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Selling a Screenplay: The Screenwriter's Guide to Hollywood

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- Breaks Down the Business of Screenwriting - Explains What the Buyer Looks For - Shows You What to Do to Get in the Door - Tackles the Pitching Process - Provides Personal Insights from Famous Screenwriters Everybody has a story to tell. Everybody wants to write the great American screenplay. But what do you do after it’s written? How do you sell it? Studio honchos. Devel - Breaks Down the Business of Screenwriting - Explains What the Buyer Looks For - Shows You What to Do to Get in the Door - Tackles the Pitching Process - Provides Personal Insights from Famous Screenwriters Everybody has a story to tell. Everybody wants to write the great American screenplay. But what do you do after it’s written? How do you sell it? Studio honchos. Development Executives. Independent Producers. What do they want? Do you need an agent or manager to get it into production? Selling a screenplay can mean earning $250,000 or more, so competition is fierce. Syd Field gives you an insider’s look at the movie and TV industry, packed with essential tips from the pros. Selling a Screenplay is a must-have guide for every screenwriter, filled with frank real-life advice from Hollywood’s most powerful deal makers and most celebrated screenwriters. They all started somewhere.


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- Breaks Down the Business of Screenwriting - Explains What the Buyer Looks For - Shows You What to Do to Get in the Door - Tackles the Pitching Process - Provides Personal Insights from Famous Screenwriters Everybody has a story to tell. Everybody wants to write the great American screenplay. But what do you do after it’s written? How do you sell it? Studio honchos. Devel - Breaks Down the Business of Screenwriting - Explains What the Buyer Looks For - Shows You What to Do to Get in the Door - Tackles the Pitching Process - Provides Personal Insights from Famous Screenwriters Everybody has a story to tell. Everybody wants to write the great American screenplay. But what do you do after it’s written? How do you sell it? Studio honchos. Development Executives. Independent Producers. What do they want? Do you need an agent or manager to get it into production? Selling a screenplay can mean earning $250,000 or more, so competition is fierce. Syd Field gives you an insider’s look at the movie and TV industry, packed with essential tips from the pros. Selling a Screenplay is a must-have guide for every screenwriter, filled with frank real-life advice from Hollywood’s most powerful deal makers and most celebrated screenwriters. They all started somewhere.

30 review for Selling a Screenplay: The Screenwriter's Guide to Hollywood

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gary Reger

    First the confession: I didn't read this whole book. I got through the first 49 pages and then skipped around, a chapter here, a chapter there. So take my reaction with the grains of salt it deserves. Field interviewed players at all levels of the movie business, from agents to script readers, to see what they would advise if a screenwriter hoped to sell a screenplay. While their answers are colored by their professional relation to the process of moving a screenplay from typewriter (more on that First the confession: I didn't read this whole book. I got through the first 49 pages and then skipped around, a chapter here, a chapter there. So take my reaction with the grains of salt it deserves. Field interviewed players at all levels of the movie business, from agents to script readers, to see what they would advise if a screenwriter hoped to sell a screenplay. While their answers are colored by their professional relation to the process of moving a screenplay from typewriter (more on that below) to premier, the advice they all give really boils down to two principles: write a good screenplay with strong characters and a compelling plot, and believe passionately in your project. Oh, and it helps a lot to know people. That's about it. Just how this advice is supposed to help the hopeful writer at her computer in Iowa or Alabama isn't particularly clear. Field marbles his advice with cute stories, several coming from the success that his screenwriting students had, others from his own long career. I've read novels set in Hollywood written in the 1920s and 1990s, and it's striking how little the structure of its culture has changed. With its competitiveness, back-biting (which, however, Field rarely alludes to), personality- and network-driven decision-making, and focus on money and status, Field's Hollywood could be Fatty Arbuckle's. (Field in fact tried to write a screenplay about Arbuckle's trials, but couldn't come to an arrangement with the actor's lawyer's grandson for access to his papers.) Everyone wants to sell everyone else something. Sometimes Hollywood comes across as a brush salesmen's convention. Today's Hollywood I know little about, but I suspect there have been at least some changes thanks to the explosion of venues demanding what Field unabashedly calls "product." (He seems oblivious to the ironies in treating the creativity he seems to insist on as if it discharged in vacuum cleaners.) When Field wrote in 1989, a handful of TV-based distributors had just begun to emerge. Today the market is bursting, and the demand for "product" must be astronomical. Whether that creates any wider opportunities for the new screenwriter I don't know. Field's own career was not as a screenwriter but a mentor to screenwriters, teaching classes and publishing how-to books. Evidently his advice about the three-act structure has become gospel. And, to be perfectly honest, his basic advice is still no doubt well-taken: write a good script and believe in it. No guarantees, though.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tayfun

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Thompson

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    Jason Harmon

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    Colin

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    Marge Destler

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    Jason

  8. 4 out of 5

    CompassionateRationalist

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paul Cope

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kara

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    Ben

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    John Ciuba

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    Tom Bourne

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dan

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    Sarah Granger

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    Chris Mitchell

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jon Shai

  18. 5 out of 5

    John

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    Nikki Pope

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tobias Desomer

  21. 4 out of 5

    ياسر ثابت

  22. 4 out of 5

    Robert Clifton Storey Jr

  23. 4 out of 5

    richard

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    Paul

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    Robert Monroe

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    Cat

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

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    Melissa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Schmacko

  30. 4 out of 5

    Yago Mesa

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