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How to Give Up Plastic: A Guide to Changing the World, One Plastic Bottle at a Time. From the Head of Oceans at Greenpeace and spokesperson for their anti-plastic campaign

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'We have a responsibility, every one of us' David Attenborough Around 12.7 million tonnes of plastic are entering the ocean every year, killing over 1 million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals.By 2050 there could be more plastic in the ocean than fish by weight.Plastic pollution is the environmental scourge of our age, but how can YOU make a difference? This accessible g 'We have a responsibility, every one of us' David Attenborough Around 12.7 million tonnes of plastic are entering the ocean every year, killing over 1 million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals.By 2050 there could be more plastic in the ocean than fish by weight.Plastic pollution is the environmental scourge of our age, but how can YOU make a difference? This accessible guide, written by the campaigner at the forefront of the anti-plastic movement, will help you make the small changes that make a big difference, from buying a reusable coffee cup to running a clean-up at your local park or beach. Tips on giving up plastic include:· Washing your clothes within a wash bag to catch plastic microfibers (the cause of 30% of plastic pollution in the ocean) · Replacing your regular shampoo with bar shampoo · How to lobby your supermarket to remove unnecessary packaging · How to throw a plastic-free birthday party · How to convince others to join you in giving up plasticPlastic is not going away without a fight. We need a movement made up of billions of individual acts, bringing people together from all backgrounds and all cultures, the ripples of which will be felt from the smallest village to the tallest skyscrapers. This is a call to arms - to join forces across the world and to end our dependence on plastic. #BreakFreeFromPlastic Plastic is not going away without a fight. We need a movement made up of billions of individual acts, bringing people together from all backgrounds and all cultures, the ripples of which will be felt from the smallest village to the tallest skyscrapers. 'Plastic waste is one of the greatest environmental challenges facing the world' Theresa May


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'We have a responsibility, every one of us' David Attenborough Around 12.7 million tonnes of plastic are entering the ocean every year, killing over 1 million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals.By 2050 there could be more plastic in the ocean than fish by weight.Plastic pollution is the environmental scourge of our age, but how can YOU make a difference? This accessible g 'We have a responsibility, every one of us' David Attenborough Around 12.7 million tonnes of plastic are entering the ocean every year, killing over 1 million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals.By 2050 there could be more plastic in the ocean than fish by weight.Plastic pollution is the environmental scourge of our age, but how can YOU make a difference? This accessible guide, written by the campaigner at the forefront of the anti-plastic movement, will help you make the small changes that make a big difference, from buying a reusable coffee cup to running a clean-up at your local park or beach. Tips on giving up plastic include:· Washing your clothes within a wash bag to catch plastic microfibers (the cause of 30% of plastic pollution in the ocean) · Replacing your regular shampoo with bar shampoo · How to lobby your supermarket to remove unnecessary packaging · How to throw a plastic-free birthday party · How to convince others to join you in giving up plasticPlastic is not going away without a fight. We need a movement made up of billions of individual acts, bringing people together from all backgrounds and all cultures, the ripples of which will be felt from the smallest village to the tallest skyscrapers. This is a call to arms - to join forces across the world and to end our dependence on plastic. #BreakFreeFromPlastic Plastic is not going away without a fight. We need a movement made up of billions of individual acts, bringing people together from all backgrounds and all cultures, the ripples of which will be felt from the smallest village to the tallest skyscrapers. 'Plastic waste is one of the greatest environmental challenges facing the world' Theresa May

30 review for How to Give Up Plastic: A Guide to Changing the World, One Plastic Bottle at a Time. From the Head of Oceans at Greenpeace and spokesperson for their anti-plastic campaign

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    I already knew plastic waste was having an impact on our wildlife and landscape, but just how devastating this impact is was heart-breaking to read about. The first 50 pages of this book provided numerous examples of how we are harming our planet through the plastic wastage that is littering our earth and filling our lakes and oceans, and just one of these would be enough to convert any reader to the zero-waste lifestyle! The rest of the book was comprised of ideas on how to reduce the plastic in I already knew plastic waste was having an impact on our wildlife and landscape, but just how devastating this impact is was heart-breaking to read about. The first 50 pages of this book provided numerous examples of how we are harming our planet through the plastic wastage that is littering our earth and filling our lakes and oceans, and just one of these would be enough to convert any reader to the zero-waste lifestyle! The rest of the book was comprised of ideas on how to reduce the plastic in all areas of your life. As reducing my plastic was something I was keen to explore before discovering this book, some of these were already known to me. I had already started to reject plastic straws and to ensure I had a water bottle and tote bag with me wherever I go, so I would not have to purchase plastic alternatives when out and about. This also informed me on all manner of things I had no previous concept of. For example, I never before realised that micro-fibres from synthetically made clothing sheds as we are moving and also in the washing machine, meaning we are plugging our water supply as well as our environment with less obvious forms of plastic waste, without even being able to see that we are doing so. Thankfully, I am now far better informed and also well armed with easy to implement ideas on how to reduce my plastic waste and convert to zero waste living.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pooja

    A very useful guide to reduce your plastic footprint. It has been 5 months since I have not thrown any plastic items in the dustbin and I would continue doing it. The book gave me a metaphorical pat on my back and told me that what I'm doing is essential and important. So yeah, that works for me. For beginners, there are a lot of suggestions and ideas in this book. Those who already are practicing it, can directly read the sections they are interested in. I found the letter writing, organising a c A very useful guide to reduce your plastic footprint. It has been 5 months since I have not thrown any plastic items in the dustbin and I would continue doing it. The book gave me a metaphorical pat on my back and told me that what I'm doing is essential and important. So yeah, that works for me. For beginners, there are a lot of suggestions and ideas in this book. Those who already are practicing it, can directly read the sections they are interested in. I found the letter writing, organising a campaign, protest and petition to be very interesting.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mara

    This is a really practical & helpful guide to how to systematically reduce using single use plastics in your own life, and for that alone, it is quite successful. What I really appreciated about it was that a) there was a pragmatic understanding that it is nearly impossible to fully give up plastics for most people, b) different economic, social, and medical realities can create variation for how much plastic each individual will be able to give up, and c) the author consistently points back to This is a really practical & helpful guide to how to systematically reduce using single use plastics in your own life, and for that alone, it is quite successful. What I really appreciated about it was that a) there was a pragmatic understanding that it is nearly impossible to fully give up plastics for most people, b) different economic, social, and medical realities can create variation for how much plastic each individual will be able to give up, and c) the author consistently points back to the need for systemic change in how consumer products are regulated, packaged, sold, etc. I also really enjoyed the little side interviews throughout with different environmentalists and regulators

  4. 5 out of 5

    Max

    This was a great guide on giving up plastic. I listened to it as an audiobook on Storytel with a very nice narrator. His voice was soothing and he worked well with the material. This book has helpful tips to use less plastic in almost every aspect of your life. What I love about this book is that it also has background information about climate change and the effects of plastic. There's also interviews with people who work with getting rid of single-use plastic and those are very interesting! I al This was a great guide on giving up plastic. I listened to it as an audiobook on Storytel with a very nice narrator. His voice was soothing and he worked well with the material. This book has helpful tips to use less plastic in almost every aspect of your life. What I love about this book is that it also has background information about climate change and the effects of plastic. There's also interviews with people who work with getting rid of single-use plastic and those are very interesting! I also liked the non-condescending tone. No one is perfect, and the author recognizes that and doesn't expect you to. I've read some books on this topic where you really felt pressured, but this author realised that pressure doesn't work at all, it just makes you annoyed. Also the author is realistic about plastic being necessary for some people or situations and explains that a ban of for example plastic straws can be really troublesome for people who are having trouble drinking. And also in healthcare you can't recycle needles and IV drip bags, LOL! So great book, helpful tips and eye-opening. Great book to begin with if you're looking to use less plastic, I think it's the best one on giving up single-use plastic I've read so far. The only little annoyance for me is no big deal, but the author is clearly working with Greenpeace, and that's mentioned a lot.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Margo

    This book will change my life! I have been unforgivable ignorant about the ways we misuse plastic in modern life. I didn't even know for sure what a "micro plastic" is let alone the ways in which they were damaging our planet. There was no excuse for me to be so I'll informed. I was lazy. This book has given me the kick in the butt I needed to change. It reinforced the (few) things I am doing right and made simple, practical suggests for ways I personally could do more. It is a quick and easy rea This book will change my life! I have been unforgivable ignorant about the ways we misuse plastic in modern life. I didn't even know for sure what a "micro plastic" is let alone the ways in which they were damaging our planet. There was no excuse for me to be so I'll informed. I was lazy. This book has given me the kick in the butt I needed to change. It reinforced the (few) things I am doing right and made simple, practical suggests for ways I personally could do more. It is a quick and easy read and doesn't not the reader down with dry statistics. The author is the head of Greenpeace UK which I found a bit scary but, from the start, this book is written in an honest, engaging way. The damage being done by plastics is really only coming to light now so we are all on learning curve. The US is a bit ahead of us here in Europe. This book contains interviews with leading figures from the conservation world and it is interesting to here their views and get tips from them. I am so glad I stepped out of my narrow world of fiction to pick up this book. I listened to the audio book which is available through Borrowbow.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Victoria (Eve's Alexandria)

    I bought this to help me cut down on my plastic usage and found it quite a useful beginners guide. McCallum has a down to earth non-judgemental tone and provides plenty of useful practical tips on reducing plastic waste in different parts of your life, home and community. At the back there is a step by step guide to starting a plastic reduction campaign in your local area. That said, there is nothing here that you couldn't find online in an hour of judicious googling and clicking. Most of this i I bought this to help me cut down on my plastic usage and found it quite a useful beginners guide. McCallum has a down to earth non-judgemental tone and provides plenty of useful practical tips on reducing plastic waste in different parts of your life, home and community. At the back there is a step by step guide to starting a plastic reduction campaign in your local area. That said, there is nothing here that you couldn't find online in an hour of judicious googling and clicking. Most of this information and advice is freely available on the many plastic free and zero waste blogs - I feel like I've outgrown it in a very short space of time. I will very happily pass it along though, and hope that it inspires more people to take action.

  7. 5 out of 5

    owilkumowa

    BLOG blog BlOg bLoG HASHTAG hashtag HaShTaG hAsHtAg GREENPEACE FOR THE WIN, BUY BRAND X AND BUY BRAND Y. Really, if you care for the environment, help people think for themselves and learn how to arrive at conscious choices. You criticize corporate ways for their brainwashing tactics, fine, but stop doing the same in your own ranks. Overall, I can label this book as environment protection for babies. Generic content, much insubstantial talk presented in an inflated manner. Supposedly aimed at adul BLOG blog BlOg bLoG HASHTAG hashtag HaShTaG hAsHtAg GREENPEACE FOR THE WIN, BUY BRAND X AND BUY BRAND Y. Really, if you care for the environment, help people think for themselves and learn how to arrive at conscious choices. You criticize corporate ways for their brainwashing tactics, fine, but stop doing the same in your own ranks. Overall, I can label this book as environment protection for babies. Generic content, much insubstantial talk presented in an inflated manner. Supposedly aimed at adult activists, and simultaneously provides advice like... Make sure there is no spelling mistakes in your letter! Before hitting send, read your email at least twice! ...wow, brilliant, who could have thought? Perhaps this was supposed to be an internal booklet for Greenpeace activists, and if so, it should have stayed that way. I can't imagine giving this book to a friend of mine whom I would like to be more aware of environment pollution. I am quite sure the result would be the opposite of what had been intended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Saar The Book owl

    This is a really useful book on how to give up on plastic and how to start it. I thought I knew much about plastic from the documentaries, but after reading I've found holes in my knowledge about the subject. Also, I was a bit passive and reluctant to reduce my plastic use. I did it, but not far enough and not severe enough. This book opened my eyes once more that this is serious and things are really bad, but that it is important that we can do something about it and that we definately should. This is a really useful book on how to give up on plastic and how to start it. I thought I knew much about plastic from the documentaries, but after reading I've found holes in my knowledge about the subject. Also, I was a bit passive and reluctant to reduce my plastic use. I did it, but not far enough and not severe enough. This book opened my eyes once more that this is serious and things are really bad, but that it is important that we can do something about it and that we definately should. The book is told from different point of views: individual, governement, compagnies and what they all can do about it. So, don't be ignorant, read the book and see what you can do and actively do it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Kayt

    This was better than I thought it would be. I had the nasty feeling that the author might be like one of those people who corner you at a party and tell you that the sausage roll on your plate is tantamount to murder. Or who tell you in tedious detail that Little Jemima and Little Tarquin don't have plastic toys, or imply that you're a lazy slacker who wants the world to burn because you spend one hour shopping at Tesco rather than six hours tracking down every artisan shop that will supply basi This was better than I thought it would be. I had the nasty feeling that the author might be like one of those people who corner you at a party and tell you that the sausage roll on your plate is tantamount to murder. Or who tell you in tedious detail that Little Jemima and Little Tarquin don't have plastic toys, or imply that you're a lazy slacker who wants the world to burn because you spend one hour shopping at Tesco rather than six hours tracking down every artisan shop that will supply basic essentials like quinoa in a paper bag... OK, rant over. I don't know what McCallum is like as a person, but as a writer he seems to understand that in the real world, many (most?) of us don't have either the money or the time to actually 'give up plastic'. Instead, he concentrates on real-world ways to reduce our plastic use. Nor does he give the impression that he's always known such basic stuff as what you thought was a recyclable paper coffee cup actually has a thin layer of plastic in it... And if the Head of Oceans at Greenpeace admits he didn't know that until relatively recently, the rest of us can feel less guilty about it too. The lack of smugness is refreshing. (And presumably he knows this, because he points out that patronising or attacking people generally doesn't work very well.) So is McCallum's attitude that you don't have to be making vast lifestyle changes to make a difference: if all you can do is stop drinking bottled water, then that's good too. This book is divided between: 1. Environmental facts about how much plastic gets dumped and where. 2. 'Interviews' (only a page long of Q&A) with various people with an interest in plastic reduction. 3. Practical ideas on what you can do to reduce plastic consumption. The latter ranges from the personal and simple (use a re-usable coffee cup for your takeaway coffee, and a re-usable water bottle) to advice on how to contact relevant people about reducing plastic use in their company/department/constituency. The personal plastic reduction ideas are divided into sections, depending on use: out and about, bathroom, kitchen, nursery, and so on. Then you have sections on persuading others to reduce their use of plastic, in bigger and wider ways. This is a useful little book, and a quick read. To be honest, many of the ideas for personal plastic reduction are also available on various blogs (as you'd expect), but here, they're conveniently collected into a little book. It even has places for you to write your own plastic-free plans - although this probably works a lot better with the hardback than the Kindle version!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Clair Sharpe

    "Around 12.7 million tonnes of plastic are entering the ocean every year, killing over 1 million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals. By 2050 there could be more plastic in the ocean than fish, by weight" How to Give Up Plastic is a great little book. Written by Will McCallum who is head of oceans for Greenpeace it is a mixture of shocking facts about the plastic pollution we generate and some ideas to help stop the dependency we all have on plastic. I've been reasonably environmentally minded ov "Around 12.7 million tonnes of plastic are entering the ocean every year, killing over 1 million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals. By 2050 there could be more plastic in the ocean than fish, by weight" How to Give Up Plastic is a great little book. Written by Will McCallum who is head of oceans for Greenpeace it is a mixture of shocking facts about the plastic pollution we generate and some ideas to help stop the dependency we all have on plastic. I've been reasonably environmentally minded over the years - I've carried my own bags for years rather than take plastic and I'm pretty good at recycling but I'm aware there is a lot more I can be doing, and this book has given me the inspiration to try new products and think differently in my day to day life. For those who wish to go even further, there is a section on how to organise a beach clean or how to run campaigns and write letters. East to read and digestible, this is a fantastic book for those who care about the environment and want to do more. Thank you to Penguin Life for sending me a copy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Blair

    This was great. I expected a book telling me depressing statistics and droning in and on about how we should do stuff now and stop single use plastics, but it ended up being much more. It had a story by step of getting rid of plastic in every situation (the bathroom, in your kitchen, in your community, taking a stance against companies, etc.) but then instead of ending it there I was given links and many alternatives and solutions. Nearly every page had an alternative to to products such as sing This was great. I expected a book telling me depressing statistics and droning in and on about how we should do stuff now and stop single use plastics, but it ended up being much more. It had a story by step of getting rid of plastic in every situation (the bathroom, in your kitchen, in your community, taking a stance against companies, etc.) but then instead of ending it there I was given links and many alternatives and solutions. Nearly every page had an alternative to to products such as single use plastics kn shampoo bottles, food packaging, and more. Living in Singapore, a few of the alternatives given obviously weren’t the best, but it was good nonetheless. Overall this had great advice on everything, even being polite about your no plastic policies.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elle (theartfulelle)

    ESSENTIAL READING !!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gerardine Betancourt

    "In the United States, more than 1,500 plastic bottles are used every second" How to give up plastic is a very life-changing book! This book has many tools to help us live a plastic-free life. Some of them are: * The classic stuff like buying a stainless steel bottle, a reusable coffee cup, reusable straws, a tote bag, or backpack for groceries. * Refuse plastic wherever you can, say no to single-use plastic * Reduce plastic in your home and workplace switch to long-lasting products. * Recycle and di "In the United States, more than 1,500 plastic bottles are used every second" How to give up plastic is a very life-changing book! This book has many tools to help us live a plastic-free life. Some of them are: * The classic stuff like buying a stainless steel bottle, a reusable coffee cup, reusable straws, a tote bag, or backpack for groceries. * Refuse plastic wherever you can, say no to single-use plastic * Reduce plastic in your home and workplace switch to long-lasting products. * Recycle and dispose of your house plastic responsibly. This book also helps us use our voices and take action in our communities to reduce the mass consumerism of single-use - plastic bags, cutlery, and plastic-lined - coffee to create a better world for future generations. Thanks to Edelweiss and Penguin Books for this arc in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jacquie

    I loved the details and the ideas for helping the reader get started in living without plastic, or reducing the use. I think the first part of the book was for someone that does not know about the issues with plastics on the environment, but I've worked since I was a teen to reduce my use (before I knew it was a thing). I would have preferred more ideas for getting involved, connecting with others, what to do with current plastics, etc. I loved the details and the ideas for helping the reader get started in living without plastic, or reducing the use. I think the first part of the book was for someone that does not know about the issues with plastics on the environment, but I've worked since I was a teen to reduce my use (before I knew it was a thing). I would have preferred more ideas for getting involved, connecting with others, what to do with current plastics, etc.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bloodorange

    Non-judgmental, compelling, relatable, full of practical tips. This book gives you a very concrete action plan. I appreciate the chapter on lobbying - will definitely share it with my students.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Bearman

    #breakfreefromplastics I read all the time. The majority of the books I read pertain to my craft: environmental education. I work extensively to improve my understanding of the world around me and sometimes I like to share that with my friends and family. This is one of those occasions. I just read, “How to Give Up Plastic” by Will McCallum. Already, I imagine, some people have retreated or cringed. Can you even imagine a world without plastic? It is definitely hard to imagine, but it is not impo #breakfreefromplastics I read all the time. The majority of the books I read pertain to my craft: environmental education. I work extensively to improve my understanding of the world around me and sometimes I like to share that with my friends and family. This is one of those occasions. I just read, “How to Give Up Plastic” by Will McCallum. Already, I imagine, some people have retreated or cringed. Can you even imagine a world without plastic? It is definitely hard to imagine, but it is not impossible. Small changes can make a huge difference. Remember David and Goliath or Jonah and the Whale or Gandhi or Greta Thunberg. These individuals made great gains against all odds. But, why? I am happy or, more correctly, unhappy to tell you. Do you love birds? How about the ocean? Beaches? Clean water? Healthy meat? All of these things have plastic in them. ALL. OF. THEM. McCallum shares a statistic that the amount of plastic in the world will outweigh the fish in 2050 (which is not that far away). There are 165 million TONS of plastics in the oceans. Here’s the best (worst) part: 80% of plastic in the ocean comes from land. If I’m honest, I have always known this. I have a special activity called Microplastics that I teach. The summary is this imagine a cereal box nearly full of sand. Then, measure out maybe ¼ of a cup of the tiniest beads you can find and dump them into the sand. Close the box and shake it up. Now, find all of those beads. Go on, I’ll wait. Microplastics like the beads from fancy soaps or microfibers from washing your plastic clothing or whatever, is in the ocean. These little things are EATEN by phytoplankton and zooplankton that think, hey, now that looks like a treat. Then, those little fellows are eaten by bigger and bigger animals all the way up the food chain to us. Maybe, you are thinking, but they are so small, how could that possibly effect a big whale? Or a sailfish? Let me put that in perspective for you: a bat, an average run-of-the-mill bat eats 600 insects a night. ONE NIGHT. That’s 20 pizzas a night for ONE human. Now, think about how much plankton a whale would have to eat. Don’t worry about the math, the basics are that it is a lot. And you may also think, I don’t eat whale. Or I don’t eat shellfish. Well, birds eat those things, do you eat any birds? Do you like sushi? Do you think that because you don’t eat from the ocean, you are safe? I thought that too. Think about this figure: in a freshwater river in the UK, there were 500,000 plastic particles per square meter. This is the highest number found so far, but plastics are everywhere. I also just learning that your clothing sheds fibers with EVERY wash. Therefore, if the fibers are not natural, guess where they are going and who is going to eat them? So, here’s what I really want to say: yes, you may be dead and gone before the world implodes, maybe that’s your kid’s problem or your grandkid’s problem. But don’t you want to enjoy the world now? Do you like going on walks and seeing litter everywhere? No? Then, maybe pick up three pieces of trash on each walk. Also, use reusable things. No more plastic water bottles. No more one-time use plastics, Styrofoam, and so on. Be creative and up-cycle your plastics, that’s how I am going to package Christmas presents this year: upcycled items. Maybe wear clothes two days instead of one. Please. I beg you. “Reducing your plastic footprint by a bottle here, a coffee cup there, maybe no more than a drop in the ocean… the ocean is nothing if not countless drops of water.” (McCallum, 2018) Here are the Top Five Steps for Getting Rid of Plastics: 1. Plastic Free Shopping Spree a. Buy things that will put plastic out of business: Reusable water bottles, reusable shopping bags, etc. 2. Plastic Free Purge a. Remove and never again use plastic wherever you can in your house. For example: we have done away with liquid bath soap and only use bar soap. 3. Plastic Free Preaching a. Spread the word. This is how change starts. And that’s what this reading is. 4. Make Plastic Free Plans a. Try to shop without plastic. Have a holiday or event without plastic. 5. Start Your Own Plastic Free Campaign a. Do it! Here’s some more terrifying facts in case you are a glutton for punishment: 1. 120 Billion plastics made by Coca-Cola (check your water bottles, those may be Coke too) 2. 38 Billion plastic fragments found on Henderson Island which is UNINHABITED 3. 363 Million tons of plastic produced EVERY YEAR. 4. 13.9 Million tons of plastic entering the ocean every year. 5. 1 garbage truck full of plastic enters the ocean EVERY MINUTE. 6. EVEN TOOTHPASTE HAS PLASTIC IN IT. Big Four Plastic Problems: 1. Cups/Lids (even those “paper” cups have plastic in them!) 2. Straws 3. Bottles 4. Bags The book again is: How to Give Up Plastic by Will McCallum. It is an excellent, quick read. It also has charts and questions included so you can budget these life changes and see where you can eliminate plastic in your life. Our household has been doing this process for a while. We have eliminated plastic wrap and bags. We have eliminated a plastic shower curtain and replaced it with a washable cotton one (I need to replace the other still). We also have moved to bars from bottles of soap. I even cleaned up debris from our neighbor’s fireworks. And this coming week, I am challenging myself to have a plastic-free shopping trip to the grocery store. I imagine this will be very difficult and probably next to impossible considering where I live, but I am nothing if not creative and resourceful. I would also like to recommend Hydroflask for water bottles. They are a bit pricey, but they last and have a lifetime warranty. I have even used the warranty; I needed a replacement on my bottle top at one point and I had a new one in just a few days.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    An excellent little primer on how to reduce the plastic in your life without being preachy or condescending. McCallum gives many, many examples of ways to think about reducing plastic, offering alternatives & illustrating how even small changes can make a big difference. He offers himself as an example where he can, both of how he's reduced his plastic use and places that still catch him up, while filling this with important facts about plastic use today. A great place to start if you've done th An excellent little primer on how to reduce the plastic in your life without being preachy or condescending. McCallum gives many, many examples of ways to think about reducing plastic, offering alternatives & illustrating how even small changes can make a big difference. He offers himself as an example where he can, both of how he's reduced his plastic use and places that still catch him up, while filling this with important facts about plastic use today. A great place to start if you've done the obvious in reducing plastic and are looking for the next step.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jenae Lovercamp Hulsey

    Anyone who works to reduce plastic in the world is my hero. Thank you, Will McCallum. There are a few helpful tips for reducing plastic consumption in different areas of your life: bathroom, grocery shopping, parties, etc. must of which I have read before. There are also excellent resources for planning beach/park clean ups and starting a media campaign.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    This was a very basic guide to giving up (single-use) plastics. The author says time and again that it's almost impossible to remove plastics from your life 100%, so worry about the worst offenders first and then talk to lawmakers and individual companies to use your influence as a consumer to help make larger scale changes in purchasing and/or production. While it wasn't a fun book to read per se, it was filled with a lot of good information for someone who is just starting to make this journey This was a very basic guide to giving up (single-use) plastics. The author says time and again that it's almost impossible to remove plastics from your life 100%, so worry about the worst offenders first and then talk to lawmakers and individual companies to use your influence as a consumer to help make larger scale changes in purchasing and/or production. While it wasn't a fun book to read per se, it was filled with a lot of good information for someone who is just starting to make this journey in their life and wants to know the best things to do. The fact that they include sections on how to write letters to companies or politicians, how to hold meetings, get press attention and protest was an important part of this book, because few similar books have anything like that. It also introduced me to some new eco-friendly stores and products to incorporate into my daily routines (for instance, I never thought of all the plastic microfibers from clothing washed down the drain during laundry...luckily other people have and have made some products to help limit that a bit). This book is fine for an introduction, but I've read others that expand on the subject matter a lot and are suitable follow-ups for this one. If you're really interested in this life change, this book probably won't be enough.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    I LOVED this book! It actually has a lot of practical tips on how to reduce plastic in your life, in your workplace, and in your community. I'm confident there are tips I can take from this book and apply to my life. My only complaint (and it's so minor) is that most of the company's mentioned in the book are British companies. I'd love to try some of their products, but the carbon emissions to ship them here actually outweigh the good getting rid of the plastic would do. I LOVED this book! It actually has a lot of practical tips on how to reduce plastic in your life, in your workplace, and in your community. I'm confident there are tips I can take from this book and apply to my life. My only complaint (and it's so minor) is that most of the company's mentioned in the book are British companies. I'd love to try some of their products, but the carbon emissions to ship them here actually outweigh the good getting rid of the plastic would do.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

    I thought this was quite good. I liked the practical things about giving up plastics as individuals. Not sure I am ready to go on a campaign just yet. My favourite quote from the book in reference to plastics would have to be "Like the last drink at a party, it was a good idea at the time, but it turned out pretty terribly". I am going to employ some of these ideas. Everything helps. I thought this was quite good. I liked the practical things about giving up plastics as individuals. Not sure I am ready to go on a campaign just yet. My favourite quote from the book in reference to plastics would have to be "Like the last drink at a party, it was a good idea at the time, but it turned out pretty terribly". I am going to employ some of these ideas. Everything helps.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    3.5 stars This book definitely makes you think, even if you're already a conscious customer. There's an undeniable power in numbers and statistics, at least from my perspective, so this is definitely a good wake-up call and a useful beginners guide for those who still buy bottled water and use a new plastic bag for every single grocery purchases (we all know such people, I bet). Personally, I was hoping for more advanced tips (I learnt a few new things but not enough) and I'd have been just fine w 3.5 stars This book definitely makes you think, even if you're already a conscious customer. There's an undeniable power in numbers and statistics, at least from my perspective, so this is definitely a good wake-up call and a useful beginners guide for those who still buy bottled water and use a new plastic bag for every single grocery purchases (we all know such people, I bet). Personally, I was hoping for more advanced tips (I learnt a few new things but not enough) and I'd have been just fine without the author repeating the same things over and over again (most likely because I already knew them). But "How to Give Up Plastic" definitely showed me how much I can still improve and it gave me a good, motivating kick to pay more attention to how much even the tiniest things can impact the environment negatively.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karolina Brzezińska

    ○ It is estimated that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the oceans than fish ○ every minute the content of one garbage truck full of plastic waste goes to the ocean ○ for turtles, the bag looks like a jellyfish, and the microfibers precipitated from clothes during washing are taken to the waters, and thus to the organisms of the animals living in them ○ plastic that goes into waters, absorbs substances like sponge, absorbs, for example, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), whose use has been bann ○ It is estimated that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the oceans than fish ○ every minute the content of one garbage truck full of plastic waste goes to the ocean ○ for turtles, the bag looks like a jellyfish, and the microfibers precipitated from clothes during washing are taken to the waters, and thus to the organisms of the animals living in them ○ plastic that goes into waters, absorbs substances like sponge, absorbs, for example, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), whose use has been banned throughout the world since 2002 The above and many other examples presented in the book do not fill us with optimism. Many of the studies are still in the initial phase, but the results are terrifying. The world is flooded with bags, coffee mugs, straws, styrofoam packaging from take-away dishes. There is not much needed to start fighting with plastic. The author argues that every individual is important, and the resignation of even a tiny part of plastic in our lives introduces change. Maybe your friend who notices that you are using a reusable cup or straw, will also invest in such a cup? The book "How to give up plastic" presents ready-made solutions for use in the bathroom, bedroom, kitchen, backpack or bag, children's room, workplace. This is a kind of study of small steps that, if taken gradually, can lead to a large, environmentally beneficial change. "How to give up plastic" by Will McCallum, Ocean director at the Greenpeace branch in the UK, are the most important, shocking but well-informed facts about the environmental pollution of plastic waste. The book also contains inspiring interviews, practical tips on how to reduce or eliminate plastic and where to look for alternatives. This is primarily a book for those who want to start working, but do not know how. In my opinion, this is a book everyone should know, without exception.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sasha Vaniev

    An eye-opening read for those who are just environmental novices! William McCallum managed to describe in a very friendly with lots of examples the impact of over-excessive use of plastics and especially single-use plastics. The key message for me is that the essential way to reduce plastic is NOT to "consume and recycle" but rather do the following actions (with some buts of course): – avoid single-use plastics at all costs (except medicine purposes, e.g. syringe) – reduce products containing or w An eye-opening read for those who are just environmental novices! William McCallum managed to describe in a very friendly with lots of examples the impact of over-excessive use of plastics and especially single-use plastics. The key message for me is that the essential way to reduce plastic is NOT to "consume and recycle" but rather do the following actions (with some buts of course): – avoid single-use plastics at all costs (except medicine purposes, e.g. syringe) – reduce products containing or wrapped in plastic and find multiple-use alternatives (sometimes, the environment does not allow to do that though) - raise awareness about the wrecking impact of microplastics and plastics to the global ocean (prospective study says that microplastics are found in human stool but there is no direct evidence that it harmfully affects human... at least so far) Additionally, I put 4 stars, as the book is quite locally targetting UK market, and many facts are left without references or scientific evidence (not all though).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Crumb

    A good solid reporting of the problem and steps that we as individuals can take to reduce. I liked that the author freely admits that going plastic free 100% of the time is not feasible for all. I am well on my journey to lower my own consumption but still found lots of good information and alternative steps to take. The part about how to campaign for change was well done and makes it easier for everyone to help with the huge problem that is plastic. I especially liked that the author explained th A good solid reporting of the problem and steps that we as individuals can take to reduce. I liked that the author freely admits that going plastic free 100% of the time is not feasible for all. I am well on my journey to lower my own consumption but still found lots of good information and alternative steps to take. The part about how to campaign for change was well done and makes it easier for everyone to help with the huge problem that is plastic. I especially liked that the author explained that the companies that are responsible for creating the plastic are ignoring the problem in the United States. It makes one think about the importance we all have to make changes based on how we spend our money. If we don't buy the products we're making a difference. If we complain to the "people in charge" and offer different options that are responsible, we can change the disaster that is coming.

  26. 4 out of 5

    thebookishmeg

    This was a really good introductory guide to reducing the amount of plastic in your life, and it is a useful read for everyone. Plastic pollution is a huge environmental problem, and if you are overwhelmed by the amount of plastic in your life, then this is a great starting point for finding items that can easily be swapped from plastic to an alternative. This book goes through the different rooms of the house to highlight easy swaps, from reusable bottles to bamboo toothbrushes and recycled pla This was a really good introductory guide to reducing the amount of plastic in your life, and it is a useful read for everyone. Plastic pollution is a huge environmental problem, and if you are overwhelmed by the amount of plastic in your life, then this is a great starting point for finding items that can easily be swapped from plastic to an alternative. This book goes through the different rooms of the house to highlight easy swaps, from reusable bottles to bamboo toothbrushes and recycled plastic pillows to shampoo bars. It also goes through beach cleanups and provides so much advise about writing letters to the council, companies and journalists in order to be active in creating change. It was definitely informative, and it would be my first recommendation if anyone wanted more information about plastic pollution and first steps in plastic waste reduction.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    If you want a motivating read to make changes in your life to reduce wastage, especially of plastic, I would recommend this book. Personally I found it very helpful with the constant referring to extra sources, companies, blogs and sites that talk about zero waste or plastic free living or providers of commodities that follow a strong ethos. Despite doing a lot already, I definitely feel the need to do more and start reaching out to companies with the power of a consumer to change their habits o If you want a motivating read to make changes in your life to reduce wastage, especially of plastic, I would recommend this book. Personally I found it very helpful with the constant referring to extra sources, companies, blogs and sites that talk about zero waste or plastic free living or providers of commodities that follow a strong ethos. Despite doing a lot already, I definitely feel the need to do more and start reaching out to companies with the power of a consumer to change their habits of excess packaging with single use plastics. It can be very easy to make some changes and if everyone could start with one change of habits such as a reusable water bottle or coffee mug, the world would already benefit by tons of less waste that takes half a millenia to break down.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bethany Woodcock

    This book is great for anyone that has been living under a rock for the past couple of years or good for someone literally just starting their plastic free journey. The first half of the book gives an overview of the problems, and the second half is where most people will want to start. Most of the tips like 'avoid plastic bags' and 'make shopping lists before you go shopping' I'd assume are quite obvious even to people who wouldn't consider themselves particularly eco friendly. Honestly I was exp This book is great for anyone that has been living under a rock for the past couple of years or good for someone literally just starting their plastic free journey. The first half of the book gives an overview of the problems, and the second half is where most people will want to start. Most of the tips like 'avoid plastic bags' and 'make shopping lists before you go shopping' I'd assume are quite obvious even to people who wouldn't consider themselves particularly eco friendly. Honestly I was expecting something a bit more radical, but I was disappointed to see a book that could have had potential basically be a promotional guide for Greenpeace and its own agenda.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yerzhan Karatay

    The writer is adequate in his suggestions and there are great common ideas like buy quality products instead of many cheap ones. We can't just give up plastic right away without recognizing the people in vital need of it. It's really great that there is lot of guides to follow. I listened to an audio version but it's probably better to actually read it and take notes to write all the mentioned eco-friendly companies in different life aspects, though the new ones must have entered the market since The writer is adequate in his suggestions and there are great common ideas like buy quality products instead of many cheap ones. We can't just give up plastic right away without recognizing the people in vital need of it. It's really great that there is lot of guides to follow. I listened to an audio version but it's probably better to actually read it and take notes to write all the mentioned eco-friendly companies in different life aspects, though the new ones must have entered the market since the time the book was written, so it's probably best to look for the particular things during the actual period, nevertheless the book is quite informative.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Brackett

    I'd wanted to read this for months after seeing it in a small bookstore over the summer. Got it from the library. Let it sit for ages until the day before it was due and then just sped read the whole thing in an hour. I did skip areas that I've already switched over (like toothpaste and toothbrush and cleaning supplies) but I enjoyed the interviews and the workbook sections and the data and numbers to show just what plastic is doing to our planet. This was a good read and I'd recommend it to any I'd wanted to read this for months after seeing it in a small bookstore over the summer. Got it from the library. Let it sit for ages until the day before it was due and then just sped read the whole thing in an hour. I did skip areas that I've already switched over (like toothpaste and toothbrush and cleaning supplies) but I enjoyed the interviews and the workbook sections and the data and numbers to show just what plastic is doing to our planet. This was a good read and I'd recommend it to anyone regardless of where they are on the journey.

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