web site hit counter Fuck Yeah, Video Games: The Life and Extra Lives of a Professional Nerd - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Fuck Yeah, Video Games: The Life and Extra Lives of a Professional Nerd

Availability: Ready to download

As Daniel Hardcastle careers towards thirty, he looks back on what has really made him happy in life: the friends, the romances… the video games. Told through encounters with the most remarkable – and the most mind-boggling – games of the last thirty-odd years, Fuck Yeah, Video Games is also a love letter to the greatest hobby in the world. From God of War to Tomb Raider, P As Daniel Hardcastle careers towards thirty, he looks back on what has really made him happy in life: the friends, the romances… the video games. Told through encounters with the most remarkable – and the most mind-boggling – games of the last thirty-odd years, Fuck Yeah, Video Games is also a love letter to the greatest hobby in the world. From God of War to Tomb Raider, Pokémon to The Sims, Daniel relives each game with countless in-jokes, obscure references and his signature wit, as well as intricate, original illustrations by Rebecca Maughan. Alongside this march of merriment are chapters dedicated to the hardware behind the games: a veritable history of Sony, Nintendo, Sega and Atari consoles. Joyous, absurd, personal and at times sweary, Daniel's memoir is a celebration of the sheer brilliance of video games.


Compare

As Daniel Hardcastle careers towards thirty, he looks back on what has really made him happy in life: the friends, the romances… the video games. Told through encounters with the most remarkable – and the most mind-boggling – games of the last thirty-odd years, Fuck Yeah, Video Games is also a love letter to the greatest hobby in the world. From God of War to Tomb Raider, P As Daniel Hardcastle careers towards thirty, he looks back on what has really made him happy in life: the friends, the romances… the video games. Told through encounters with the most remarkable – and the most mind-boggling – games of the last thirty-odd years, Fuck Yeah, Video Games is also a love letter to the greatest hobby in the world. From God of War to Tomb Raider, Pokémon to The Sims, Daniel relives each game with countless in-jokes, obscure references and his signature wit, as well as intricate, original illustrations by Rebecca Maughan. Alongside this march of merriment are chapters dedicated to the hardware behind the games: a veritable history of Sony, Nintendo, Sega and Atari consoles. Joyous, absurd, personal and at times sweary, Daniel's memoir is a celebration of the sheer brilliance of video games.

30 review for Fuck Yeah, Video Games: The Life and Extra Lives of a Professional Nerd

  1. 5 out of 5

    Karen Mace

    As a huge fan of computer games - I still have my Atari, Commodore 64 and countless Nintendo consoles - I knew this was going to be my kind of book! And I wasn't wrong! Although the author mainly features games from the 90's, it's still written in a way that I connected with and has now left me itching to go and buy a new console or two and try out some more of the games he has recommended! This is a love letter to computer games! The moments in our lives where we remember a certain game that coi As a huge fan of computer games - I still have my Atari, Commodore 64 and countless Nintendo consoles - I knew this was going to be my kind of book! And I wasn't wrong! Although the author mainly features games from the 90's, it's still written in a way that I connected with and has now left me itching to go and buy a new console or two and try out some more of the games he has recommended! This is a love letter to computer games! The moments in our lives where we remember a certain game that coincided with a memory and how it made us feel. The fact that you could be cool at school if you were good at playing certain games! The different lives you could pretend to have through playing these games and how you could see a whole new side to a person by the way they reacted during their time playing a game! It also highlights the changes that there's been over the years in playing games and what video games meant - it used to be for fun but now it all seems to be about how much money can be made. Something that I struggle to get my head around at times to be fair and I just wonder if that takes away that element of escapism that games used to offer me, as nowadays they have to be taken so seriously. Illustrated brilliantly by his wife, this book was such a blast to read. So many funny footnotes alongside fascinating facts, I think it's a book that will appeal to so many different people. And not only does he focus on the great games, he mentions the stinkers too - the hits and the misses, the classics and the clunks! How some games worked because of their simplicity and how others were just complete madness! It also looks at the main players behind the games - Sony, Sega, Atari, Nintendo along with many of the top games such as Sims, Mario, Sonic, Fortnite and Tomb Raider and the impact each of these games had at the time. It brought back so many fun memories for me and has made me learn a lot more about the video game industry and history too and I can't wait to start my homework now of playing some of the games he mentions in his top list!! Fabulous fun!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Omar Alhashimi

    I've watched Dan's videos for 8 years. The first video I ever saw of his was "Let's play indie games - Overgrowth". That video released on the 24th of December 2011. I was in the 11th grade at the time. Meaning I've been watching Dan as a highschooler, a university student, an engineer, and finally a married man. Strangely I have stuck by him, still to this day I watch all of his videos. Which doesn't really happen. If I try and remember the Youtubers I watched back in 2011, most if not all of t I've watched Dan's videos for 8 years. The first video I ever saw of his was "Let's play indie games - Overgrowth". That video released on the 24th of December 2011. I was in the 11th grade at the time. Meaning I've been watching Dan as a highschooler, a university student, an engineer, and finally a married man. Strangely I have stuck by him, still to this day I watch all of his videos. Which doesn't really happen. If I try and remember the Youtubers I watched back in 2011, most if not all of them I have unsubscribed from. Not Dan though. But my fascination for Dan happened way later. Not in 2011. But in 2013. That was when I was in University. I studied abroad, and had a really tough time. As a shy person, it was hard for me to build relationships. I had a lot of trouble sleeping. But I found the solution, I used to watch a Nerdcubed video everyday before going to bed. All of those awful thoughts in my head would go away for that one moment, and I was able to sleep peacefully every night after laughing my ass off. It's actually strange because I have such a polar opposite taste to Dan when it comes to video games. But it doesn't matter to me. Although I can't play something like Planet Coaster, watching someone like Dan spend 40 mins getting the lighting together is so entertaining for some reason. Its because he loves games, and I love seeing people genuinely enjoy games. So why am I giving all of you this backstory? Well because this book gave me the exact same feeling I felt during those sleepless nights abroad watching his videos. This is a book that brings you back to those special moments in videogames. The joy of discovering something new and fresh. Dan gives us a perfect balance of personal stories and how they can relate to video games. Only Dan can make a story about a Michelin star restaurant relate to Metal Gear Solid 2. But it works! And it makes sense. His humor is on point and reminds me of why I love watching his videos. Even though I dont have a connection to most of the games he talked about, the way he was writing about it made me feel like I've been playing this game forever. It is a wonderful book filled with passion and love for games. I highly recommend this book. I wish Dan all the best and cant wait for his next endeavor

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gijs Van

    Writer: Daniel Hardcastle Publisher: Unbound Platform: Hardback, Ebook, audiobook Released: 2019 What is it? A book about video games. What is it really? A love letter to everything gaming. In short: If you want to explain to someone why videogames can be amazing pieces of art, have them read a single chapter in this book. Daniel perfectly explains why games can be truly awesome (original meaning of the word). Some context: My parents never really liked computers, so I was never really raised to do ver Writer: Daniel Hardcastle Publisher: Unbound Platform: Hardback, Ebook, audiobook Released: 2019 What is it? A book about video games. What is it really? A love letter to everything gaming. In short: If you want to explain to someone why videogames can be amazing pieces of art, have them read a single chapter in this book. Daniel perfectly explains why games can be truly awesome (original meaning of the word). Some context: My parents never really liked computers, so I was never really raised to do very much with them. In hindsight not such a great idea, although I now do own an absolute boatload of books and have probably forgotten more stories than I can remember. I'm not even 30 yet. However, I've always had a keen interest for computergames. After all, how often is it that a completely new medium comes along? So when youtube really became a thing I dove in there and watched all sorts of gaming stuff. Enter Nerdcubed, aka Daniel Hardcastle. Open and honest to his fans, hilarious when he wants to be and informative in other moments. So when he said he was writing a book the entire fanbase was getting hyped up. And boy did he deliver. I can recommend this book to anyone who has even the remotest interest in games and gaming culture. Not in the dry boring way you might expect, but in a fun and exciting way filled with endearing personal stories to boot. If you're interested in what the book actually looks like: this revieuw is written in rougly the same format (except shorter, less funny, and without beautifull art). Each chapter focusses on a specific game, opening with a short story from Daniels personal life, and then continues into the game itsself, it's major features, maybe some stuff that made the news when it came out, etc. Several times in the book he pauses talking about the games and talks about the consoles instead, Nintendo, Sony, the lot of them. Honestly these chapters are the driest this book gets, and it's still amazing. Even if the information itsself isn't very interesting the little illustrations make it worth it. And this is the time I mention what truly lifts this book to 5 stars: the artwork. the text is all good, but the art is just something else. From Daniels face stuck on Lara Crofts body (very confusing) to a woodlice with a toothpick cellotaped to its back (it's in the lore!), all of the art is poster worthy, and I can't say how glad I am that I went for the collecter's edition when I backed it on unbound (consider this a disclaimer I guess), so I now have some of that art gracing the walls of my student flat.

  4. 5 out of 5

    elis classified surname

    if u like dan, you'll like this book. if u love dan, you'll love this book. it reads as the most polished plays video, interspersed with ramblings reminescent of streams and those long road trip videos. its just, great. its a good fun time, looking back (mostly) at the utter joy video games can be. (there may be one or two exceptions. no spoilers) sometimes its nice to just focus on the positives when theres so much negatives around, yaknow? honestly, idk what to say if uve never seen a nerdcubed if u like dan, you'll like this book. if u love dan, you'll love this book. it reads as the most polished plays video, interspersed with ramblings reminescent of streams and those long road trip videos. its just, great. its a good fun time, looking back (mostly) at the utter joy video games can be. (there may be one or two exceptions. no spoilers) sometimes its nice to just focus on the positives when theres so much negatives around, yaknow? honestly, idk what to say if uve never seen a nerdcubed video before! go watch one of his plays videos. if u like it, you'll like this book too. the preview of his next book at the end... whilst small, it holds so much promise. nerdcubed my dude u can tell stories super good and i cant wait to read more of them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    James

    I have to admit to having a love/hate relationship to videogames and gaming. At points in my life I’ve been a gamer. My early teens in the late 1980’s/early 1990’s (yes, I really am that old) were spent playing Dungeon Master, a Dungeons & Dragons type of role-playing game, on a machine that I can’t even recall. But then I discovered girls, underage drinking and worse, and stopped playing. Years later, after graduating from university, I played out my god-complex with Sid Meier’s Civilisation, a I have to admit to having a love/hate relationship to videogames and gaming. At points in my life I’ve been a gamer. My early teens in the late 1980’s/early 1990’s (yes, I really am that old) were spent playing Dungeon Master, a Dungeons & Dragons type of role-playing game, on a machine that I can’t even recall. But then I discovered girls, underage drinking and worse, and stopped playing. Years later, after graduating from university, I played out my god-complex with Sid Meier’s Civilisation, a game which had you guide a tribe of cavemen through the stages of civilizational development, all the while battling and conquering other tribes and cities, until they were the most advanced and powerful on earth. But I got bored of that and besides, responsibility in the form of work and family got in the way. In recent years I’ve dabbled with my crime fiction tendencies, fancying myself as an assassin and hitman, and playing games with those titles (Assassin’s Creed and Hitman). But again, I’ve eventually got bored and found they just take too much time. The point is that I’m not a videogames aficionado in the true sense of the word, I don’t share the author’s love and affection for them, these days preferring books or film. But I certainly can understand their appeal. Fuck Yeah, Videogames is a peon to gaming and the games that Daniel Hardcastle has played, an ode to them, an extended love letter if you will. He’s clearly younger than me (there’s no Dungeon Master here, nor Sid Meier’s Civilisation) and those that do cross with my later period of gaming differ from my choices (no mention of Assassin’s Creed or Hitman) but that’s ok, you don’t have to agree with his choices, or even to have played the games at all. In fact, you don’t even have to be a gamer to enjoy this book, the author’s enthusiasm is infectious and with entertaining illustrations courtesy of Rebecca Maughan, this book is really brought to life. I very much enjoyed Fuck Yeah, Videogames. It’s not my usual type of read or my preferred genre, but one can’t help but get caught up in his enthusiasm.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Don Jimmy Reviews

    to see the original review, including images, visit Don Jimmy Reviews I have been playing video games for a very long time. My first memories of gaming are playing Mario Bros on my cousins Nes – for some reason I used to call Luigi “Lennox”, no idea why – and Revenge of Shinobi on my friends Sega. I didn’t have a game system at the time. It was to my delight that one year at Christmas a Commodore Amiga 64 was revealed to the family and I found out you could get games on it. After realising that p to see the original review, including images, visit Don Jimmy Reviews I have been playing video games for a very long time. My first memories of gaming are playing Mario Bros on my cousins Nes – for some reason I used to call Luigi “Lennox”, no idea why – and Revenge of Shinobi on my friends Sega. I didn’t have a game system at the time. It was to my delight that one year at Christmas a Commodore Amiga 64 was revealed to the family and I found out you could get games on it. After realising that paint wasn’t in fact a game, we found Silly Putty – one of the greatest games of all time (to the mind of a child). Of course, years later I tried it again on an emulator and had no idea what was happening… The Amiga of course ran on floppy disks, and Silly Putty ran on several them. One of my worst memories is sliding the metal part of one of these floppy disks and touching the plastic bit. Silly Putty was no more. Other games that made an appearance on the Amiga that stick out in my mind are Indiana Jones which it took a long time to figure out. I only ever made it as far as the train. Street Fighter 2 which almost always ended up with two people on one keyboard having arguments like YOU CAN’T BE DHALSIM, THAT’S CHEATING. Battle Chess in which the pieces were actually little soldiers who would fight eachother when trying to take a square. The graphics of this at the time blew my mind. I just googled it and I’m incredibly disappointed. I also had Nightbreed – which is the first game I recall completing and doing a little dance in celebration at doing so. I’m also sure I was too young to play it. Another lasting memory of mine is playing the super awesome Mario Bros rip off for systems that are not Nintendo – The Great Giana Sisters which was so like Mario that it was comical – but it was also fucking awful. It played like it was in slow motion. It must be seen to be believed so take a look below (but maybe after you’ve read the rest of my review) . Moving on from the Amiga, we got a “Proper PC” after a few years which I had lots and lots of games for over the years. I can’t remember which order they came in but they ranged from FIFA 98 which I played to death(and remains the best ever FIFA) Dave Mirra Freestyle BMX which had possibly the best soundtrack ever (and introduced me to Cypress Hill’s metal side) and Settlers 3 – which I loved too. However, the strangest game to last in my memory is Baldies. Baldies was a strategy game which put you in charge of a bunch of short, bald people. You could breed baldies and give them jobs to invent weapons etc all with the purpose of winning the war against – and I shit you not – the Hairies. Even though it sounds awful I adored it. Even talking about it makes me want to play it again. Of course, these were some of the forts PC games I played. There were many more after but nothing ever “new” as the PC didn’t have a graphics card – options were limited. When I was in college, I opted for an Xbox original over a PS2. I remember debating which one to go for and deciding on an Xbox for Halo – and I have stuck with Xbox ever since. This generation has really tested my patience though as so far all the top games have been on PlayStation (God of War, Last of Us, and Spiderman are games I am supremely jealous of). At least I have Gears of War and Halo though… Anyway, I feel like I have been typing for ages and I haven’t even mentioned the book properly yet, so let’s get to the point here. Fuck Yeah Video Games is a memoir of a gamer. Sure, the chapters are mostly based on classic games (one chapter is based on the worst game ever but whatever) but the author also works in stories from real life which link in. Early in the book he tells a story about trying to find a mysterious van in Pokémon Red and Blue and it is brilliantly funny. This level of storytelling and humour continues throughout and I was laughing throughout. Mr. Hardcastle is a very funny person indeed. If, like me, you have never played the likes of Bloodborne, God of War, or…. Bratz: Rock Angelz and you want to read a gamers experience. Then this is the book for you. Even if it is just to prove to yourself two things 1) You really need to buy or get a loan of a PS4 and play God of War 2) Bratz: Rock Angelz is a game you definitely never ever want to read about again. While they are less funny than the “game” chapters of the book the chapters about manufacturers Sega, Nintendo, Sony, and Atari are incredibly informative giving me a lot of information I was completely unaware of. It also showed me that even companies at the top of their game make numerous numerous mistakes. At the same time, I was a little taken aback that Microsoft wasn’t on the list – but the reasons given for doing this can’t be argued against. He’s just right for not including them. This is a book about gaming for gamers. Every gamer should be able to relate to the topics here. I haven’t played (and in some cases heard of) a lot of the games mentioned. Even so, reading Daniel’s experiences with the games was brilliant. If anything, it has made me want to hop on to the game store and pick up everything I can (yes, including the game mentioned as the worst ever, I’m strangely drawn to finding out just how bad it is). Before we conclude, it would be absolutely impossible to talk about this book without giving a very worthy mention to the illustrator Rebecca who has done a fantastic job. The illustrations bring a further injection to the book, and the attention to detail is outstanding. These illustrations alone are one reason I recommend picking up a hardback (or at least a physical) copy of the book. It’s a beauty and the team have done a great job putting it together. While Daniel obviously comes down on the wrong side of the Mario Vs Sonic debate, I’m willing to overlook it and give this a top score (see how nice I am, just like Mario. Not like that pompous hedgehog who is responsible for the worst game I have ever bought). It has everything going for it. It is insightful, full of interesting facts and is brilliantly funny. He’s knocked this one out of the park – which probably means we can go home and play more video games. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED – All the Stars (Well 5)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    GAMER’S WILL SWEAR BY HARDCASTLE’S REFERENCE BOOK The first thing I can tell you about this month’s second book, is that quite a few of my readers are not going to like it from the get-go. But there will be a group of you who will be fascinated by this book, even excited. The book is Fuck Yeah Video Games by Daniel Hardcastle and published by Unbound (www.unbound.com) on the 19th September. Another thing a few readers won’t like, is reading this book on your morning and evening commute as I found GAMER’S WILL SWEAR BY HARDCASTLE’S REFERENCE BOOK The first thing I can tell you about this month’s second book, is that quite a few of my readers are not going to like it from the get-go. But there will be a group of you who will be fascinated by this book, even excited. The book is Fuck Yeah Video Games by Daniel Hardcastle and published by Unbound (www.unbound.com) on the 19th September. Another thing a few readers won’t like, is reading this book on your morning and evening commute as I found out. When I was met with a few raised eyebrows and tutting on the LUAS, Dublin’s light rail system (owing to the large yellow expletive on the cover). I even think a couple of mothers pulled their children closer and shielded their eyes. The book charts the history of video games from the humble tennis game, where you moved a cursor up and down the screen trying to hit a bouncing white square past your opponent’s cursor to score a point, to today’s modern games which are almost movie-esque in story-line and action, These allow you to play with or against not just a person or persons in the same room, but random strangers not even on the same continent, who more often than not may be half your age. These modern video games also feature so much detail, that the afore mentioned tennis game is now not too far removed from the hoop and stick our grandparents derived so much pleasure from as kids. The book also looks back at the success and failures of the large game designers and console producers (three of them to be exact) Sony , Nintendo and Atari… Who???(google it). Gaming nowadays has progressed from something aimed initially at an age group spanning 8 – 18yrs, to today, where forty-somethings like myself are not ashamed to say they are gamers. No anoraks here, unlike train spotters and model train enthusiasts! Oh no, we stay warm and toasty in our bedrooms and “Mancave’s”. Also, with the likes of the Nintendo WII console sports packs, gaming is now a family pastime and regularly seen as the ideal post-Christmas dinner entertainment. Where everyone from the youngest to the grandparents gets involved. Then of course you only have to see the news recently, where a teenager in America took home $3million for winning the Fortnite (it’s a popular video game) World Cup in front of a packed out sports stadium and even bigger online audience; and you wonder why some people such as Hardcastle can make a living out playing games all day long. Yes, my name’s Adrian and I’m a gamer, but I’m not nerdy about. I don’t go out and buy a game and play it constantly, unless the wife’ away or out for the evening. This due in part to having responsibilities, I only really returned to gaming a few years ago when I requested a PS4 as a present for my fortieth, after a hiatus from when I played them in my youth. FYVG is all in all an entertaining and light-hearted read. But it’s really a reference book, namely because it has footnotes, which I find distracting in anything that is not a self-help book, textbook or encyclopedia. It’s not a book you are going read from cover to cover. It’s more like a swimming pool at a holiday resort, there for you to dip in and out of it on a regular basis, while leaving it on your coffee table or bookshelf as a conversation starter. My initial reaction when getting it was that its very big. But I soon realised that of the 379 pages only 296 were actually part of the book, the rest were a list of 101 of the best games ever published, a glossary of terms used in the book, author bio and crowd funding acknowledgements, of which there are quite a few. As for the games featured in the book, I’ve only played two. As for the 101 best games ever published listed at the back, its seven. Does that really make me a gamer? I was personally disappointed there where weren’t references to my current favourites “No Mans Sky”, which has had its own problematic road to success. Then there’s Tom Clancy’s Division 1 and 2, the numerous Call Of Duty games and for a real history lesson, games played on the Comodore 64, ZX Spectrum and my own Dragon 32(yep, Google it). Admittedly those three weren’t games consoles, but before consoles arrived on the scene video games were played on computers and publishers still release PC editions of popular titles these days. This is English author Daniel Hardcastle’s (@danNerdCubed) first book, despite what the inside cover might say. He’s is a gamer and regular broadcaster on Twitch – an online channel solely dedicated to allowing you to watch people like Daniel play video games… I’ve never watched any of these, as I’d rather be playing the game myself. The lavish illustrations in the book are provided by Daniel’s wife Rebecca and these include caricatures of the leading crowd funders who helped get this book published. Overall, I got the feeling that Hardcastle was trying to emulate columnist, author and TV presenter Jeremy Clarkson in his writing style and general ladishness, even referencing him several times throughout the book. But as much a I liked this book, I thought he tried too hard and, in the end If I discovered “Jezza” had ghost-written this book, I wouldn’t be surprised. I did like FYVG, as I have an interest in the topic. But again, it is a book with a niche readership, despite the number of people worldwide who play video games. You’ll also find quite a few of the younger generation aren’t big readers. But again, as it’s quite easy to read in bite sized chunks, this maybe a popular read for them and also a way to reignite interest in the older games discussed in the book, that you’ll find in the second hand section of gaming stores and car boot sales. Reviewed by : Adrian Murphy on www.thelibrarydoor.me

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Bradford

    Great book. I love the article/essay format anyway, and this is a book by one of my favourite writers about one of my favourite topics. Injects humour and 25 years experience into this fantastic book. Glad I backed it, cannot wait for the next one.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    I have many, many fond memories of playing the Sega Mega Drive, riding fire-breathing dragons while wielding an axe before zooming along at high speeds collecting rings as a blue blur. Then came the arrival of the N64 and discovering one of the most awesome games ever, Goldeneye. Weekends were spent running around a statue graveyard on a spilt-screen while trying to take each other out. Not to mention the fun additions of special unlock-able characters and weapons, LAZERS! You see dear reader, l I have many, many fond memories of playing the Sega Mega Drive, riding fire-breathing dragons while wielding an axe before zooming along at high speeds collecting rings as a blue blur. Then came the arrival of the N64 and discovering one of the most awesome games ever, Goldeneye. Weekends were spent running around a statue graveyard on a spilt-screen while trying to take each other out. Not to mention the fun additions of special unlock-able characters and weapons, LAZERS! You see dear reader, like books, games have always been a part of my life. When I was younger I would play them with my older brother, then in my teenage years I got my own PS2 and spent most of my pocket-money renting them out at good old Blockbusters. Now as an “Adult” (yes, I did the whole quotation thing) I find myself married to not only a drummer but an avid gamer. So you can imagine my pure delight when given the chance to relive fond memories by reviewing this hidden trophy. *Squee* Where to start? I loved this book. It’s nostalgic, witty and just generally awesome. The footnotes alone could make up a stand-alone book. Normally I find footnotes a pain but here I found myself excited for the next set, to say they are amusing would be an understatement. Hardcastle brings a buttload (yes I just said that) of personality to this book. He doesn’t bore and overload the reader with endless facts, figures and information but talks to you like a much aquatinted friend. He writes about his personal experiences of growing up playing games and has tonnes of comic anecdotes to tell. It made me itch to play, to dive back into some of my favourites while experiencing some new discoveries. The reader is taken on an adventure through the past 30 odd years of gaming and shown some real beauties and one particularly bad rotten egg; it must not be named. With each game Hardcastle reminisces, we are given a short bio of developer, platform, release date, what it’s about, and my personal favourite; what it’s really about. At the end of the book the reader is treated to a list of the top 101 games of all time which brings light to some much loved forgotten favourites. I highly approve of the top entry, so, so many hours playing that game and nibbling haribo. It was the taste of my teenage years! It was SO GOOD! I won’t spoil it for you dear readers, you’ll have to give it a read to find out. I have to admit, I was a little wary of reading the Hardware History sections. But fear not, for surprisingly I found it all rather fascinating. It wasn’t all bore, bore, bore with dull tedious information that made me want to fall asleep. He brought new life and humour into the fold which was fun to read and relatable. I am not in the least bit surprised that this is the most successful book in UK crowdfunding history, having been funded in as little as 42 minutes with over 9,000 supporters. That’s INSANE! I suppose having over 2.6 million subscribers on Youtube kinda helps but still, that’s dedication that needs applauding. This book is a must read for any gamer, not only does it feature a foreword by the legendary game designer Tim Schafer but there is also a guest chapter from Youtuber Stuart Ashen (aka Ashens). Seriously, check him out if you have no idea who I’m talking about. His humour is electric! I also have to give a big round of applause to the illustrator, Rebecca Maughan. With Hardcastle’s writing and her loveable sketches this book felt even more personal. They are adorable illustrations that bring my high pitched squee out whenever I see something cute. They made me smile and remember my gaming days fondly. It is the perfect included DLC to this book, I can’t imagine it without them…in fact I don’t want to. I give Fuck Yeah Video Games By Daniel Hardcastle a Five out of Five paw rating. Just YES! I have totally geeked out over this book and rightly so. It’s just so amazing that we live in a world where books with devoted passions such as gaming are becoming the norm. Because it does bring people together and makes you feel not quite so alone. The mythical beast of the avid gamer living in their mum’s basement is just a façade. Gamers are often the most lovely people out there and what is more mind-blowing than being able to plug into another world to experience an endless supply of adventures. Become a hero, legend and sometimes even a goat. (Goat Simulator…less said the better).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Steph Warren

    *I received a free ARC of this book with thanks to the author, Unbound, and Anne Cater of Random Things Blog Tours. The decision to review and my opinions are my own.* If you love video games and enjoy laughing, then this is the book for you. Please tell me I don’t need to give you a language warning… you’ve all seen the title of the book, yes?! In this book, Daniel Hardcastle romps joyously through various games and consoles, apparently at random, peppering his opinions with personal anecdotes, wi *I received a free ARC of this book with thanks to the author, Unbound, and Anne Cater of Random Things Blog Tours. The decision to review and my opinions are my own.* If you love video games and enjoy laughing, then this is the book for you. Please tell me I don’t need to give you a language warning… you’ve all seen the title of the book, yes?! In this book, Daniel Hardcastle romps joyously through various games and consoles, apparently at random, peppering his opinions with personal anecdotes, witty asides, and Pratchettesque foot notes. Each short chapter features a different game or console and few are limited to just a straightforward review, but instead gloriously reimagined as fictional prison diaries, recaps of his childhood mission plans and reminiscences about schoolyard swaps and secrets. Personally I am mainly a PC gamer these days, but have (and in some cases still do) owned a SNES, Sega Mega Drive, GameBoy, PS1-4 (inclusive) and Ninetendo DS. Not to mention my early days playing Jumping Jack on the ZX Spectrum. So I have a vague clue about the games and consoles that appealed to me (The Sims, The Elder Scrolls, Sonic, Mario, Donkey Kong Country, Civilization) and less knowledge about the more mainstream war,, combat and sports games. Regardless of whether I was familiar with the games and consoles covered in the book though, Daniel Hardcastle’s easy-to-read style and tongue-in-cheek humour had me totally hooked and, having intended to dip in and out of the book, I found myself unable to put it down until the last page. Hardcastle’s enthusiasm for games, lack of ego when it comes to his skills, and sheer joy in bantering with (at!) fellow fans shone through every page. Likewise, Rebecca Maughan’s illustrations reflect the same joy and humour, perfectly complementing the text and adding an extra layer of enjoyment for the reader. In reading this book I spluttered with audible laughter so many times that my husband has begged me to buy him his own copy for Christmas (he claims I’ve sprayed pop all over my copy). In short, I wholeheartedly recommend this book to fans of video games and funny stories. Game Over. My progress in Sonic the Hedgehog was ironically slow. First, I had to work out what jumping was for. Thinking about it, jumping is probably the most frequently included part of gaming that doesn’t come up often in your daily life.4 If the only way to get somewhere was by jumping I’d probably call up some health and safety department and complain. The only time I ever jump these days is if a spider surprises me in the garage. Not just jumping, mind; any variation from a continuous flat surface could ruin my day. It tut almost out loud every time the gap between the train and the platform is particularly wide. 4 Fruit eating is another big one. If anyone ate as much fruit as early gaming characters, they’d catch whatever the opposite of scurvy is. – Daniel Hardcastle, Fuck Yeah, Video Games Review by Steph Warren of Bookshine and Readbows blog https://bookshineandreadbows.wordpres...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    A great first outing by author Danial Hardcastle. This book contains detailed information about interesting games & games consoles from a variety of regions and times over the past 30 years. That information while useful & interesting to some is not what makes this book outstanding. The pure joy & love of the subject matter, along with razor sharp wit and humor take what would be a droll informational text and make it into a fun filled page turner that you want to share with friends. Beyond the A great first outing by author Danial Hardcastle. This book contains detailed information about interesting games & games consoles from a variety of regions and times over the past 30 years. That information while useful & interesting to some is not what makes this book outstanding. The pure joy & love of the subject matter, along with razor sharp wit and humor take what would be a droll informational text and make it into a fun filled page turner that you want to share with friends. Beyond the text itself is the creative genius of the artwork throughout. Renowned Artist Rebecca Maughan has wonderfully imaginative illustrations on nearly every page. The artwork inside is largely left uncolored and begs the more talented readers to color in as they read along. While this is a book whose audience is clearly intended to be adult, older children can also clearly get enjoyment out of it. Is any book truly perfect? No. But having an audience restriction which excludes young children only takes this book down to a 4.9 and there's no way I can allow that to round down to 4. Therefore, yes. This book deserves a 5 of 5 star rating.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Cole

    One of the best Books I've ever read. in recent years reading has become hard for me, with distractions mounting, it's a lot harder than when I was a kid. but this book filled me with a childhood wonder that's hard to put into words. to read about all these things I love so much is brilliant, and although you need a bit of an understanding of Internet and gaming culture, it is a beautifully crafted piece of comedic writing. Fuck Yeah. One of the best Books I've ever read. in recent years reading has become hard for me, with distractions mounting, it's a lot harder than when I was a kid. but this book filled me with a childhood wonder that's hard to put into words. to read about all these things I love so much is brilliant, and although you need a bit of an understanding of Internet and gaming culture, it is a beautifully crafted piece of comedic writing. Fuck Yeah.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    A hilariously, personal and honest book about Dan's love for video games. Besides his personal opinion and stories, he did his research and not only looks into games that he encountered and reviewed over the years, but also at the hardware and the history of it. The book is funny, insightful and lovely illustrated by Rebecca Maughan. The book really is a page turner for everyone who likes Dan, video games or the nostalgia of video games. A book I really recommend. A hilariously, personal and honest book about Dan's love for video games. Besides his personal opinion and stories, he did his research and not only looks into games that he encountered and reviewed over the years, but also at the hardware and the history of it. The book is funny, insightful and lovely illustrated by Rebecca Maughan. The book really is a page turner for everyone who likes Dan, video games or the nostalgia of video games. A book I really recommend.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Garlick

    Fuck Yeah Video Games, by Daniel Hardcastle, is partially reviewing games and telling life anecdotes. It is witty and hilarious, and the footnotes are amazing. From the Sims to God of War, and including educational information on Sony, Nintendo, Sega and Atari, this is a great book for noobs or expert gamers. Daniel goes by DanNerd3 on YouTube, and I wish I could watch his videos, but they sadly don’t have subtitles – so this book is a good alternative.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Clary Black

    One of the best books I ever touched I was half way through the Dracula book a book I adore and immediately stopped to read this and was glad I did it's funny well written(in Dan's way of that) and just a very nice read will defo be reading again thank your Mr Daniel hardcastle/MrRebecca for this gift One of the best books I ever touched I was half way through the Dracula book a book I adore and immediately stopped to read this and was glad I did it's funny well written(in Dan's way of that) and just a very nice read will defo be reading again thank your Mr Daniel hardcastle/MrRebecca for this gift

  16. 5 out of 5

    James Wright

    If you're fan of videogames or Dan specifically then absolutely buy this. It's basically written like he did a couple hour long stream where he adlibs about the chapters. If you're not into his dark but also silly humour then it's probably not for you but I'd assume you weren't really considering it anyway. If not then absolutely buy it. If you're fan of videogames or Dan specifically then absolutely buy this. It's basically written like he did a couple hour long stream where he adlibs about the chapters. If you're not into his dark but also silly humour then it's probably not for you but I'd assume you weren't really considering it anyway. If not then absolutely buy it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Barry Davies

    I hate reading, i only ever read one book in my life and that was Of Mice And Men I secondary school while being held at gun point. Got this book today and went from bot reading ever to reading 127 pages in one sitting. It so interesting to see someone else gaming career and what they got out of it. Oh and also it really funny to.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jodie

    Hilarious, informative, and wholly irreverent. I've spent many hours over quite a few years listening to this man talk about video games, and it was a pleasure to do so for about six and a half hours more. I highly recommend the audiobook, but be sure to have a look at the lovely art Rebecca did as well. Hilarious, informative, and wholly irreverent. I've spent many hours over quite a few years listening to this man talk about video games, and it was a pleasure to do so for about six and a half hours more. I highly recommend the audiobook, but be sure to have a look at the lovely art Rebecca did as well.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jack Bartlett

    Like many of the reviews here I grew up watching Dan through my teens, loved his Plays series especially. While at university I began to lose touch with gaming and picked up other hobbies, I watched YouTubers like Dan less as I got more into things like reading (and drowned in university work too). Two days ago I walked into Waterstones by chance and picked this book up out of curiosity. Having barely been able to put the book down in the last 48 hours I've finally finished what's been the funnie Like many of the reviews here I grew up watching Dan through my teens, loved his Plays series especially. While at university I began to lose touch with gaming and picked up other hobbies, I watched YouTubers like Dan less as I got more into things like reading (and drowned in university work too). Two days ago I walked into Waterstones by chance and picked this book up out of curiosity. Having barely been able to put the book down in the last 48 hours I've finally finished what's been the funniest book I've read since reading the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy three years ago. Dan's humour effortlessly transfers to writing and it is maintained throughout the book. His anecdotes spread throughout are enjoyable to read, and from how excellently each section of the book is constructed, it is easy to see how passionate Dan is about games. It is wonderful to read and I wish I had supported it on its Unbound campaign. For now I think it's catching up on watching his videos for me!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Warren Glover

    A book I got signed, it's an intensely funny look at the important points of video game history, with even the unfamiliar bits carrying enough to get over some lack of knowledge. The anecdotes were intresting for a fan and the art is amazing with the faces on the consoles being particularly adorable. It is an instant recommendation to anyone interested in video games A book I got signed, it's an intensely funny look at the important points of video game history, with even the unfamiliar bits carrying enough to get over some lack of knowledge. The anecdotes were intresting for a fan and the art is amazing with the faces on the consoles being particularly adorable. It is an instant recommendation to anyone interested in video games

  21. 4 out of 5

    Beth Capp

    Best book I have ever read! Hilarious and informative. Nerdcubed in book form. If you need a laugh or just love video games this book is a must read for everyone! Do yourself a favour and buy it now!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matty Davis

    I am only about 4 or 5 chapters in and I'm already laughing out loud at every page. Brilliantly written, this love letter to video games is a pure delight to read, crafted with passion from a man who simply loves video games! I am only about 4 or 5 chapters in and I'm already laughing out loud at every page. Brilliantly written, this love letter to video games is a pure delight to read, crafted with passion from a man who simply loves video games!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tobias

    So far this is the BEST book I have ever read its witty and humourous and simple to pick up, I mean it's a book, it's a whole lot of laughs even if you dont really follow Nerd³ I would definitely recommend it to all. So far this is the BEST book I have ever read its witty and humourous and simple to pick up, I mean it's a book, it's a whole lot of laughs even if you dont really follow Nerd³ I would definitely recommend it to all.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Zach Cormier

    This book is seriously fantastic. If you’re a fan of video games, Nerdcubed, naughty words or just comedy in general I’d heartily recommend Daniel’s deep dive into the world of video games. His passion for gaming really shines through and he’ll have you laughing out loud regularly. It’s excellent

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rhuaridh Kinghorn

    An absolute blast to read all the way through. The little anecdotes that comprise so much of the books character are a joy, and all hand drawn illustrations in it are simply beautiful. A 10/10 for anyone a fan of witty humour, videogames or biographies.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Really really funny - a great dip in and out book and laugh out loud pretty much the whole way through. Didn't play that game? Dan will make you want to play it in just a few short pages - or go watch someone (him) play it on Youtube. Really really funny - a great dip in and out book and laugh out loud pretty much the whole way through. Didn't play that game? Dan will make you want to play it in just a few short pages - or go watch someone (him) play it on Youtube.

  27. 5 out of 5

    James

    This book had my laughing from cover to cover! Along adorable artwork, hardware history and stores with questionable relation to the games; are the ramblings of a madman who genuinely and wholeheartedly loves video games. I'd definitely recommend it if you shake a similar passion. This book had my laughing from cover to cover! Along adorable artwork, hardware history and stores with questionable relation to the games; are the ramblings of a madman who genuinely and wholeheartedly loves video games. I'd definitely recommend it if you shake a similar passion.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bookreaderviv

    Really enjoyable. Wish he had gone in more detail about Fortnite and prison architect as those are games I actually wanted to know more about now just a little rant or story about something that had nothing really to do with the game

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jake Wilson

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Great book about the author’s experiences in life framed around their experiences with video games (also my name is in it somewhere apparently so I have to give it a good review)

  30. 4 out of 5

    David

    For Daniel, video games are pure joy. Reading about his passion, is also pure joy.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.