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Fact vs. Fiction: Teaching Critical Thinking Skills in the Age of Fake News

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The advent of the 24-hour news cycle, citizen journalism and an increased reliance on social media as a trusted news source have had a profound effect not only on how we get our news, but also on how we evaluate sources of information, share that information and interact with others in online communities. When these issues are coupled with the "fake news" industry that int The advent of the 24-hour news cycle, citizen journalism and an increased reliance on social media as a trusted news source have had a profound effect not only on how we get our news, but also on how we evaluate sources of information, share that information and interact with others in online communities. When these issues are coupled with the "fake news" industry that intentionally spreads false stories designed to go viral, educators are left facing a new and challenging landscape. This book will help them address these new realities. Fact vs. Fiction provides educators with tools and resources to help students discern fact from fiction in the information they access not only at school, but on the devices they carry in their pockets and backpacks.


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The advent of the 24-hour news cycle, citizen journalism and an increased reliance on social media as a trusted news source have had a profound effect not only on how we get our news, but also on how we evaluate sources of information, share that information and interact with others in online communities. When these issues are coupled with the "fake news" industry that int The advent of the 24-hour news cycle, citizen journalism and an increased reliance on social media as a trusted news source have had a profound effect not only on how we get our news, but also on how we evaluate sources of information, share that information and interact with others in online communities. When these issues are coupled with the "fake news" industry that intentionally spreads false stories designed to go viral, educators are left facing a new and challenging landscape. This book will help them address these new realities. Fact vs. Fiction provides educators with tools and resources to help students discern fact from fiction in the information they access not only at school, but on the devices they carry in their pockets and backpacks.

30 review for Fact vs. Fiction: Teaching Critical Thinking Skills in the Age of Fake News

  1. 4 out of 5

    Donalyn

    Second read. Fabulous resource for educators striving to teach media and critical literacy skills.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paul Warner

    This is a very important book that every social studies & language arts teacher, plus definitely every teacher-librarian, should own and use to help teach students how to be critical readers and evaluators of information in today's on-line world. I highly recommend this excellent book! This is a very important book that every social studies & language arts teacher, plus definitely every teacher-librarian, should own and use to help teach students how to be critical readers and evaluators of information in today's on-line world. I highly recommend this excellent book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anna Davidson

    This easy to read text provides some great background information about fake news as well as some good teaching suggestions and resources. It leans perhaps more to middle and senior school.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    An outstanding job addressing this important topic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    "We can no longer point to any source and guarantee that its information is 100% accurate and without bias. We must teach our students to deconstruct media, in all its forms, and to uncover any underlying messaging" "We can’t teach kids to make good choices without actually giving them choices" This was a great dynamic read on the topic of media and information literacy, I highlighted a bunch of passages and found some helpful resources. Although it's US-centric, some of the reflections and strate "We can no longer point to any source and guarantee that its information is 100% accurate and without bias. We must teach our students to deconstruct media, in all its forms, and to uncover any underlying messaging" "We can’t teach kids to make good choices without actually giving them choices" This was a great dynamic read on the topic of media and information literacy, I highlighted a bunch of passages and found some helpful resources. Although it's US-centric, some of the reflections and strategies proposed resonated with my experience in other contexts.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karen Arendt

    A must read! Full of plenty of resources to get any librarian started to teach fake news lessons.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    A must read for school librarians and all teachers teaching how to evaluate information for accuracy. A special strength of this new work is advice on how to teach these skills in the current context of mobile device usage by students.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kris Patrick

    A terrific companion title to Sara K. Ahmed's Being the Change. I read paperback version but know that eBook version is available on Hoopla. A terrific companion title to Sara K. Ahmed's Being the Change. I read paperback version but know that eBook version is available on Hoopla.

  9. 5 out of 5

    nicole

    Purchased during ISTE 2019, actually read it as professional development post-Capitol insurrection, because I felt the intense need to re-evaluate my entire media literacy program for K-5. Incredibly helpful resource, with quality implementation ideas for elementary and even tips for how to modify into the lower grades. Chapters 1-4/8 were good for framework and developing a PD session, Chapters 5-7 better for concrete lesson plans/ideas for student use. Recommend diving into each article and res Purchased during ISTE 2019, actually read it as professional development post-Capitol insurrection, because I felt the intense need to re-evaluate my entire media literacy program for K-5. Incredibly helpful resource, with quality implementation ideas for elementary and even tips for how to modify into the lower grades. Chapters 1-4/8 were good for framework and developing a PD session, Chapters 5-7 better for concrete lesson plans/ideas for student use. Recommend diving into each article and resource as you come into it, rather than saving things to look at later. The mobile device focused fake news assessment alone is worth the cost of the book. So looking forward to testing out Scott Bedley's game, Kim Wilken's Foiling Fake News, and Arika Dickens Two Truths and a Lie unit with my own students.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Mitchell

    Teachers are given the task of teaching students how to navigate through our information filled world. Many educators have little training and even fewer resources to assist them with this task. This book, Fact Vs Fiction does a wonderful job of providing educators with strategies & rationale which can be applied in the classroom with elementary through high school age students. The authors have provided resources to assist students with tasks such as: evaluating information to determine its val Teachers are given the task of teaching students how to navigate through our information filled world. Many educators have little training and even fewer resources to assist them with this task. This book, Fact Vs Fiction does a wonderful job of providing educators with strategies & rationale which can be applied in the classroom with elementary through high school age students. The authors have provided resources to assist students with tasks such as: evaluating information to determine its validity. Teachers will find this book a necessary addition to their professional library. It’s content is relevant, desperately needed and user friendly. I, for one will be recommending it to my teacher friends.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    This a a fairly short read that would benefit any K-12 educator. As FDR said, “We may not be able to prepare the future for our children, but we can at least prepare our children for the future.” Teaching kids (and adults) how to spot fake news, how to recognize the types of fake news, and that the truth matters is important now, more than ever. Kids need to learn to be media/news literate. They need to know how to get to the facts and they need to know the red flags and signs to watch for to sp This a a fairly short read that would benefit any K-12 educator. As FDR said, “We may not be able to prepare the future for our children, but we can at least prepare our children for the future.” Teaching kids (and adults) how to spot fake news, how to recognize the types of fake news, and that the truth matters is important now, more than ever. Kids need to learn to be media/news literate. They need to know how to get to the facts and they need to know the red flags and signs to watch for to spot fake news. “Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.” ~ Margaret Mead This book does a good job with this timely topic.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    This is a genuinely good introduction to using media literacy education to address the problems associated with “fake news” and dis/misinformation. The discussion and explanation sections for each chapter will be helpful for newcomers but many of the suggested resources are freely available on guides created by librarians. I would suggest this to new teachers and teachers with lots of experience who are interested in engaging with media literacy in their classrooms but are unsure of how to get s This is a genuinely good introduction to using media literacy education to address the problems associated with “fake news” and dis/misinformation. The discussion and explanation sections for each chapter will be helpful for newcomers but many of the suggested resources are freely available on guides created by librarians. I would suggest this to new teachers and teachers with lots of experience who are interested in engaging with media literacy in their classrooms but are unsure of how to get started.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andee

    Every teacher should have this book. Any parent who wants to reinforce lessons about proper sources should have this book. There are not a lot of books I need to own - this is one I need and will be referencing again and again. What I appreciate: Numerous websites and infographics Real life lessons and feedback Stories still prevalent in our news today Photos giving examples of what we see daily on social media I will be using these lessons in my Literacy Enrichment class. The book really is a "mu Every teacher should have this book. Any parent who wants to reinforce lessons about proper sources should have this book. There are not a lot of books I need to own - this is one I need and will be referencing again and again. What I appreciate: Numerous websites and infographics Real life lessons and feedback Stories still prevalent in our news today Photos giving examples of what we see daily on social media I will be using these lessons in my Literacy Enrichment class. The book really is a "must have".

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I was introduced to this book for a class that I'm taking on library methods; I found it very engaging and well written. It's full of tons of practical resources (charts, sites, examples) for teachers (or parents, even) to use when trying to learn and teach younger people how to differentiate between valid information online and mis(or dis)information. An excellent read with some targeted points. Continues to be even more valid as time passes and the term "fake news" is used with more frequency I was introduced to this book for a class that I'm taking on library methods; I found it very engaging and well written. It's full of tons of practical resources (charts, sites, examples) for teachers (or parents, even) to use when trying to learn and teach younger people how to differentiate between valid information online and mis(or dis)information. An excellent read with some targeted points. Continues to be even more valid as time passes and the term "fake news" is used with more frequency and less meaning.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Martha

    More of “why to teach” than “how to teach” critical thinking in the age of fake news, the book spends most of its time preaching to the choir. Chapters 5 and 6, though, provide QR codes for resources, thereby enabling the choir to compose its own hymnal. According to their posts on Twitter, the authors are planning a follow-up book of lesson plans and instructional strategies; can’t wait to sing along.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Some of the references are outdated (such is the nature of technology reads) but there are many sound principles and activities that can be used and modified by educators. Current (as of January 2021) misinformation/disinformation identification skills need to go beyond the adjusted CRAAP method used in this text. Hopefully, the authors and the publisher will update this text with more information on how to act like fact checkers.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Recommended by others in the literacy/education world, this is a great resource for K-12 teachers. This is a great introduction to the world of Fake News and the terminology and skills teachers should be passing on to students in many content areas. I'm excited to start designing lessons for my students! Recommended by others in the literacy/education world, this is a great resource for K-12 teachers. This is a great introduction to the world of Fake News and the terminology and skills teachers should be passing on to students in many content areas. I'm excited to start designing lessons for my students!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    This is a fantastic resource for educators who are looking for ways to help their students (and themselves) discern credible information. In this era of fake news and clickbait, we need this more than ever. I especially love how the authors emphasize that we need to integrate these lessons into all of our curriculum, rather than just in one-off digital citizenship lessons.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    This is a great tool for teachers and librarians to curate ideas about how to cover the subject of fake news. We each need to spend more time examining what we read instead of just taking it as truth and moving on. This book looks into the growing issue of fake news, why it is out there, and what we can do about it. I will be using this multiple times in the future!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anca

    Excellent read! Great materials and inspiration for class activities that can be easily adapted to online teaching. This one is a treasure trove that will be a constant presence on my teaching desk for the foreseeable future. It has exercises and strategies for students of all ages and (seasoned) adults as well. So glad I found this one!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Worthy Information to understanding social media technology and information literacy..... This book requires reading ability above the high school level. It is not only for teachers but anyone willing to invest in self learning and increase understanding of the world around them.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mariya Ortiz

    This book really expanded my mind about the importance of media literacy instruction. Both the historical background about media manipulation and the amount of teaching resources makes this book an invaluable resource for teachers and librarians.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lara Samuels

    Every educator needs to read this at all levels. We must incorporate critical thinking and critical reading. It will also help the reader make sense of the information that can be overwhelming so we can make informed decisions. Must purchase your own copy.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    A well-written and concise discussion of an important and difficult topic. Geared toward educators and teacher librarians, in particular, this book is educational for anyone interested in wading through the complicated waters of "fake news" and information consumption. A well-written and concise discussion of an important and difficult topic. Geared toward educators and teacher librarians, in particular, this book is educational for anyone interested in wading through the complicated waters of "fake news" and information consumption.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gina Beirne

    Lots of good information and instructional strategies.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Mannon

    Some good tips.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tweller83

    This was good with lots of examples of things to use and teach. I found it informative and have used some of it with my students already.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Great book looking at how to teach about fake news from K-12.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Excellent media literacy resource for educators

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Rath

    A must read for all teachers who want their students to do any research. Sometimes I think teachers need this experience as much as the students.

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