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An impossible murder behind a locked door. Can DCI Oldroyd find the key to the mystery? Lord Redmire’s gambling habit has placed him in serious debt. Determined to salvage his fortune by putting Redmire Hall on the map, the aristocrat performs an impossible locked-door illusion on live TV. But as the cameras roll, his spectacular trick goes fatally wrong… Special guest DCI J An impossible murder behind a locked door. Can DCI Oldroyd find the key to the mystery? Lord Redmire’s gambling habit has placed him in serious debt. Determined to salvage his fortune by putting Redmire Hall on the map, the aristocrat performs an impossible locked-door illusion on live TV. But as the cameras roll, his spectacular trick goes fatally wrong… Special guest DCI Jim Oldroyd has a front-row seat, but in all his years with the West Riding Police he’s never witnessed anything like this. He sees Redmire disappear—and then reappear, dead, with a knife in his back. As Oldroyd and DS Stephanie Johnson soon discover, nearly everyone at the event had a reason to resent the eccentric lord. But how did the murderer get into the locked room—or out, for that matter? When the only other person who knew the secret behind the illusion is brutally silenced, the case begins to look unsolvable. Because as Oldroyd and Johnson know, it’s not just a question of who did it and why—but how?


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An impossible murder behind a locked door. Can DCI Oldroyd find the key to the mystery? Lord Redmire’s gambling habit has placed him in serious debt. Determined to salvage his fortune by putting Redmire Hall on the map, the aristocrat performs an impossible locked-door illusion on live TV. But as the cameras roll, his spectacular trick goes fatally wrong… Special guest DCI J An impossible murder behind a locked door. Can DCI Oldroyd find the key to the mystery? Lord Redmire’s gambling habit has placed him in serious debt. Determined to salvage his fortune by putting Redmire Hall on the map, the aristocrat performs an impossible locked-door illusion on live TV. But as the cameras roll, his spectacular trick goes fatally wrong… Special guest DCI Jim Oldroyd has a front-row seat, but in all his years with the West Riding Police he’s never witnessed anything like this. He sees Redmire disappear—and then reappear, dead, with a knife in his back. As Oldroyd and DS Stephanie Johnson soon discover, nearly everyone at the event had a reason to resent the eccentric lord. But how did the murderer get into the locked room—or out, for that matter? When the only other person who knew the secret behind the illusion is brutally silenced, the case begins to look unsolvable. Because as Oldroyd and Johnson know, it’s not just a question of who did it and why—but how?

30 review for The Murder at Redmire Hall

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kylie D

    A fun, old school mystery that sees DCI Oldroyd trying to solve the mystery of a Lord who is murdered when a magic illusion goes wrong. Lord Redmire has gathered his family and close friends to his estate to witness the illusion, something his father did many years ago, but when the curtains are opened the Lord is found dead, yet he's been alone in a room with no way in or out except for the door he entered. Oldroyd then has to sift through not only who murdered the Lord, but also how it was done A fun, old school mystery that sees DCI Oldroyd trying to solve the mystery of a Lord who is murdered when a magic illusion goes wrong. Lord Redmire has gathered his family and close friends to his estate to witness the illusion, something his father did many years ago, but when the curtains are opened the Lord is found dead, yet he's been alone in a room with no way in or out except for the door he entered. Oldroyd then has to sift through not only who murdered the Lord, but also how it was done! All the gathered relatives have some motive or other, scorned wives and mistresses, a jealous brother, a demanding daughter, old business partners that he has left in the lurch. Then we find out that Lord Redmire was consistently gambling the estates money away, so which members of his family were trying to stop him before they were left with nothing? I got a lot of enjoyment from this mystery, trying to work out who had the most to lose, but here, nothing is as it seems. JR Ellis makes us question and second guess ourselves, right up to the final, Agatha Christie-like denouement. I recommend this book to all crime and mystery lovers. My thanks to NetGalley and Amazon Publishing UK for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Beata

    *I would like to thank J.R.Ellis, Amazon Publishing UK and Netgalley for providing me with ARC in exchange for my honest review.* This is a perfect novel for those readers who like a mystery set in a beautiful English stately homein Yorkshire, a wide range of characters and a clever policeman who knows where to look for the clues and who is assisted by an intelligent female colleague. The story begins with a trick performed by Lord Redmire in hope to cover his gambling debts but which unfortunate *I would like to thank J.R.Ellis, Amazon Publishing UK and Netgalley for providing me with ARC in exchange for my honest review.* This is a perfect novel for those readers who like a mystery set in a beautiful English stately homein Yorkshire, a wide range of characters and a clever policeman who knows where to look for the clues and who is assisted by an intelligent female colleague. The story begins with a trick performed by Lord Redmire in hope to cover his gambling debts but which unfortunately has tragic consequence for him. DCI Jim Oldroyd and DS Stephanie Johnson conduct investigation in the way typical of the genre and naturally uncover lots of family secrets on the way. The book reads very well and I personally enjoyed it thoroughly on my holiday.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Li'l Owl

    Magic tricks are all fun and games until someone gets murdered! ****** 'I have here with me the owner of Redmire Hall, and the performer of tonight’s magic trick, the Honourable Frederick Carstairs, Lord Redmire.’ Redmire stepped up, handed a rather rusty-looking key to Oldroyd , entered the room and sat at the desk. A drum roll began. ‘Ladies and gentlemen, the chief inspector will now close the door and lock it.’ Oldroyd duly did as he was told. ‘Can you hear me, Lord Redmire? Are you still ther Magic tricks are all fun and games until someone gets murdered! ****** 'I have here with me the owner of Redmire Hall, and the performer of tonight’s magic trick, the Honourable Frederick Carstairs, Lord Redmire.’ Redmire stepped up, handed a rather rusty-looking key to Oldroyd , entered the room and sat at the desk. A drum roll began. ‘Ladies and gentlemen, the chief inspector will now close the door and lock it.’ Oldroyd duly did as he was told. ‘Can you hear me, Lord Redmire? Are you still there?’ ‘Yes, I’m here,’ came the slightly quiet but clear reply. ‘So now I will draw this curtain for only fifteen seconds.’ As he did this, dramatic music began once again. At the end of the fifteen seconds, the music stopped and the presenter drew back the curtain. There was silence. Every member of the audience in both rooms was enthralled . Oldroyd had forgotten his embarrassment as he unlocked the door and opened it. It was empty... ‘Well, ladies and gentlemen, as you can see, Lord Redmire has completely disappeared from a locked room. But that’s not the end: he will now return. So I ask the chief inspector to close and lock the door again.’ There was a repeat of the locking, curtain-drawing and music. ‘And now, ladies and gentlemen , the chief inspector will once again open the door to this strange room and reveal . . . well, let’s see!’ When the door was opened , Redmire was again sitting at the desk. Applause and shouts of ‘Bravo!’ came from the audience, but Oldroyd had a strange feeling: something wasn’t right. ‘And there he is, ladies and gentlemen! What an amazing trick! Lord Redmire, can you—?’ The presenter’s patter stopped abruptly. Redmire had neither said anything nor moved until that moment. Then his body toppled sidewise out of the chair and the knife sticking out of his back became visible. Blood splattered on to the floor. ‘Oh, bloody hell!’ muttered Oldroyd to himself, before pandemonium broke out. ********* The Murder at Redmire Hall by J.R. Ellis is the third in the Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series and the books just keep getting better and better with each installment! The story starts out quickly and continues to gain speed and mystery as the case progresses. This is my favorite in this series so far as the storyline is compelling, intriguing, as all the books have been, but what sets this one apart is that a pinch of mischief was thrown in as the solution to the case was revealed! It's smart and amusing! Ellis's characters are colorful and well thought, and the murders in each book are unique, fresh, interesting, and exciting. He uses an ingenuity to the storyline by seamlessly fitting in an actual puzzle of how the murderers got their victims — where they were found and/or how the murderer escaped without being seen. I've never come across this ingenious idea before and I've read hundreds of murder mysteries! Mr. Ellis takes full advantage of the mysterious and diverse landscapes and the history surrounding the settings in his books which are located in and around Haarrogate in the Yorkshire Dales. It adds a bit of distinction to the stories making them more enticing, interesting, and educational. The information is added to the plot seamlessly preventing the story from being needlessly long winded or boring. I always love to travel the world through books so I always appreciate the addition of factual elements provided by author, especially when the novel is a work of fiction. The main characters continued to grow on me with each book! In book one, The Body in the Dales, we are introduced to the three main characters in this series, DCI Jim Oldroyd, DS Andrew 'Andy' Carter, and DS Stephanie 'Steph' Johnson. Andy Carter has come from London but fits right in with his two colleges and by the end of the case they've become a very efficient team of three. In book two, The Quartet Murders, DS Johnson is working on a separate case leaving DCI Oldroyd and DS Carter working together to solve their case. In this book, the third in the series, DS Carter is on a brief holiday so it's up to DCI Oldroyd and DS Johnson to solve the murders at Redmire Hall. Separating the characters in this way is a very cleaver way to allow the reader to become more acquainted with the characters without taking a lot of time away from solving the cases. It's unlike most other novels and very effective and efficient. I'm really enjoying the Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series and it's my hope that Mr. Ellis will continue writing future books in this series! ** Thanks to NetGalley, Thomas & Mercer, and Mr. J. R. Ellis for giving me this advanced reading copy in return for my honest review. This book was released on September 13, 2018.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I don't like these books as much as others. For my taste: too long, too melodramatic and downright campy. I guess I am supposed to find DI Oldroyd sympathetic since his wife of many years has decided on a divorce. Anyway...for my memory minder: grand country house, locked room mystery, extended investigation of a large cast of characters who are stereotypes and artificial, gruesome killings for such a loosely knit and seemingly normal trio of perpetrators. A model train is particularly loathsome I don't like these books as much as others. For my taste: too long, too melodramatic and downright campy. I guess I am supposed to find DI Oldroyd sympathetic since his wife of many years has decided on a divorce. Anyway...for my memory minder: grand country house, locked room mystery, extended investigation of a large cast of characters who are stereotypes and artificial, gruesome killings for such a loosely knit and seemingly normal trio of perpetrators. A model train is particularly loathsome as one of the murder methods. But that's just me. Did like: Yorkshire setting and various landmark references such as Harewood Castle Kindle Unlimited

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This is a 4.5 star read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    Yorkshire Murder Mysteries #3 Lord Redmire gambling habit has placed him in serious debt. Determined to put Redmire Hall on the map, the aristocrat performs an impossible locked-room illusion on live TV. But as the cameras roll, his spectacular trick goes fatally wrong. Lord Redmire wants to perform the locked-room trick his father used to perform to try and raise much needed funds. He has invited DCI Jim Oldroyd to witness it and it's going to be performed live on TV. But nothing goes to plan. On Yorkshire Murder Mysteries #3 Lord Redmire gambling habit has placed him in serious debt. Determined to put Redmire Hall on the map, the aristocrat performs an impossible locked-room illusion on live TV. But as the cameras roll, his spectacular trick goes fatally wrong. Lord Redmire wants to perform the locked-room trick his father used to perform to try and raise much needed funds. He has invited DCI Jim Oldroyd to witness it and it's going to be performed live on TV. But nothing goes to plan. On Lord Redmires return from the locked-room, he is dead, with the knife still in his back. With family and the staff all suspects, the list is long. I liked the authors style in writing this book. We get snippets of local history and the descriptions of the Yorkshire countryside make you feel you are there. This is a traditional police procedural. This is the third book in the series but it is the first book that I have read. I do think it can be read as a standalone. I do enjoy these types of mysteries. A real cosy mystery. I would like to thank NetGalley, Thomas & Mercer and the author J. R. Ellis for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    2.5 rounded up to 3. Part of the problem with this book was fact that I figured out the mystery of the locked room well before Oldroyd. In fact, I had seen the solution in another mystery. I also was not impressed with Oldroyd's lack of professionalism in his handling of the case, especially towards the end. He was a bit of a hypocrite, considering how he botched his own marriage. Maybe he wasn't addicted to gambling or sex, but his addiction to his job was just as destructive. 2.5 rounded up to 3. Part of the problem with this book was fact that I figured out the mystery of the locked room well before Oldroyd. In fact, I had seen the solution in another mystery. I also was not impressed with Oldroyd's lack of professionalism in his handling of the case, especially towards the end. He was a bit of a hypocrite, considering how he botched his own marriage. Maybe he wasn't addicted to gambling or sex, but his addiction to his job was just as destructive.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Thomas & Mercer for an advance copy of The Murder at Redmire Hall, the third novel to feature DCI Jim Oldroyd of the Harrogate police. When debt ridden Freddy Carstairs, Lord Redmire decides to revive his father's locked room illusion to raise much needed funds he invites DCI Jim Oldroyd to witness it on live TV, but nothing goes to plan and when the room is unlocked Freddy is found stabbed to death. Freddy wasn't a nice man, being a compulsive gambler and woma I would like to thank Netgalley and Thomas & Mercer for an advance copy of The Murder at Redmire Hall, the third novel to feature DCI Jim Oldroyd of the Harrogate police. When debt ridden Freddy Carstairs, Lord Redmire decides to revive his father's locked room illusion to raise much needed funds he invites DCI Jim Oldroyd to witness it on live TV, but nothing goes to plan and when the room is unlocked Freddy is found stabbed to death. Freddy wasn't a nice man, being a compulsive gambler and womaniser so all the invited friends and family had a motive but no means as they were all filmed watching the illusion. I thoroughly enjoyed The Murder at Redmire Hall which is an intricately plotted novel with some excellent misdirection and sleight of hand. The plot has two mysteries - how and who, both of which have ingenious solutions. I must admit that the technicalities of the how rather passed over my head (not being of a technical bent) but I can admire the idea behind it which is very clever. As the explanation is short it didn't impinge on my reading pleasure. The who is much more to my taste. I didn't have a clue and spent the whole novel trying to work out who among the many suspects had the strongest desire to see Freddy dead. In retrospect many of the clues are there but I failed to put it together. It's very well done and had me turning the pages furiously. With a limited cast of suspects characterisation is more important than in many whodunits. The Carstairs family, led by the loathsome Freddy, are not a likeable bunch so each one of them is a viable suspect. Oldroyd has a fun time offending their aristocratic sensibilities because being in that environment brings out his inner socialist. He is still battling loneliness after his wife left him and nurturing false hope of a reconciliation without changing his workaholic ways which is why she left him in the first place. The Murder at Redmire Hall is a good read which I have no hesitation in recommending.

  9. 4 out of 5

    peggy

    DCI Oldroyd is faced with the Locked Room Mystery. This is a captivating and murder mystery at its best. This the third book I have read in this series and I am still not disappointed. As I expect from this author there are lots of twists and turns and red herrings. It is beautifully written and hooks you from the start. The rapport between Oldroyd and his team is fascinating and has a lot of old world charm. The description of his beloved Yorkshire is breathtaking. I know that when one of this se DCI Oldroyd is faced with the Locked Room Mystery. This is a captivating and murder mystery at its best. This the third book I have read in this series and I am still not disappointed. As I expect from this author there are lots of twists and turns and red herrings. It is beautifully written and hooks you from the start. The rapport between Oldroyd and his team is fascinating and has a lot of old world charm. The description of his beloved Yorkshire is breathtaking. I know that when one of this series lands in my inbox I am in for a really good read. Another gem from this author MORE PLEASE I would like to thank the author J.R. Ellis, Amazon Publishing UK and Net.galley for giving me the opportunity to read this book in return for giving an honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    My favourite so far in the series. A cracking cosy murder mystery that’s perfect for the long nights. Another score for independent publishing. Hope there’ll be another Yorkshire Murder Mystery soon!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kate Ellis

    A satisyfying read. A cosy murder mystery with some unexpected turns. I have enjoyed other books by J.R.Ellis (no relation) this year. His writing is an easy to follow and read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Linda Sharp

    Magic is not magical I enjoyed the characters and the plot. A magical illusion costs a reprobate aristocrat his life, from there it keeps getting better.

  13. 5 out of 5

    The Cats’ Mother

    This is the third, but hopefully not the last, of the Yorkshire Murder Mystery series, featuring lonely workaholic DCI Oldroyd, who fancies himself as a modern day Poirot or Holmes. This one in particular pays homage to the Locked-Room mysteries of the Golden Age, with a large cast of aristocrats, where everyone has a motive, in a stately home. Oldroyd and his DS Steph have been invited by Lord Redmire to witness a magical illusion, first performed forty years earlier by his father, where he will This is the third, but hopefully not the last, of the Yorkshire Murder Mystery series, featuring lonely workaholic DCI Oldroyd, who fancies himself as a modern day Poirot or Holmes. This one in particular pays homage to the Locked-Room mysteries of the Golden Age, with a large cast of aristocrats, where everyone has a motive, in a stately home. Oldroyd and his DS Steph have been invited by Lord Redmire to witness a magical illusion, first performed forty years earlier by his father, where he will disappear from a locked room, live on TV. The performance goes ahead, in front of his assembled family and friends, but when he is due to re-appear, Redmire is found dead, with a knife in his back. No one seems too upset about his death, and Oldroyd rapidly learns that the man was a selfish gambler and womaniser, whose spending was threatening the estate itself, but all the main suspects were in the room with him at the time, so how could they be the killer? I have enjoyed getting to know DCI Oldroyd, and his loyal subordinates. "Some might think him a pompous mansplainer", as Steph thinks to herself, but we see his sadness at the realisation that his estranged wife is moving on, his daughter flits in and out, and his work takes most of his attention. As with the previous books, Yorkshire itself becomes a prominent character, you can tell the author has a deep love for the area, it's people and it's traditions. The mystery was well concealed, with the right number of clues and red herrings, and a classic Poirot-style reveal. I didn't guess whodunnit, but neither did I feel cheated, as it all made sense. Hopefully there will be many more to come in this series, which should appeal to fans of Peter Robinson's DCI Banks series. It would easily be read as a standalone if you have not read the earlier books. My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC in exchange for a voluntary honest review. The book was published on 13.09.18.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patiscynical

    It never fails.. Why is it that in almost every mystery that I read someone always says, 'this is a murder enquiry'? Like we don't already know that? It's become such a cliche. To be fair, it was used only seven times in this book, but I think that's seven times too many. And the Ian Barden character keeps walking around telling people that he's 'seen things', just asking to become a murder victim. Do people actually do that? And the police gathering together the suspects to reveal the killer? I ca It never fails.. Why is it that in almost every mystery that I read someone always says, 'this is a murder enquiry'? Like we don't already know that? It's become such a cliche. To be fair, it was used only seven times in this book, but I think that's seven times too many. And the Ian Barden character keeps walking around telling people that he's 'seen things', just asking to become a murder victim. Do people actually do that? And the police gathering together the suspects to reveal the killer? I call no way. That may have happened in Agatha Christie books, but not in modern times. Results: nope, wouldn't happen.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Roden

    A wonderfully written, well-paced, original 'locked room' mystery. Too good for 4 stars, hence my rating. A wonderfully written, well-paced, original 'locked room' mystery. Too good for 4 stars, hence my rating.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Les Wilson

    Excellent! I’m really enjoying this author.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Donna J

    I will never stop loving any books that have an Agatha Christi Edge! Especially in my former home Land of the 🇬🇧 This locked room mystery starts off actually amazingly interesting...Imagine a room full of ‘rather very rich snobs’ staying over for a weekend, in the month of June 1980. Imagine a room, after a lavish dinner, that has a showgirl as the helper and the host of the well to do party of parties, hosted by Lord Redmire. The Lord gathers all his guests for a ‘unbelievable vanishing act’, b I will never stop loving any books that have an Agatha Christi Edge! Especially in my former home Land of the 🇬🇧 This locked room mystery starts off actually amazingly interesting...Imagine a room full of ‘rather very rich snobs’ staying over for a weekend, in the month of June 1980. Imagine a room, after a lavish dinner, that has a showgirl as the helper and the host of the well to do party of parties, hosted by Lord Redmire. The Lord gathers all his guests for a ‘unbelievable vanishing act’, but not just any act. The Lord disappears and when the guests examine the contents of the ‘amazing spectacle’ The Lord is right behind them!! Basically the trick is to understand how Lord Redmire performs this great wonder. While locked in a room, he disappears, and then returns while his guests are, well. drunk and can’t believe their eyes! ‘I say, Viv jolly good show! How did you do that!’ See, Lord Redmire not only had a trick of a lifetime, but NEVER performs the trick again, or ever mentions it in any conversation. It’s discussed among his ‘friends’ but The Lord doesn’t give a thing away. The one thing in his life was to be spoken about and his trick. Yet Redmire soon lost interest in magic & soon Redmire Hall needs to make money. He had tours of the grounds but the door to that locked magic room, remains forever locked. As the years go by most of the guests that weekend pass away, including The Lord. Redmire Hall has lost its hay day of fancy dinner parties and tours on the grounds...Did the room and trick die along with Lord Redmire or was it a room that someone else knows extremely well, and decides to gather others into the secret room for a long weekend party, or carry out not only only a sinister ploy, but maybe something else completely unexpected. Alas with all British who-dun-it reviews, I would be doing an injustice to give you spoilers. So I’m a few words this is what I’ll say: I’ve read all 3 of J.R.Ellis’ murder Yorkshire style, I’ve listened on Audible with the GREAT Michael Page as narrator & have read too. I’ve read horrible reviews because a lot of Americans do not understand that, like the States, various parts of Great Britain have accents you’ll NEVER understand, like Yorkshire! Okay, a quick look into ‘The Murder at Redmire Hall’. The present Lord, who’s name is ‘Freddie Carstairs’ and not because of age, inherited Redmire Hall. At this point and time, Freddie is pretty close to his fathers age, and even has the same type of once a year long weekend party. This particular Lord is also a womanizer, gambler, divorced, ran the estate down. To put it bluntly, everyone pretty much hates their host, brother, father, ex-husband, ex-partner in business and Mummy, the original Lord Redmire’s wife, who lives on the grounds and is probably the funnest of them all! As I end this most unusual yet right down to the point review., Freddie’s daughter loves ‘Daddy’ because her artist boyfriend wants to be..kept. The ex-wife is a joy and is loved by his Mummy, but is already remarried. The ex-partner with Freddie, well, hates him! A deal that was started by them both, but as you probably can guess, Freddie did nothing and ran that business into the ground. The brother has always been jealous of his brother, since Freddie was always ‘Daddy’s’ favorite and his brother received NOTHING. Then there is Freddie’s secretary Andrea Jenkinson and the grounds keeper, Richard Wilkins. Will something happen during the weekend? Think Agatha Christi—nothing appears as it seems. The last thing I will say is with every last three books, who is always on hand? That would be DCI Oldroyd & DS Stephanie Johnson, they were personally invited to dinner that night. The one thing no one understood was WHY did Freddie invite a camera crew?! And that my fellow Amazon readers is the million dollar question.. Do I recommend this Book 3? ABSOLUTELY!! Do I recommend the 3 most unusual with many characters written by J.R.Ellis?! If you don’t read them and especially this one, then how will you know where I was going?? For sure Mr Ellis definitely has characters left & right, but what Good British author doesn’t have many to either confuse you or keep you informed. I will tell you this everything comes together and NOT in any way you may expect! Pay attention and you’ll never figure it out..I PROMISE If you have Kindle Unlimited PLEASE listen & read! You will love Michael Page! 5 stars out of 5 stars!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. The Murder at Redmire Hall is the 3rd book in the Yorkshire murder mystery series by J. R. Ellis featuring DCI Jim Oldroyd. Released 13th September by Amazon imprint Thomas & Mercer, it's 300 pages and available in ebook, paperback, and audiobook formats. There is impressive writing continuity between this and the previous books in the series. They're all solidly readable and engaging books. This book explores some golden age tropes such as lock Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. The Murder at Redmire Hall is the 3rd book in the Yorkshire murder mystery series by J. R. Ellis featuring DCI Jim Oldroyd. Released 13th September by Amazon imprint Thomas & Mercer, it's 300 pages and available in ebook, paperback, and audiobook formats. There is impressive writing continuity between this and the previous books in the series. They're all solidly readable and engaging books. This book explores some golden age tropes such as locked door murder mysteries, stately home murder with a seething dysfunctional family and class resentments aplenty. Though it's the third book with several recurring characters, it would be perfectly fine as a standalone. I do feel that the author took too many liberties with the golden age amateur sleuth techniques (Poirot), up to and including a denouement with everyone gathered together in a room for the murder reveal. It was intentional (including Poirot references written into the book itself), but it seemed a trifle over the top, given that DCI Oldroyd is not an amateur and the setting isn't the interwar period. It just came across as unnecessarily clunky. The mash-up of ALL the Christie plot devices was cheeky, but I think it worked in this particular case. That being said, it's a very enjoyable read and although Oldroyd's personal life is something of a downer, he's an appealing character and the book is very well written, and I am looking forward to the next book(s). Three and a half stars, rounded up for the writing. Definitely a worthy read for classic procedural mysteries with a touch of the golden age. Possibly worth noting for Kindle Unlimited subscribers, this book is included in the KU subscription. Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anne Brown

    Detective Inspector Jim Oldroyd and Detective Sergeant Stephanie Johnson are involved in another complex murder case, owing with more than a nod to Agatha Christie. The detectives have been invited by Freddy Carstairs as witnesses to his recreation of a locked room disappearing and reappearing trick once, and only once, performed before by his father at the family’s stately home, Redmire Hall. Freddy’s father, Vincent, performed the trick for family and friends. Freddy has much more pecuniary hop Detective Inspector Jim Oldroyd and Detective Sergeant Stephanie Johnson are involved in another complex murder case, owing with more than a nod to Agatha Christie. The detectives have been invited by Freddy Carstairs as witnesses to his recreation of a locked room disappearing and reappearing trick once, and only once, performed before by his father at the family’s stately home, Redmire Hall. Freddy’s father, Vincent, performed the trick for family and friends. Freddy has much more pecuniary hopes. He is short of cash due to his gambling and has invited a TV crew in to film the whole thing. As well as the fee from this, Freddy is hoping for a boost to the visitor numbers at Redmire Hall. His ancient family seat is simply a meal ticket to Freddy and he’s willing to exploit it in any way he can to finance his gambling, womanising and general high life. Oldroyd was not told about the TV crew and realises he is there to take part by checking the room before the illusion takes place to give added veracity and drama. Although he considers just leaving, the lure of the illusion holds him and he fulfills his role, confirming there is no way out of the room or anywhere to hide within it. The illusion takes place, with Freddy first disappearing from the locked room and then reappearing. All is as it should be, except for the fact Freddy now has a knife sticking out of his back and is dead. We then meet the friends and family who were the other invited witnesses to the illusion. It takes Oldroyd and Johnson some teasing out but it seems every one of them had a motive for Freddy’s death. Then a second murder is discovered on the estate. This time it’s a retired mechanic who had a hand in creating the illusion first time round. The detectives believe this proves the murders are linked and that they need to understand how the illusion works to help them discover who is responsible for the killings. This proves to be no easy task as first Vincent then Freddy took great pains to keep every detail about the illusion a secret. Kept confined to the house, the suspects are soon turning on each other as even they start to believe that at least one of them must be a killer.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Peter Marsh

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As locked room mysteries go this was a little different in as much as the locked room was a trick and known to be a trick from the outset. It was a locked room trick that turned into a locked room murder and the problems start with the trick. DCI Oldroyd is plucked from a live TV audience, he hasn't been rehearsed by the TV production and could have pulled a Leatherman multitool from his pocket and proceeded to take the next hour prising up floorboards, shoving things into walls and unscrewing t As locked room mysteries go this was a little different in as much as the locked room was a trick and known to be a trick from the outset. It was a locked room trick that turned into a locked room murder and the problems start with the trick. DCI Oldroyd is plucked from a live TV audience, he hasn't been rehearsed by the TV production and could have pulled a Leatherman multitool from his pocket and proceeded to take the next hour prising up floorboards, shoving things into walls and unscrewing things and I think this might have upset timings somewhat for for a live broadcast; so there's that. There seemed to be a considerable delay to the room being dismantled and the mechanism being discovered when it should have been obvious to even a moderately well educated flatfoot that a room say 10' wide with an identical, slide in, room side by side requires 30' of space to accommodate it and someone who knows one end of a tape measure from the other ought to be able to establish the existence that extra space fairly easily. None of this is really critical to the solution as the mechanism doesn't point to the murderer but these things just nagged away at me. Then there is the 3rd victim who, after a week or more still hasn't been interviewed by Yorkshire's finest, who is present on the estate daily and is going around implying to all and sundry that he knows something and ends up getting topped before they can speak to him. I'll try to avoid spoilers which are too obvious but one of the murderers has a particular talent but ends up using another talent to be involved with the trick, even though the skill needed to operate the trick is available from another source on the estate, which doesn't work that well for me, neither does this individual turning out to be a psychopath, able to dismiss murdering one colleague as collateral damage and going total whack job theatrical on another. Introducing undisclosed forensic evidence to tie it all together in the end was a bit of a cheap shot. I might try another in the future but not right now.

  21. 5 out of 5

    M

    Dated and mediocre police procedural with clichéd characters. I’m in the minority of reviewers opining about this book, so please take this review with a pinch of salt. I found this a dated, country mansion-type murder with suspects who’re wealthy snobs and their servitors who do all the donkey work. The clichéd suspects are allowed to toddle off to their rooms, breakfast together, chit-chat ad lib as they would in the golden-oldies, Agatha Christie mysteries. The creaky plot harkens back to loc Dated and mediocre police procedural with clichéd characters. I’m in the minority of reviewers opining about this book, so please take this review with a pinch of salt. I found this a dated, country mansion-type murder with suspects who’re wealthy snobs and their servitors who do all the donkey work. The clichéd suspects are allowed to toddle off to their rooms, breakfast together, chit-chat ad lib as they would in the golden-oldies, Agatha Christie mysteries. The creaky plot harkens back to locked room tropes a la John Dickson Carr. For a current-day police procedural, there’s minimal forensics, no SOCOs, no white noddy suits or paper booties, no confiscating mobiles or laptops, etc. But wait! A forensic pathologist actually attends the murder scenes. The detectives do little detecting and/or investigating, but they do conduct incessant interviews. They actually miss/forget an important tertiary character—probably to drive the plot forward—and of course, she/he is murdered. Here’s what was frustrating: I specifically hunted for lab reports about evidence submitted by a secondary character. Sadly, no results, because the author clutches all relevant information to his breast like precious pearls. Also, it takes waaaay too long for the police protagonists and their auxiliary police-experts (?) to figure out the locked room mystery. There are hand-held radar scanners—that can sense pipes, wires, etc. hidden behind walls—to be had by civilians today. What wonderful tech do elite police units and/or paramilitary units have? The denouement features the protagonist’s histrionic, Poirot-like performance, during which the author finally reveals the incriminating forensic evidence that—TAH-DAH!—led to the culprit(s). As for the culprits, there was no way I could suspend disbelief and accept a specific character as THE serial murderer. Totally illogical choice. The second culprit could’ve and should’ve been the serial murderer. I vacillated between 1 and 2 stars. Settled on 2, ‘cuz I actually made it to the end, mostly so I could leave a review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    John Lee

    I have enjoyed this short series and look forward to the next which should be available later this year. So far there have been only 4 books in this series and that, for someone like me who makes a point of reading books in order, makes it even more annoying that I read the 4th The Royal Baths Murder, before this one. A couple of things were mentioned in the background story in this book without any mention of their development/solution in the Royal Bath book. All was revealed when I checked out I have enjoyed this short series and look forward to the next which should be available later this year. So far there have been only 4 books in this series and that, for someone like me who makes a point of reading books in order, makes it even more annoying that I read the 4th The Royal Baths Murder, before this one. A couple of things were mentioned in the background story in this book without any mention of their development/solution in the Royal Bath book. All was revealed when I checked out the author on Fantastic Fiction.com How could I have made that mistake? Reader, if you are reading the series, this is #3 , Royal Baths Murder is #4. In the authors profile , he says that his particular interest is the sub genre of the Locked Room Mystery. This book must have been his dream to write. A real locked room mystery from the past , recreated with such a dramatic conclusion in the present day and with all the motive ridden family assembled to watch. There is even a disclosure of how this kind of trick could be staged. Although I read it out of sequence , this was by far the best of the series so far. All of the characters were clearly identified and their position in the family tree well defined. The motives and the suspects came tumbling out of the woodwork of the old hall. In this novel, I think, the author captures the essence of the who-done-it, keeping everybody in the steadily increasing suspense not only with the 'who' but the 'how'. A wonderful denouement staged to perfection when all the family secrets were revealed. There were clues to be spotted and red herrings obvious and subtle to be avoided. A definite 5 from me. I hope the new one is as good.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hannelore Cheney

    Thank you NetGalley and Thomas Mercer for the eARC. This locked room mystery sees the murder of Lord Redmire as he performs the magic trick of being locked in a room, disappearing, then returning. This trick was successfully performed by his late father and remained a mystery all this time. Unfortunately, on this occasion, Lord Redmire returns...dead, with a knife in his back. Since the whole family was at Redmire Hall to watch the spectable, they as well as the staff form an extensive list of su Thank you NetGalley and Thomas Mercer for the eARC. This locked room mystery sees the murder of Lord Redmire as he performs the magic trick of being locked in a room, disappearing, then returning. This trick was successfully performed by his late father and remained a mystery all this time. Unfortunately, on this occasion, Lord Redmire returns...dead, with a knife in his back. Since the whole family was at Redmire Hall to watch the spectable, they as well as the staff form an extensive list of suspects. Lord Redmire was a serial adulterer who gambled away much of the family money, much disliked by many. DCI Oldroyd and DCS Steph Johnson had front row seats while TV cameras filmed the event. Now they have to solve one of the most baffling cases of their careers. Neither of them find the family members at all sympathetic; they are truly a group of overindulged, arrogant aristocrats who are entitled to only the best while doing the least. Following 2 more murders, Oldroyd and Johnson have a tough case in their hands. The locked room trick was an ingenious one and the identity of the murderer(s) quite a surprise, but I had difficulty connecting with any of the characters and found I was struggling at times to feel invested in the story. It was a pleasant read, but it wasn't enough to make me want to read the others in the series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jud Hanson

    The Redmire Estate is deeply in debt, thanks to the current Lord Redmire’s gambling habits and general lack of economic discipline. However, he has a plan to boost the estate’s profile and bring in more capital. He will perform the same magic trick that had been so well received when his father performed it. He only recently discovered the secret behind it and to add a note of authenticity, he has invited local DCI Jim Oldroyd and DS Stephanie Johnson to examine the room from which he will disap The Redmire Estate is deeply in debt, thanks to the current Lord Redmire’s gambling habits and general lack of economic discipline. However, he has a plan to boost the estate’s profile and bring in more capital. He will perform the same magic trick that had been so well received when his father performed it. He only recently discovered the secret behind it and to add a note of authenticity, he has invited local DCI Jim Oldroyd and DS Stephanie Johnson to examine the room from which he will disappear and then reappear. The performance appears to be going well until the Lord reappears with a knife in his back. Of course, everyone, both family and staff, in attendance is a suspect. Figuring out the secret of the trick and solving the case may be Oldroyd’s greatest challenge but when two staff members are murdered, he realizes that failure is not an option. “Murder at Redmire Hall” by J.R. Ellis is the third DCI Oldroyd book. Ellis has conceived characters and a plot that is believable and flows well, especially when set in Great Britain, as this series is. The series clearly falls into the detective novel genre and although not as graphic as more established series such as Connelly’s Harry Bosch, I would definitely not consider this a so-called “cozy” mystery. I found this book quite enjoyable. I would give it 4/5 stars. *A copy of this ebook is the only consideration received in exchange for this review.*

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    The Murder at Redmire Hall is the third of the Yorkshire Murder Mystery novels. DCI Jim Oldroyd has been invited to Redmire Hall as a special guest to view a lock-door illusion. The present Lord Redmire is a gambling addict and has run up a large amount of debt and needs to find a way to increase revenue at his stately home in order to pay off his debtors. The stately home, the eccentric Lord, the hard done by younger brother, the spoilt daughter, the divine ex-lover and the sophisticated ex-wif The Murder at Redmire Hall is the third of the Yorkshire Murder Mystery novels. DCI Jim Oldroyd has been invited to Redmire Hall as a special guest to view a lock-door illusion. The present Lord Redmire is a gambling addict and has run up a large amount of debt and needs to find a way to increase revenue at his stately home in order to pay off his debtors. The stately home, the eccentric Lord, the hard done by younger brother, the spoilt daughter, the divine ex-lover and the sophisticated ex-wife. We all these wonderful characters a murder takes place and once again DCI Oldroyd has a front seat. J R Ellis's style of writing is so smooth and gentle that the reader finds themselves hooked from the first page. The beautiful descriptions of the Yorkshire countryside and the little snippets of local history all add realistic depth to these wonderful tales. The story may seem familiar and you might think you were in the middle of an Agatha Christie novel or a game of Cluedo, but there is nothing formulaic or steriotypical of this novel and as the plot thickens and bodies mount up you realise the clever way the author has guided you to the end of the novel. I will definitely be looking forward to the next Yorkshire Murder Mystery.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    This is the third book in the Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series featuring Detective Chief Inspector Jim Oldroyd and Detective Sergeant Stephanie Johnson. While this is a book in a series, it easily reads like a stand-alone book. Ellis’ characters are based on the descriptions of 1930s British aristocracy and should remind the reader of Dorothy Sayers or Agatha Christie’s characters. Ellis’ two detectives are also based on Sayers/Christie’s characters, but not quite. They less bumbling than many o This is the third book in the Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series featuring Detective Chief Inspector Jim Oldroyd and Detective Sergeant Stephanie Johnson. While this is a book in a series, it easily reads like a stand-alone book. Ellis’ characters are based on the descriptions of 1930s British aristocracy and should remind the reader of Dorothy Sayers or Agatha Christie’s characters. Ellis’ two detectives are also based on Sayers/Christie’s characters, but not quite. They less bumbling than many of their predecessors and are entirely likable. The mystery of who killed Lord Redmire is complicated by the fact that Lord Redmire was killed in a room that has only one way in and out of it. The detectives must figure out not only who killed the Lord but how the killer managed to stab the man in the back inside room locked from the outside. Unfortunately for the reader there are many possible suspects in the Lord’s immediate family to say nothing of several more from his personal life. This cozy will remind the reader not only of the heyday of Sayers and Christie, but also of their meticulously plotted mysteries where the detectives peel back layer after layer, much like an onion, until they find the murderer.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Neill Smith

    The explanation for the murders lay deep in the past. Vivian Carstairs, Lord Redmire, was rather extravagant in his spending. When he learned of a magic trick - escaping from a locked room - he saw this as a way to increase his estate’s revenue by inviting a paying audience. Years later his son, Frederick Carstairs, the current Lord Redmire, rediscovered his father’s secret and, having the same spending patterns, decided to repeat the performance. He invited DCI Oldroyd who had brought DS Stephan The explanation for the murders lay deep in the past. Vivian Carstairs, Lord Redmire, was rather extravagant in his spending. When he learned of a magic trick - escaping from a locked room - he saw this as a way to increase his estate’s revenue by inviting a paying audience. Years later his son, Frederick Carstairs, the current Lord Redmire, rediscovered his father’s secret and, having the same spending patterns, decided to repeat the performance. He invited DCI Oldroyd who had brought DS Stephanie Johnson with him to ostensibly view the performance although his intentions were to have the Inspector legitimize his escape. Lord Redmire’s family members enjoyed a range of vices among them, some of which being less admirable than others. When the escape proved to reveal not the Lord but his corpse with a knife in his back it became Oldroyd’s new case. His investigations into the family and the employees of the manor led to relationships dating from years in the past with a dramatic denouement at the end. I enjoyed this book a lot.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    Oldroyd and Steph Solve It Again. James is away on leave and Jenkins, borrowed from a neighboring force, joins the team. Lord Redmire, womanizer and gambler, finds himself seriously short of money. So why not perform a bit of a magic trick? Performed successfully by his father forty years earlier, it involves the apparent escape from a locked room with no exits and a reappearance after the empty room is locked and then reopened. To get the most exposure of the trick and hopefully increased touris Oldroyd and Steph Solve It Again. James is away on leave and Jenkins, borrowed from a neighboring force, joins the team. Lord Redmire, womanizer and gambler, finds himself seriously short of money. So why not perform a bit of a magic trick? Performed successfully by his father forty years earlier, it involves the apparent escape from a locked room with no exits and a reappearance after the empty room is locked and then reopened. To get the most exposure of the trick and hopefully increased tourism to the Estate,the event is televised. Imagine the horror when Lord Redmire does indeed reappear, stabbed to death! As seems to always be the case in Yorkshire murders, Detective Inspector Oldroyd is an invited guest, in the audience with Steph. With no shortage of spurned women, spoiled children, unfortunate and importunate relatives,the suspect list is lengthy. To say nothing about the mystery of the Locked Room! This series just gets better and better.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Well what can I say, the death of a person in a magic room and how was it done, well let me tell you - No I cant it will spoil the book for you. Once again J R Ellis, weaves a web of mystery, intrigue and crime. Although he does not like the upper classes, which unfortunately in this book he has to deal with, he makes the most of the dealings he has to have with him. The DCI is invited to watch a magic trick in a lost room by the current Lord of Redmire Hall, (This trick was first acted out by his Well what can I say, the death of a person in a magic room and how was it done, well let me tell you - No I cant it will spoil the book for you. Once again J R Ellis, weaves a web of mystery, intrigue and crime. Although he does not like the upper classes, which unfortunately in this book he has to deal with, he makes the most of the dealings he has to have with him. The DCI is invited to watch a magic trick in a lost room by the current Lord of Redmire Hall, (This trick was first acted out by his father the previous Lord of Redmire Hall) what follows is a web of lies, greed and revenge. This all goes on in the beautiful house and grounds of Redmire Hall. The characters stand out on their own as in the previous books, and unlike some books, J R Ellis has moved his main Characters on in time instead of it only being a few months in between each book. Whilst approximately 2/3rds of the way into the book, I had not worked out who had done the murder and why. Highly recommended.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gina Burgess

    I have been having lots of fun watching several different British cop shows, one of my favorites is DCI (Detective Chief Inspector) aka Boss Banks. This book reminded me of that show. The top detective is quite personable, even though he is a DI and not DCI, and his trusty DS, detective sergeant explore the murder of Lord Redmire. I found the characters are all distinctive and believable. In fact, the blending of characters and their subsequent reactions to situations, and add to that the myster I have been having lots of fun watching several different British cop shows, one of my favorites is DCI (Detective Chief Inspector) aka Boss Banks. This book reminded me of that show. The top detective is quite personable, even though he is a DI and not DCI, and his trusty DS, detective sergeant explore the murder of Lord Redmire. I found the characters are all distinctive and believable. In fact, the blending of characters and their subsequent reactions to situations, and add to that the mystery of the room, and it almost made me not really care whodunit. Just an enjoyable read. Not a lot of English slang so it is very understandable. There is some dry wit (my favorite kind of humor). Four of Five stars for making me not really care whodunit, which is the purpose of a murder mystery! Received this book from Netgalley. This is my honest opinion of this book.

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