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Ethel and Ernest

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Poignant, funny, and utterly original, Ethel & Ernest is Raymond Briggs's loving depiction of his parents' lives from their first chance encounter in the 1920s until their deaths in the 1970s.Ethel and Ernest are solid members of the working class, part of the generation (Brokaw's "Greatest Generation") that lived through the tumultuous era of the twentieth century. They m Poignant, funny, and utterly original, Ethel & Ernest is Raymond Briggs's loving depiction of his parents' lives from their first chance encounter in the 1920s until their deaths in the 1970s.Ethel and Ernest are solid members of the working class, part of the generation (Brokaw's "Greatest Generation") that lived through the tumultuous era of the twentieth century. They meet during the Depression -- she working as a chambermaid, he as a milkman -- and we follow them as they encounter, and cope with, World War II, the advent of radio and t.v., telephones and cars, the atomic bomb, the moon landing. Briggs's portrayal of his parents as they succeed, or fail, in coming to terms with their rapidly shifting world is irresistably engaging -- full of sympathy and affection, yet clear-eyed and unsentimental. The book's strip-cartoon format is deceptively simple; it possesses a wealth of detail and an emotional depth that are remarkable in such a short volume. Briggs's marvelous illustrations and succinct, true-to-life dialogue create a real sense of time and place, of what it was like to experience such enormous changes. Almost as much a social history as it is a personal account, Ethel & Ernest is a moving tribute to ordinary people living in an extraordinary time.


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Poignant, funny, and utterly original, Ethel & Ernest is Raymond Briggs's loving depiction of his parents' lives from their first chance encounter in the 1920s until their deaths in the 1970s.Ethel and Ernest are solid members of the working class, part of the generation (Brokaw's "Greatest Generation") that lived through the tumultuous era of the twentieth century. They m Poignant, funny, and utterly original, Ethel & Ernest is Raymond Briggs's loving depiction of his parents' lives from their first chance encounter in the 1920s until their deaths in the 1970s.Ethel and Ernest are solid members of the working class, part of the generation (Brokaw's "Greatest Generation") that lived through the tumultuous era of the twentieth century. They meet during the Depression -- she working as a chambermaid, he as a milkman -- and we follow them as they encounter, and cope with, World War II, the advent of radio and t.v., telephones and cars, the atomic bomb, the moon landing. Briggs's portrayal of his parents as they succeed, or fail, in coming to terms with their rapidly shifting world is irresistably engaging -- full of sympathy and affection, yet clear-eyed and unsentimental. The book's strip-cartoon format is deceptively simple; it possesses a wealth of detail and an emotional depth that are remarkable in such a short volume. Briggs's marvelous illustrations and succinct, true-to-life dialogue create a real sense of time and place, of what it was like to experience such enormous changes. Almost as much a social history as it is a personal account, Ethel & Ernest is a moving tribute to ordinary people living in an extraordinary time.

30 review for Ethel and Ernest

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    1950-1960.... "says we've got to be HIP. What? Just talk sense, Ernest. We've got to HANG LOOSE with the CATS. Ernest! Go to bed. You're overtired. I'll make the Cocoa. You're a SQUARE. baby. Oh Ernest... When will you grow up?" From 1920 to deaths in the 70's...Ethel & Ernest steal your heat!!!! The illustrations are deeply moving of love - War - parenthood - and old age. Simply Beautiful & Precious!!!! 1950-1960.... "says we've got to be HIP. What? Just talk sense, Ernest. We've got to HANG LOOSE with the CATS. Ernest! Go to bed. You're overtired. I'll make the Cocoa. You're a SQUARE. baby. Oh Ernest... When will you grow up?" From 1920 to deaths in the 70's...Ethel & Ernest steal your heat!!!! The illustrations are deeply moving of love - War - parenthood - and old age. Simply Beautiful & Precious!!!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    This graphic novel for adults covers the lives of Raymond Briggs parents from when they first met to their deaths. Beginning with Ethel working as a lady's maid and Ernest passing her house as a milkman we see the couple fall in love, marry and begin their lives together. It is a sad book, I hope their lives had more happiness, I think they probably did, a book covering the whole of someone's life often seems sad just because it has flashed past but these lives did seem portrayed in a sad way. I This graphic novel for adults covers the lives of Raymond Briggs parents from when they first met to their deaths. Beginning with Ethel working as a lady's maid and Ernest passing her house as a milkman we see the couple fall in love, marry and begin their lives together. It is a sad book, I hope their lives had more happiness, I think they probably did, a book covering the whole of someone's life often seems sad just because it has flashed past but these lives did seem portrayed in a sad way. I think Raymond's relationship with his parents was perhaps not an easy one although he clearly loves them. This was a wonderful look into the era, so much changed in this period of history. I would like to see Raymond Briggs do the same for his life too.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Greta G

    A short and charming story, written by the British author/cartoonist Raymond Briggs in memory of his parents Ethel and Ernest, who both died in 1971. It's a very personal, heartfelt story of the lives of an ordinary British couple during the years 1920-1970. Although they have differing political views and many marital squabbles, they obviously deeply care for each other. This is a great, whimsical character study of a common married couple as well as an excellent social study of British working A short and charming story, written by the British author/cartoonist Raymond Briggs in memory of his parents Ethel and Ernest, who both died in 1971. It's a very personal, heartfelt story of the lives of an ordinary British couple during the years 1920-1970. Although they have differing political views and many marital squabbles, they obviously deeply care for each other. This is a great, whimsical character study of a common married couple as well as an excellent social study of British working-class morals and beliefs in the twentieth century. This endearing graphic novel is made into an animated movie in 2016.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I have read Briggs's silent picture book masterpiece, The Snowman, and seen an animated film based on it many times. So I am glad to have read this rather different story about how Briggs imagines his parents's 43 years together. It's a British working class marriage between a maid and a milkman, that became a Tory/Labour house, though not ever very strained, politically or otherwise. This is a loving tribute to his parents and also a cultural and social history of sorts, from roughly 1930 throu I have read Briggs's silent picture book masterpiece, The Snowman, and seen an animated film based on it many times. So I am glad to have read this rather different story about how Briggs imagines his parents's 43 years together. It's a British working class marriage between a maid and a milkman, that became a Tory/Labour house, though not ever very strained, politically or otherwise. This is a loving tribute to his parents and also a cultural and social history of sorts, from roughly 1930 through 1970. So we get to view things like WWII in brief snapshots through the lens of one household. Beautiful illustrations, lovely story that may make you think of your own parents or grandparents (I did of mine, at least).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    One of the best classic graphic novels! Life gets pretty basic. Based during the Nazi times of ww2, this graphic novel is pretty impressive! Reminds me of the movie Up at times. *Detailed review will be up soon.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    This story is a memoir of Raymond Briggs' parents living their lives in an extraordinary time. What I enjoyed about this was that it was VERY British (which of course connected with me) and that they felt so 'normal'. This couple isn't famous or wealthy or anything too out of the ordinary, they just have to keep on getting by whilst the wars happen and technology changes and politics shifts all around them. They kind of represent most British people's grandparents I would imagine, or maybe even This story is a memoir of Raymond Briggs' parents living their lives in an extraordinary time. What I enjoyed about this was that it was VERY British (which of course connected with me) and that they felt so 'normal'. This couple isn't famous or wealthy or anything too out of the ordinary, they just have to keep on getting by whilst the wars happen and technology changes and politics shifts all around them. They kind of represent most British people's grandparents I would imagine, or maybe even great-grandparents. They just got on with it, and made it work - they didn't have a choice... I did really love the story and how matter of fact it was, it was down-to-earth, and I did get a little emotional too - 4*s

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dov Zeller

    This is the first book I've read by Briggs and I'm so glad I picked it up. It's based on the story of Briggs's parents, their life in London from the 1930s until the the early 1970s. When the book begins Ethel is a lady's maid cleaning a window and Ernest a milkman riding by on his bike. They get to waiving to each other when he rides by and soon enough he's asked her to the movies. As economic and political climates change and war comes and goes it becomes clear that they each have their own pe This is the first book I've read by Briggs and I'm so glad I picked it up. It's based on the story of Briggs's parents, their life in London from the 1930s until the the early 1970s. When the book begins Ethel is a lady's maid cleaning a window and Ernest a milkman riding by on his bike. They get to waiving to each other when he rides by and soon enough he's asked her to the movies. As economic and political climates change and war comes and goes it becomes clear that they each have their own peculiar wisdom and short-sightedness, and to see the world through their eyes and their bickering is a delight. There is so much humor and tenderness in this book. The love Ethel and Ernest have for each other is epic and perhaps even more so given that Briggs is focusing on the mundane, every-day stuff of life (even during wartime). Both Ethel and Ernest are on the old side for married couples in those days, I think, but certainly Ethel who is, I believe, in her mid to late thirties. They want children and it takes them some time to have their first and the doctor tells them they will have to stop there. And in this way the artist is born and a few years later sent to relatives in the country in order to stay safe from the bombing of London. The absence of the author from the pages is intriguing to me, the way he keeps himself very peripheral to his own story and really focused in on his parents, their particular way of moving through time, working, delighting, worrying, arguing and making up. Or, to quote LG in their gr review: I adore this fictionalized true story. Briggs shows us scenes from his imagination of his parents’ lives: how they met, raised a family during a destructive world war, and lived through the cultural roller-coaster ride of the 20th century. Briggs’s illustrations are full of humor, marvelous detail, and obvious love for the people who inspired the title characters. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... p.s. an animated film based on the book has been made. https://whatson.bfi.org.uk/lff/Online...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Loyd

    I've always thought that the difference between British and American children's literature is that the British never sentimentalize childhood. Dickens was rough on children, but they always came out fine in the end. Roald Dahl was absolutely brutal. Dahl's books are populated with unfortunate children who become wounded but wiser by their adventures, such as James and the Giant Peach, The Witches, and so on. Lewis Carroll was certain rough on children, and the tradition carries on in such books I've always thought that the difference between British and American children's literature is that the British never sentimentalize childhood. Dickens was rough on children, but they always came out fine in the end. Roald Dahl was absolutely brutal. Dahl's books are populated with unfortunate children who become wounded but wiser by their adventures, such as James and the Giant Peach, The Witches, and so on. Lewis Carroll was certain rough on children, and the tradition carries on in such books as Neil Gaiman's Coraline on in the film Nanny McPhee, where children visiting their undertaker father at work never seem to mind the corpse on the table. Which brings us to Ethel & Ernest, a different kind of book. It's the true story of Raymond Briggs' parents, and his journalistic, colorful account of their life before he was born. It's hard to imagine writing dispassionately, much less drawing objectively, about your own birth, your parent's view of your chosen profession, and especially, about their deaths. Joan Didion did it well in The Year of Magical Thinking, but she didn't have to draw a picture of her father on his deathbed. Even in C.S. Lewis' A Grief Observed, you can sense the tears falling on the page as he wrote. Perhaps dispassionate is the wrong word. Let's just say it's honest. That's what makes the greatest impact. Raymond Briggs has created some of the most enduring stories in modern pictorial literature. His book The Snowman is a marvelous, touching fable about the wonders of Christmas. But he also drew a harrowing view of the life of ordinary people following an atomic bomb blast in When The Wind Blows. Ethel & Ernest is a wonderful piece of work that falls somewhere in between.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Idarah

    Briggs is a very famous British children's author, which I didn't realize until after I finished reading this graphic novel. It didn't surprise me though, because the rich illustrations reminded me of books I'd read as a child. They were fabulous! A tribute to his parents, this is their love story. When they first meet in 1920s London, Ethel is in her mid 30s, and working as a lady's maid for a respectable upper class family. Ernest is a spry milkman, who loses no time in asking Ethel out on a d Briggs is a very famous British children's author, which I didn't realize until after I finished reading this graphic novel. It didn't surprise me though, because the rich illustrations reminded me of books I'd read as a child. They were fabulous! A tribute to his parents, this is their love story. When they first meet in 1920s London, Ethel is in her mid 30s, and working as a lady's maid for a respectable upper class family. Ernest is a spry milkman, who loses no time in asking Ethel out on a date. As the decades go by, the two weather the social and technological changes that come their way. They survive the depression of the 30s, World War II and the havoc it wreaks on Londoners, the economic downturn and rationing that follows, and the "love generation" of the 60s. Ernest's commentary on world events is always related through the tidbits he reads out loud to Ethel from the newspaper. Also discernible is Ethel's sensitivity to class distinctions, which was significant of a bygone era. A lovely read, you'll want to hug your parents and grandparents after reading this.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Licha

    Short story about the author's parents. We see a little bit of how they court, buy a home and build their dreams in it, how they form a family. Apparently, the author's parents were already up in age when they met and married and his mom was only able to have one child or run the risk of dying if she were to attempt to have more children. There were some funny moments but I also didn't get a lot of the jokes, language, or historical references when they referred to England. There were a lot of s Short story about the author's parents. We see a little bit of how they court, buy a home and build their dreams in it, how they form a family. Apparently, the author's parents were already up in age when they met and married and his mom was only able to have one child or run the risk of dying if she were to attempt to have more children. There were some funny moments but I also didn't get a lot of the jokes, language, or historical references when they referred to England. There were a lot of sweet moments but the book felt a little rushed. The artwork and coloring however are really beautiful.

  11. 5 out of 5

    James

    'Ethel and Ernest' (1998) is an affecting, effectively told and brilliantly illustrated graphic novel, telling the story of Briggs' parents from the 1930's to the 1970's. It is a very lovely, very human story and obviously one very personal to Raymond Briggs. As well as working on a very personal and biographical level, 'Ethel and Ernest' provides a fascinating version of British history through the lens of Briggs' parents lives. Recommended. 'Ethel and Ernest' (1998) is an affecting, effectively told and brilliantly illustrated graphic novel, telling the story of Briggs' parents from the 1930's to the 1970's. It is a very lovely, very human story and obviously one very personal to Raymond Briggs. As well as working on a very personal and biographical level, 'Ethel and Ernest' provides a fascinating version of British history through the lens of Briggs' parents lives. Recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Well that was poignant! Ethel and Ernest follows the lives of Raymond Briggs' parents throughout the decades, with each section divided into 10 year chunks. The story opens when they first meet, Ethel is a ladies maid and spots Ernest on his bike; he looks up and notices her at the window, and the rest, they say, is history. Ethel leaves her job and they set up home together. Whilst the story was heart-warming and quite tender in places, I couldn't help but notice the political discrepancies betw Well that was poignant! Ethel and Ernest follows the lives of Raymond Briggs' parents throughout the decades, with each section divided into 10 year chunks. The story opens when they first meet, Ethel is a ladies maid and spots Ernest on his bike; he looks up and notices her at the window, and the rest, they say, is history. Ethel leaves her job and they set up home together. Whilst the story was heart-warming and quite tender in places, I couldn't help but notice the political discrepancies between them. Ethel was a Tory and Ernest was Labour. My problem with this was how Ethel came across: she came from a working class family (she had about 8 other siblings) and yet she looked down on what she referred to as 'commoners'. I understand that she wanted what was best for her son but too many people in this world try and forget their roots, and they're ashamed of them, when they really shouldn't be. I am working-class and I always will be. I just feel that Ethel sometimes came across as someone who thought she was better than others which diminished the affinity I had with her. On the other hand, I loved Ernest - he was a passionate man who liked to rub his wife up the wrong way at times, just to see her reaction. He always knew where he came from and in this respect, he was a completely grounded character who warmed my heart. The illustrations were beautiful and reminiscent of Briggs' other masterpiece, The Snowman, and the ending was very, very poignant. A great little read which will undoubtedly move you to tears.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Fred

    This book is written by Raymond Briggs and it follows the true story of his parents. It follows their lives throughout WWII and the very politically active world during that time and the changes they make, the sacrifices they make etc. It has various artistic elements to it which are commendable: in other words, I really liked the art style! :-) This was nice enough! There is a very emotionally poignant side to it...according to other people's reviews. As far as I'm concerned, this is a comic str This book is written by Raymond Briggs and it follows the true story of his parents. It follows their lives throughout WWII and the very politically active world during that time and the changes they make, the sacrifices they make etc. It has various artistic elements to it which are commendable: in other words, I really liked the art style! :-) This was nice enough! There is a very emotionally poignant side to it...according to other people's reviews. As far as I'm concerned, this is a comic strip of a couple discussing their son, politics and what they're doing to their house. I didn't connect any further than that, partly because I'm not that fussed about politics (I am quite young after all!) It was a quick read - it took me about half an hour - so I would recommend it if you like comic strips that are well drawn and are rather amusing. But I didn't find it anything emotionally or politically powerful.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    This graphic memoir/ biography is about the author's parents from the time they met in the 1920s until their deaths in the 1970s. Ethel worked as a chambermaid, Ernest a milkman, and this is the story of their life together during the large and small political and social changes of their day in Britain. I loved the art and colors in this one, and was delighted by the clear affection the author has for his parents. It was fun to read about the couple's dynamics, and this is a wonderful tribute to This graphic memoir/ biography is about the author's parents from the time they met in the 1920s until their deaths in the 1970s. Ethel worked as a chambermaid, Ernest a milkman, and this is the story of their life together during the large and small political and social changes of their day in Britain. I loved the art and colors in this one, and was delighted by the clear affection the author has for his parents. It was fun to read about the couple's dynamics, and this is a wonderful tribute to them. The reason this does not get a higher rating is that this is a very specific story about a certain, albeit lovely, couple, and I'm not sure why anyone not family would really care about them. I gather that the author is a much loved children's author, so maybe if this would work better for fans of his work. I know that this is a perpetual issue I have with these types of books, and I didn't know the premise when I picked it up. Still, it's a fast read, and the art is lovely.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katie Lumsden

    I really like this. It's a lovely graphic biography and combines a very personal moving story with the wider history of the mid-20th century. A very enjoyable read. I really like this. It's a lovely graphic biography and combines a very personal moving story with the wider history of the mid-20th century. A very enjoyable read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Estepp

    Saw this recommended on the First Second blog over Christmas and instantly put in my library request for it. Such a lovely little thing, but you really should *not* finish reading it right before your break is over, because it will make you cry and then you'll have to go back to work and be all, like, "Hey man, what's up? What do you mean my eyes are red? I'm fine. Shut up." Or something. If you are at all like me anyway. So, yeah. It's pretty great. And I am a sap. Saw this recommended on the First Second blog over Christmas and instantly put in my library request for it. Such a lovely little thing, but you really should *not* finish reading it right before your break is over, because it will make you cry and then you'll have to go back to work and be all, like, "Hey man, what's up? What do you mean my eyes are red? I'm fine. Shut up." Or something. If you are at all like me anyway. So, yeah. It's pretty great. And I am a sap.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Moira Macfarlane

    Such a loving, touching and honest story. It did make me feel a bit melancholy, maybe because it is not glamorous at all and shows the life of many ordinary working class people in the 20th century. Seeing the world change in oh so many ways, making the best of everything, sticking together for better and for worse. Voor een inkijkje in deze graphic novel: https://www.instagram.com/p/B7JG0iyACZ9/ Such a loving, touching and honest story. It did make me feel a bit melancholy, maybe because it is not glamorous at all and shows the life of many ordinary working class people in the 20th century. Seeing the world change in oh so many ways, making the best of everything, sticking together for better and for worse. Voor een inkijkje in deze graphic novel: https://www.instagram.com/p/B7JG0iyACZ9/

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    If you loved this review or would like to check out other iconic graphic novels here is the link of where I am discovering these books. AbeBooks: 50 Essential Graphic Novels I got an email months ago from AbeBooks giving me this list of what they believe is the 50 essential graphic novels to read (I tend to disagree with some its choices) and I have been lazy to check them out from the library until now. I thought it would be very interesting to read this book because why would an author make a g If you loved this review or would like to check out other iconic graphic novels here is the link of where I am discovering these books. AbeBooks: 50 Essential Graphic Novels I got an email months ago from AbeBooks giving me this list of what they believe is the 50 essential graphic novels to read (I tend to disagree with some its choices) and I have been lazy to check them out from the library until now. I thought it would be very interesting to read this book because why would an author make a graphic novel about his ordinary parents? While reading it I discovered that this book is really about life, love, and how quick times are changing when it comes to history and technology. The story takes place in London, England from the 1920s through 1971. We meet Ethel who is a maid who one day she sees a man from the window who is riding a bike. He waves at her and she blushes that a man is paying attention to her. He tells her that his name is Ernest and then asks her out to go watch a movie. After that encounter they become a couple and soon enough they get married. She quits her job and becomes a house wife while Ernest works as a milkman. We enter the 1930s and the times are rough during these period because of high unemployment, recuperating from WWI, and economic depression. Ethel by now is already 37 years old and wants a baby and luckily she gets pregnant and has Raymond but the doctors warned Ernest that she can never have another child because she will die while giving birth. While we see Raymond growing up as a boy, we get the back drop of WWII and how they had to send Raymond to live in the country side while London is being destroyed by German bombs. As Raymond grows up, he gets admitted into Grammar school which is exciting for his parents because they didn't have a proper education and then get disappointed when he wants to attend art school. They don't believe he will be making any money and they don't understand the difference between pursuing what you love versus getting a typical 9-5 job and be bored and resenting every moment of that. I believe since they didn't have the luxury to attend University they never experience the option of having a choice in your career. And as the times are changing, you get to see Ethel and Ernest not liking a different political party in government, men growing long hair, women wearing shorter skirts, and how quickly the world they grew up is changing especially having a women in Parliament. I cannot give a proper review for this book and I will leave the plot empty because if I write anymore I will spoiled this short book for you. I find it interesting how different each decade appears in this book and how easily our opinions changes during our life. For Example, when Hitler first came into power, Raymond parents didn't find him horrible and liked him. But immediately when he started invading Europe and sending Jews to death camps, they realize that he needs to be stopped or he can conquer and destroy England. We also get to see Ethel and Ernest's reaction to the invention of the television and how it feels like being inside a movie theater in your own home. This was such a short and sweet book and I enjoyed every aspect of it from the storyline, the illustrations and how grateful we are as human beings when parents try and make the life of their children better than what they went through. Their son became a famous illustrator and author and never had to live below poverty level or be a working class. It was sad how they both died and I am glad that Raymond chose to honor them in his book. While reading this book it brought nostalgic feelings for me and my family and I appreciate how much my grandparents had to go through so much being immigrants in a foreign country, getting a job and trying to provide food and clothes from my mother and her siblings. If they didn't sacrifice all that they did I would be living in a country where basic human rights are nonexistent and starving. I highly recommend everyone to read this book especially if you love Raymond Briggs children books.

  19. 4 out of 5

    LG

    I adore this fictionalized true story. Briggs shows us scenes from his imagination of his parents’ lives: how they met, raised a family during a destructive world war, and lived through the cultural roller-coaster ride of the 20th century. Briggs’s illustrations are full of humor, marvelous detail, and obvious love for the people who inspired the title characters.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    A graphic memoir? Heartfelt and funny. Best of all this was a present from my friend Edel in Ireland. Thanks.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Crane

    Quite An Emotional Tale.

  22. 5 out of 5

    adam

    first book of the stay at home reading rush! challenges completed: - read a book in the same room the whole time (read it in my garden) - read a book with a house on the cover

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elli (The Bibliophile)

    This heart-warning graphic novel tells the story of Raymond Briggs' parent. It is through their eyes that we witness the major events of the 20th century. This is a touching read about love, and about coping with the changes that happen to our world as we age. It was a quick read, but quite powerful. At times it did feel like the story jumped from major event to major event and I would have maybe liked it to be longer and include a bit more about their lives. It was a very cute read, however, an This heart-warning graphic novel tells the story of Raymond Briggs' parent. It is through their eyes that we witness the major events of the 20th century. This is a touching read about love, and about coping with the changes that happen to our world as we age. It was a quick read, but quite powerful. At times it did feel like the story jumped from major event to major event and I would have maybe liked it to be longer and include a bit more about their lives. It was a very cute read, however, and I would recommend it to everyone! I almost cried at the ending!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    The story of Raymond Briggs' parents life together, from first meeting to their final moments. What an incredible achievement this book is: it captures such deep truth and resonant emotion in deceptively simple scenes and images. Briggs takes the mundane moments that make up a life and shows how they all, every one of them, make life the indescribable thing that it is. I can't get over how brilliant this book is. The story of Raymond Briggs' parents life together, from first meeting to their final moments. What an incredible achievement this book is: it captures such deep truth and resonant emotion in deceptively simple scenes and images. Briggs takes the mundane moments that make up a life and shows how they all, every one of them, make life the indescribable thing that it is. I can't get over how brilliant this book is.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    An amazing graphic biography of Brigg's parents' lives as a couple - stupendous! An amazing graphic biography of Brigg's parents' lives as a couple - stupendous!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gary Butler

    58th book read in 2016. Number 430 out of 551 on my all time book list. Review Pending:

  27. 4 out of 5

    Noninuna

    Art: 4/5 Narration: 4/5 Enjoyment:4/5 Overall: 4/5This is a memoir/autobiography of author's parents. Of how they met, what they went through during the war and raising up the author. There's 1 disappointment tho; (view spoiler)[the author has several siblings but none were mention throughout the story except their names at the beginning. I was expecting some sibling clashes, rivalry or fall out but I can understand if he decided to put that out. (hide spoiler)] Art: 4/5 Narration: 4/5 Enjoyment:4/5 Overall: 4/5This is a memoir/autobiography of author's parents. Of how they met, what they went through during the war and raising up the author. There's 1 disappointment tho; (view spoiler)[the author has several siblings but none were mention throughout the story except their names at the beginning. I was expecting some sibling clashes, rivalry or fall out but I can understand if he decided to put that out. (hide spoiler)]

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    The story of a marriage from the 1930s to 1970s. Here they are in the late 50s (their age, as well as the century's): - Here, Et, listen. It says we've got to be HIP. - What? - GROOVY, babe. And REAL COOL. - Just talk sense, Ernest. - We've got to HANG LOOSE with the CATS. - Cats? - YEAH, MAN! - Ernest! Go to bed. You're overtired. I'll make the cocoa. :) The story of a marriage from the 1930s to 1970s. Here they are in the late 50s (their age, as well as the century's): - Here, Et, listen. It says we've got to be HIP. - What? - GROOVY, babe. And REAL COOL. - Just talk sense, Ernest. - We've got to HANG LOOSE with the CATS. - Cats? - YEAH, MAN! - Ernest! Go to bed. You're overtired. I'll make the cocoa. :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    I was impressed with this book. The illustrations are beautiful and very expressive. I don't usually read books in the graphic novel category, but I'm glad I read this one! I was impressed with this book. The illustrations are beautiful and very expressive. I don't usually read books in the graphic novel category, but I'm glad I read this one!

  30. 4 out of 5

    LittleEyesReading

    This is so sweet and cute, from building their house together to their everyday conservation and argument, I just adore everything. And I LOVE the art style, i think it is the best art style I've ever seen in a graphic novel. This is so sweet and cute, from building their house together to their everyday conservation and argument, I just adore everything. And I LOVE the art style, i think it is the best art style I've ever seen in a graphic novel.

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