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Franklin Steak: Dry-Aged. Live-Fired. Pure Beef. [A Cookbook]

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The be-all, end-all guide to cooking the perfect steak--from buying top-notch beef, seasoning to perfection, and finding or building the ideal cooking vessel--from the team behind the acclaimed and bestselling book Franklin Barbecue. Aaron Franklin may be the reigning king of brisket, but in his off-time, what he really loves to cook and eat at home is steak. So, in th The be-all, end-all guide to cooking the perfect steak--from buying top-notch beef, seasoning to perfection, and finding or building the ideal cooking vessel--from the team behind the acclaimed and bestselling book Franklin Barbecue. Aaron Franklin may be the reigning king of brisket, but in his off-time, what he really loves to cook and eat at home is steak. So, in this follow-up to his New York Times bestselling book Franklin Barbecue, the pitmaster extraordinaire teaches readers how to cook his favorite food to absolute perfection. With their trademark rigor and expertise, Franklin and coauthor Jordan Mackay go deeper into the art and science of cooking steak than anyone has gone before. They demystify cattle breeds, explore the technique of dry-aging, explore globally-inspired techniques like the reverse sear and hibachi-style cooking, and even teach readers how to build a custom, backyard grill setup. For any meat-lover, backyard grill-master, or fan of Franklin's fun yet authoritative approach, this book is a must-have.


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The be-all, end-all guide to cooking the perfect steak--from buying top-notch beef, seasoning to perfection, and finding or building the ideal cooking vessel--from the team behind the acclaimed and bestselling book Franklin Barbecue. Aaron Franklin may be the reigning king of brisket, but in his off-time, what he really loves to cook and eat at home is steak. So, in th The be-all, end-all guide to cooking the perfect steak--from buying top-notch beef, seasoning to perfection, and finding or building the ideal cooking vessel--from the team behind the acclaimed and bestselling book Franklin Barbecue. Aaron Franklin may be the reigning king of brisket, but in his off-time, what he really loves to cook and eat at home is steak. So, in this follow-up to his New York Times bestselling book Franklin Barbecue, the pitmaster extraordinaire teaches readers how to cook his favorite food to absolute perfection. With their trademark rigor and expertise, Franklin and coauthor Jordan Mackay go deeper into the art and science of cooking steak than anyone has gone before. They demystify cattle breeds, explore the technique of dry-aging, explore globally-inspired techniques like the reverse sear and hibachi-style cooking, and even teach readers how to build a custom, backyard grill setup. For any meat-lover, backyard grill-master, or fan of Franklin's fun yet authoritative approach, this book is a must-have.

30 review for Franklin Steak: Dry-Aged. Live-Fired. Pure Beef. [A Cookbook]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maxine

    Essential for anyone who likes to grill steak because you learn a lot about tips and techniques. I wish the book had more recipes but it is not a recipe book and more of a guide.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Despite practically being born and largely raised in Texas, cooking steaks was never something I took seriously. My technique was essentially getting whatever off the supermarket racks, coat in some olive oil, a little salt and grill for a few minutes. Sometimes it was ok, sometimes not. The depth this book goes into explaining the cuts, marbling, and certifications as well as the history is very interesting. Some of it I couldn't care for, such as the history of cattle. But I get why it was add Despite practically being born and largely raised in Texas, cooking steaks was never something I took seriously. My technique was essentially getting whatever off the supermarket racks, coat in some olive oil, a little salt and grill for a few minutes. Sometimes it was ok, sometimes not. The depth this book goes into explaining the cuts, marbling, and certifications as well as the history is very interesting. Some of it I couldn't care for, such as the history of cattle. But I get why it was added and it was a decent TIL. As soon as I finished the book I decided to make this at least a biweekly focus, if not weekly. So far I've reverse seared New York Strips on two nights. The first night was okay; not great. Two areas I messed up: 1. In the book he suggests 1.5% of the weight to add salt. So a 1000 gram steak gets 15 grams of salt. My family and I thought this was quite salty. Now, mind you I salted 48 hours pre-cook. The book suggests anywhere between 4 and 48 hours. Perhaps this made a difference. The second cook I cut the salt in half and, while you could still taste the salt, it wasn't as bad. My next attempt will cut in half again and go from there. BTW, the salt is not for taste but to draw out moisture. So my aim is not to taste it at all. 2. More my fault, the first cook I did was in the oven at 250 for 1 1/4" thick cuts. This took maybe 30-45 minutes. I took them out around 128 and let sit for several hours. I seared to get the Maillard effect but probably too long so they came out medium-well. The second attempt was identical with the exception of taking out at 120 and let them rest for a couple of hours. I seared just enough to get the coloring and the finish was probably medium with a broad gradient. If you're going this route I would recommend for cuts 1 to 1 1/2" thick then remove from oven or grill at 120 or even 115 then sear. I would also note it is mentioned or suggested in the book that the longer you salt your steaks, the broader the gradient. So, I may have had a more medium-rare steak if instead of salting for 48 hours I just did 12 or so. All in all, there is a ton of information in this book and I'm super excited to perfect this. If, like me, you're experience with steaks is limited, start with using the oven to get better control over the parameters and knowing what to expect. When you get that down, then start experimenting with the grill and different types of charcoal or wood.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    PETA would not approve. I am just getting into cooking, and this was the perfect book for me. Many how-to books don't explain the science behind their decisions, or they avoid technical language because they want to avoid overwhelming their reader. Franklin and Mackay don't avoid this language, but they also give a "dumb" definition to help the reader get a foothold and then explain why they do things a certain way. I appreciated this because it allows you to learn what to think about, but also PETA would not approve. I am just getting into cooking, and this was the perfect book for me. Many how-to books don't explain the science behind their decisions, or they avoid technical language because they want to avoid overwhelming their reader. Franklin and Mackay don't avoid this language, but they also give a "dumb" definition to help the reader get a foothold and then explain why they do things a certain way. I appreciated this because it allows you to learn what to think about, but also helps you understand the science behind cooking a great steak. There are 9 chapters, only one that offers recipes. So don't expect you're getting a cookbook with this. Instead, you'll get a brief history of beef and why different breeds offer different flavor. Then there are chapters on what to think about when buying a steak, including diet and cut. Then they offer a section thinking about techniques that impact the overall flavor of the meat, including surface to cook on. From there it's setting up your grill and preparatory things like salting your meat. I really enjoyed this book and learned a ton. I highly recommend this to anyone who is interested in home cooking a great steak!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Franklin BBQ is my favorite food books and gave me so much knowledge learning about BBQ so I was very excited for this one. It was good and I certainly learned a lot about steak at a point I was interested in learning a lot more about steak. I felt like the sections I found really useful and interesting were not as numerous as I’d hoped, but very good. Not as much as I would have hoped in terms of recipes definitely more of a food book than a cookbook.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    Aaron Franklin knows his stuff. If you already know it all this may not be for you. However, if you want to know the nuts and bolts of all kinds of different beef, cooking methods for said beef and the science behind it you should read it. I've read his BBQ book as well. This aint no center line bovine book. Try not to get drool all over the pages. Especially if you have to take it back to the library... Aaron Franklin knows his stuff. If you already know it all this may not be for you. However, if you want to know the nuts and bolts of all kinds of different beef, cooking methods for said beef and the science behind it you should read it. I've read his BBQ book as well. This aint no center line bovine book. Try not to get drool all over the pages. Especially if you have to take it back to the library...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sam Garcia

    A wonderful read that is not just about steak. If you love food, the art and science of cooking, and being a responsible consumer, this is a book for you. This is not just for meat lovers. Aaron Franklin and Jordan Mackay are two men that are passionate about food and sharing the wonderful parts of their journey to study steak. This is not a cookbook, you can just sit and read at your leisure and enjoy the knowledge they have to impart

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Wright

    I wish they had done a volume 2 or 3 times the size of the one they did. Comprehensive look at steak, going back to the animal, through the butcher, and to the plate. Great cooking techniques, gracefully presented and useful. Aaron of course is a master of fire management, so there's plenty of that, too. I wish they had done a volume 2 or 3 times the size of the one they did. Comprehensive look at steak, going back to the animal, through the butcher, and to the plate. Great cooking techniques, gracefully presented and useful. Aaron of course is a master of fire management, so there's plenty of that, too.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    I devoured this book, I already have a date set to pull out the grill, head over to the specialty meat store and get grilling. This book dives DEEP into meats, cuts, grills and technique. This is for the serious grilling geek.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    Great read. Thought I knew steak but this guy taught me so much. Can't wait to slow cook and reverse sear a dry aged tomahawk ribeye! Great read. Thought I knew steak but this guy taught me so much. Can't wait to slow cook and reverse sear a dry aged tomahawk ribeye!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    I'm changing up my steak game this summer, and this will be a big help. I'm changing up my steak game this summer, and this will be a big help.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    My wife is glad I read this....prepare for steak perfection

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    Beautiful book but seems to be aimed at the novice grilled.

  13. 4 out of 5

    John

    Aaron Franklin is passionate about barbecue. He brings the same passion to his book about steak. If you are expecting a recipe book, this is definitely not it. If you you are looking for a book about the “science” of steak, this is it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John

    Whether you end up a steak-geek or a steak-snob after reading this is entirely up to you.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Sigman

  16. 5 out of 5

    Casey

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alexandre Lupien

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Sedlon

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jade Scott

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rose Ann

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robert Feol

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Powell

  23. 5 out of 5

    Russ Bryant

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  26. 5 out of 5

    Clayton Jenkins

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mark Fairholm

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Barnet

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aaron H Johnson

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