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Last Dance at the Savoy: Life, Love and Caregiving for Someone with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

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When Kathryn Leigh Scott's husband was diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a neurological disease for which there is (so far) no cure, it was a devastating time for both of them, not least because so little is known about the cause or treatment of a disease that affects some 20,000 Americans, a number similar to that of Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS).Last Danc When Kathryn Leigh Scott's husband was diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a neurological disease for which there is (so far) no cure, it was a devastating time for both of them, not least because so little is known about the cause or treatment of a disease that affects some 20,000 Americans, a number similar to that of Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS).Last Dance at the Savoy is both a personal story about Scott's husband, Geoff Miller, the founding editor of Los Angeles magazine, who lived life fully despite having a terminal illness, and a sharing of her insights on dealing with the day-to-day issues of caring for someone with a progressive neurological condition. Scott "often yearned for someone to figuratively take my hand and walk with me through the difficult times; I hope through this book I can reach out to you with encouragement and practical advice."Last Dance at the Savoy includes a resource guide that provides facts about prime-of-life diseases; contact information for support organizations, research studies and clinical trials; where to find handicap products and equipment; and recommended caregiving publications and family conferences.Contains a foreword by Yvette Bordelon, MD, PhD, a neurologist at UCLA whose clinical work involves the diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders.


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When Kathryn Leigh Scott's husband was diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a neurological disease for which there is (so far) no cure, it was a devastating time for both of them, not least because so little is known about the cause or treatment of a disease that affects some 20,000 Americans, a number similar to that of Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS).Last Danc When Kathryn Leigh Scott's husband was diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a neurological disease for which there is (so far) no cure, it was a devastating time for both of them, not least because so little is known about the cause or treatment of a disease that affects some 20,000 Americans, a number similar to that of Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS).Last Dance at the Savoy is both a personal story about Scott's husband, Geoff Miller, the founding editor of Los Angeles magazine, who lived life fully despite having a terminal illness, and a sharing of her insights on dealing with the day-to-day issues of caring for someone with a progressive neurological condition. Scott "often yearned for someone to figuratively take my hand and walk with me through the difficult times; I hope through this book I can reach out to you with encouragement and practical advice."Last Dance at the Savoy includes a resource guide that provides facts about prime-of-life diseases; contact information for support organizations, research studies and clinical trials; where to find handicap products and equipment; and recommended caregiving publications and family conferences.Contains a foreword by Yvette Bordelon, MD, PhD, a neurologist at UCLA whose clinical work involves the diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders.

30 review for Last Dance at the Savoy: Life, Love and Caregiving for Someone with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I started this book then put it aside because I knew it was going to be sad. But the draw of the story made me pick it up again. I was right about the sadness. However, I also found the real-life story extremely touching and loving as well. What both Ms. Scott and her husband went through was just too much to read about. And I'm sorry this has to happen to anyone. This is not the usual genre I read, but I knew the writing style was something I could easily get into. I think she's a wonderful sto I started this book then put it aside because I knew it was going to be sad. But the draw of the story made me pick it up again. I was right about the sadness. However, I also found the real-life story extremely touching and loving as well. What both Ms. Scott and her husband went through was just too much to read about. And I'm sorry this has to happen to anyone. This is not the usual genre I read, but I knew the writing style was something I could easily get into. I think she's a wonderful story teller and I read most the book in one day. But mostly I'm glad she opened up her personal life to the public to share this story which may help someone else in the same situation.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marsha

    I met Kathryn Leigh Scott, who was a guest at the Greater Austin Comic Con in June 2018. She told me she is an actress and a former cast member of the TV show, “Dark Shadows.” I told her that I did not watch that show when I was young, but that I was curious about the books she had for sale. This book, “Last Dance at the Savoy” is about her husband who had progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), which is a rare neurological disease. Kathryn Leigh Scott’s husband, Geoff Miller was the founding edit I met Kathryn Leigh Scott, who was a guest at the Greater Austin Comic Con in June 2018. She told me she is an actress and a former cast member of the TV show, “Dark Shadows.” I told her that I did not watch that show when I was young, but that I was curious about the books she had for sale. This book, “Last Dance at the Savoy” is about her husband who had progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), which is a rare neurological disease. Kathryn Leigh Scott’s husband, Geoff Miller was the founding editor of Los Angeles magazine, an intelligent, witty man whose life dramatically changed due to this disease, starting with his balance. He couldn’t seem to control his hands, or hold items, pushing items away from him, instead of towards him. At first, there was denial from Kathryn, but mostly from Geoff, who refused to see a doctor. But, then he was falling and there were gashes on his head. He would verbally repeat his words. When doctors realized after tests that there were some neurological issues going on, it appeared to be similar to Parkinson’s disease, but not quite the same. He was given medication, and Kathryn took on the role of caretaker, standing close by or next to him when Geoff walked, supporting him so he would not fall, and worried of course, what to do if he should fall. The couple continued to live their lives the best they could. They traveled, saw friends and all the while Kathryn tried to help her husband continue to have his dignity and not embarrass him with regards to his continuing limitations. As it was apparent his health continued to get worse, care became more difficult. Kathryn eventually joined a support group for others with PSP and other neurological diseases. Eventually, Kathryn would need to hire outside assistance. She then had caretakers and friends help her with Geoff. Yet, the couple still continued to travel, or go out to events and gatherings and share good memories while they could until the inevitable. This is a very moving story. I think anyone who ever was a caretaker for an individual with a progressive disease, especially for a close family member, would shed tears as they relate to this story. I think Kathryn wanted to write this book to help others learn about PSP and how to deal with this and other deliberating diseases. She also shows the reader how much she loved her husband and I think this is a wonderful memorization of their relationship during this challenging time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    Well-written, heartbreaking story of what it’s like to lose a loved one to PSP.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Story Circle Book Reviews

    "Progressive supranucler palsy (PSP) crept into our lives on cat's paws, insinuating itself without haste or fanfare...The outcome was inevitable. Our way of dealing with the insidious, relentless advance of his rare neurological disease was to go on living with as little disruption as possible." (p 6). In this lyrical, heartfelt, and at times gut-wrenching memoir, Kathryn Leigh Scott shares the journey through her husband Geoff Miller's rare disease but more profoundly, she shares her intimate l "Progressive supranucler palsy (PSP) crept into our lives on cat's paws, insinuating itself without haste or fanfare...The outcome was inevitable. Our way of dealing with the insidious, relentless advance of his rare neurological disease was to go on living with as little disruption as possible." (p 6). In this lyrical, heartfelt, and at times gut-wrenching memoir, Kathryn Leigh Scott shares the journey through her husband Geoff Miller's rare disease but more profoundly, she shares her intimate love story with the world. In tender and honest writing, Scott introduces readers to the world of PSP victims and their families. Kathryn is an author and actress who married Geoff Miller, founding editor of Los Angeles magazine. Their marriage was put to the ultimate test when Geoff was diagnosed with Progressive supranuclear palsy. Their drive to live life to its fullest despite his terminal diagnosis is a testament to the love of life and love for each other that drove them through all of their days together. This book reveals the power of such a deep abiding love—even after such a deeply personal and tragic loss. A rare neurologic disease for which there is no cure, PSP sneaks in, grabs hold and never lets go. Through the pages of Scott's memoir, readers glimpse the very human condition of dealing with such an insidious disease while trying to maintain a sense of decorum and normalcy. Scott lovingly portrays her relationship with her beloved Geoff while also reflecting on the often subtle hints of trouble that went unnoticed or were explained away in other, less daunting terms until the condition was undeniable. Through the myriad consultations, tests, medical appointments, ups and downs of the disease and the move into hospice care, Scott shares her struggles, her joys, her realizations and a few u-turns along the way. But what shines through in all of her writing is the incredible depth of the love she and her husband shared and the lengths they would go to keep that alive in the worst of times. Thoughtfully, Scott has included a "Resource Guide" at the back of her book. As she recalls, "When my husband was diagnosed with PSP, I yearned for someone to figuratively take my hand and walk me through the difficult times I knew were ahead." However, she is quick to point out that little is known about the cause or treatment of this rare condition. A percentage of the royalties from the sale of this book are donated to CurePSP. by Lee Ambrose for Story Circle Book Reviews reviewing books by, for, and about women

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl m Craft

    Heart Wrenching! I read this book to relate and hope I could understand what is currently happening with my mom. The care the Geoff received was beyond remarkable. My dad and I struggle to find help, care and relief of constant stress, and over whelming daily tasks for my mom. This book flows smoothly but expresses how quickly things changes during this dreadful disease. Thank you for sharing the demanding and private moments of psp. I would never wish this disease on anyone.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dave McCormick

    "Last Dance at the Savoy" is a beautifully written account of the daily struggle of caring for a spouse with a debilitating illness. This isn't a "woe is me story", rather a love story, full of thankfulness and valuable life lessons. Thank you, KLS, for sharing your personal life journey with us! "Last Dance at the Savoy" is a beautifully written account of the daily struggle of caring for a spouse with a debilitating illness. This isn't a "woe is me story", rather a love story, full of thankfulness and valuable life lessons. Thank you, KLS, for sharing your personal life journey with us!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sally Reynolds

    the story of living with someone with a progressive illness. follows their lives and how life changes as the illness progresses.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stanley D. Friedman

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rowena Gerber

  10. 4 out of 5

    Caz Ashford

  11. 5 out of 5

    stephen sobell

  12. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robyn Rashleigh

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Eisenbeil

  15. 4 out of 5

    Karyn Schneier

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carleen Schnitker

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karen Howarth

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Kendall

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Hayhurst

  20. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Byron

  22. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  23. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Dixon

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    As of September 11, 2016, the book has not been received.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Carter-cole

  26. 5 out of 5

    Debra Jurvich

  27. 4 out of 5

    WM Clark

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jill

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Strom

  30. 4 out of 5

    Balachandar Naidu

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