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Law School for Everyone

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The skills lawyers wield in courtrooms across the country are the result of years of study. As much as we'd like to cultivate these same skills, the truth is that you cannot know how a lawyer thinks and works without studying the law itself. Now there's an easier way to get the same foundational knowledge as lawyers - without the enormous time and financial commitment. Over The skills lawyers wield in courtrooms across the country are the result of years of study. As much as we'd like to cultivate these same skills, the truth is that you cannot know how a lawyer thinks and works without studying the law itself. Now there's an easier way to get the same foundational knowledge as lawyers - without the enormous time and financial commitment. Over the span of 48 lectures, four experienced lawyers and teachers recreate key parts of the first-year law student experience, introducing you to main areas of law most every beginning student studies. You'll start with 12 lectures on litigation and legal practice that offer eye-opening answers to many questions about the art and craft of legislation. In the second 12 lectures, you'll learn how criminal law and procedure - an area of law dramatized by countless TV shows - really works. Additional lectures investigate the civic procedures courts follow to resolve disputes about substantive rights and examine broader questions any system of litigation must address. And 12 lectures are devoted entirely to the stranger-than-fiction topic of tort law. Enriched with famous cases from the annals of American law and powerful arguments by some of history's most successful lawyers, these lectures offer access to an often intimidating, surprisingly accessible, and civically important field.


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The skills lawyers wield in courtrooms across the country are the result of years of study. As much as we'd like to cultivate these same skills, the truth is that you cannot know how a lawyer thinks and works without studying the law itself. Now there's an easier way to get the same foundational knowledge as lawyers - without the enormous time and financial commitment. Over The skills lawyers wield in courtrooms across the country are the result of years of study. As much as we'd like to cultivate these same skills, the truth is that you cannot know how a lawyer thinks and works without studying the law itself. Now there's an easier way to get the same foundational knowledge as lawyers - without the enormous time and financial commitment. Over the span of 48 lectures, four experienced lawyers and teachers recreate key parts of the first-year law student experience, introducing you to main areas of law most every beginning student studies. You'll start with 12 lectures on litigation and legal practice that offer eye-opening answers to many questions about the art and craft of legislation. In the second 12 lectures, you'll learn how criminal law and procedure - an area of law dramatized by countless TV shows - really works. Additional lectures investigate the civic procedures courts follow to resolve disputes about substantive rights and examine broader questions any system of litigation must address. And 12 lectures are devoted entirely to the stranger-than-fiction topic of tort law. Enriched with famous cases from the annals of American law and powerful arguments by some of history's most successful lawyers, these lectures offer access to an often intimidating, surprisingly accessible, and civically important field.

30 review for Law School for Everyone

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jarl Olsen

    As a Boy Scout, I recall learning how to apply a tourniquet to a severed limb, what to do if confronted by a bear, how to determine direction when lost in the woods by looking at moss and a 3-step process for breathing life into a drowned person. I am now 61 and it has occurred to me that I probably will never get to see if those procedures that I so dutifully memorized in Wolf Pack 2 are efficacious (I had to look up the spelling of "efficacious".) I have, however, had to sue someone, been thre As a Boy Scout, I recall learning how to apply a tourniquet to a severed limb, what to do if confronted by a bear, how to determine direction when lost in the woods by looking at moss and a 3-step process for breathing life into a drowned person. I am now 61 and it has occurred to me that I probably will never get to see if those procedures that I so dutifully memorized in Wolf Pack 2 are efficacious (I had to look up the spelling of "efficacious".) I have, however, had to sue someone, been threatened with a lawsuit, tried to advise a family member who had accrued multiple DUI's and hired an accountant whose methods, I was informed, may have constituted crimes. Law School for Everyone is not "The Law for Dummies". It gives a general overview of how the legal system in America works or is supposed to work. It doesn't tell you how to beat a speeding ticket or have your home declared architecturally significant. That said, by examining how the criminal and civil courts operate and touching on how legal decisions are made and handed down, I feel that, god forbid, should find myself in court that I will understand what the judge needs to make a ruling in my favor. I didn't give it five stars just because "Law School for Everyone" had all the sexy criminal law in the beginning and ended with civil law. You don't go out on tort law. You will lose your jury.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    This is one of the better “great courses” programs, mostly because it was a broad selection of topics which gave fairly comprehensive coverage of the field. I was already pretty familiar with criminal law, constitutional law, data privacy/etc, and very familiar with homicide and self defense law. However, I had basically insufficient knowledge of the rules of civil procedure and almost no knowledge of torts and product liability. After the course, I don’t know anything more about criminal law (e This is one of the better “great courses” programs, mostly because it was a broad selection of topics which gave fairly comprehensive coverage of the field. I was already pretty familiar with criminal law, constitutional law, data privacy/etc, and very familiar with homicide and self defense law. However, I had basically insufficient knowledge of the rules of civil procedure and almost no knowledge of torts and product liability. After the course, I don’t know anything more about criminal law (except some confidence my knowledge is comprehensive in scope), and I know the basics of civil procedure and product liability and torts. This is exactly what one would want from a program like this. Everything was clearly presented, with good examples (the classic ones from law school.). You don’t particularly need any domain specific knowledge to follow it. Strongly recommend.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Coming from the Great Courses, this audiobook was both extremely informative and easy to follow. A very useful tool for anyone with an emerging interest in law.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Angie Bowen

    I bought this audiobook to help me see if law school is a realistic goal for me. Anyone can read A Time To Kill or watch How to Get Away With Murder and think they would be a good lawyer, but I wanted to learn about the actual topics you will learn in your first year of law school: the judiciary, criminal law, civil procedure, and torts. Turns out I absolutely love even the "boring" stuff! For anyone thinking about law school, this book is a must. I bought this audiobook to help me see if law school is a realistic goal for me. Anyone can read A Time To Kill or watch How to Get Away With Murder and think they would be a good lawyer, but I wanted to learn about the actual topics you will learn in your first year of law school: the judiciary, criminal law, civil procedure, and torts. Turns out I absolutely love even the "boring" stuff! For anyone thinking about law school, this book is a must.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sina Jafarzadeh

    It is a very good introduction to the legal system (the US legal system but applies to the legal system in many western countries as well), its components, and how different components work together. The book is full of interesting stories which makes it very enjoyable and easy to digest. If you are curious about how someone could sue McDonald's for serving their coffee "too hot" and win 400K in punitive compensation then give this book a read! It is a very good introduction to the legal system (the US legal system but applies to the legal system in many western countries as well), its components, and how different components work together. The book is full of interesting stories which makes it very enjoyable and easy to digest. If you are curious about how someone could sue McDonald's for serving their coffee "too hot" and win 400K in punitive compensation then give this book a read!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kaveh

    This is a lengthy, and yet enjoyable, introduction to the practice of law in the United States. It starts with a very informative chapter on litigation and legal procedures by Molly Bishop Shadel. She introduces the alphabet of litigation, puts everything in a historical and philosophical perspective, and she gets down to the knots and bolt of logical thinking. The latter was an interesting topic for me as I found many similarities between the reasoning in law and in science (e.g. there is a gre This is a lengthy, and yet enjoyable, introduction to the practice of law in the United States. It starts with a very informative chapter on litigation and legal procedures by Molly Bishop Shadel. She introduces the alphabet of litigation, puts everything in a historical and philosophical perspective, and she gets down to the knots and bolt of logical thinking. The latter was an interesting topic for me as I found many similarities between the reasoning in law and in science (e.g. there is a great deal of information about deductive and inductive reasoning and how things have changed since the time of Aristotle). Despite my initial hesitation, I also found the final chapter on torts interesting too. The course suffers from an imbalanced scope. There is too much emphasis on civil and criminal procedures that could be easily shortened and replaced with other areas of law such as intellectual property, corporate, and international law. Overall, I found the audio course and the accompanying booklet very educational for someone with no background in law.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Makoto

    Should have read this a while ago. I'm not sure that this is the most riveting book but it does outline a basic framework of the law that I think feels more like "fitting" in a complex Goedelian labyrinth than measuring out justice in a clockwork universe. Should have read this a while ago. I'm not sure that this is the most riveting book but it does outline a basic framework of the law that I think feels more like "fitting" in a complex Goedelian labyrinth than measuring out justice in a clockwork universe.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Skyler Peterson

    I felt that this was a strong layman's intro in US law and procedure. It covers a lot of material including; defining key terms, discussing historical aspects of state and federal law, the complexity of jurisdiction, the incorporation of the Bill of Rights into state courts, and historically important SCOTUS decisions. I feel like I now at least have a basic understanding of important terms in US law, politics, and history. This includes understanding what common law is, where it comes from, and I felt that this was a strong layman's intro in US law and procedure. It covers a lot of material including; defining key terms, discussing historical aspects of state and federal law, the complexity of jurisdiction, the incorporation of the Bill of Rights into state courts, and historically important SCOTUS decisions. I feel like I now at least have a basic understanding of important terms in US law, politics, and history. This includes understanding what common law is, where it comes from, and how it works in a procedural manner. Even though it was a bit dry, criminal and civil procedure provides a lot of insight into how the system works. Even the tort law section provided a lot of basic knowledge that lawyers and politicians take for granted when communicating with the public. I think one of the most important arcs throughout these lectures is the deep historical complexity of jurisdiction between federal and state courts and the Incorporation of the Bill of Rights from Federal into State law. I had no idea that only 80 or so years ago, most of the Bill of Rights only applied to Federal Courts. Additionally, the natural extension of the commerce clause of the constitution leads to some deep discussion about how State and Federal legal rights are only getting more complicated over time. In summary, I think this lecture series does a good job providing fairly in depth introductions to such a huge and complex space. I also think that the many discussions relating around Incorporation Doctrine, Federal and State Jurisdiction, and the history of law all the way back to the founding provides some of the most rich insights. The one place it falls short is seemingly inevitable. There is so much raw knowledge, that it is difficult to keep track of it all and not forget huge amounts of details. There are also many times, where you will want to know much more about a specific section of the lecture, but time is not permitted here. I do not fault this work too much on this as this material is meant to be an introduction to US law, not a definitive source. It provides enough insight that someone who is new and interested in the subject can learn enough to then go out and dig deeper where they see fit.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zack

    I've really come to enjoy the Great Courses for their clarity and the great insight and humor displayed by the various narrators for the courses. This introduction to the American judicial system was no exception, and was actually extra fun for having four different professors instruct on their speciality. Each brought a great dose of personality to their respective section of the course, which made for some incredibly engaging, informative lectures. One thing to highlight in this course in part I've really come to enjoy the Great Courses for their clarity and the great insight and humor displayed by the various narrators for the courses. This introduction to the American judicial system was no exception, and was actually extra fun for having four different professors instruct on their speciality. Each brought a great dose of personality to their respective section of the course, which made for some incredibly engaging, informative lectures. One thing to highlight in this course in particular was how much fun the various case examples are as a way of educating and emphasizing the sometimes ridiculous and yet incredibly deliberate setup of our law and court systems. Overall I definitely learned a lot, particularly about how to think like a lawyer and some more about how to navigate the particular oddities of American law. While I will never be ready to say that I'm an expert, I can definitely say that this course helped me to feel a bit more stable in my ability to read about and understand legal debates in the news or online, which is definitely a useful skill to have.

  10. 4 out of 5

    D

    Reviewing all the sections in this course really was a great Refresher for me if you're ever interested in learning about different terminology used in the legal profession feel or have interest in expanding your career perhaps as a paralegal or considering law school, this would be the perfect place to start just to give you a bit of foundation and what you're getting yourself into. LOL I personally love law and I love every bit of it especially the section about torts. I highly recommend this Reviewing all the sections in this course really was a great Refresher for me if you're ever interested in learning about different terminology used in the legal profession feel or have interest in expanding your career perhaps as a paralegal or considering law school, this would be the perfect place to start just to give you a bit of foundation and what you're getting yourself into. LOL I personally love law and I love every bit of it especially the section about torts. I highly recommend this course but do realize it it will take you several days to get through because it's very comprehensive and yet informative.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Nyen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This series comprises different topics covered in multiple lectures by different experts. Some landmark cases are referred back to on and off and serve as great bridges to the topics and show the complexity of issues that can arise from one case. I love how the series brings together legal terms and concepts on how lawyers think and make points of argument to make cases as fair as possible in the legal system. Because this lecture series is about American Law, it may not apply to judicial systems This series comprises different topics covered in multiple lectures by different experts. Some landmark cases are referred back to on and off and serve as great bridges to the topics and show the complexity of issues that can arise from one case. I love how the series brings together legal terms and concepts on how lawyers think and make points of argument to make cases as fair as possible in the legal system. Because this lecture series is about American Law, it may not apply to judicial systems that are different from it. But seeing that many tv shows and movies are from the US, it sheds light to the background to how the judicial system works and the cases behind the main argument.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jenny's Book Life

    Twelve lectures on litigation and legal practice using famous and/or unusual cases. SO INTERESTING. I think we all should know a touch more about the law. I enjoyed most some history about how legal practices evolved, such as plea bargaining and Miranda. Who knew? I listened to these 25 lecture hour each day while walking my dogs, but often kept listening afterwards. Highly recommend! No previous legal knowledge required.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Fantastic. Very relevant and principled discussion of the history and current status of our legal system. Very good at explaining the reasons for and backing of the legal system. I gained a much great appreciation for how well our system mediates disputes and balances costs vs justice. The 48 lectures are broken up into four 12 part series, some more relevant than others. The first and last of the four were my favorites. Can anyone say "offensive non-mutual issue preclusion"? Fantastic. Very relevant and principled discussion of the history and current status of our legal system. Very good at explaining the reasons for and backing of the legal system. I gained a much great appreciation for how well our system mediates disputes and balances costs vs justice. The 48 lectures are broken up into four 12 part series, some more relevant than others. The first and last of the four were my favorites. Can anyone say "offensive non-mutual issue preclusion"?

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    I knew very little of US law. This was extremely educational and I now understand much better how the US system of works. The first two parts about law in general and criminal were the easiest to follow. The rest of the course is a bit harder to follow, but no less interesting. I especially liked the last part referring to Tort Law which I knew very little about. A great book if you are not familiar with the English or American legal system.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Luka Žarković

    Its not for everyone, its for USA citizens. First and last lecturer seemed to me the best but other were also fine. I have to admit that i almost quit in the begining when i heard the lecturer defended USA on terrorism but i dont know much on that mater so i didnt judge. This should be implemented in the school for sure, every nation should have its basic law thought not just expect that you know it. The only thing this book lack for me was more comparisons with the rest of the world.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Roo Phillips

    A fantastic course for understanding the basics of legal and civil procedure, criminal law, and torts. It makes everything you see on TV or in the news make a lot more sense, and should be standard for GE as long as we have requirements. It is long, and some parts are certainly more interesting than others, but it can be immediately applicable to everyday life.

  17. 4 out of 5

    James Keogh

    If you were always interested in going to law school, but choose not to go there. This audiobook is for you. While this course is the not the same as attending law school, but I am able to hold my own in talking with law students concerning subjects like tort and contract law. I really liked that the law professors were engaging and provided the history of the case laws for the subjects.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vince Cooper

    Easy to follow and understand series of lectures. Most of the series was entertaining, but the portion related to procedure of law was boring. Unfortunately that same portion is also needed if you want to understand why courts operate the way they do.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tony Poerio

    Great stories. Excellent oration. Practical knowledge about the basics of American Law. You won't be an expert after this, but you'll have a general understanding of the relevant issues & guiding principles of the legal field. Which is all you can really hope for from an audiobook, right? Great stories. Excellent oration. Practical knowledge about the basics of American Law. You won't be an expert after this, but you'll have a general understanding of the relevant issues & guiding principles of the legal field. Which is all you can really hope for from an audiobook, right?

  20. 4 out of 5

    D

    I learned a whole lot from this book and I highly recommend this audiobook for anyone who wants to learn the basics of law. The one star removed is for sections in the course that you might never find relevant in your life (Sorry maybe it was just me who got bored by specific sections).

  21. 5 out of 5

    Noah Graham

    Their are times when the stupidity of the legal precedents judges created made me want to hit someone or break something. This is a good audiobook to go with demolition work or unarmed combat training.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stennett Eberly

    I love what I learned in this course about law and litigation, because it opened a world that we all hear hints of many times but don’t understand. It will probably stand me in good stead sometime in my life.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Weston

    Thoroughly enjoyed this Great Course. It was a perfect balance of different lecturers and a variety of content. I rarely felt like the course got so specific or technical that it wasn't relevant and interesting. Highly recommend to anyone interested in learning more about the Justice System. Thoroughly enjoyed this Great Course. It was a perfect balance of different lecturers and a variety of content. I rarely felt like the course got so specific or technical that it wasn't relevant and interesting. Highly recommend to anyone interested in learning more about the Justice System.

  24. 4 out of 5

    John Ronald

    Good quick overview of the American legal system

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark Jr.

    Extremely well done, particularly the female lecturer at the beginning.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Quan

    I didn't expect a book about laws so interesting to read. Highly recommended for anyone who want to know the fundamentals about laws I didn't expect a book about laws so interesting to read. Highly recommended for anyone who want to know the fundamentals about laws

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mayank Gupta

    Great book with a lot of great information and examples.

  28. 5 out of 5

    John Randall

    The lectures were excellent and the content interesting. However, they did say "pay attention to every word in the sentence". If so, then the title does not fit. Seriously doubt everyone needs to know about criminal law and tort. Would have given 5 stars if the content matched the title or vice versa. The lectures were excellent and the content interesting. However, they did say "pay attention to every word in the sentence". If so, then the title does not fit. Seriously doubt everyone needs to know about criminal law and tort. Would have given 5 stars if the content matched the title or vice versa.

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Zhang

    An insightful and enjoyable crash course in many areas of law and legal practice

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nolan Martin

    Very informative. Definitely broadened my knowledge of law and litigation.

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