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Harpy's Flight

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A reissue of classic backlist titles from the author of the best selling Farseer Trilogy and The Liveship Traders books. HARPY'S FLIGHT was Lindholm's first novel, and the first in the WINDSINGERS series, which introduced her popular gypsy characters, Ki and Vandien. A reissue of classic backlist titles from the author of the best selling Farseer Trilogy and The Liveship Traders books. HARPY'S FLIGHT was Lindholm's first novel, and the first in the WINDSINGERS series, which introduced her popular gypsy characters, Ki and Vandien.


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A reissue of classic backlist titles from the author of the best selling Farseer Trilogy and The Liveship Traders books. HARPY'S FLIGHT was Lindholm's first novel, and the first in the WINDSINGERS series, which introduced her popular gypsy characters, Ki and Vandien. A reissue of classic backlist titles from the author of the best selling Farseer Trilogy and The Liveship Traders books. HARPY'S FLIGHT was Lindholm's first novel, and the first in the WINDSINGERS series, which introduced her popular gypsy characters, Ki and Vandien.

30 review for Harpy's Flight

  1. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    This is the debut of Megan Lindholm (best known as Robin Hobb). Although it’s a bit clumsy and doesn’t have the fluency her later books have, you can see Fitz’ world and Realms of the Elderlings series blooming from here. The style is the same – character driven stories, this one more introspective and descriptive than all others I read. I don’t think many will like it too much because of its slow pace, but I did – I missed her warm words. And by all means, it’s a truly sweet, tragic but also hop This is the debut of Megan Lindholm (best known as Robin Hobb). Although it’s a bit clumsy and doesn’t have the fluency her later books have, you can see Fitz’ world and Realms of the Elderlings series blooming from here. The style is the same – character driven stories, this one more introspective and descriptive than all others I read. I don’t think many will like it too much because of its slow pace, but I did – I missed her warm words. And by all means, it’s a truly sweet, tragic but also hopeful story; one of an ending and a new beginning. It doesn’t have a proper magic system (yet) but the touches present here and there - mostly related to the world - are unique. Ki and Vandien are two strong characters, easy to root for. There are also other sentient species, albeit not very detailed here but intriguing nonetheless and I hope they will be developed further in the next books. One (more) thing I appreciate in her works is the love and respect for nature in its entirety which you can sense in every word. I have a soft spot for that. And I loved below paragraph, even though Harpies (view spoiler)[are, well, sort of the bad guys here (hide spoiler)] : , ‘[…]But a Harpy kills only in need. Only when it must feed. It is not like a Human, who may kill for sport or sheer idleness. Harpies have learned the balancing points between the worlds, between death and life itself. They could show us the paths of peace our own kind have forgotten.’

  2. 4 out of 5

    L

    This mesmerizing tale of love, adventure and magic is beautifully written and a truly timeless classic. I was a huge fan of Robin Hobb’s work when she used to write novels as Megan Lindholm, such as ‘The Ki and Vandien Quartet’ which introduced me to a great writer. I certainly feel that Harpy’s Flight projects the qualities of a great fantasy writer and those raw traits that the author possessed before the creation of epics (such as the Farseer Trilogy in which Fitz Chivalry was born). This ric This mesmerizing tale of love, adventure and magic is beautifully written and a truly timeless classic. I was a huge fan of Robin Hobb’s work when she used to write novels as Megan Lindholm, such as ‘The Ki and Vandien Quartet’ which introduced me to a great writer. I certainly feel that Harpy’s Flight projects the qualities of a great fantasy writer and those raw traits that the author possessed before the creation of epics (such as the Farseer Trilogy in which Fitz Chivalry was born). This richly evocative tale is full of distinct originality, professing the author’s uniquely individualistic style - which is apparent in all her work. Unlike others within this highly competitive and greatly popular genre, Megan Lindholm stands-out for miles with how she puts such creative vision and inspired ideas onto paper with such effortless ease and dexterity. This is a book in a collection of favorites that never cease to amaze me and leave me awestruck, for this is a writer who is so impressive as she is the creator of ambitious masterpieces. ‘Harpies don’t give up on blood debts. Neither do the men who serve them. A life must be given in return’ Within a world of ancient rituals and magic, lie harsh mountainous regions and extraordinary races. Instead of remaining in the comfort of her husband’s Gypsy people Ki chooses to become an outcast and wander in solitude whilst plagued by haunted memories. As she leaves all that is familiar, Ki encounters all kinds of beings and ends up being hunted by Harpies and a mysterious man who is intent to remain a part of her future. This supremely singular tale is wrought with danger and shrouded in secrets, which will dazzle any fan of epic fantasy and well-written literary works. I do believe that the author’s later works (written as Robin Hobb), such as the liveship traders and her phenomenal Farseer trilogy are so accomplished and spectacular compared to her earlier published works as Megan Lindholm. However, if you are a fan of this author then I would strongly recommend reading books such as this (together with others as Megan Lindholm), for you will still enjoy a brilliantly assured work of outstanding proportions and substance. This highly readable, enjoyable tale is one that sparkles as you glimpse the writer emerging from her chrysalis…soon to blossom into something quite remarkable! Robin Hobb (aka. Megan Lindholm) has to be one of the greatest fantasy writers of all-time and who deserves her rightful place next to JRR Tolkien, Raymond E Feist and others. Works as Megan Lindholm: The reindeer people The wolf’s brother Cloven Hooves the Ki and Vandien quartet 3.5 stars

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    Harpy's Flight was written before the books that Lindholm wrote as Robin Hobb. This is evident in several ways -- the quality of the writing and plotting, the less rich characterisation, the fact that some characters seem almost like test runs for later ones (Rhesus from this book for Restart in Liveships, for example). Her potential also shows in the brightly described world, in the descriptions of cultures and rites, in the quality of the writing and the way it can grip you even when the first Harpy's Flight was written before the books that Lindholm wrote as Robin Hobb. This is evident in several ways -- the quality of the writing and plotting, the less rich characterisation, the fact that some characters seem almost like test runs for later ones (Rhesus from this book for Restart in Liveships, for example). Her potential also shows in the brightly described world, in the descriptions of cultures and rites, in the quality of the writing and the way it can grip you even when the first seven pages are just about climbing up a cliff (not the most gripping stuff). There's a lot of physicality in Hobb's writing -- when Ki is sore and raw and exhausted, it really comes through, which is something she did as well, probably better, in Farseers, with the various poison/torture/agony scenes of poor Fitz. I like the ideas in this book, and some of the writing is wonderful. I felt like the way it's structured is a little clunky: too much diving around between past and present with the clumsy little 'going to sleep'/'waking up' transitions. Enjoyable, and worth reading, especially if you want to see Hobb's earlier work, but not up to the standard of Farseers.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lucille

    2.5/5 There were way too many flashbacks for my liking and actually not that much happening BUT all that has to do with emotions and feelings was great, Lindholm/Hobb is definitely queen of my emotions

  5. 4 out of 5

    Wild Ones Homestead

    Not as good as her books under Robin Hobb but still a very enjoyable and interesting read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    I love Robin Hobb, but I wouldn't recommend this as a first read for anyone new to her work. Compared to the rich characterisation and deftly interwoven plots of her work as Hobb, Lindholm, in this novel anyway, reads more like a writing workshop offering. The characters are flat, the drama seems contrived. The setting is interesting and well described, but the world doesn't feel as expansive and diverse as the six duchies and the cursed shores of her work as Hobb. I would recommend reading the I love Robin Hobb, but I wouldn't recommend this as a first read for anyone new to her work. Compared to the rich characterisation and deftly interwoven plots of her work as Hobb, Lindholm, in this novel anyway, reads more like a writing workshop offering. The characters are flat, the drama seems contrived. The setting is interesting and well described, but the world doesn't feel as expansive and diverse as the six duchies and the cursed shores of her work as Hobb. I would recommend reading the Robin Hobb novels well exhaustively before turning to this one. In fact I read this only because I have currently read all of Hobb's work and am starting over with the Megan Lindholm books until the new series comes out this fall.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    ...Harpy's Flight is not Lindholm's best novel but it is still an impressive read. The emptiness Ki experiences after the loss of her family and the violence she unleashes on their killers is heartbreaking. Whatever the technical flaws of this novel, on an emotional level is works very well. It is very clear that there is a lot more to discover about this world in the later three volumes. I think I saw a few more imperfections in the novel the second time around but I am still glad to have my co ...Harpy's Flight is not Lindholm's best novel but it is still an impressive read. The emptiness Ki experiences after the loss of her family and the violence she unleashes on their killers is heartbreaking. Whatever the technical flaws of this novel, on an emotional level is works very well. It is very clear that there is a lot more to discover about this world in the later three volumes. I think I saw a few more imperfections in the novel the second time around but I am still glad to have my copy of the second volume, The Windsingers, on hand. Full Random Comments review

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jacoline Maes

    Not impressed, I don't think I'll be continuing this series. It doesn't intrigue me. It reads fast, but I couldn't like the characters and I thought the storyline to be quite dull. I'll stick to reading the books Margaret Lindholm wrote under her pseudonym Robin Hobb. Not impressed, I don't think I'll be continuing this series. It doesn't intrigue me. It reads fast, but I couldn't like the characters and I thought the storyline to be quite dull. I'll stick to reading the books Margaret Lindholm wrote under her pseudonym Robin Hobb.

  9. 5 out of 5

    DiscoSpacePanther

    A rather interesting fantasy novel that is blessedly free of the tired Tolkien tropes that so bedeviled the genre until well into the '80s. Ki is a sympathetic, albeit not particularly likable, protagonist, who has a very well-established and consistent character that provides ample justification and explanation for her actions. Vandien is much more of a cipher until close to the end of the book—we are not entirely sure of his motivations and loyalties because we only see him through the lens of K A rather interesting fantasy novel that is blessedly free of the tired Tolkien tropes that so bedeviled the genre until well into the '80s. Ki is a sympathetic, albeit not particularly likable, protagonist, who has a very well-established and consistent character that provides ample justification and explanation for her actions. Vandien is much more of a cipher until close to the end of the book—we are not entirely sure of his motivations and loyalties because we only see him through the lens of Ki's preconceptions and suspicions. Still, I couldn't help imagining his appearance to be the same as Marcus Cole from Babylon 5, so the whole trek through the mountains took on a bit of the Ivanova/Marcus tone in my mind. The best thing about the book for me was the world it described—not a fantasy world of clashing armies and evil wizards—but instead a world of travellers and townsfolk, of primitive customs and superstitions, and of elemental and inexplicable enchanted places with dangers to consume unwary visitors. I'd be more than happy to read the other books in this series (I didn't know it was the first part of a series until after I'd finished it), and would recommend it to anyone with an interest in the fantasy genre who prefers character-led pieces rather than traditional Manichean swords-and-sorcery epics.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ☆Ruth☆

    This was a fairly quick read, centering around two main characters Ki & Vandien, who were reasonably well drawn. The story was interesting enough to encourage me to try the next in the series but I didn't find it particularly gripping. This was a fairly quick read, centering around two main characters Ki & Vandien, who were reasonably well drawn. The story was interesting enough to encourage me to try the next in the series but I didn't find it particularly gripping.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ronja

    The book is ok, but nowhere near as brilliant as her other work, the Fitz/Fool novels etc. Still, worth reading while waiting for Fitz and the Fool Part 3 to come out.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amy Westgarth

    I would never have picked this up were it not for Book Club as I've always avoided Fantasy. However, I have to say this wasn't as bad as I feared. Fantasy is often lumped in with Sci-Fi as a genre, but I didn't find this book confusing or annoying as I do with most Science Fiction. I understood what was going on most of the time (in stark contrast to Sci-Fi) and how the book was trying to portray Ki's new-found grief. Likening Sven's family's devotion to harpies to that of organised religion was I would never have picked this up were it not for Book Club as I've always avoided Fantasy. However, I have to say this wasn't as bad as I feared. Fantasy is often lumped in with Sci-Fi as a genre, but I didn't find this book confusing or annoying as I do with most Science Fiction. I understood what was going on most of the time (in stark contrast to Sci-Fi) and how the book was trying to portray Ki's new-found grief. Likening Sven's family's devotion to harpies to that of organised religion was something that had to be pointed out to me, but once I clocked on it came through and was an interesting idea. The plot was quite slow and the book felt more like 500 pages than 300. Sadly, my interest did wane at some points. If you're expecting an action packed romp through a fantasy land then you may be disappointed. If you take the book on what it's trying to say rather than what is actually happening then the experience is more rewarding. That's not to say the storyline was all bad. I liked being slowly fed the backstory (although I did get a little muddled when it jumped forward and back in time mid-chapter too often). The appearance of Vandien and the possible future with Ki was also intriguing. I enjoyed the writing style here too. There was enough description to build up a picture of the surroundings, but not so much that it dragged on. It was was an easy read in that regard – not too verbose. I don't think I liked this enough to read on for the rest of the series, but it hasn't put me off trying another Fantasy book one day.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alina

    Like it happened a long time ago with , I was smitten from the first pages by Megan Lindholm's flowing writing, even if her debut work isn't quite as chiseled as her later works, written under the pseudonym Robin Hobb. Although much of the story is rather slow paced (a thing that might bore some readers), it's a work of great beauty and tragedy, packed with emotions and emanating raw feelings, but also humour and wits. “And you might have asked. It would have cost you only a small bit of Like it happened a long time ago with , I was smitten from the first pages by Megan Lindholm's flowing writing, even if her debut work isn't quite as chiseled as her later works, written under the pseudonym Robin Hobb. Although much of the story is rather slow paced (a thing that might bore some readers), it's a work of great beauty and tragedy, packed with emotions and emanating raw feelings, but also humour and wits. “And you might have asked. It would have cost you only a small bit of pride. Of that abundance you carry, you can afford to part with a little.” It's a tale of love and revenge, of adventure and grief and new beginings. We get a glimpse of magic and ancient rituals, which unfortunately are not developed enough, but I hope she'll come back to them in the future books. Strictly about the narrative, I was especially interested to find more about the people and customs from Harper's Ford and those of the Romni’s, and was less interested about fighting with harpies and the struggles with the Sisters, which I guess were the more action packed scenes. So the character oriented nature of the majority of the book was exactly to my taste. I look forward to find lots more about the other sentient species mentioned and not (yet, I hope) detailed. “When I was small, I believed that the moon was the mother of us all. She had birthed every race: Human, Harpies, Dene, Tcheria, Alouea, Windsingers, Calouin, and all the others. To each she gave a different gift, and she placed us all on this world. She gave us a law: Live in peace together.”

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cissa

    I love world-building, and this is an excellent world. Five sentient races, each of whom is very different from each other, with difficulties in reconciling such and working together. This book (while it read as a stand-alone, there are apparently others set in the world) focuses on the relationships between the humans and the harpies. Some humans hate them; some worship them. What happens when these collide? The harpies are well-drawn, though- and this might be a spoiler- in the end it looks lik I love world-building, and this is an excellent world. Five sentient races, each of whom is very different from each other, with difficulties in reconciling such and working together. This book (while it read as a stand-alone, there are apparently others set in the world) focuses on the relationships between the humans and the harpies. Some humans hate them; some worship them. What happens when these collide? The harpies are well-drawn, though- and this might be a spoiler- in the end it looks like they are using their worshippers as dupes. Ki isn't having any of that, given her experiences. Though- her choices were ambiguous; she clung to memories even when they were hurting her. The plot was well-crafted to show character growth, and her tentative transition between mourning the past and having a future. Other characters also grew and changed. The plot and pacing were excellent., handled by a series of flips between the current situation and flashbacks- but very well-handled. I am pleased to see there are more in this series, because this one read like a stand-alone novel; no cliffhangers, and the plot threads were resolved. Still, the world and the writing are fascinating enough that I look forward to reading more. Triggers: some serious violence, but nothing rapey.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shayna

    The first chapter of this book gripped me. I love the creative freedom that Hobb has when she writes as Megan. I read this book before I read anything by her as Hobb and I enjoy both styles of writing although I find that as Hobb she is more restricted and rather depressing at the end of each trilogy. The fact that Ki isn't a young, doe-eyed thing as so many fantasy protagonists HAVE to be these days to be enjoyable. I feel that Hobb put a lot of her own pain, joy and experiences into this series The first chapter of this book gripped me. I love the creative freedom that Hobb has when she writes as Megan. I read this book before I read anything by her as Hobb and I enjoy both styles of writing although I find that as Hobb she is more restricted and rather depressing at the end of each trilogy. The fact that Ki isn't a young, doe-eyed thing as so many fantasy protagonists HAVE to be these days to be enjoyable. I feel that Hobb put a lot of her own pain, joy and experiences into this series of books which is why it is so rich with emotion. There is freedom in this series to explore a world without needing to be a best-selling, Adult Fiction fantasy writer. You may not always know where she is headed with the story (it is rather unconventional) but I found it great to just enjoy the ride.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Donnelle Brooks

    Some would argue that this book by Megan Lindholm is not up to the standard of her work as Robin Hobb, and in some ways I agree. The world is not as fleshed out as it could be, but it still feels complete, with a lot of mystery and magic left to be explored. This is still, however, a gut-wrenching, emotionally charged story with characters that feel real and interesting, and that is what I love about Hobb. The world feels larger than the characters and the events they are involved in. There is a Some would argue that this book by Megan Lindholm is not up to the standard of her work as Robin Hobb, and in some ways I agree. The world is not as fleshed out as it could be, but it still feels complete, with a lot of mystery and magic left to be explored. This is still, however, a gut-wrenching, emotionally charged story with characters that feel real and interesting, and that is what I love about Hobb. The world feels larger than the characters and the events they are involved in. There is action, but the emotional investment in the characters is what makes you give a shit about the result. My pet peeve when it comes to fantasy writers such as Raymond E Feist is that they are too busy packing action and romance and bad assery into their books to build their characters beyond one dimensional stereotypes. I want to know whose ass it it and why it's farting! 4 stars

  17. 4 out of 5

    William Cardini

    Although I fiercely love Robin Hobb's books, it took me a long time to try a Megan Lindholm novel. I was surprised to discover that this was her first book, since so many elements of her writing as Robin Hobb seemed strongly present in this book (a visceral phsysicality, emotionally devastating, intense descriptions of cold and privation). This book only pales in comparison to the Farseer books. It's much better than most fantasy. I also like that it's short and wraps up the main conflict, even Although I fiercely love Robin Hobb's books, it took me a long time to try a Megan Lindholm novel. I was surprised to discover that this was her first book, since so many elements of her writing as Robin Hobb seemed strongly present in this book (a visceral phsysicality, emotionally devastating, intense descriptions of cold and privation). This book only pales in comparison to the Farseer books. It's much better than most fantasy. I also like that it's short and wraps up the main conflict, even though there are sequels.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liz Cee

    I truly enjoyed this. The characters believable and the plot well-drawn. I started reading some Megan Lindholm (a.k.a.) Robin Hobb's short stories in a couple of anthologies and really enjoyed them. They led me to this book, and I'm glad the author has many titles to her name. Wonderful fantasy! I truly enjoyed this. The characters believable and the plot well-drawn. I started reading some Megan Lindholm (a.k.a.) Robin Hobb's short stories in a couple of anthologies and really enjoyed them. They led me to this book, and I'm glad the author has many titles to her name. Wonderful fantasy!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Am having a bit of a Robin Hobb withdrawal, having now caught up with her newest series. So decided to try some of her books under the Megan Lindholm pseudonym. I liked this first entry into the Windsinger series and have already reserved the next book. The world-building is top-notch, and the characters and plot are involving.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pam Baddeley

    Re-read this novel a few years ago and still loved it. The beginning, where Ki is climbing up the cliff to exact vengeance on the harpies who murdered her family is absolutely stunning and gut wrenchingly emotional.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Pike

    Not totally polished, but good world building, and the interweaving of flashbacks was generally well done.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Martin Dion

    Not bad at all, the only other books from Robin Hobb/Megan Lindholm that I actually like... The Ship and Shaman series failed to drag me in but bot this one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Wombat

    Well.... That was something... "Harpy's Flight" was the first fantasy novel written by Margaret Ogden (a.k.a Robin Hobb, Megan Lindholm). I knew it was her first novel and was expecting something fairly rough... but oh boy was I wrong. I think most people who read fantasy will have heard of Robin Hobb and the fan-frikken-tastic series of series that is the "Realm of the Enderlings". The characterisation in those books really sets the standard in fantasy (I feel) and are some of my favourite books t Well.... That was something... "Harpy's Flight" was the first fantasy novel written by Margaret Ogden (a.k.a Robin Hobb, Megan Lindholm). I knew it was her first novel and was expecting something fairly rough... but oh boy was I wrong. I think most people who read fantasy will have heard of Robin Hobb and the fan-frikken-tastic series of series that is the "Realm of the Enderlings". The characterisation in those books really sets the standard in fantasy (I feel) and are some of my favourite books these days. So when I went looking at her early works I was going in with very lowered expectations. But from the first we get some great "Hobb" writing. The whole book if from the point of view of Ki - a woman bent on revenge. The writing is on point. We get a great scene of climbing a mountain to get to a Harpy nest, and the writing really sucked me in. I still think that the Courtney Schafer did better rock-climbing in "The Whitefire Crossing, but this comes close. Ki is a woman driven to revenge for the death of her husband Sven and two kids. It almost feels a reverse of the cliche of the hero's wife being killed off... But Ki saw the loves of her life taken by a mated pair of Harpys, and now she is willing to throw away her life in the pursuit of revenge.... She survives, miraculously, but the act ripples out over the whole story. The "rough" bit of this book is the structure. It starts sort of in the middle. There is a forward track of a smuggling trip across a mountain pass that goes wrong, and a series of flashbacks that details how Ki and her husband met, his family and their traditions. Including the odd religion that worships the Harpy's as psychopomps who carry the souls of the deceased. (So yes, that revenge causes problems for her...) The transitions between the forward and flashback narratives is not handled very nicely - abrupt and sometimes a little confusing. But the good here is great :) The "worldbuilding" is very subtle and always in support of the events around Ki -everything seems incidental and in the background until it comes front and centre and impacts Ki in some new way. Also the world itself feels interesting - with humans only one of a number of "sentient species". While this is only book one of a series of 4, it feels like a stand alone novel about a broken woman slowly trying to find a new connection to life. Definitely would recommend and will be reading the rest of the series!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Riff

    I suppose the most positive thing I can say about this one is that it serves to remind us that everybody starts somewhere. Lindholm/Hobb is unambiguously one of the finest writers of fantasy working today, but this 1983 debut only hints at the heights the author would later surmount. What is present is a deep psychological care for characters and a deft delicacy with words; qualities any number of established popular authors should probably take note of. Though the storytelling is Harpy's Flight I suppose the most positive thing I can say about this one is that it serves to remind us that everybody starts somewhere. Lindholm/Hobb is unambiguously one of the finest writers of fantasy working today, but this 1983 debut only hints at the heights the author would later surmount. What is present is a deep psychological care for characters and a deft delicacy with words; qualities any number of established popular authors should probably take note of. Though the storytelling is Harpy's Flight is spectacularly flawed: Essentially the same two characters repeating the same two thoughts and conversations on every page for three hundred pages. That's barely an exaggeration; there is some travel and uninteresting backstory in here, but nothing happens in the book aside from us being reminded on every page the character is sad. It's somewhat pleasing as a fan to see where Lindholm started her career. It's far from a mature piece of writing and impossible to recommend to anyone other than the many fantasy authors who can't write characters.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bron

    I felt I wanted to read this again. I don't think I've been back to it since the 1980s and I can no longer read the small type in my paperback! So now it's in the kindle. I used to think it was just a good fantasy adventure with monsters and aliens with strange customs but now I see it is also a rather harrowing study of grief and loss, guilt and the wish for retribution. The woman Ki is a very well filled out character, you can believe she's real but I'm not so sure yet about her travelling com I felt I wanted to read this again. I don't think I've been back to it since the 1980s and I can no longer read the small type in my paperback! So now it's in the kindle. I used to think it was just a good fantasy adventure with monsters and aliens with strange customs but now I see it is also a rather harrowing study of grief and loss, guilt and the wish for retribution. The woman Ki is a very well filled out character, you can believe she's real but I'm not so sure yet about her travelling companion Vandien, is he perhaps just the "interesting dark haired man" that pops up in stories or is he going to get his chance to become real in the later books?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    I read this years and years ago but have meant to revisit the series for ages. This was written before Lindholm was writing under the Robin Hobb moniker, and you can tell that this is an early novel - it lacks the style and verve of the Fitz books, but it is full of imagination and real, believable characters (something she is especially good at). The chronology jumps around rather in an unclear fashion throughout, so be warned! I'd recommend this to fans of the Farseer books, who want to read mo I read this years and years ago but have meant to revisit the series for ages. This was written before Lindholm was writing under the Robin Hobb moniker, and you can tell that this is an early novel - it lacks the style and verve of the Fitz books, but it is full of imagination and real, believable characters (something she is especially good at). The chronology jumps around rather in an unclear fashion throughout, so be warned! I'd recommend this to fans of the Farseer books, who want to read more of her writing, but maybe not as a starting point.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jody

    I love Lindholm's/Hobb's writing, I just do. This is an earlier example of her writing, so is not as proficient - there is a little too much moving back and forth in time, which is clumsily executed at times, and the ending was too abrupt. The story won't suit everyone. But there is realistic world building, and beautifully crafted family obligations and ties which I enjoy so much in her work. Her worlds exist in my mind and linger much longer than others. I love Lindholm's/Hobb's writing, I just do. This is an earlier example of her writing, so is not as proficient - there is a little too much moving back and forth in time, which is clumsily executed at times, and the ending was too abrupt. The story won't suit everyone. But there is realistic world building, and beautifully crafted family obligations and ties which I enjoy so much in her work. Her worlds exist in my mind and linger much longer than others.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This is not a happy book. In many ways, it is about dealing with grief, and how different upbringings can create misunderstandings and complications in doing so. Lindholm does all of this in a world that leaves you intrigued and wanting more. I am looking forward to reading the second book in this series.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Azri

    Honestly more of a 3 star book, but I threw an extra one in because of the faint echoes of Fitz and the Fool. Nowhere near as well done, but what right does a starving man have to complain about the food offered? Though... why give Vandien a mustache at the end? Ugh, so not an attractive feature.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Celine

    Harpy's Flight is the debut novel of Megan Lindholm, also known as Robin Hobb. While reading I realized how refreshing it is to read a short fantasy story, rather than the drawn-out tomes that are still in fashion. Harpy's Flight is the debut novel of Megan Lindholm, also known as Robin Hobb. While reading I realized how refreshing it is to read a short fantasy story, rather than the drawn-out tomes that are still in fashion.

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