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Vivien Morse, a young social worker is discovered battered to death in Silver Lady Woods. Everyone assumes she was attacked by her estranged husband until her supervisor disappears. The connection appears to be Vivien’s last client. A damaged and disturbed girl who believes a bundle of rags is her lost baby and never leaves the family farm while she awaits the return of he Vivien Morse, a young social worker is discovered battered to death in Silver Lady Woods. Everyone assumes she was attacked by her estranged husband until her supervisor disappears. The connection appears to be Vivien’s last client. A damaged and disturbed girl who believes a bundle of rags is her lost baby and never leaves the family farm while she awaits the return of her lover. The matter is confused by the arrival of a stranger to the area clearly searching for something or someone and an escaped convict with connections to the area. DCI Hatherall has to separate fact from fantasy to discover who did kill Vivien Morse.


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Vivien Morse, a young social worker is discovered battered to death in Silver Lady Woods. Everyone assumes she was attacked by her estranged husband until her supervisor disappears. The connection appears to be Vivien’s last client. A damaged and disturbed girl who believes a bundle of rags is her lost baby and never leaves the family farm while she awaits the return of he Vivien Morse, a young social worker is discovered battered to death in Silver Lady Woods. Everyone assumes she was attacked by her estranged husband until her supervisor disappears. The connection appears to be Vivien’s last client. A damaged and disturbed girl who believes a bundle of rags is her lost baby and never leaves the family farm while she awaits the return of her lover. The matter is confused by the arrival of a stranger to the area clearly searching for something or someone and an escaped convict with connections to the area. DCI Hatherall has to separate fact from fantasy to discover who did kill Vivien Morse.

30 review for Who Killed Vivien Morse?

  1. 5 out of 5

    James

    Who Killed Vivien Morse? is the 4th book in the 'DCI Peter Hatheral Mystery' series written by Diana J. Febry. I enjoyed the book a lot, but I'm kicking myself now for breaking one of my normally cardinal rules -- Don't read a series out of order! Truthfully, you can read this as a standalone novel; I just prefer to read them in order, and I don't know what possessed me not to do it here. That said, I can confidently say I will go back and pick up the others later this year, so I'm current and c Who Killed Vivien Morse? is the 4th book in the 'DCI Peter Hatheral Mystery' series written by Diana J. Febry. I enjoyed the book a lot, but I'm kicking myself now for breaking one of my normally cardinal rules -- Don't read a series out of order! Truthfully, you can read this as a standalone novel; I just prefer to read them in order, and I don't know what possessed me not to do it here. That said, I can confidently say I will go back and pick up the others later this year, so I'm current and caught up on author Febry's clever and fun series before a new one (hopefully) comes out. Written in third-person POV, our perspective shifts from not only the main detectives on the case but to the criminal and a few other people involved in the case; it's done by chapter, so you won't be confused at all. A police-procedural of sorts, we follow Hatheral and his team while they try to find who killed a young social worker in a small English town. While I wouldn't exactly call this a cozy, it's within such a range but also has a nice foray into a bit darker and more visceral (all in a good way). I liked the puns and balance between light and heavy; it clearly shows the author's vast range. As for plot... we've got a prison escape, a missing fortune, a young girl who was run down by a car, a mysterious social worker's client visits, an odd family hiding secrets, and a stranger who is snooping in people's cottage windows. What could they all have to do with one another? At first, I thought I'd figured it out, but by 2/3 of the way, I was thrown for a nice loop and rethought my guesswork. The characters are vivid. Some are flighty, a few are mean, and another group are purposefully misleading. It keeps you on your toes as a reader trying to decide what they know that we don't know. I like these kinds of tales because we can play detective or sit back and watch it unfold ourselves. I did a little of both! Febry's first few chapters are extremely well-written. I'm only focusing on those because that's what often makes or a breaks a book for me. It's not necessarily about whether the plot is good, but how well the author paints the picture for a reader. It flowed quite well, and I found myself immediately immersed in the detective's life, the victim's tragedy, and the various clues being dropped about. I connected with the writing style as a fellow author and felt we had a similarity in sentence structure and flow... hence why I probably found this such an easy read. Kudos to the author for nailing the first few chapters, so that readers know right away they've found a solid one!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    DCI Peter Hatherall was called to the death of social worker Vivien Morse. She had been brutally bludgeoned, and he and DI Fiona Williams immediately focused on Vivien’s husband, from whom she was estranged. But the mystery and intrigue of this murder would take Peter and his team far beyond what they originally imagined to be the case. A peeping Tom and his devoted dog; a young woman who lived in a fantasy world; a convict who had ties to the area; a snooty social worker – boss of the victim – DCI Peter Hatherall was called to the death of social worker Vivien Morse. She had been brutally bludgeoned, and he and DI Fiona Williams immediately focused on Vivien’s husband, from whom she was estranged. But the mystery and intrigue of this murder would take Peter and his team far beyond what they originally imagined to be the case. A peeping Tom and his devoted dog; a young woman who lived in a fantasy world; a convict who had ties to the area; a snooty social worker – boss of the victim – all these distractions and more were what the team had to sift through to find the answers. But would they discover who killed Vivien Morse? Who Killed Vivien Morse? is the 4th in the DCI Peter Hatherall Mystery series by Diana J. Febry (a fact I was unaware of when I purchased the book) and while some of the characters were quite bizarre, the story kept my attention. It was fine as a standalone, though I would normally read from the start of a series. As a British police procedural, it was quite enjoyable. Recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dianne

    Mystery Lovers! Diana J. Febry has a fabulous Giveaway going on right now! Intl where allowed - Ends Oct 10, 2016 - click on Banner to enter! Diana Febry takes us back into the world of mayhem, mystery and murder as DCI Peter Hatherall and Fiona are put on the trail to unravel one of their most unusual cases ever. Step into their world of questions, clues and so much more in Who Killed Vivien Morse? Will Hatherall and Fiona work as the dynamic duo they can be or are there snags in the fibers of th Mystery Lovers! Diana J. Febry has a fabulous Giveaway going on right now! Intl where allowed - Ends Oct 10, 2016 - click on Banner to enter! Diana Febry takes us back into the world of mayhem, mystery and murder as DCI Peter Hatherall and Fiona are put on the trail to unravel one of their most unusual cases ever. Step into their world of questions, clues and so much more in Who Killed Vivien Morse? Will Hatherall and Fiona work as the dynamic duo they can be or are there snags in the fibers of their team? A young woman has been bludgeoned to death and the suspect list is growing as the web of deceit and death becomes more entangled with both fact, fiction and quirky persons of interest. When one who is associated with the victim goes missing, others are injured and a con man is lurking in the area, a delusional woman with a pretend baby only further skews the case into the realm of the unbelievable. Top that off with home-fire tensions for both Peter and Fiona and how can one expect them to follow the clues with rapt attention? Hang on tight as every time you think you know what is going on, you discover you had better leave the detective work to the professionals who have the patience to deal with following the crumbs. Filled with Diana Febry’s classic wit and banter, fascinating characters that beg to be remembered and once again, we have another great mystery with the guts to stand strong in a world filled with unanswered questions, twisted trails and less than obvious solutions! The big question remaining? Who did it? Ponder that question with your cuppa and this fabulous read! I received this copy from Diana J. Febry in exchange for my honest review. Series: DCI Hatherall - Book 4 Publisher: Wings ePress, Inc (August 1, 2016) Publication Date: August 1, 2016 Genre: Mystery | Thriller | Suspense Print Length: 185 pages Available from: Amazon |  Barnes & Noble For Reviews & More: http://tometender.blogspot.com

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stjepan Cobets

    My rating is 4.2 The writer Diana J. Febry with this book takes us into the world of DCI Peter Hatherall who should find out who killed Vivien Morse. Although initially there was no indication or reason why she was killed, there are many potential suspects in her death. The writer draws us into the story slowly introducing us to characters who are each in its own way and with it related to Vivian to directly or indirectly. Each of them has its own story and beautifully embedded in the whole book. My rating is 4.2 The writer Diana J. Febry with this book takes us into the world of DCI Peter Hatherall who should find out who killed Vivien Morse. Although initially there was no indication or reason why she was killed, there are many potential suspects in her death. The writer draws us into the story slowly introducing us to characters who are each in its own way and with it related to Vivian to directly or indirectly. Each of them has its own story and beautifully embedded in the whole book. The lie and truth are intertwined in the story and only them Peter and his colleague Fiona have to unravel and reveal the killer. The story is set in a picturesque place in the fictional English Earl of Ditchburns country district and writer us easily can fit in that world, the tradition and the present. Book gladly recommend to all lovers of a good mystery novel. "I received a free copy from the author without an obligation to review."

  5. 5 out of 5

    J. Schlenker

    For anyone who likes Who Done It mysteries, this would be a good one to read. The author, Diana J. Febry, introduces an array of characters, all with distinct personalities, which she differentiates quite well with her writing skills. We start out with the ex-husband being the main suspect, but as we read on, it may not be that simple. And with a second murder, the story becomes more complex. The author takes us on a ride that takes many twists and turns. Without giving anything away, the author For anyone who likes Who Done It mysteries, this would be a good one to read. The author, Diana J. Febry, introduces an array of characters, all with distinct personalities, which she differentiates quite well with her writing skills. We start out with the ex-husband being the main suspect, but as we read on, it may not be that simple. And with a second murder, the story becomes more complex. The author takes us on a ride that takes many twists and turns. Without giving anything away, the author maneuvered those twists and turns well. This is the fourth book in a series featuring, I believe two detectives, Peter Hatherall and his partner, Fiona Williams. This is the only one I've read thus far in the series. I saw it as a stand-alone, something I like when it comes to a series. I guess I would define this as a cozy mystery since it was an easy read filled with some odd characters and witty dialogue. So, if you're a cozy mystery fan, you will want to read this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    J.P. Willson

    I have to say it has been a long while since I have picked up a book in this genre. I had forgotten what it was like to simply read a book for the sheer enjoyment of the story alone. I enjoyed this story quite a bit, and although it was nothing mind-boggling it did contain some twists I have to say I did not see coming. Having enjoyed some other series by the likes of Sue Grafton and Patricia Cornwell I think I have found a new series to delve into with this author. Being a Canadian I especially I have to say it has been a long while since I have picked up a book in this genre. I had forgotten what it was like to simply read a book for the sheer enjoyment of the story alone. I enjoyed this story quite a bit, and although it was nothing mind-boggling it did contain some twists I have to say I did not see coming. Having enjoyed some other series by the likes of Sue Grafton and Patricia Cornwell I think I have found a new series to delve into with this author. Being a Canadian I especially enjoyed the use of the "English" in this book. Perhaps you need to be a Canadian to fully appreciate this statement? What really is proper English anyway? A pleasant way to return to reading for the sake of reading alone. To use the imagination to lose ourselves- instead of the day to day strife that seems to question our very being at times. Recommended for a break from the hustle and bustle of today.

  7. 5 out of 5

    P. Zoro

    The title becomes a question that haunts the reader if you dare put the book down! I hardly had reason to, because I found ‘Who killed Vivien Morse’ an entertaining and engaging read. DCI Peter Hatherall and his partner, DCI Fiona Williams, have to find the answer to the ringing question. The book starts off a bit slow with Febry taking time to build a complete setting and introducing a lot of characters. It might appear a bit tedious to keep track at first, but that is what mystery is all about. The title becomes a question that haunts the reader if you dare put the book down! I hardly had reason to, because I found ‘Who killed Vivien Morse’ an entertaining and engaging read. DCI Peter Hatherall and his partner, DCI Fiona Williams, have to find the answer to the ringing question. The book starts off a bit slow with Febry taking time to build a complete setting and introducing a lot of characters. It might appear a bit tedious to keep track at first, but that is what mystery is all about. If you don't pay attention to the small details, you miss the whole plot. There are a lot of investigations whose results keep both the reader and DCI Hatherhall nowhere near solving the crime. The action begins when Rob escapes from prison and the whole atmosphere is charged with danger and murder until the very end when who killed Vivien Morse is somewhat a disappointing discovery. The writer is a great storyteller who knows how to handle suspense and add interesting twists to an otherwise normal police case. The characters are well developed. I loved Gladys from the start. Her partnership with Dick proved a humorous distraction to the anxiety about Vivien Morse's killer. Ellen and Rob were another eccentric pair with dark and deceptive emotions that the writer explored well. There were issues left hanging that I would have loved to understand more – Peter’s deteriorating relationship with Sally, his younger wife, and Fiona’s relationship with her partner who left finger marks on her arms. Maybe they are resolved in the next book. I wouldn’t hesitate to pick another DCI Hatherhall Series book at all.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Vincent

    DCI Hatherall Series Book #4 Do you know DCI Peter Hatherall? The man is “impeccably dressed” though less in shape – his idea of fighting his mid-forties consists of colouring his hair of which he is “irrationally proud” and having a 10 year younger wife. He’s a bit grumpy and follows hunches, but insists on proof for others’ gut feelings. I didn’t know him and his team – and I am so glad to have met them in this classy detective novel. It is a pleasure to read, to puzzle and connect the dots, be DCI Hatherall Series Book #4 Do you know DCI Peter Hatherall? The man is “impeccably dressed” though less in shape – his idea of fighting his mid-forties consists of colouring his hair of which he is “irrationally proud” and having a 10 year younger wife. He’s a bit grumpy and follows hunches, but insists on proof for others’ gut feelings. I didn’t know him and his team – and I am so glad to have met them in this classy detective novel. It is a pleasure to read, to puzzle and connect the dots, because I too wanted to find out who is responsible for murdering Vivien Morse. It’s typical English weather – rainy, muddy and overcast. A murdered woman is found in Silver Lady Woods. Before DCI Peter Hatherall can attend to the crime scene however, he bumps into the nagging woman from the neighbourhood watch, complaining about a druid and a dog walking in the woods – complete with robe and sandals. Peter dismisses the druid and dives into the murder case to find the murderer of Vivien Morse, the battered woman in the woods. Vivien is a social worker with a restraining order for her soon to be ex-husband Nigel Morse due to the fact that he couldn’t keep his hands to himself. Vivien's boss Jane Salt thinks Nigel is a trouble maker and should be the police's main suspect for the murder. So when Peter, DI Fiona Williams and the team start investigating, they first consider the obvious suspect: husband Nigel Morse. While driving to Nigel's house Peter and Fiona hear on the car radio of Rob Creer being hospitalized, a convicted con man who ‘resides’ at Shoreham Prison. Little do they know that it is the first but by far not the last time they hear the name of this notorious crook and “burglar of the rich and famous” during their murder enquiry. Back to Nigel Morse, a success to himself, a failure to the rest of the world. He looks scruffy just like his house – but Fiona swears the new suits she sees hanging about are expensive, however Peter refuses to believe so. When Fiona and Peter visit the Bassetts, their daughter Ellen being Vivien’s last house call, again the name Rob Creer comes to mind: he deliberately drove Ellen of her bike years ago – turning her into the mental wreck she is today. Kathy, who found Vivien, is a nurse; as it happens she is known to visit the Bassetts regularly. When next Vivien’s boss Jane goes missing, the police are getting more and more confused. It appears everyone in this case, be it a victim, witness or client, is in some way connected to the others, the dots are visible, but there are too many lines to connect! What is going on and why does that crook's name Rob Creer keep popping up and what has the druid in the woods got to do with all this? This detective is the fourth in the DCI Hatherall Series and all I can think is 'why didn't I spot this series before?' It's got the right ingredients I love as a lifelong Agatha Christie fan: an intriguing and puzzling plot and interesting characters, with whom you can easily connect. It’s witty, gritty, there is a murder to solve complete with the usual suspects. There's the humour in between, like the appearance of the sandaled druid walking in the mud and the tractor hunt (sorry, cannot tell you more). I want to read all the books in this detective series! Read the full review on my website: http://www.bitsaboutbooks.net/who-kil...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Grant Leishman

    One of the things I've always liked about the DCI Hatherall series by Febry is its quintessential Britishness. There is something about the setting, in the English countryside and the quirky characters that inhabit it, that draws you in and says; "sit down in front of the fire, put your feet up and have a good read, with a cup of tea." The Hatherall mysteries are very much like that for me. I feel comfortable reading them and chuckle along at the characters. Who Killed Vivien Morse was typical H One of the things I've always liked about the DCI Hatherall series by Febry is its quintessential Britishness. There is something about the setting, in the English countryside and the quirky characters that inhabit it, that draws you in and says; "sit down in front of the fire, put your feet up and have a good read, with a cup of tea." The Hatherall mysteries are very much like that for me. I feel comfortable reading them and chuckle along at the characters. Who Killed Vivien Morse was typical Hatherall, with a host of possible suspects and nothing much for the DCI to go on. Vivien Morse, bludgeoned to death in a damp forest, but why? and by who? The ex-husband was the obvious choice, but rarely is the obvious choice the right one, in a murder mystery. In this book, we meet a bunch of quirky characters, who make up the small country villages of rural England. I particularly enjoyed the over-the-top Druid and could well picture him prancing around the forest doing his Druidic things. I am a fan of Febry's style, which is reminiscent of many British crime writers that I can think of. Her entire Hatherall series has created a set of stories that would not be amiss in a BBC Television Series - they remind me of Inspector Morse, among others. I will be reading more of Febry's work over the months I imagine. She has me hooked as a fan of this series, at least.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Colin Garrow

    When young social worker Vivien Morse is found battered to death in Silver Lady Woods, suspicion immediately falls on her estranged husband. However, when Vivien's supervisor also disappears, the case begins to get a little complicated. Police follow the trail to Vivien’s last client - a disturbed girl who carries a bundle of rags around with her, believing it to be her lost baby. This is the fourth book featuring DCI Hatherall (a detective with the obligatory difficult home life). As I haven't r When young social worker Vivien Morse is found battered to death in Silver Lady Woods, suspicion immediately falls on her estranged husband. However, when Vivien's supervisor also disappears, the case begins to get a little complicated. Police follow the trail to Vivien’s last client - a disturbed girl who carries a bundle of rags around with her, believing it to be her lost baby. This is the fourth book featuring DCI Hatherall (a detective with the obligatory difficult home life). As I haven't read the others, I thought that might be a problem but the novel works very well as a stand-alone mystery. There are plenty of clues, but the murder trail seems to lead everywhere but the truth. Throw in some strange characters (like Dick the Druid) and the abusive husband (who, naturally, has an alibi), and you've got a nice mix of suspects. And then there's the escaped prisoner... This is a well thought out story with plenty of twists that somehow manages to pull all the loose ends together just in time for the end.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Owen Mullen

    This is my introduction to this series and Diana Febry caught me early and kept hold. The high points of an always intriguing tale were: good characterisation; often far out and funny ; believable plotlines that kept me guessing like a good detective should; and, fallable police officers which makes for interesting reading (super heroes are a bore). I thought the writing was sharp and clean and moved the story along. On a personal note. I am in agreement with the nosy neighbour; Druids in sandal This is my introduction to this series and Diana Febry caught me early and kept hold. The high points of an always intriguing tale were: good characterisation; often far out and funny ; believable plotlines that kept me guessing like a good detective should; and, fallable police officers which makes for interesting reading (super heroes are a bore). I thought the writing was sharp and clean and moved the story along. On a personal note. I am in agreement with the nosy neighbour; Druids in sandals deserve to be investigated wherever they raise their pagan heads. This was really good with plenty of clever twists. Keep them coming.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Ryan

    4.5* Although I haven’t read the preceding books in the series, this wasn’t too difficult to settle into. DCI Hatherall is waylaid by the local, loves to complain, busybody, Glenys Pitman, who is well known at the police station. She has seen a man dressed in Druid robes behaving suspiciously in the woods. A humorous exchange follows before DCI Hatherall is able to usher Glenys on her way. Returning to his office, his partner DI Fiona Williams informs him the body of a young social worker, Vivien 4.5* Although I haven’t read the preceding books in the series, this wasn’t too difficult to settle into. DCI Hatherall is waylaid by the local, loves to complain, busybody, Glenys Pitman, who is well known at the police station. She has seen a man dressed in Druid robes behaving suspiciously in the woods. A humorous exchange follows before DCI Hatherall is able to usher Glenys on her way. Returning to his office, his partner DI Fiona Williams informs him the body of a young social worker, Vivien Morse, has been discovered in Silver Lady Woods. Vivien’s estranged husband, Nigel, is the most likely suspect for her murder initially. That is, until Vivien’s supervisor goes missing and a prison inmate along with his paranoid and obviously disturbed erstwhile girlfriend, are thrown into the mix. The list of suspects grows. Although Fiona is still convinced there’s something off about Nigel, it seems the client Vivien visited before her death could be linked to the murder and missing supervisor. This is a well thought through and tightly woven mystery with a twisty, somewhat convoluted plot, requiring plenty of concentration, and unconventional characters. I particularly enjoyed the Druid, Dick Death (or Dee-ath as he likes to pronounce it), his (female) dog, Colin and over the top Gladys. There’s a feeling of some sort of history between Peter and Fiona, but not having read the previous books, I’m not sure how accurate that is. And it seems Fiona’s current relationship might not be all hearts and flowers. The humour and banter offset the darker side of the story extremely well. Vivid and atmospheric descriptions convey a real sense of the locations and characters. From the start I could picture Peter Hatherall – a man approaching middle age, with a younger, second wife, resenting the fact he had to work at keeping in shape but proud of his full head of dark hair. He is purposeful and determined to find the murderer, and won’t run with an obvious theory until he has explored every avenue. There are plenty of threads to unravel and needless to say, I didn’t guess the outcome. Well written with sharp, witty dialogue, a fast paced, intricate plot and a mix of quirky and interesting characters makes for a very enjoyable read. I chose to read and review Who Killed Vivien Morse? for Rosie Amber’s book review team, based on a digital copy from the author.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mystereity Reviews

    Who killed Vivien Morse? A killer, of course. But which one? Read my full review on Mystereity Reviews When a social worker is found dead in the woods, battered to death with a tree branch, DCI Hatherall and his team are called in to investigate. Was it a domestic dispute? Did the mysterious Druid have something to do with it? Or was it her last client, a damaged girl who clutches a bundle of rags, calling it her baby, Future? DCI Hatherall has to put all the pieces together to find a killer. Thi Who killed Vivien Morse? A killer, of course. But which one? Read my full review on Mystereity Reviews When a social worker is found dead in the woods, battered to death with a tree branch, DCI Hatherall and his team are called in to investigate. Was it a domestic dispute? Did the mysterious Druid have something to do with it? Or was it her last client, a damaged girl who clutches a bundle of rags, calling it her baby, Future? DCI Hatherall has to put all the pieces together to find a killer. This was a fantastic book, so absorbing that I read half of it in one sitting and only reluctantly put it down. I really enjoyed the plot, the many threads woven together to create a multi-dimensional story packed with suspense and intrigue that lead up to a great ending, I loved that sinking realization when you realize what you've missed and just what's going on, then the race to the finish to see how it all plays out. I really enjoyed the characters, from pragmatic and methodical DCI Hatherall to the colorful villagers, the rich characters added much depth to the story. What really drew me in was the disturbed girl who clutched a bundle of rags, claiming it to be her baby, Future. I just had to know more about it! Although this is book 4 of the DCI Hatherall series, it can easily be read as a standalone. While there were a few references to past events, they didn't confuse the story at all. Fans of Brit Crime will really enjoy this, with a strong sense of location, well-drawn characters and a strong plot and a satisfying conclusion, Who Killed Vivien Morse is a gripping mystery that will draw you in from the first page. Thank you to the author, who provided a copy of the book in exchange for my honest review

  14. 4 out of 5

    David Boiani

    Superb who done it mystery... This is an excellent who done it mystery. The characters are well developed and each has their own little idiosyncrasies and quirks that makes them easy to keep separate as you read. I have not yet read the first three books in the Peter Hatherall series, but I intend to dive deeper into this world in the coming months...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Erin Daniels

    Who Killed Vivien Morse was a fast-paced whodunit that not only kept me guessing but entertained me along the way. I loved the local characters that we were introduced to along the way and they kept me laughing out loud just when the tension of the plot had me biting my nails. I mean, how can you not love Dick and Gladys? The other important thing about this book was the above average procedural writing. The author didn't miss a beat and the detectives didn't do anything that real detectives don Who Killed Vivien Morse was a fast-paced whodunit that not only kept me guessing but entertained me along the way. I loved the local characters that we were introduced to along the way and they kept me laughing out loud just when the tension of the plot had me biting my nails. I mean, how can you not love Dick and Gladys? The other important thing about this book was the above average procedural writing. The author didn't miss a beat and the detectives didn't do anything that real detectives don't do when investigating a murder. There were no quirky departures from reality or silly fictional attempts to make the investigators "interesting". This was a huge plus in my book. The detectives did an amazing job and the side characters added the interest - this combination made for a great read and kept things believable and tightly paced. The only thing that kept this from being a five star was the ending. I felt it was too abrupt and there should have been a better wrap up, possibly with a confession or explanation from the killer, or at least a wrap-up or commentary from the subsequent trial. But aside from that this was an awesome read - well done!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Lewis

    This is a fantastic book. It's full of interesting characters having an interesting mystery. The whole thing was fun to read from beginning to end, and I highly recommend it. One thing that stands out about the book was its intelligence. I don't mean pompous intelligence, like there were pointless discussions on quantum physics or something. I mean down-to-earth intelligence that is relevant to the story. Most of the time, when I see a TV show or a movie, or read a book, the characters end up doi This is a fantastic book. It's full of interesting characters having an interesting mystery. The whole thing was fun to read from beginning to end, and I highly recommend it. One thing that stands out about the book was its intelligence. I don't mean pompous intelligence, like there were pointless discussions on quantum physics or something. I mean down-to-earth intelligence that is relevant to the story. Most of the time, when I see a TV show or a movie, or read a book, the characters end up doing stupid things just because the plot requires them to do it. Detectives also end up making ridiculous assumptions that turn out to be right. It strikes me as lazy writing. Even Sherlock Holmes (who I absolutely adore) make ridiculous leaps in logic that work only because we're having such a good time. I don't think any of that sort of thing happened in this book. There was no point where I thought the investigators were being super obtuse just for some cheap dramatic tension. Nor did any other character end up doing something moronic just because the plot needed it. The other thing that struck me about this book was its humanity. There are a couple of odd characters who are played for laughs in this book, but they are LOVING laughs! When authors play people for laughs, we can frequently see a certain meanness and spitefulness coming through. I don't think that's the case in this book. These characters provide comedic relief, but there is a sense that the author genuinely loves these people, and we come to love them too. They are among the best people in the novel. This gave me a great sense of the author's goodness. One thing that might turn some people off about this book was that it strains credulity at times. (SPOILER ALERT) There's a scene where a dog plays Lassie and leads a man to his captive girlfriend. (END SPOILER ALERT) It seemed almost comically implausible, but it was fun, and it was part of a really fun book. Anyway, my point isn't that this one scene ruins the book or is a stain on the book. I'm just using it as an example how the book can strain credulity at times. But Shakespeare and Dicken both constantly strain credulity. Super Hero movies strain credulity. So you can't let it get to you. You definitely don't need to turn your brain off. You'll need your brain in a fun way, but you have to accept that this is a fun adventure, and thus is packed more than real life is with fun adventures, interesting people, and intriguing events. Oh yeah. This is kind of a mystery book, so I should comment about that. It kept me constantly guessing as to what was going on. Even till the end, I couldn't guess where the clues were leading, but the author still gave enough information that I could have figured it out.

  17. 4 out of 5

    N.A. Granger

    Who Killed Vivien Morse? is the fourth book in the DCI Peter Hatherall series. I haven’t read the other three, but the author has done a great job making this a stand-alone book. This is what I would call a traditional English mystery. It opens with a complaint to the nattily dressed DCI Hatherall by a neighborhood busybody, who reports seeing a man looking like a Druid and accompanied by a dog peeking into the windows of houses in her neighborhood. Hatherall’s interaction with her is humorous b Who Killed Vivien Morse? is the fourth book in the DCI Peter Hatherall series. I haven’t read the other three, but the author has done a great job making this a stand-alone book. This is what I would call a traditional English mystery. It opens with a complaint to the nattily dressed DCI Hatherall by a neighborhood busybody, who reports seeing a man looking like a Druid and accompanied by a dog peeking into the windows of houses in her neighborhood. Hatherall’s interaction with her is humorous but is quickly leavened by the discovery of a young social worker, the Vivien Morse of the title, battered to death in a local wood. The reader is quickly introduced to the main players in the action: Hatherall’s partner, Fiona; Ellen, a disturbed, strange young woman who was Vivien’s last client contact; Nigel Morse, Vivian’s husband – a prime suspect but with an alibi; Jane Salt, Vivien’s boss, with whom Vivien has publicly argued; Lucy and Ian, Ellen’s parents, whose marital relationship is strained, and Kathy, Ellen’s aunt. We learn that Ellen’s problems date from being run down by her boyfriend, Robbie Creer, who is serving time in prison for fraud. Creer is discovered to have links to each of these characters as the yarn unwinds, including Dick Death (pronounced Deeath), the hulking, sandal-wearing Druid-like man. I enjoyed the characters, although Dick Death, and his new, elderly girlfriend, Gladys, rather overpowered everyone else. Ellen, with clear mental issues, also stands out, with her occasional violent episodes and her attachment to a ragged doll she calls ‘Future,’ a replacement for Robbie’s baby which she lost in the accident. There are a number of McGuffins cleverly placed to lead the reader, Hatherall and Fiona down various paths before the main path to the solution is discovered. The story is complex and the reader needs to pay close attention to figure out whodunit. I loved the light humor of various parts of the book. What did become somewhat tedious after a while were the long, long dialogues between Peter and Fiona, not quite the give-and-take of real conversation. Nevertheless, the characters were human, with all the normal warts and foibles.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Peter Best

    What a great story this has turned out to be. DCI Hatherall and his partner Fiona are searching for the killer of a young social worker found battered to death in the woods in what I would describe as a no nonsense story and that's just the way I like them. Even the title has a straightforward ring to it and doesn't stop there as the author continues the story with some fantastic writing. However, it's not just her writing that makes this such a great read the plot is fantastic also with everyth What a great story this has turned out to be. DCI Hatherall and his partner Fiona are searching for the killer of a young social worker found battered to death in the woods in what I would describe as a no nonsense story and that's just the way I like them. Even the title has a straightforward ring to it and doesn't stop there as the author continues the story with some fantastic writing. However, it's not just her writing that makes this such a great read the plot is fantastic also with everything totally believable. As the story moves along and the plot takes off, of course we all try to work out who the killer is. However just like the detectives in the story I just could not come up with the answer but let's just say the story comes to a very good end. Now before we get to the end, or really I should say right from the start we meet some great characters. Dick the Druid is my favourite closely followed by his partner Gladys. I really must congratulate the author on how she has set these two into the story and if you do have the chance to read this book(And I recommend you do.) you will see what I mean.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emily Williams

    Oooh how I love a good mystery! Although this book is part of a series, I didn't feel lost starting at the fourth book. I didn't need knowledge of the previous books to enjoy this one as it was well-written with a well-researched and rounded plot. It had me hooked from the start. What an exciting book filled with vivid descriptions and characters with depth. I love a good mystery and this certainly provided me with that. This book had a good range of characters and a great setting. The characters Oooh how I love a good mystery! Although this book is part of a series, I didn't feel lost starting at the fourth book. I didn't need knowledge of the previous books to enjoy this one as it was well-written with a well-researched and rounded plot. It had me hooked from the start. What an exciting book filled with vivid descriptions and characters with depth. I love a good mystery and this certainly provided me with that. This book had a good range of characters and a great setting. The characters were revealed and as to the relationship with Vivien as the book progressed. I enjoyed seeing DCI Hatherall investigate this mystery with colleague Fiona. This book was filled with twists and turns and leads to a satisfying conclusion. A well thought out book for the genre that I thoroughly enjoyed. I look forward to reading more from this talented mystery writer.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Inishowen Cailín

    A well plotted murder mystery with quirky characters and plenty of twists to keep you guessing. I really couldn't guess which way the investigation was going to go nor could I figure it all out until it was fairly obvious towards the end. The author has created a very strong, eclectic mix of characters with richly detailed and interesting back stories. The novel is also laced with a subtle dark humour which I enjoyed immensely. I hadn't read any of the previous books in this series but it didn' A well plotted murder mystery with quirky characters and plenty of twists to keep you guessing. I really couldn't guess which way the investigation was going to go nor could I figure it all out until it was fairly obvious towards the end. The author has created a very strong, eclectic mix of characters with richly detailed and interesting back stories. The novel is also laced with a subtle dark humour which I enjoyed immensely. I hadn't read any of the previous books in this series but it didn't deter from my enjoyment of the story. There is good chemistry between the members of the investigating team and I think it would be interesting to go back and read more about them from the beginning of the series. I received a copy from the author in exchange for my honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bill Ward

    Another great read in this series! Plenty of red herrings and suspense as people are getting murdered. Peter and Fiona once again investigate and we run into some characters from the earlier books which I really enjoyed. There is some gentle humor and despite the multiple murders there is little actual violence on the pages. The English countryside and village life is beautifully described by the author but it does seem a dangerous place to live! Twists right up to the last pages will keep you t Another great read in this series! Plenty of red herrings and suspense as people are getting murdered. Peter and Fiona once again investigate and we run into some characters from the earlier books which I really enjoyed. There is some gentle humor and despite the multiple murders there is little actual violence on the pages. The English countryside and village life is beautifully described by the author but it does seem a dangerous place to live! Twists right up to the last pages will keep you turning the pages. Highly recommended!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lucinda Clarke

    ALWAYS GOOD I always enjoy this authors books. Set in a rural part of England I am familiar her detective stories are always entertaining and keep you guessing right to the end. Easy to read the words flow effortlessly and her characters are real and delightfully human. I always pounce on her books as soon as they come out.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Landis

    What a great mystery! I really enjoyed this story of police detectives setting out on a complicated and intriguing whodunit with a British setting. There was just enough angst and humor thrown in with a complicated and well thought out story line that kept my attention all the way to the end. This is the first I've read by Febry and I liked her style. I'm intrigued to read more with Peter and Fiona. Well written, descriptive, with deep and fully developed characters, this murder mystery will keep What a great mystery! I really enjoyed this story of police detectives setting out on a complicated and intriguing whodunit with a British setting. There was just enough angst and humor thrown in with a complicated and well thought out story line that kept my attention all the way to the end. This is the first I've read by Febry and I liked her style. I'm intrigued to read more with Peter and Fiona. Well written, descriptive, with deep and fully developed characters, this murder mystery will keep you guessing all the way to the end. I kept thinking I knew what was going to happen next but there was enough twists and turns, unlikely and eccentric characters, and life in an English town to keep you on your toes. Loved the druid. And the last client to see her alive was one of the best characters in the book. Quite thought provoking at times and I love to see fallible main characters, so much more interesting to read. Who killed Vivien Morse? You'll have to read to find out!

  24. 4 out of 5

    J.B. Trepagnier

    I haven't read the other books in the series, but this is a very British whodunit with an awesome cast of eccentric characters that really sets it apart from most of the other police investigative stories I've read. Among the usual cast of the main detective and their partner, you've got appearances by the neighborhood busybody who wants to make police reports on all of her neighbors, a free spirited older lady who says exactly what she's thinking and falls in love with a wandering Druid who just I haven't read the other books in the series, but this is a very British whodunit with an awesome cast of eccentric characters that really sets it apart from most of the other police investigative stories I've read. Among the usual cast of the main detective and their partner, you've got appearances by the neighborhood busybody who wants to make police reports on all of her neighbors, a free spirited older lady who says exactly what she's thinking and falls in love with a wandering Druid who just got out of prison. Oh, and he's also a suspect in the murder of Vivian Morse. Among the cast of eccentric characters that will have you laughing, there's a long list of murder suspects. Just when our DCI gets more information on who you might THINK did it, another suspect pops up or the author throws a twist in with another suspect. Who Killed Vivien Morse? You'll have to read it to find out

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lucretia

    I do love a good murder mystery. This was a great one, with a fantastic plot that kept me guessing until the end. It has a very British feel and rich details that allowed me to easily slip into a foreign location. The characters were well developed, I especially enjoyed Fiona and Peter and the dynamic they have together. There were also so many other colorful characters they came across in their investigation. I try to stay away from details, particularly with a mystery, so I don’t give anything I do love a good murder mystery. This was a great one, with a fantastic plot that kept me guessing until the end. It has a very British feel and rich details that allowed me to easily slip into a foreign location. The characters were well developed, I especially enjoyed Fiona and Peter and the dynamic they have together. There were also so many other colorful characters they came across in their investigation. I try to stay away from details, particularly with a mystery, so I don’t give anything away. So I will just say there are enough twists and turns and moments to keep you flipping pages and fully engaged to the end. Add to that the beautiful style and you can’t go wrong with this one.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Brasher

    I enjoyed this well-structured and fast-paced mystery. The writing is good, and I especially love the interesting and quirky characters. Sometimes when the detectives recap the facts for each other, it feels a little awkward, and there are a few typos and other errors, but nothing too serious or distracting. Overall, a good mystery that kept me guessing. I recommend it to fans of the genre, especially those who like their murders set in small-town England.

  27. 4 out of 5

    W.T. Fallon

    This is a good, fast-paced mystery. To be fair, I have not read the earlier DCI Hatherall books so some things may have made more sense to me if I had. DCI Hatherall and colleagues are investigating the death of a woman whose abusive husband looks like the prime suspect—but is that too easy? Did someone else do it? And what about that Druid guy wandering around the park? The book starts out in kind of a funny way, with Hatherall taking a report from someone upset about a guy dressed as a Druid in This is a good, fast-paced mystery. To be fair, I have not read the earlier DCI Hatherall books so some things may have made more sense to me if I had. DCI Hatherall and colleagues are investigating the death of a woman whose abusive husband looks like the prime suspect—but is that too easy? Did someone else do it? And what about that Druid guy wandering around the park? The book starts out in kind of a funny way, with Hatherall taking a report from someone upset about a guy dressed as a Druid in a park. Then we get into the murder investigation and there are lots of twists and turns, plus you meet the usual colorful characters as the cops investigate the case. I would have liked a little more internalization, as often there are large sections with a lot of talking and no one thinking anything that could have been broken up by an internal observation or two. Otherwise, it was a solid mystery with good pacing and interesting characters.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sandra McKenna

    Top read. The body of a woman is found, and there is a strange Druid priest in the area. Did he murder the woman and if so, why? DCI Peter Hatherall and his partner Fiona are led on several wild goose chases, with lots of misleading clues, and people being put at risk. Another brilliantly written murder mystery by Diana J Febry which draws the reader in immediately and won't let go until the very end. Highly recommended. Top read. The body of a woman is found, and there is a strange Druid priest in the area. Did he murder the woman and if so, why? DCI Peter Hatherall and his partner Fiona are led on several wild goose chases, with lots of misleading clues, and people being put at risk. Another brilliantly written murder mystery by Diana J Febry which draws the reader in immediately and won't let go until the very end. Highly recommended.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hock Tjoa

    This volume is the fourth in a series that features DCI Peter Hatherall who is less rumpled than in previous stories but otherwise retains his complex working relationship with Fiona. Don’t, he says to her, go all new wave and hippy on me. He gets enough of that from his daughter and “partner” – the latter is trying to find herself all the time. I, he asserts, am exactly where I left myself the night before, and my inner self isn’t battling to escape so it can communicate with astral beings. Thi This volume is the fourth in a series that features DCI Peter Hatherall who is less rumpled than in previous stories but otherwise retains his complex working relationship with Fiona. Don’t, he says to her, go all new wave and hippy on me. He gets enough of that from his daughter and “partner” – the latter is trying to find herself all the time. I, he asserts, am exactly where I left myself the night before, and my inner self isn’t battling to escape so it can communicate with astral beings. This tone has its appeal. A 30-ish social worker is found murdered in the woods, a convicted con man and cat burglar of the rich and famous is injured in a prison brawl, a teenager riding a bicycle is seriously injured by said con man – there are twists and personalities enough to fill a good sized mystery. The characters are mostly credible although in her attempt to make some of them more memorable the author seems stuck on size, tall men and ample women. Fans will appreciate a marked cleaning up of the writing and format, perhaps due to the editor gracefully given credit at the beginning of the book. But there remains some jarring moments for this reader, such as, “Her over reaction [one word] seemed, well, off skelter [kilter? helter skelter?] and out of character. Or maybe it was just that special time of the month for her.” The last remark would be off-limits to a male writer. Amid the muddy earth-tones of one scene, “the only relief came from blue pheasant feeder bins. Their artificial sheen …” The pronoun refers presumably to the birds and not the feeder bins. One last jarring note: through Gladys, the author attempts to give definition to her portrayal of the antagonist. “No one could disguise those eyes of his. It’s like looking into an iceberg. So cold and yet oddly suggestive of hidden depths … of cruelty and evilness.” I found the “yet” and “evilness” odd.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    A woman is found murdered in the woods and it is down to DCI Peter Hatherall and DI Fiona Williams to solve the case. The lady, Vivien Morse is a respected social worker and the crime duo seem to hit a brick wall when Vivien doesn't appear to have enemies and people with close connections to her, all seem to have tight alibis. We are introduced to Vivien's client who was the last person to see her alive. She is a physically and mentally damaged girl who sadly carries an imaginary baby who she ref A woman is found murdered in the woods and it is down to DCI Peter Hatherall and DI Fiona Williams to solve the case. The lady, Vivien Morse is a respected social worker and the crime duo seem to hit a brick wall when Vivien doesn't appear to have enemies and people with close connections to her, all seem to have tight alibis. We are introduced to Vivien's client who was the last person to see her alive. She is a physically and mentally damaged girl who sadly carries an imaginary baby who she refers to as 'my Future'. Will this vulnerable and deeply disturbed girl lead the police to Vivien's killer?. Other interesting characters are Druid Dick, his female dog called Colin, and extrovert girlfriend Gladys. They add quirkiness to the story, subtle humour and an air of mystery. The plot develops quickly and becomes a fast-paced, gripping crime thriller with a satisfying ending.The author has a fantastic eye for detail and the story unfolds clearly and precisely. The plot is believable and tightly written with fascinating characters woven into an intricate story. This is the first book I have read by Diana J. Febry and I was impressed enough to want to read the others and can highly recommend this one. I tried to work out 'Who killed Vivien Morse' but the twists and red herrings left me guessing right up to the end. I was sent a copy of the book by the author in exchange for an honest review.

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