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Philosophical Rudiments Concerning Government and Society (LibriVox Audiobook)

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De Cive ("On the citizen") is one of Thomas Hobbes's major works. "The book was published originally in Latin from Paris in 1642, followed by two further Latin editions in 1647 from Amsterdam. The English translation of the work made its first appearance four years later (London 1651) under the title 'Philosophicall rudiments concerning government and society'." It anticip De Cive ("On the citizen") is one of Thomas Hobbes's major works. "The book was published originally in Latin from Paris in 1642, followed by two further Latin editions in 1647 from Amsterdam. The English translation of the work made its first appearance four years later (London 1651) under the title 'Philosophicall rudiments concerning government and society'." It anticipates themes of the better-known Leviathan. The famous phrase bellum omnium contra omnes ("war of all against all") appeared first in De Cive. - Summary by Wikipedia


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De Cive ("On the citizen") is one of Thomas Hobbes's major works. "The book was published originally in Latin from Paris in 1642, followed by two further Latin editions in 1647 from Amsterdam. The English translation of the work made its first appearance four years later (London 1651) under the title 'Philosophicall rudiments concerning government and society'." It anticip De Cive ("On the citizen") is one of Thomas Hobbes's major works. "The book was published originally in Latin from Paris in 1642, followed by two further Latin editions in 1647 from Amsterdam. The English translation of the work made its first appearance four years later (London 1651) under the title 'Philosophicall rudiments concerning government and society'." It anticipates themes of the better-known Leviathan. The famous phrase bellum omnium contra omnes ("war of all against all") appeared first in De Cive. - Summary by Wikipedia

30 review for Philosophical Rudiments Concerning Government and Society (LibriVox Audiobook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This book, one of Hobbes's works, similar and prior to Leviathan, was the basis of one of my papers in college. It outlines a type of social contract, and is quite similar to other works, such as Locke's 2nd Treatise on Government. It is an excellent book for anyone with an interest in constitutionalism and social contract theory. This book, one of Hobbes's works, similar and prior to Leviathan, was the basis of one of my papers in college. It outlines a type of social contract, and is quite similar to other works, such as Locke's 2nd Treatise on Government. It is an excellent book for anyone with an interest in constitutionalism and social contract theory.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eric Cagnant

    Hobbes pose avec cet ouvrage paru en 1642 les fondements de la philosophie politique. Certes, d'autres avant lui (Platon, Aristote, Saint Thomas...) avait tenté d'embrasser le chantier des fondements d'une civilisation mais c'est Hobbes avec cet ouvrage qui jette vraiment les bases de ce que sont que l'état de nature, l'Etat, les pactes, les alliances, les formes de gouvernements, etc...un monument donc qui sera affiné et complété par son oeuvre majeure quelques années plus tard, le Léviathan. Hobbes pose avec cet ouvrage paru en 1642 les fondements de la philosophie politique. Certes, d'autres avant lui (Platon, Aristote, Saint Thomas...) avait tenté d'embrasser le chantier des fondements d'une civilisation mais c'est Hobbes avec cet ouvrage qui jette vraiment les bases de ce que sont que l'état de nature, l'Etat, les pactes, les alliances, les formes de gouvernements, etc...un monument donc qui sera affiné et complété par son oeuvre majeure quelques années plus tard, le Léviathan.

  3. 4 out of 5

    N Perrin

    De Cive can be read as a kind of preliminary draft of Leviathan which can stand on its own ground as an important formulation of political philosophy but is expanded and improved through the Leviathan which was written only a few years later.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jaq

    'Perciò, che si debba cercare la pace, finché resta qualche speranza di ottenerla; e quando non si può ottenerla, che si debba cercare aiuti per la guerra.' 'Perciò, che si debba cercare la pace, finché resta qualche speranza di ottenerla; e quando non si può ottenerla, che si debba cercare aiuti per la guerra.'

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Rose

    often overlooked, kind of like Leviathan's ugly uncle with bad posture but always has sweets at the family gatherings often overlooked, kind of like Leviathan's ugly uncle with bad posture but always has sweets at the family gatherings

  6. 5 out of 5

    Boradicus

    This is a very well-written book. Hobbes wrote this prior to Leviathan, and one might say that the back-bone of his social contract theory in its essential form is presented in this book. Hobbes, along with other Rationalist philosophers tended to refer to a theoretical "State of Nature," wherein, "Natural Law" predominated. "Natural Law" then becomes the basis upon which civil society is formed. For Hobbes, it works essentially like this: supposing world in which everyone can do exactly what he This is a very well-written book. Hobbes wrote this prior to Leviathan, and one might say that the back-bone of his social contract theory in its essential form is presented in this book. Hobbes, along with other Rationalist philosophers tended to refer to a theoretical "State of Nature," wherein, "Natural Law" predominated. "Natural Law" then becomes the basis upon which civil society is formed. For Hobbes, it works essentially like this: supposing world in which everyone can do exactly what he or she wants (which, by consequence, poses a threat to the life and liberty of all), each individual, being deemed to each have a "Natural Right" to self-preservation, and therefore to self-defense, upon realizing their common plight (that no person by themselves is safe in such a world; the threat of death being continually present via the vulnerability consequent to the need to sleep, and therefore the inability to be continually vigilant) decide to form a civil society on the basis of mutual defense. While Hobbes' social contract is constructed on the basis of "Natural Right" (extrapolated from "Natural Law," or the supposed "State of Nature," i.e., total anarchy), the whole idea of "Natural Right" was not meant to be a "right" to be "devolved to" in the case of individual dissent from the civil government therefrom formed (it is a device made to be used expressly for the purpose of rhetoric); rather, according to Hobbes, once the individual members of civil society give their consent to be thereby governed, they have permanently assigned their "Natural Right," and their will thereunto, to that civil government. Rather, the function of the "State of Nature" is two-fold: on the one hand it rhetorically serves as a hypothetical state that no rational person would ever desire to be subjected to, and on the other, it serves as the basis for rationalizing a government in which every person has a will, a stake, and agreement (to quote Abraham Lincoln, "government of the people, by the people, for the people") one formulation of which would be by simply, as Hobbes would say, to "erect" a monarch, who would then govern them. Mary Midgley concisely states the purpose of Hobbes "State of Nature"(a term that John Locke used): "The contract myth - which is never regarded as literal history - is essentially a fence against arbitrary tyranny. It exists to make authority depend on the consent of the governed. Its main use is to cut out other, more superficial and biased, supposed sources of political obligation" (Animals and Why They Matter, p. 71).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Egilva

    A book that is so well written as to have few rivals for clearness, coherence, elegance. I struggled 5 years to find an alternative natural foundation for the formation of society, against the hypothesis that it is founded on fear: the fear of bigger forces as a connecting link between similar organisms capable of evaluating the difference between the sum of external forces, the sum of the force of the self, and the summability of the forces of similar beings and preferring this last option in a A book that is so well written as to have few rivals for clearness, coherence, elegance. I struggled 5 years to find an alternative natural foundation for the formation of society, against the hypothesis that it is founded on fear: the fear of bigger forces as a connecting link between similar organisms capable of evaluating the difference between the sum of external forces, the sum of the force of the self, and the summability of the forces of similar beings and preferring this last option in a scale of fearfulness. I have an alternative theory: the fear on which society is based is not the fear towards each other, but the negligible fear of other similar beings in emergency situations. This in so far as it was a motive that led to collect many of the same species in a place, where occurred an experience such that the main part of that collection could then remember that they shared the same fear state in the others. In accord, society would be based on recognition of similarity, and not on fear of dissimilarities. A book to meditate on- and to learn from how to write.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Guida Al·lès

    "La revancha, si sólo mira hacia el pasado, no es nada más que un cierto triunfo y gloria del yo, que no apunta a ninguna finalidad, pues la finalidad es algo por venir. Mas aquello que no tiene finalidad es vano". (pàg 88). "La revancha, si sólo mira hacia el pasado, no es nada más que un cierto triunfo y gloria del yo, que no apunta a ninguna finalidad, pues la finalidad es algo por venir. Mas aquello que no tiene finalidad es vano". (pàg 88).

  9. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Reimann

  10. 5 out of 5

    Miro R

  11. 5 out of 5

    Constance Burwell

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Hudák

  15. 5 out of 5

    Usman Raza

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vitor Lunas

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  18. 4 out of 5

    Darren

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jason Lee

  20. 5 out of 5

    Luigi Catellani

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lucas Roda

  22. 4 out of 5

    Asier López Gordón

  23. 4 out of 5

    Yoruichi

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andres Rojas

  25. 5 out of 5

    Justin Rosenberger

  26. 4 out of 5

    N Kaplan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Asad Baig

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ollie

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