and the planet. They outline why feminism must fight against capitalism and neo-liberalism if it is to have any positive impact on the lives of 99% of the world's population (especially women who bear the brunt of poverty, violence and oppression). I agree with all of their points but my criticism is that it reads like a manifesto for the already converted. They assume that readers This is a short manifesto about how liberal feminism and capitalism are destroying democracies, the lives of people and the planet. They outline why feminism must fight against capitalism and neo-liberalism if it is to have any positive impact on the lives of 99% of the world's population (especially women who bear the brunt of poverty, violence and oppression). I agree with all of their points but my criticism is that it reads like a manifesto for the already converted. They assume that readers will understand complex political theory with little explanations or illustrations. I understand that a manifesto is not a textbook, but if its purpose is to influence people who do not already agree with them, they needed to make their points more accessible to the reader.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    A powerful manifesto that compels us to make our feminism more revolutionary, specifically by targeting capitalism as a primary root of women’s oppression. Written by three of the organizers of the international women’s strike, Feminism for the 99% draws from women’s mobilizing efforts in countries such as Mexico, Spain, Brazil, and more to expand feminism to dismantle economic, environmental, and racist injustice. I loved this book for its bold and uncompromising call for moving beyond a form o A powerful manifesto that compels us to make our feminism more revolutionary, specifically by targeting capitalism as a primary root of women’s oppression. Written by three of the organizers of the international women’s strike, Feminism for the 99% draws from women’s mobilizing efforts in countries such as Mexico, Spain, Brazil, and more to expand feminism to dismantle economic, environmental, and racist injustice. I loved this book for its bold and uncompromising call for moving beyond a form of feminism that serves white and/or wealthy women. Here’s a quote from the beginning of the book that addresses the problem with liberal feminism, a common form of feminism within contemporary society: “Centered in the global North among the professional-managerial stratum, [liberal feminism] is focused on ‘leaning-in’ and ‘cracking the glass ceiling.’ Dedicated to enabling a smattering of privileged women to climb the corporate ladder and the ranks of the military, it propounds a market-centered view of equality that dovetails perfectly with the prevailing corporate enthusiasm for ‘diversity.’ Although it condemns ‘discrimination’ and advocates ‘freedom of choice,’ liberal feminism steadfastly refuses to address the socioeconomic constraints that make freedom and empowerment impossible for the large majority of women. Its real aim is not equality, but meritocracy. Rather than seeking to abolish social hierarchy, it aims to ‘diversify’ it, ‘empowering’ ‘talented’ women to rise to the top. In treating women simply as an ‘underrepresented group,’ its proponents seek to ensure that a few privileged souls can attain positions and pay on a par with the men of their own class. By definition, the principal beneficiaries are those who already possess considerable social, cultural, and economic advantages. Everyone else remains stuck in the basement.” I would highly recommend this book to anyone who wants a quick, intelligent, and fiery takedown of capitalist exploitation and the importance of ensuring that feminism transcends replicating oppressive class and race dynamics. It’s short, so the authors don’t really provide deep or thorough methods for putting these ideals into practice, and at the same time I figure we can read more books or read up on organizing and policy to help us enact their vision. Furthermore, I did wonder if the authors’ language is accessible to all those who they may be trying to reach. At the same time, I feel that this book works as a call to action to those of us with more privilege (whether that be class, education, and/or race privilege) to both use our privilege and to step aside for those who have been marginalized again and again through capitalism. Ideally, we’d fight for a world where social and economic hierarchies are completely dismantled. I’ll end this review with a quote I appreciated from the authors’ section on how feminism must be anti-racist and anti-imperialist: “The effects of this global pyramid scheme are gendered as well. Today, millions of black and migrant women are employed as caregivers and domestic workers. Often undocumented and far from their families, they are simultaneously exploited and expropriated – forced to work precariously and on the cheap, deprived of rights, and subject to abuses of every stripe. Forged by global care chains, their oppression enables better conditions for more privileged women, who avoid (some) domestic work and pursue demanding professions. How ironic, then, that some of these privileged women invoke women’s rights in support of political campaigns to jail black men as rapists, to persecute migrants and Muslims, and to require that black and Muslim women assimilate to dominant culture!”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Lucid and broad in scope, Feminism for the 99% offers a clear vision of a more just world. The manifesto consists of eleven concise theses, which diagnose social ills across the globe and outline how they might be dispelled by an international, anti-capitalist feminist movement. As the co-authors argue for everything from eco-socialism to anti-imperialism, they describe recent instances of women’s resistance to the oppressive status quo, drawing attention to how the movement they envision is alr Lucid and broad in scope, Feminism for the 99% offers a clear vision of a more just world. The manifesto consists of eleven concise theses, which diagnose social ills across the globe and outline how they might be dispelled by an international, anti-capitalist feminist movement. As the co-authors argue for everything from eco-socialism to anti-imperialism, they describe recent instances of women’s resistance to the oppressive status quo, drawing attention to how the movement they envision is already taking shape. The book succinctly details how capitalist exploitation is all pervasive and extends far beyond the workplace and convincingly makes the case for a new form of leftist politics that focuses as much on unpaid social reproduction as industrial wage labor.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lili

    3.5 stars I wholeheartedly agree with the premise of this manifesto that we need a feminist system that is more intersectional. But I find this book somewhat lacking. First, it listed a lot of aspects of the current society that Feminism for the 99% rejects but the authors sadly failed to explain how exactly they want to establish this change. It's all nice and all if you know that the status quo is failing and that it needs to be replaced but it's kind of naive to assume that you can change it j 3.5 stars I wholeheartedly agree with the premise of this manifesto that we need a feminist system that is more intersectional. But I find this book somewhat lacking. First, it listed a lot of aspects of the current society that Feminism for the 99% rejects but the authors sadly failed to explain how exactly they want to establish this change. It's all nice and all if you know that the status quo is failing and that it needs to be replaced but it's kind of naive to assume that you can change it just by simply pointing out its flaws. You need an approach how to change that and how to, realisticly, implement that change. The book never adressed that problem. We're talking about a change that would affect the whole globe. So there are definitely factors like diffrent government/judicial systems, differnt cultural mentalities, etc. to consider. Second, the book read like the authors saw in capitalism the root of every problem. While I wholeheartedly agree that capitalism causes a lot of problems, it's not the only system to do so. Racism and sexism are systematic problems of societies. Hartred and mistreatment are generated in people's minds and exist outside of capitalism just fine as well. Capitalism is the big bad here, yes, agreed. But it most definitely didn't invent racism or sexism. Those issue can thrive just fine outside of capitalism - maybe just in different shapes and forms as we know it now. This book was a good and interesting read but could have been longer and elaborated more on some issues. Everyone who is interested in a critique of the current neo-liberal system and feminist movement should definitely give this book a try.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Konstantin

    It's really not "a manifesto" if it only contains one single sentiment rephrased dozens of times. Also, there's no chance in hell of it attracting anyone except those who already identify as socialist feminists. It's really not "a manifesto" if it only contains one single sentiment rephrased dozens of times. Also, there's no chance in hell of it attracting anyone except those who already identify as socialist feminists.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    In "Feminism for the 99%", three leading Marxist-Feminist thinkers and activists—Arruzza, Bhattacharya and Fraser—lay out a politics to serve the current international wave of mass women's protest that includes a direct critique of capitalism. The book is exceedingly accessible, lively, and dynamically engaged in a major social movement. They effectively introduce for all audiences many emerging and significant currents of Marxist-Feminist thought today: social reproduction theory that integrate In "Feminism for the 99%", three leading Marxist-Feminist thinkers and activists—Arruzza, Bhattacharya and Fraser—lay out a politics to serve the current international wave of mass women's protest that includes a direct critique of capitalism. The book is exceedingly accessible, lively, and dynamically engaged in a major social movement. They effectively introduce for all audiences many emerging and significant currents of Marxist-Feminist thought today: social reproduction theory that integrates waged and unwaged household labor as part of a common logic of capitalism, the idea we are living through a care crisis motiving a gendered class rebellion, and the value of putting anti-capitalism at the center of multi-issue feminism. This is a crucial movement and a crucial book, and well worth the read. As a partisan of the movement and a comrade of the authors, I have various critiques, but none of them are lethal. I don't think we are living in a care crisis. Unlike the mid-1800s, for example, working class people in most of the world are not dying at such rates that they cannot generationally replace themselves. I would lean towards calling this a "care squeeze," but unlike crisis that suggests resistance and rebellion are not inevitable, but still have to be explained. This has important implications for how we imagine the care squeeze may effect capitalist accumulation—I suspect it will have little effect without major political struggle. I'm suspicious that social reproduction theory may not sufficiently account for the political struggles of those excluded from chains of reproduction of labor power, such as those in communities where both mothers and their children are unlikely to ever find much work, an increasing reality for racialized "surplus populations" that are an important part of Marx's original predictions for capitalist development. Most importantly, I think the title is poorly chosen and dated from a now lost moment of Occupy. We have since seen the growth of mass fascist misogyny among sections of small property owners, constituting a not insignificant part of the population, capable of electing fascists in political office. We have to actually understand, explain and make sense of the class structure we are facing and "99%" just confuses that. But compared to the brilliance, value and helpfulness of this book, these are minor critiques. It's an excellent read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ike

    It's just... I think this is unlikely to be readable to people who aren't at home in critical theory literature on gender, race and class (which is ironic for a book about feminism for the 99%), while at the same time if you are at home in that literature, I'm unsure how much of this is new. There is also a difference between issues being intertwined and causation and sometimes I feel like those two get mixed up here. Anyway, there is definitely truth in here, and it was at times very effective It's just... I think this is unlikely to be readable to people who aren't at home in critical theory literature on gender, race and class (which is ironic for a book about feminism for the 99%), while at the same time if you are at home in that literature, I'm unsure how much of this is new. There is also a difference between issues being intertwined and causation and sometimes I feel like those two get mixed up here. Anyway, there is definitely truth in here, and it was at times very effective at formulating specific arguments, but just not as great as I had hoped.

  8. 4 out of 5

    chantel nouseforaname

    Yo these women really laid it down!!! A concretely clear and succinct work explaining how capitalism is killing everyone, focally women. They highlighted the lack of effort put forth by governments across the globe to circumvent the exploitation and subjugation of women internationally. I mean, real talk — I feel like a better feminist after reading this because it informed me of what I should be looking for in my leaders in my community. Platitudes from neoliberals and their empty statements wo Yo these women really laid it down!!! A concretely clear and succinct work explaining how capitalism is killing everyone, focally women. They highlighted the lack of effort put forth by governments across the globe to circumvent the exploitation and subjugation of women internationally. I mean, real talk — I feel like a better feminist after reading this because it informed me of what I should be looking for in my leaders in my community. Platitudes from neoliberals and their empty statements won’t do. We need evidence of measures taken to rectify situations where capitalistic influence has harmed the lives of marginalized peoples. We need to expose the lack of effort where it exists from our elected/appointed officials, expose the lies and hold our leadership accountable. It informed me of what I should be looking for especially from leaders and those with influence, in the spirit of equity for women everywhere. I’m invested. This really read like some work from the Combahee River Collective. Such an important read and I’m still processing many concepts from each of their thesis. They’ve given me a ton of other work to look into. I’m brushing up on my Marx and Engels.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessie

    A short but strong manifesto written by three Marxist-Feminists, calling for an intersection between feminism, environmentalism, anti-racism and anti-capitalism etc. It shows us the potential these philosophies have if we were to connect them, showing that they're best when they are combined. It's short, yet detailed and definitely packs a punch. I do feel, however, that - it being a manifesto for the 99% - it was not always as accessible as I had hoped. Nevertheless, it has important food for t A short but strong manifesto written by three Marxist-Feminists, calling for an intersection between feminism, environmentalism, anti-racism and anti-capitalism etc. It shows us the potential these philosophies have if we were to connect them, showing that they're best when they are combined. It's short, yet detailed and definitely packs a punch. I do feel, however, that - it being a manifesto for the 99% - it was not always as accessible as I had hoped. Nevertheless, it has important food for thought and ideas to act upon. Definitely an interesting read that you should pick up if you're interested in short feminist manifesto's and ideas on how we could rebuild our society.

  10. 4 out of 5

    muthuvel

    Gender could be seen and debated on its own when it comes to abstract grounds. In reality we live in a world where there's a lot of compromise between individualism and collectivism filled with many systematic organizations for we are, after all, social beings in nature. This manifesto comes with eleven theses about how liberal feminism and capitalism aren't really favouring for democracies, living conditions of people in general and of the planet. With citing recent woman's resistance movements a Gender could be seen and debated on its own when it comes to abstract grounds. In reality we live in a world where there's a lot of compromise between individualism and collectivism filled with many systematic organizations for we are, after all, social beings in nature. This manifesto comes with eleven theses about how liberal feminism and capitalism aren't really favouring for democracies, living conditions of people in general and of the planet. With citing recent woman's resistance movements across the globe in response the oppressive living conditions, the book calls for the feminists to work together with eco-socialists, anti-imperialists, immigrant toiling workers for better living conditions for all in the gender spectrum and also makes the case for paving a new form of leftist politics that provide better conditions not just for the top 1% (I started missing Bernie already.) "Cinzia Arruzza had parsed the fraught relations between feminism and socialism, both historically and theoretically. Tithi Bhattacharya had theorized the implications of social reproduction for the concepts of class and class struggle. Nancy Fraser had developed enlarged conceptions of capitalism and capitalist crisis, of which the crisis of social reproduction forms one strand." Both Cinzia and Nancy are professors of philosophy at The New School of NYC. Tithi is a professor of South Asian Studies at Purdue university and a Marxist feminist. Marx says that 'The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it.' Many of us in the 20th century if not the recent times have tried to change the world too often without understanding it much in the first place causing a lot of mess in its wake. Systems that rationalize structural functionalism has got to make sure the rationalization has fair amount of validity at the least before coming up with compromises over the majority of the population. Most of the problems stem from the historical colonialism to modern day imperialism, racism under capitalist frameworks. Definitely worth reading.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura Noggle

    Not sure what to think of this one. Still need to process a bit, but initial thoughts are that this book is a touch alienating and extremely academic. Ironically, I’d say this book is probably *NOT* for 99% of the population. Might review this manifesto again as it was very short and did pack a punch.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zhaleh

    I’ve been talking about some of the premises mentioned in the manifesto (not as coherently) but received resistance from others, even from feminists especially about sexual exploitation. I’m with the Feminism for 99 percent, count me in NOW. “For the reason that a feminism for the 99 percent incarnates and fosters the struggle for bread and roses.”

  13. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Guys capitalism is bad

  14. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    This "manifesto" has very little to do with feminism and is in reality a drawn out anti-capitalist rant with little basis in fact, and equally lacking in its ability to create a coherent argument. Tough to read, would not recommend. This "manifesto" has very little to do with feminism and is in reality a drawn out anti-capitalist rant with little basis in fact, and equally lacking in its ability to create a coherent argument. Tough to read, would not recommend.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marzena

    If anyone ever asks me why I read Feminism for the 99%: A Manifesto I'll answer: because I didn't know what I was getting into. In my quest in broadening my own horizons and learning about feminism more than YAY GRL PWR!, I found myself reading this book and questioning my sanity. I mean, I agree with some of the manifesto's points. I wholeheartedly reject others. The manifesto is full of big words, so if one was mischievous, one could say 99% of readers won't understand much of it. A feminism tha If anyone ever asks me why I read Feminism for the 99%: A Manifesto I'll answer: because I didn't know what I was getting into. In my quest in broadening my own horizons and learning about feminism more than YAY GRL PWR!, I found myself reading this book and questioning my sanity. I mean, I agree with some of the manifesto's points. I wholeheartedly reject others. The manifesto is full of big words, so if one was mischievous, one could say 99% of readers won't understand much of it. A feminism that is truly anti-racist and anti-imperialist must also be anticapitalist. All in all, I have to say I'm impressed how much this manifesto is both American AND communist.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Thought-provoking in a good way, but contains some gaps that I find baffling. This manifesto, written by three adepts of Social Reproduction Theory (SRT), stakes out the goals and framework of a feminism for the 99% - socialist, anti-racist, anti-imperialist, ecological,... It stresses the centrality of women in reproductive labour, the necessity of strikes, and so forth. It's on the whole a step in the right direction which will certainly appeal to both academia (speaking their language) and thi Thought-provoking in a good way, but contains some gaps that I find baffling. This manifesto, written by three adepts of Social Reproduction Theory (SRT), stakes out the goals and framework of a feminism for the 99% - socialist, anti-racist, anti-imperialist, ecological,... It stresses the centrality of women in reproductive labour, the necessity of strikes, and so forth. It's on the whole a step in the right direction which will certainly appeal to both academia (speaking their language) and thinkpieces, but there are some strange absences. Trade unions are rightly criticized for their oftentimes male-dominated nature, but no appeal is made to joining them to reform them from the inside, nor is it ever made explicit that for a woman, regardless if she performs unpaid or paid labour, there's safety in a union. Most gallingly, there is no mention of a party to coordinate the struggle, and all in all the stress is put mostly on the reactive "anti-capitalism" rather than a positive ambition (ie "socialism" or something similar). I might need to re-read it a bit, which is fortunately easy as the manifesto is only 50-something pages long. I applaud it, as it does take up various positions that will be sure to spur on debate, but I find the 'marxist' content of the whole lacking, seemingly more present in terminology than in method. The reader does not get a sense of historical necessity the way the Communist Manifesto (or, rather, the manifesto of the communist party) grants it; many different struggles are explained away as if they were "decided" by the ruling class, rather than grown out of the practical material development of capitalism. The ABCs of Capitalism + this would be a wonderful combination.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Charity

    I was very disappointed in this book. I enjoy reading all kinds of literature, regardless of whether or not I personally agree with its thesis or premise. But here - where I hoped to find original thought and insight, I found nothing but the same tired rhetoric of political propaganda. Where I hoped to find articulate, insightful, intelligent debate, I found only bitting remarks that are symptomatic of our divided state as a nation. A feminist ideology that alienates those who do not have the sa I was very disappointed in this book. I enjoy reading all kinds of literature, regardless of whether or not I personally agree with its thesis or premise. But here - where I hoped to find original thought and insight, I found nothing but the same tired rhetoric of political propaganda. Where I hoped to find articulate, insightful, intelligent debate, I found only bitting remarks that are symptomatic of our divided state as a nation. A feminist ideology that alienates those who do not have the same political orientation or is built on attacking the “neo-liberal” women currently in power is not a feminism I want. Feminism should fight for ALL women. The authors do not care about the 99%, only the small percentage who believe exactly the way they do.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kab

    I want this revolution, but this is not written for the 99%. Even for the already converted, at a would-be punchy fifty pages, it's repetitive and low on solid indictment and action to grab onto. The conclusions to each thesis come across as wispy as self-help fluff and the argumentation is too generalised to be rallying. I want this revolution, but this is not written for the 99%. Even for the already converted, at a would-be punchy fifty pages, it's repetitive and low on solid indictment and action to grab onto. The conclusions to each thesis come across as wispy as self-help fluff and the argumentation is too generalised to be rallying.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Liv

    A feminism that is truly anti-racist and anti-imperialist must also be anticapitalist. Feminism for the 99% was an impulse buy and read, and I am so glad that I picked this book up. Feminism for the 99% is a series of theses that critiques capitalism and highlight how capitalism has resulted in racism, discrimination, gender inequality, gender violence, ecological destruction and hetero-normative behaviour being entrenched as acceptable behaviour in our society. This book is inherentl A feminism that is truly anti-racist and anti-imperialist must also be anticapitalist. Feminism for the 99% was an impulse buy and read, and I am so glad that I picked this book up. Feminism for the 99% is a series of theses that critiques capitalism and highlight how capitalism has resulted in racism, discrimination, gender inequality, gender violence, ecological destruction and hetero-normative behaviour being entrenched as acceptable behaviour in our society. This book is inherently political and calls out capitalism as a problem; the book also serves as an attack on liberal and capital feminist like Sheryl Sandberg who it openly critiques throughout for her "lean in" doctrine. However, this book is titled as a manifesto and is clearly a call to arms for women to strike and take action. Therefore, I don't think this book has to be or should be objective in its arguments. This book does not pull punches as it rallies for the socialist/marxist cause and promotes equality in its truest form. If you do not have leftist political leanings then you probably would not appreciate the arguments in this book. The book also feels especially relevant in the current climate, which is why I think it felt so stark reading it, as the authors highlight how the structures and system of capitalism does not benefit the people. In the UK at the moment, we are seeing how the government has prioritised the economy over the safety of the people. The government plans to send primary school children back to school as a means of providing free child care, so parents can return to work. This evidences the way in which capitalist culture and society prevails and does not protect the weak and the vulnerable, and is exactly the arguments this book puts forth. The book is very high-level in its approach and there is no bibliography to the research that these women have clearly done to inform their arguments. However, all the authors are professional academics who have written extensively on their subjects. Furthermore, this book didn't need the research and footnotes to support its arguments as their examples are so clearly demonstrated in key cases we see in the news. One example would be the question about the justice systems ability to deal with violence against women. The authors argue that the justice system disproportionately targets poor and working-class men of colour. We have seen, particularly in America as this book focuses on, only recently with the shooting of the jogger Ahmaud Arbery, the justice system targets people of colour. The justice system, especially in America accuses and shoots first on people of colour and asks questions secondly. Another instance of the justice systems failure to protect women is the gang-rape of the teenager in Cyprus last year. The young woman was then vilified and given a suspended sentence for public mischief despite being a victim, highlights how across the world the justice system is not working to protect the vulnerable. It shows that these arguments that are put forward do not need footnote documentation when we can see the real-life examples so clearly around us right now. This book is also a manifesto, so it would draw away from the pace and punch of the arguments. Feminism for the 99% is entirely persuasive and well-written as I found myself utterly absorbed and agreeing with the arguments that were put forward throughout the book. At times some of the language was a little academic as the authors talk about neo-liberalism, social reproduction, imperialist and colonial behaviours etc. However, in the authors note at the back, the authors unpick some of the terminology they use, their credibility for writing this piece as women academics involved in extensive research around these topics, as women involved in the strikes for women around the globe. They bolster and support their piece effectively in their authors notes and articulate both why and how they chose to write a manifesto which I think is important and relevant. This is definitely a book that is reaching out to the masses, and I think its accessible at just under 100 pages. Although you may need to google some terms if you're not familiar this book feels incredibly relevant. Far from proposing to obliterate or trivialize them, our Manifesto advocates that we fight against capitalism's weaponization of our differences. Feminism for the 99 percent embodies the vision of univeralism: always in formation, always open to transformation and contestation, and always establishing itself anew through solidarity. I especially liked the focus on interweaving feminism with topics of racism, LGBTQ+ discrimination, Islamphobia etc. The book highlighted how nations show 'enlightened toleration' in one area and use it as a way to vilify other communities; for example they spoke about how certain European nations show increasing liberalism to LGBTQ+ communities, but then use this to actively discriminate against Muslims who they argued don't show this 'enlightened toleration'. When it comes to issues of race, a lot of their arguments drew back to the impact of colonialism and the exploitation of workers under colonialism, apartheid and the international division of labour. The authors called out how the exploited workers have roughly always coincided with the "global color line". They also spoke about how women of colour were predominantly in the service of their white women counterparts and the disadvantages and exploitation that left them open to. I liked how clear these messages were. I think it was incredibly important that this brief manifesto connected together all these issues so clearly and at a really high level connected the various problems to show how they are all a feminist issue. This book feels like a good introduction and call to arms to bigger problems in regards to global feminism, inter-sectional feminism and true feminism that believes in equality for all. I only wish for me there was a bibliography as a stepping stone to reading about more areas these women spoke about, however, I think the next step will be to look up their other works.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Raquel

    «Feminism for the 99 percent is a restless anticapitalist feminism—one that can never be satisfied with equivalences until we have equality, never satisfied with legal rights until we have justice, and never satisfied with democracy until individual freedom is calibrated on the basis of freedom for all» Review in English | Reseña en español (abajo) I came across Feminism for the 99 percent thanks to several recommendations on bookstagram last year so I had it on my to-be-read radar for some ti «Feminism for the 99 percent is a restless anticapitalist feminism—one that can never be satisfied with equivalences until we have equality, never satisfied with legal rights until we have justice, and never satisfied with democracy until individual freedom is calibrated on the basis of freedom for all» Review in English | Reseña en español (abajo) I came across Feminism for the 99 percent thanks to several recommendations on bookstagram last year so I had it on my to-be-read radar for some time. Then in March, I saw Verso Books were sharing free ebooks to download on their website due to the COVID-19 quarantine, and this manifesto was among them. Feminism for the 99 percent is written by three of the organisers of the International Women's Strike: Cinzia Arruzza, Tithi Bhattacharya, and Nancy Fraser, and it is a brief, compelling and powerful manifesto that compels us to make our feminism more revolutionary by targeting capitalism as a primary root of women’s oppression. But it is more as it shows how capitalism is the problem of all sorts of oppression around the world. The authors divide the text into eleven thesis –from how we need to learn from the new feminist wave reinventing the strike movement all over the world, and the complete refusal and fight against liberal feminism, to how feminism should be anticapitalist– and talk about gender oppression and gender violence, how capitalism tries to regulate sexuality, why it is a racist and colonial violent system, or even how «[…] capitalist societies are structurally inclined to destabilize the habitats that sustain communities and to destroy the ecosystems that sustain life.», among other topics. As I said, this manifesto is a brief yet captivating text for all of those interested in intersectional and anti-capitalist feminism. I particularly liked how the authors gave not only “voice” to my political ideas, but also hope for a new wave of feminism focused on the benefit of 99% percent of the people. «[…] these claims are tantamount to a demand for a massive reorganization of the relation between production and reproduction: for social arrangements that prioritize people’s lives and social connections over production for profit; for a world in which people of every gender, nationality, sexuality, and color combine social-reproductive activities with safe, well-remunerated, and harassment-free work» - - - - Descubrí Feminismo para el 99 por ciento gracias a varias recomendaciones en bookstagram el año pasado, así que lo tuve bastante tiempo en mi radar para leer “pronto”. En marzo vi que Verso Books compartía libros electrónicos gratuitos para descargar en su sitio web debido a la cuarentena COVID-19, y este manifiesto estaba entre ellos. Feminismo para el 99 por ciento está escrito por tres de las organizadoras de la huelga internacional feminista: Cinzia Arruzza, Tithi Bhattacharya y Nancy Fraser, y es un breve, convincente y poderoso manifiesto que nos empuja a hacer que nuestro feminismo sea más revolucionario apuntando al capitalismo como la raíz principal de la opresión de las mujeres. Pero es más, ya que muestra cómo el capitalismo es el problema de todo tipo de opresión en todo el mundo. Las autoras dividen el texto en once tesis –desde cómo debemos aprender de la nueva ola feminista que ha reinventado el movimiento de huelga en todo el mundo, o el rechazo completo y la lucha contra el feminismo liberal, hasta cómo el feminismo debería ser anticapitalista– y así nos hablan sobre la opresión y violencia de género, cómo el capitalismo trata de regular la sexualidad, el poder reproductivo y social de la población, por qué es un sistema violento racista y colonial de base, o incluso cómo « [...] las sociedades capitalistas están estructuralmente inclinadas a desestabilizar los hábitats que sustentan a las comunidades y destruir los ecosistemas que sostienen la vida», entre otros temas. Como he dicho, este manifiesto es un texto breve pero cautivador para todas aquellas personas interesadas en el feminismo interseccional y anticapitalista. Me gustó especialmente ver cómo las autoras dieron no solo "voz" a mis ideas políticas, sino también la esperanza de una nueva ola feminista centrada en el beneficio e igualdad para el 99% de las personas en todo el mundo. *Comparto aquí el link con unos extractos en español del manifiesto, compartidos en CTXT, por si a alguien le puede interesar.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nic

    Amazing - so much jam-packed into such a small book! Gave me a ton of new language to enhance my anti-capitalist approach to content and activism. The kind of book that helps make sense of this violent, perplexing world we live in. My only complaint, and it is significant, is that the book was lacking in a transgender perspective. There is a lot of trans-feminist scholarship out there and just a few sentences of inclusion in the book (particularly around gender violence) would have made it a per Amazing - so much jam-packed into such a small book! Gave me a ton of new language to enhance my anti-capitalist approach to content and activism. The kind of book that helps make sense of this violent, perplexing world we live in. My only complaint, and it is significant, is that the book was lacking in a transgender perspective. There is a lot of trans-feminist scholarship out there and just a few sentences of inclusion in the book (particularly around gender violence) would have made it a perfect manifesto. The book did use inclusive language and included trans people in its feminism, so it wasn't TERFy by any standards, just was lacking a little perspective that would have hit that next level of theory. Overall, HIGHLY recommend. I highlighted almost every page and something from the book comes up in conversation nearly every single day.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Noura

    I wholeheartedly agree with almost every single point that was made throughout this manifesto. However, the writers did something that I absolutely abhor seeing in nonfiction books and that is a relentless overuse of jargon that a lot of readers might not be familiar with. No one has the time to stop reading every other line in order to go look up a term. I didn't have a problem comprehending their writing because I read a lot of complex theory due to the nature of my studies, which in turn dese I wholeheartedly agree with almost every single point that was made throughout this manifesto. However, the writers did something that I absolutely abhor seeing in nonfiction books and that is a relentless overuse of jargon that a lot of readers might not be familiar with. No one has the time to stop reading every other line in order to go look up a term. I didn't have a problem comprehending their writing because I read a lot of complex theory due to the nature of my studies, which in turn desensitized me to such pomposity. Buttt I can't, in good conscience, give it a higher rating because I really don't think it's particularly accessible.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm

    In some ways I can’t help but read this as putting Bhattacharya’s excellent Social Reproduction Theory into practice. This svelte and compelling manifesto takes the analyses of three of the most exciting current feminist scholar activists blended with the rising tides of feminist, anti-colonial and anti-capitalist activism to develop a programme of action for the current era. While arguing for and clearly laying out the terms of the current crisis, the Manifesto clearly rejects the offers on In some ways I can’t help but read this as putting Bhattacharya’s excellent Social Reproduction Theory into practice. This svelte and compelling manifesto takes the analyses of three of the most exciting current feminist scholar activists blended with the rising tides of feminist, anti-colonial and anti-capitalist activism to develop a programme of action for the current era. While arguing for and clearly laying out the terms of the current crisis, the Manifesto clearly rejects the offers on the table to settle the crisis. They are clear, progressive neoliberalism caused the crisis, setting out the conditions facilitating populist nationalism then offering itself as the solution – these are not solutions, but a promise of more of the same, of dispossession, of disempowerment and of continuing precariousness. Instead, and drawing on notions of social reproduction theory that sees class, race, gender and other social divisions as interwoven (this is not intersectionality’s intersecting forms), Arruzza, Bhattacharya & Fraser argue for a feminist inspired movement of fundamental social transformation that resists gender violence and oppression, is anti-capitalist, anti-imperialist, anti-racist and eco-socialist. While recognising the separate aspects of each of these struggles, the Manifesto argues that they are also interwoven to adopt a specific form in the current conjuncture and that if the struggles are not interwoven they will fail to bring about the transformation that is necessary. Woven through the case, and drawn out explicitly in the ‘Postface’ is the argument that to focus on capitalism as paid work without considering the commodified and uncommodified forms of social reproduction is the miss the point of capitalism’s form – that the working class not only produces the stuff of capitalism, but it also reproduces itself in unpaid work, in education, health care and countless others tasks. If we fail to focus on these they argue, if we fail to focus on capitalism’s essential base in imperialist exploitation and its continuing destruction of our ecology, any attempt at change will fail. At 57 pages, plus a 28 page Postface, this is not fully argued thorough analysis of the state of the world, but a powerful call to action based in much wider analyses of the current order – and essential reading for overcoming it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    abi

    I did enjoy this but I’m slightly confused as to who the book is for. I’m fairly familiar with the ideas included so I wanted more, whereas if you’re new to the subject and Marxist feminism I feel as though this isn’t where you should start, unless you’re prepared to research as you go along. The content is inclusive however it drops in Marx, imperialism, liberal feminism etc, without explanation and kinda assumes you already know. Fem for the 99% is clear, concise, and gave me ideas on what I w I did enjoy this but I’m slightly confused as to who the book is for. I’m fairly familiar with the ideas included so I wanted more, whereas if you’re new to the subject and Marxist feminism I feel as though this isn’t where you should start, unless you’re prepared to research as you go along. The content is inclusive however it drops in Marx, imperialism, liberal feminism etc, without explanation and kinda assumes you already know. Fem for the 99% is clear, concise, and gave me ideas on what I would like to read about further, such as labour discipline and the power of the employer in different places. But considering this is fem for the 99%, I expected something more accessible overall, even from a manifesto.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Absolutely necessary reading and the biggest breath of fresh air I've had since listening to Chomsky's "On Anarchism." Absolutely necessary reading and the biggest breath of fresh air I've had since listening to Chomsky's "On Anarchism."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lien

    This should be mandatory reading for anyone interested in feminism, anti-racism, anti-capitalism...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    A crystal clear manifesto on the kind of feminism that can lead us towards a better future.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    "We write not to sketch an imagined utopia," explain the authors of Feminism for the 99%, "but to mark out the road that must be traveled to reach a just society." By this marker, the self-described feminist manifesto falls short – in part because manifestos are not roadmaps. They serve an entirely different purpose: to provoke, inspire, energize. The policy documents and details come later. Of course, a tendency to overstate things is also a hallmark of manifestos. This one explicitly follows in "We write not to sketch an imagined utopia," explain the authors of Feminism for the 99%, "but to mark out the road that must be traveled to reach a just society." By this marker, the self-described feminist manifesto falls short – in part because manifestos are not roadmaps. They serve an entirely different purpose: to provoke, inspire, energize. The policy documents and details come later. Of course, a tendency to overstate things is also a hallmark of manifestos. This one explicitly follows in the footsteps of the most famous of them, Marx and Engels' The Communist Manifesto, which has its moments of overheated prose and overdone expectations. But setting aside the impossibility of fulfilling its own promises, Feminism for the 99% is an important, even crucial argument that feminism, if it is to truly liberate all women and not just white middle- and upper-class professionals (the manifesto refrains from using "bourgeoisie," which is a blessing, its recent re-emergence to relevance as "bougie" notwithstanding), must join with ecological, antiracist and other movements for equality and justice to bring down the capitalist system that lurks behind and undergirds oppression and exploitation of every stripe. "Although each has its own distinctive forms and characteristics, all are rooted in, and reinforced by, one and the same social system" (p.56). According to the manifesto's 11 theses and its arguably better written and more enlightening postface, capitalism is more than simply an economic system but rather has become an overarching system of social organization that extracts natural and human resources as cheaply as possible, resulting in mass immiseration across the Global South, communities of color and especially women of all races, ethnicities and national origins. It emphasizes the labor of people without the social cost of actually making the people who eventually labor – with those who primarily work at making and shaping those people, which in our gendered society is women, receiving little to no compensation for this. The result, in this as in ecology and other areas, is a tiger eating its tail, with capitalism destabilizing the very conditions it needs to survive. So the manifesto part of this small book was a little underwhelming, in part because it spends next to no time trying to convince its readers of the self-evidence of its 11 theses. Several times, it assumes that, rather than explains why, capitalism is the root cause of a particular oppression, rather than simply the system that has taken advantage of a deeper human problem or pre-existing structure of oppression. However, the subsequent postface is quite good, and does some of the academic and historical work missing (perhaps necessarily) from the manifesto. In all, I'm not sure this is going to convert anyone to the gospel of anticapitalism, but I'm not sure that's it's purpose; rather, it's arguing for a more comprehensive approach to feminism, environmentalism, antiracism and labor movements that tackles the systemic forces they all face – and that's an argument that feels more and more salient with each passing day.

  29. 4 out of 5

    womanist bibliophile

    This manifesto raises important critiques of liberal feminism--an ideology that is merely neoliberalism by another name. Where liberal feminism has embraced capitalist frameworks, the authors of the book rightly recognise such liberalism as not serving the needs and rights of women, but undermining them. Such a recognition is crucial to the redirection of feminist movements at this time. I appreciate that the second wave of the feminist movement is here referenced--although briefly--in accurate This manifesto raises important critiques of liberal feminism--an ideology that is merely neoliberalism by another name. Where liberal feminism has embraced capitalist frameworks, the authors of the book rightly recognise such liberalism as not serving the needs and rights of women, but undermining them. Such a recognition is crucial to the redirection of feminist movements at this time. I appreciate that the second wave of the feminist movement is here referenced--although briefly--in accurate terms, where all too often feminists of today spread misinformation about the content of feminist activism at that time. The radicalism of the second wave included exposing the damages wrought on women by war, by class, by race, by every iteration of male-dominated, phallogocentric culture. However, while the manifesto states that it stands for women's sexual self-determination and against male violence against women in all forms, a couple of significant forms of this violence are not called by name: prostitution and pornography. These two bastions of male violence that liberal feminism has defended for decades, so much so that this defence is itself an instantly recognisable mark of the liberal feminist, must be included in any complete critique of the capitalist infiltration of feminist analysis. It is this "sex industry" that is the nexus of patriarchy and capitalism, the site where the absolute domination and commodification of the female body is enacted, depicted, and disseminated. While the authors note that at the highest echelons of society women with more privileges have depend on the labour of working class women, predominantly women of colour, and how women without race or class privilege are disproportionately coerced by market forces into labour that does little to enhance their lives, and in many respects depletes them, they do not note how race and class act as drivers in the market of the "sex industry." A market where exploitation is not driven by women's demands but by men's.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ety

    Frustratingly inaccessible and academic, especially in light of its important message. I was hoping for something I could recommend or lend to folks ("hey, you're a feminist, here's why anti-capitalism is important too!") , but this just isn't going to be that work. Below the layers of undefined academic language it didn't say anything new to me, so I'm not sure who it's supposed to be for. It also still didn't offer any suggestions or guidelines for solutions or actions, but I may be expecting Frustratingly inaccessible and academic, especially in light of its important message. I was hoping for something I could recommend or lend to folks ("hey, you're a feminist, here's why anti-capitalism is important too!") , but this just isn't going to be that work. Below the layers of undefined academic language it didn't say anything new to me, so I'm not sure who it's supposed to be for. It also still didn't offer any suggestions or guidelines for solutions or actions, but I may be expecting too much from a manifesto in that regard. If anyone has found an anti-capitalist feminist primer that's actually approachable for people like myself and my loved ones - fellow service industry workers, people who couldn't afford college, folks with disabilities, and people like my mother (was a radical feminist in the 70s but hasn't kept up with theory or academia since)... please let me know. The only person in my broad circle I would feel completely comfortable recommending this to is my partner (who minored in women's studies), but again, it doesn't say anything she wouldn't already know.

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