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‘Elegant, lucid and funny, this book will appeal to as many readers as there are desires.’—Shohini Ghosh ‘The history of desire in India,’ writes Madhavi Menon in this splendid book, ‘reveals not purity but impurity as a way of life. Not one answer, but many. Not a single history, but multiple tales cutting across laws and boundaries.’ In Bhakti poetry, Radha and Krishna di ‘Elegant, lucid and funny, this book will appeal to as many readers as there are desires.’—Shohini Ghosh ‘The history of desire in India,’ writes Madhavi Menon in this splendid book, ‘reveals not purity but impurity as a way of life. Not one answer, but many. Not a single history, but multiple tales cutting across laws and boundaries.’ In Bhakti poetry, Radha and Krishna disregard marital fidelity, age, time and gender for erotic love. In Sufi dargahs, pirs (spiritual guides) who were married to women are buried alongside their male disciples, as lovers are. Vatsyayana, author of the world’s most famous manual of sex, insists that he did not compose it ‘for the sake of passion’, and remained celibate through the writing of it. Long hair is widely seen as a symbol of sexuality; and yet, shaved off in a temple, it is a sacred offering. Even as the country has a draconian law to punish homosexuality, heterosexual men share the same bed without comment. Hijras are increasingly marginalized; yet gender has historically been understood as fluid rather than fixed. Menon navigates centuries, geographies, personal and public histories, schools of philosophy, literary and cinematic works, as she examines the many—and often surprising—faces of desire in the Indian subcontinent. Her study ranges from the erotic sculptures of Khajuraho to the shrine of the celibate god Ayyappan; from army barracks to public parks; from Empress Nur Jahan’s paan to home-made kohl; from cross-dressing mystics to androgynous gods. It shows us the connections between grammar and sex, between hair and war, between abstinence and pleasure, between love and death. Gloriously subversive, full of extraordinary analyses and insights, this is a book you will read to be enlightened and entertained for years. About the Author Madhavi Menon is professor of English at Ashoka University, and writes on desire and queer theory. She is the author of Wanton Words: Rhetoric and Sexuality in English Renaissance Drama; Unhistorical Shakespeare: Queer Theory in Shakespearean Literature and Film; and Indifference to Difference: On Queer Universalism. She is also the editor of Shakesqueer: A Queer Companion to the Complete Works of Shakespeare.


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‘Elegant, lucid and funny, this book will appeal to as many readers as there are desires.’—Shohini Ghosh ‘The history of desire in India,’ writes Madhavi Menon in this splendid book, ‘reveals not purity but impurity as a way of life. Not one answer, but many. Not a single history, but multiple tales cutting across laws and boundaries.’ In Bhakti poetry, Radha and Krishna di ‘Elegant, lucid and funny, this book will appeal to as many readers as there are desires.’—Shohini Ghosh ‘The history of desire in India,’ writes Madhavi Menon in this splendid book, ‘reveals not purity but impurity as a way of life. Not one answer, but many. Not a single history, but multiple tales cutting across laws and boundaries.’ In Bhakti poetry, Radha and Krishna disregard marital fidelity, age, time and gender for erotic love. In Sufi dargahs, pirs (spiritual guides) who were married to women are buried alongside their male disciples, as lovers are. Vatsyayana, author of the world’s most famous manual of sex, insists that he did not compose it ‘for the sake of passion’, and remained celibate through the writing of it. Long hair is widely seen as a symbol of sexuality; and yet, shaved off in a temple, it is a sacred offering. Even as the country has a draconian law to punish homosexuality, heterosexual men share the same bed without comment. Hijras are increasingly marginalized; yet gender has historically been understood as fluid rather than fixed. Menon navigates centuries, geographies, personal and public histories, schools of philosophy, literary and cinematic works, as she examines the many—and often surprising—faces of desire in the Indian subcontinent. Her study ranges from the erotic sculptures of Khajuraho to the shrine of the celibate god Ayyappan; from army barracks to public parks; from Empress Nur Jahan’s paan to home-made kohl; from cross-dressing mystics to androgynous gods. It shows us the connections between grammar and sex, between hair and war, between abstinence and pleasure, between love and death. Gloriously subversive, full of extraordinary analyses and insights, this is a book you will read to be enlightened and entertained for years. About the Author Madhavi Menon is professor of English at Ashoka University, and writes on desire and queer theory. She is the author of Wanton Words: Rhetoric and Sexuality in English Renaissance Drama; Unhistorical Shakespeare: Queer Theory in Shakespearean Literature and Film; and Indifference to Difference: On Queer Universalism. She is also the editor of Shakesqueer: A Queer Companion to the Complete Works of Shakespeare.

30 review for Infinite Variety: A History of Desire in India

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chaitanya Sethi

    Desire in India dips into traditions of both ecstatic sensuality and stern asceticism; both an embrace and a shunning of sexuality; both pleasure and punishment. The ascetic tradition in India was judgmental about the 'excesses' of desire, and based its philosophy entirely on renunciation. But equally, the renunciates and the sensualists were not so far apart that they could never meet. Across 21 chapters, Madhavi Menon traces the history of desire in India, an ambitious task. The chapters ar Desire in India dips into traditions of both ecstatic sensuality and stern asceticism; both an embrace and a shunning of sexuality; both pleasure and punishment. The ascetic tradition in India was judgmental about the 'excesses' of desire, and based its philosophy entirely on renunciation. But equally, the renunciates and the sensualists were not so far apart that they could never meet. Across 21 chapters, Madhavi Menon traces the history of desire in India, an ambitious task. The chapters are all standalone essays and thus, in theory, can be read independent of the order (not advised though). It is a well-written, easy-to-read book that does justice to the topic. Desire is a complex topic but then so is India and Madhavi handles both well. She does not do the easy thing, which would be to put the Kamasutra at the centre and trace a descent into sexual conservatism into the present day, but leads you through multiple ups-and-downs in between. I felt I learnt a lot from this book and it made me look at quotidian aspects of desire that are now taken for granted, in a different vein - her chapter on Hair in particular and how, right from lyricists in Hindi movies to about-to-be-married youth, all are obsessed with good hair, and even the words we use to describe hair - luscious, abundant, cascading. However, owing to her selection of topics, some essays flow and connect quickly but some of her musings seem a bit stretched to fit the bill. For eg. the chapters on Dargahs, Suicides, Hair, Makeup, and Bhabhis meet the criteria of desire instinctively but her chapter on Army being built on desire (since they police same-sex behaviour) and calendars embodying desire (by featuring Gods and mythological tales in them) are not that intuitive or convincing. I have another minor gripe in that Madhavi, in some chapters, labors over the same point multiple times and repeats it within pages, with no additional insight. But it is a minor thing and more a reflection on my fussiness as a reader. Overall, I felt it was a solid book that should be read for its accessible content and interesting insights.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wanderingg__soul

    I finished reading this book last week & I am still trying to wrap my head around it. It's so beautifully written, well researched & breaks so many misconceptions that we have about desire & sexuality in India. Today, we are learning from the East to accept homosexuality but we have forgotten that with our rich culture & heritage India has also been a home to multiple desires. There are temples in India with explicit sexual carvings on the walls, dargahs where two men lovers are buried together, a I finished reading this book last week & I am still trying to wrap my head around it. It's so beautifully written, well researched & breaks so many misconceptions that we have about desire & sexuality in India. Today, we are learning from the East to accept homosexuality but we have forgotten that with our rich culture & heritage India has also been a home to multiple desires. There are temples in India with explicit sexual carvings on the walls, dargahs where two men lovers are buried together, a history of polygamous marriages, mythological stories about desire in Gods, even Kamasutra was written here!! Through this book the author has tried to enlighten the readers about this history & navigate through centuries, geography & philosophy of this country. The topics are wide spread from yoga to pan, from dargahs to temples, history behind makeup, insights from Manusmriti & Kamasutra, movies to everyday lives of people. Absolute delight, lucid, funny and brilliantly written!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shalini

    “The basic mandate of thesis book is to enlarge the horizons of desiring possibilities”, as the author states in one of the chapters. I think she achieved the mandate through several short chapters unravelling the complexity of sexual desire. While some chapters, especially the ones with a historic context such as dargahs, ayyappan and fractions are very interesting, others such as grandparents are shallow and some appear as mere page fillers. I am not sure if the East-West comparisons will hold “The basic mandate of thesis book is to enlarge the horizons of desiring possibilities”, as the author states in one of the chapters. I think she achieved the mandate through several short chapters unravelling the complexity of sexual desire. While some chapters, especially the ones with a historic context such as dargahs, ayyappan and fractions are very interesting, others such as grandparents are shallow and some appear as mere page fillers. I am not sure if the East-West comparisons will hold up to historic scrutiny but there is certainly something to be understood from the history of desire in the subcontinent.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bindesh Dahal

    Comprehensive. A scholarly and at the same time naughty work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sachi

    An excellent study on a subject so slippery in a land so hard to break down into categories.

  6. 4 out of 5

    R E

    A remarkable book that maps out new space for thinking about sexuality and desire Is desire oppressive or permissive? Repressed or expressive? Restricted or expansive? Does it lead to enlightenment or delusion? Freedom or enslavement? When is it the cornerstone of inner truth and when the distorted reflection of a society's twisted neurosis? And when was it all or any of these things? Over the past 3,500 years, the Indian subcontinent has been a fertile region that's nourished a heterogeneous pro A remarkable book that maps out new space for thinking about sexuality and desire Is desire oppressive or permissive? Repressed or expressive? Restricted or expansive? Does it lead to enlightenment or delusion? Freedom or enslavement? When is it the cornerstone of inner truth and when the distorted reflection of a society's twisted neurosis? And when was it all or any of these things? Over the past 3,500 years, the Indian subcontinent has been a fertile region that's nourished a heterogeneous profusion of complicated desires, and in "Infinite Variety: A History of Desire in India," author Madhavi Menon shifts subjects and scale, moving from macro to micro and back, until she's mapped out a unique space for extending the contours of thought and feeling about the topic. Menon provides a panoramic understanding of desire in all of its multiplicity by examining the subject not just historically and philosophically, but in ways that real people might experience or understand it. This means exploring the range of desire not just in terms of law, colonialism, education, language, and institutions (such as the military), but also in terms of personal signifiers and expressions such as hair, make-up, burial practices, parks, or the voices of grandparents (people traditionally not seen seen as desiring subjects yet the very ones who can speak of desire over the lifespan). The book succeeds not just because of its scholarship but also because of the uncommon connections made by the author. What exactly do math and fractions have to do with desire? More than you'd might expect. Menon creates a kaleidoscope of desire's fecundity, with fragments of myth, history, cruelty, liberation, agency, and tradition forming interconnected, mobile patterns that may at first defy comprehension but which soon cascade around a refreshing, multifaceted mental space for exploring the ways that desire is both a simple emotional need while simultaneously being a layered, nuanced, intricate phenomenon. Near the end of the book, Menon writes that her work is a rejoinder to Foucault's grand, systemitizing "The History of Sexuality" (with emphasis on the "The"): "I too would plot a history, but it would be a history of desire over time and space and category rather than the history of sexuality within segregated periods and times and classifications....it would locate itself in a land that has no fixed location. What counts as ‘India’ now was not ‘India’ when Vatsyayana wrote the Kamasutra. ‘India’ under the 11th-century Cholas included Sri Lanka but not present-day North India; British India included Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan." While noting Foucault's contributions, she expertly identifies the limitations and gaps in his work while making significant contributions of her own. She points us towards a more promising horizon for understanding sexuality and desire than his remaining acolytes, with their hollow, echoing Foucauldian jargon, can possibly hope to do.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karuna

    I got curious about this book largely due to the taxonomy of its chapters. Madhavi Menon covers various realms of desire which we normally would not think of as such. The chapter about grandparents or army, for example, were those i found particularly fascinating. I also appreciate the investment of the author into a more regional and consequently personal insights with the chapters on Sambandham or Swamy Ayappan. However, i consider many of her descriptions as stretched to cater to the chosen a I got curious about this book largely due to the taxonomy of its chapters. Madhavi Menon covers various realms of desire which we normally would not think of as such. The chapter about grandparents or army, for example, were those i found particularly fascinating. I also appreciate the investment of the author into a more regional and consequently personal insights with the chapters on Sambandham or Swamy Ayappan. However, i consider many of her descriptions as stretched to cater to the chosen agenda, especially as far as grammar and the language usage is concerned.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Aashrit

    This book has much potential, and at times seems to reach for it. The writer says in the beginning something like "Because the infinite desire of India cannot be defined, I will not define anything either." (I'm paraphrasing.) Unfortunately, this comes across more as an excuse to avoid detail as the book meanders on. All in all, it is more a feeler and teaser for desire than a solid study or opinion piece on the history. This book has much potential, and at times seems to reach for it. The writer says in the beginning something like "Because the infinite desire of India cannot be defined, I will not define anything either." (I'm paraphrasing.) Unfortunately, this comes across more as an excuse to avoid detail as the book meanders on. All in all, it is more a feeler and teaser for desire than a solid study or opinion piece on the history.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Annie Zaidi

    Illuminating. Must read for all, especially anyone who identifies as desi or Indian.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lavanya Arora

    So many revelations, deconstructions about desire, its many histories, and the way we came to perceive it in the contemporary world.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aishwarya Singh

    Madhavi Menon offers an interesting glimpse into the history of desire in India, where she juxtaposes the conservative elements of Manusmriti with the sexually liberatory texts like Kamasutra. The colonial state influenced by Victorian values rejected Kamasutra, the rich history of homoerotic relationships between Sufi saints and their disciples, practices of Sambandham of Nair women etc. in favour of a culturally conservative text - Manusmriti which aligned with their values and in some ways re Madhavi Menon offers an interesting glimpse into the history of desire in India, where she juxtaposes the conservative elements of Manusmriti with the sexually liberatory texts like Kamasutra. The colonial state influenced by Victorian values rejected Kamasutra, the rich history of homoerotic relationships between Sufi saints and their disciples, practices of Sambandham of Nair women etc. in favour of a culturally conservative text - Manusmriti which aligned with their values and in some ways redefined South Asian practices relating to desire. Desire no longer was an end itself rather a source of procreation. She also interestingly shines light on companionships as evidence of desire not limiting herself to sexual desire alone - quoting Freud from Three Theories of Sexuality - "sexual intercourse does not exhaust desire because our desire always exceeds the physical acts of sex". The focus is not on consummation of these relationships rather the intense desire shared by the two persons. To simply put, how does it matter if Amir Khusro and Khawaja Nizamuddin Auliya shared a spiritual or a carnal relationship - what matters is that they were buried together as lovers are. She makes important theoretical contributions in the book. One relates to anxiety of castration imposed by the Oedipus complex among men. According to Freud, male homosexuality is a result of unresolved Oedipus complex. Getting over the interest in one's mother is compulsory for male heterosexuality otherwise the child will become like his mother. Quoting the letter written by G. Bose (founder of Indian Psychoanalytic Society) in 1929 to Freud she argues that since mythology and religion (cue Vishnu as Mohini/the Sufi disciple as the bride) provide a discourse on the easy interchangeability of male and female bodies, the men are less anxious about being castrated or becoming like women rather there is certain attractiveness to it - e.g. Krishna devotees being gopis irrespective of the body, the sufi disciple being the female adoring the pir/saint who is a male in poetry. She also challenges Foucault's distinction of the ars erotica (erotic art) and scintia sexualis (science of sex) and its association with the East and West, respectively. According to Foucault, erotic art developed in the East where sex is for the sake of pleasure and a master adept in the arts of sex disseminates this secret knowledge. While science of sexuality developed in West where a discourse on sex is produced from the procedures of ancient confession to clinical testing (think of sexology). She challenges that distinction by arguing that Foucault falls in the trap of a binary of East and West. She cites Kamasutra which frustrates this binary because sex is both an art and science. While teaching the art of wooing, it also classifies sexual behaviour and how bodies should be organized. Further, there were strictures against the pleasures of sex in texts like Manusmriti against pre-marital sex and homosexual sex so East although more permissive about desire could also be rigid/conservative. Finally, she argues that Kamasutra was not a secret text rather a mass produced sex manual of its time (no master with secret knowledge of arts). Hence, she complicates the understanding of desire and cut and dry binaries of science and art by classifying Kamasutra as sexological treatise on pleasure. However, for Menon desire operates in its own plane without the complications of caste and economic status. How does the political economy of certain time produces certain ideas of desire? Do the relations of production in an economic system impact the way desire is experienced? Judith Butler argues in her essay Merely Cultural that sexuality is not merely cultural rather it is produced by and in turn reinforces the current social order. Did the art of wooing as taught in Kamasutra allowed transgressions of the varna system? The book is accessible and an easy read. It is recommended if one is interested to know about the infinite varieties of desire and seeing desire where it apparently does not exist. Seeing is also an act of power. We see what we are supposed to see, she unearths the unseen.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Solaceinbooks

    So , I finally finished the book A History of Desire in India and it is such a well researched book that it made me unlearn and interrogate the commonly accepted norms. 🍁 Menon's research is about the messiness of India's sexual diversity but it is not a chronological account. Rather what the book does is to acknowledge sites of Desire which are hardly taken into account given our obesssion with hetrosexuality. There are 20 chapters traversing ideas of sexuality that can be located in the dargah, So , I finally finished the book A History of Desire in India and it is such a well researched book that it made me unlearn and interrogate the commonly accepted norms. 🍁 Menon's research is about the messiness of India's sexual diversity but it is not a chronological account. Rather what the book does is to acknowledge sites of Desire which are hardly taken into account given our obesssion with hetrosexuality. There are 20 chapters traversing ideas of sexuality that can be located in the dargah, the Ayyappan temple,law or the army. The various sites of desire discussed in the book were intensely surprising such as Did you know that Lord Ayyappan was born out a union between Shiva and Vishnu ? or That Paan (an Indian obsession) is seen as an important part of seduction? or What is the Indian obsession with elder bhabhi and why are they seen with lustful eyes ? or That marriage has a very specific history and it wasn't the norm. Relations weren't monogamous as is the case now and there was a practice of 'sambandham' widely practiced amongst the Nair women of Kerala The book is filled with unraveling information to make us comfortable about the diverse sexual practices widely prevalent in the Indian society which have been silenced through legislative interventions. 🍁 Taking on from Michel Foucault (a French Philosopher) Menon has beautifully conveyed the message that the idea of discipline is intimately connected with the idea of sex and desire. The book is about the history of desire over time and space and category that cannot be fixed. 🍁 Desire in India can be an embrace or a shunning of sexuality, it has been about sensualism or acsetisicm for centuries, but the laws around sexuality have only attempted to control the diversity and regulate bodies and desire. 🍁 A couple of chapters did seem slightly out of context, but over all the book successfully wants us to know that desire ans sexuality has never been systematic in India as it has been presented.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sita

    Very interesting book, but not without flaws. First of all it should not have the word History in it's title, since the author does not talk about the historical development, but jumps between past and present. Some chapters are well-written, well-research and fascinating, with a lot of thought-provoking content and saucy tidbits. There are original uncensored versions of mythological stories, discussions of the morals pre and post colonialism, "hidden" stories of "different" desires, and discus Very interesting book, but not without flaws. First of all it should not have the word History in it's title, since the author does not talk about the historical development, but jumps between past and present. Some chapters are well-written, well-research and fascinating, with a lot of thought-provoking content and saucy tidbits. There are original uncensored versions of mythological stories, discussions of the morals pre and post colonialism, "hidden" stories of "different" desires, and discussions on what was sexy to ancient Indians. The chapter on Nair woman was especially fascinating for me, and it was clear how close this topic was to the author's heart. The topics of queer love hidden in plain sight was another very interesting topic. Other chapters however are poorly developed, like the death chapter -- the author basically quotes pages upon pages of love relationships ending in suicides because of familial abuse, and sums it up by saying that in India desire and death are closely connected. A better topic (and more suited to the subject matter) would be, in my humble opinion, a discussion about why death is seen as the last stage of love according to older texts. Also the book suffers from repetition and would have profited from tighter editing -- there are often paragraphs repeating something said a page back, while other interesting information is not expanded upon at all. There are a couple of pages devoted to who actually invented the zero -- we get it, it could have been the Indians but maybe also not, lets skip to the more interesting parts, shall we? Finally, I feel that some words and terms should have been explained (better), so that a non-Indian reader could follow along. On the whole I heartily recommend this book, because, in spite of the couple of flaws, it is extremely interesting and a good read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    NewGR

    A high school essay based on Internet research. The book is poorly researched; the author lacks a basic understanding of Indian history and mythology and the timeline; draws outlandish conclusions without any solid basis. A few pearls from the book should convince you about the quality of the research: 1. In the Hindi blessing ‘Sada Sukhi Raho’ (given to newly married women), ‘sukh’ is understood to mean the state of marital/sexual bliss. 2. Yoga has a syncratic history. 3. The book quotes that th A high school essay based on Internet research. The book is poorly researched; the author lacks a basic understanding of Indian history and mythology and the timeline; draws outlandish conclusions without any solid basis. A few pearls from the book should convince you about the quality of the research: 1. In the Hindi blessing ‘Sada Sukhi Raho’ (given to newly married women), ‘sukh’ is understood to mean the state of marital/sexual bliss. 2. Yoga has a syncratic history. 3. The book quotes that there are 8 types of Hindu marriages, based on some obscure scripture, but forgets to mention the swayamvara marriage, a key marriage type described in the epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata. 4. The book cites as evidence a 2009 propaganda article by Pakistan Daily Mail that the Indian Army deployed an all-women unit in Kashmir to cater for the sexual needs of its soldiers. The point the author trying to make is armies find ways to satisfy desires of their soldiers.

  15. 5 out of 5

    teohjitkhiam

    One of those rarely enjoyed, non-fiction "page-turner". Menon's book is quite the quirky work; skipping from one topic to another but still each centered on the conception of desire & sexuality. More importantly, I've gained a greater insight into some elements or imagery incorporated in Hindi movies - without recourse to the explicit or pornographic - like the ecstatic worships performed at tombs of Sufi saints, use of betel leaf preparations, or the symbolism of lush, long hair. And also, for One of those rarely enjoyed, non-fiction "page-turner". Menon's book is quite the quirky work; skipping from one topic to another but still each centered on the conception of desire & sexuality. More importantly, I've gained a greater insight into some elements or imagery incorporated in Hindi movies - without recourse to the explicit or pornographic - like the ecstatic worships performed at tombs of Sufi saints, use of betel leaf preparations, or the symbolism of lush, long hair. And also, for non-Hindu readers, it sheds much light on some aspects of Hindu mythology & their pantheon of gods. #Goodreads

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dhiran

    Infinite Variety A History of Desire in India By Madhavi Menon An enlightening account of desire across varied domains such as historical places, Bollywood movies, mathematics, gods and goddesses, education, celibacy, yoga, suicides, law, public places, army, physical appearance, relations and other fascinating categories through which one definitely gets to understand the context of desire from so many different subjects. #BookLovers #LoveToRead

  17. 4 out of 5

    deepak

    It was the Victorian morality imposed by the British in India that stiffed variety and diversity of desire in the Indian society. before that though the desires were not named and categorized, they existed without causing any damage to the fabric of the society. This was not promiscuity as perceived by the Victorian mind of the British, but an infinite variety that reflected the life itself without entering into any type of taxonomy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vachan Hukkeri

    A book that not everyone will want to read/ be interested in, but it I something that we must read. India is a sexually confused country. With everything from homosexuality, public display of affection etc being condemned. Does our history agree with our actions. ..... No it does not.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jayghosh Rao

    I found this book after listening to the author on the excellent podcast: the seen and the unseen. While I did find some comparisons, analogies and leaps in logic a tad bit overdone, I did enjoy reading and learning from this book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Manu Sharma

    A pleasant, informative and insightful book. The book is well researched and the above lines more or less sum up my thoughts on this worthwhile book

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rajashree Chowdhury

    https://mycanopyin.wordpress.com/2018... My review of the book on my blog. https://mycanopyin.wordpress.com/2018... My review of the book on my blog.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Saloni

    Truly an eyeopener! Beautifully written!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ramakalyan Ayyagari

    The opening was excellent, but It was disappointing to me in the end. Though the arguments were kind of strong, most of the the book I was wondering if at all they are needed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gunjan

    Excellent.

  25. 4 out of 5

    azamaali

    Table of Contents Introduction: A History of Impurity 1. Dargahs 1.5 Fractions 2. The Zero 3. Ayyappan 4. Education 5. Grammar 6. Celibacy 7. Yoga 8. Suicides 9. Law 10. Parks 11. Army 12. Hair 13. Make-up 14. Psychoanalysis 15. Bhabhis 16. Grandparents 17. Sambandham 18. Paan 19. Dating 20. 5exology

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anirudha Vaddadi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Deepan Banati

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jajwalya Karajgikar

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ashish Nain

  30. 5 out of 5

    Satya

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