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Sexting, cyberbullying, revenge porn, online predators... all of these potential threats can tempt parents to snatch the smartphone or tablet right out of their children's hands. While avoidance might eliminate the dangers, that approach also means your child misses out on technology's many benefits and opportunities. Raising Humans in a Digital World shows how digital kids Sexting, cyberbullying, revenge porn, online predators... all of these potential threats can tempt parents to snatch the smartphone or tablet right out of their children's hands. While avoidance might eliminate the dangers, that approach also means your child misses out on technology's many benefits and opportunities. Raising Humans in a Digital World shows how digital kids must learn to navigate this environment, through developing social-emotional skills balancing virtual and real life building safe and healthy relationships avoiding cyberbullies and online predators protecting personal information identifying and avoiding fake news and questionable content becoming positive role models and leaders. This book is packed with at-home discussion topics and enjoyable activities that any busy family can slip into their daily routine. Full of practical tips grounded in academic research and hands-on experience, today's parents finally have what they've been waiting for--a guide to raising digital kids who will become the positive and successful leaders our world desperately needs. Praise for Raising Humans in a Digital World "If you need practical, positive advice on how to handle your and your kids' digital lives, look no further. This book tackles the risks and addresses the potential harms, while keeping our eyes on the prize of the remarkable rewards that the online world brings." --Stephen Balkam, founder & CEO, Family Online Safety Institute "Raising Humans in a Digital World is not only a timely book, it's essential reading for every parent, grandparent, and teacher. Diana Graber empowers you through her educational (proven and practical) curriculum and engages you through anecdotal stories." --Sue Scheff, founder of Parents' Universal Resource Experts and author of Shame Nation, Google Bomb, and Wit's End "Brilliant, compelling, and essential are the first words that came to my mind when reading Diana Graber's Raising Humans in a Digital World. Diana not only taps her own exemplary expertise but also assembles a "who's who" of digital thought leaders to deliver a treasure trove of pragmatic advice via an engaging storytelling style." --Alan Katzman, founder and CEO, Social Assurity LLC "Diana Graber not only shows parents how to create safe and responsible relationships in this ever-changing digital world, but she gives them the powerful tools to navigate through the many aspects of what is required to keep kids safe online. The misuse of technology and the cruel behaviors that take place daily by kids and teens can be changed, and Graber shows this in her informative and educational book Raising Humans in a Digital World. The book should be every parent's bible as a resource to ensure that their children are responsible and safe." --Ross Ellis, founder and CEO, STOMP Out Bullying "This beautifully written book gives you the tools to raise healthy kids in a digital world. The anecdotes underscore the thoughtfulness of today's youth and their hunger for learning how to navigate their world well, instead of just being warned off by fearful adults. It is thoughtfully organized and theoretically sound, and will empower parents to have some of those much-needed conversations with their kids." --Dr. Pamela Rutledge, director, Media Psychology Research Center and faculty member, Fielding Graduate University


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Sexting, cyberbullying, revenge porn, online predators... all of these potential threats can tempt parents to snatch the smartphone or tablet right out of their children's hands. While avoidance might eliminate the dangers, that approach also means your child misses out on technology's many benefits and opportunities. Raising Humans in a Digital World shows how digital kids Sexting, cyberbullying, revenge porn, online predators... all of these potential threats can tempt parents to snatch the smartphone or tablet right out of their children's hands. While avoidance might eliminate the dangers, that approach also means your child misses out on technology's many benefits and opportunities. Raising Humans in a Digital World shows how digital kids must learn to navigate this environment, through developing social-emotional skills balancing virtual and real life building safe and healthy relationships avoiding cyberbullies and online predators protecting personal information identifying and avoiding fake news and questionable content becoming positive role models and leaders. This book is packed with at-home discussion topics and enjoyable activities that any busy family can slip into their daily routine. Full of practical tips grounded in academic research and hands-on experience, today's parents finally have what they've been waiting for--a guide to raising digital kids who will become the positive and successful leaders our world desperately needs. Praise for Raising Humans in a Digital World "If you need practical, positive advice on how to handle your and your kids' digital lives, look no further. This book tackles the risks and addresses the potential harms, while keeping our eyes on the prize of the remarkable rewards that the online world brings." --Stephen Balkam, founder & CEO, Family Online Safety Institute "Raising Humans in a Digital World is not only a timely book, it's essential reading for every parent, grandparent, and teacher. Diana Graber empowers you through her educational (proven and practical) curriculum and engages you through anecdotal stories." --Sue Scheff, founder of Parents' Universal Resource Experts and author of Shame Nation, Google Bomb, and Wit's End "Brilliant, compelling, and essential are the first words that came to my mind when reading Diana Graber's Raising Humans in a Digital World. Diana not only taps her own exemplary expertise but also assembles a "who's who" of digital thought leaders to deliver a treasure trove of pragmatic advice via an engaging storytelling style." --Alan Katzman, founder and CEO, Social Assurity LLC "Diana Graber not only shows parents how to create safe and responsible relationships in this ever-changing digital world, but she gives them the powerful tools to navigate through the many aspects of what is required to keep kids safe online. The misuse of technology and the cruel behaviors that take place daily by kids and teens can be changed, and Graber shows this in her informative and educational book Raising Humans in a Digital World. The book should be every parent's bible as a resource to ensure that their children are responsible and safe." --Ross Ellis, founder and CEO, STOMP Out Bullying "This beautifully written book gives you the tools to raise healthy kids in a digital world. The anecdotes underscore the thoughtfulness of today's youth and their hunger for learning how to navigate their world well, instead of just being warned off by fearful adults. It is thoughtfully organized and theoretically sound, and will empower parents to have some of those much-needed conversations with their kids." --Dr. Pamela Rutledge, director, Media Psychology Research Center and faculty member, Fielding Graduate University

30 review for Raising Humans in a Digital World: Helping Kids Build a Healthy Relationship with Technology

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Recommended by Rebecca W.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    This book is both helpful and hopeful. I have found much parental education around media use and children to be full of scare tactics. This books provides some real life ideas and examples on how to educate and prepare children to be good cyber citizens.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    Optimistic and practical digital parenting advice. It covers the topics of digital reputation, screen times, relationships, privacy, and critical thinking, and dives into specifics including sending nudes and cyberbullying. The book teaches parents to help their kids gain social and emotional skills, then encourage them to engage in online communities in positive, productive ways. Graber runs Cyberwise and Cyber Civics. For several years she's taught middle-schoolers digital literacy, digital cit Optimistic and practical digital parenting advice. It covers the topics of digital reputation, screen times, relationships, privacy, and critical thinking, and dives into specifics including sending nudes and cyberbullying. The book teaches parents to help their kids gain social and emotional skills, then encourage them to engage in online communities in positive, productive ways. Graber runs Cyberwise and Cyber Civics. For several years she's taught middle-schoolers digital literacy, digital citizenship, and the safe and responsible use of digital tools. She's also a parent. I read this to learn more about digital parenting, for my website Defending Digital. Note: This page contains affiliate links. Please see Affiliate Disclosure. Notes Introduction: Left to Their Own Devices Tech education for kids primarily focuses on warning of dangers, rather than preparing for positive experiences. Empower them to use tech well. How to decide if your child is ready for a connected device 1. Has child developed social and emotional skills necessary to use device wisely? 2. Does child know how to manage their online reputation? 3. Does child know how to unplug? 4. Does child know how to make and maintain safe, healthy relationships? 5. Does child know how to protect their privacy and personal info? 6. Does child know how to think critically about online info? 7. Is child equipped to be a digital leader, using tech positively? A Digital Journey Begins There's no long-term data on impact of digital devices (phones, tablets, etc.) on kids. The more TV a child watches between ages 1 and 3, the greater likelihood that child will develop attention problems by age 7. Every additional hour of TV watched per day increases risk of attention problems by 10%. Preschoolers who first watch 9 minutes of a fast-paced cartoon perform significantly worse on tasks that require attention than kids who first spend 20 minutes drawing. Screens have mostly negative effects on children 2 and under, particularly related to language development and executive function. Interactive tech may be better for kids than TV/video, especially live video interaction with humans. Huge increase in ADHD diagnoses may be due to use of screens. Guidelines from Children and Screens 1. Set boundaries. Limit exposure to very young children. Make bedrooms media-free. 2. Monitor use, behavior, content. Block inappropriate content. Watch and play video games with kids. Keep electronic media in public places. Talk to parents of children's friends about what your children do in their homes. 3. Be clear about acceptable behavior. Establish and enforce house rules about screen time. Don't let media interfere in family relationships. 4. Engage and lead by example. Obey your house rules. Learning to Be Human There are no credible research studies that show that a child exposed to more tech early in life has better educational outcomes than a tech-free kid. Kids whose parents actively guided their kids online end up having the healthiest and most balanced relationships with tech. Kids whose parents minimized their use of tech end up engaging in problematic behaviors (access porn, post rude or hostile comments, impersonate someone, etc.). Reputation 68% of colleges say looking at applicants' social media profiles is fair game. Nearly 90% of colleges say they've revoked a student's offer based on something found online. Of admissions officers who check prospective students' social media, 47% say they found info that gave a positive impression. Most kids can start thinking logically and ethically around ages 12-13, but some parts of brain aren't fully functional until age 25. One of last areas to mature is prefrontal cortex, largely responsible for rational thought and good judgment. Teens process info with their amygdala (emotions). Design your digital billboard activity 1. Tell children to think of their digital reputation as a billboard that anyone can see. It shows everything they post, or that others post about them. 2. Let children think about what they want billboard to say. 3. Draw blank billboard and have kids fill it with images and info they want displayed about themselves in 10 years. Screen Time AAP screen time recommendations • Under 18 mos: Avoid all screen media, other than video chat. • 18-24 mos: If you want to introduce digital media, watch high-quality programs with children. • 2-5 years: Watch up to 1 hr/day of high-quality programs with children. • 6+ years: Put limits on time spent on media, and types of media. Ensure media doesn't replace sleep, physical activity, other healthy behaviors. Have media-free times together, and media-free places (such as bedrooms). Discuss online citizenship and safety. Parental control software (aff. links) • Mobicip • Family Zone • Surfie • Net Nanny • Bark • Circle • Qustodio Many devices have parental controls pre-installed (iPhone, Android, Mac, Windows, etc.). Relationships Cyberbullying is online, intentional, repeated, and harmful. Not all unkind activity fits this definition. Sending nudes and other sexually explicit messages (sexting) of minors, even between consenting kids, is illegal in most states. Nudes of minors are technically child pornography. Kids can be charged for receiving nudes, as it's considered child porn. Kids charged with creation, possession, or distribution of child porn could do jail time and need to register as sex offenders. Most states don't have laws specifically about sending nudes, so it falls under existing child porn laws. If a child receives a nude or semi-nude photo of a minor, they should immediately delete it and not tell anyone about it. If they're asked, they should say they received it, but immediately deleted it. Cyberbullying Research Center has research and resources for cyberbullying prevention and response. STOMP Out Bullying has cyberbullying resources and live chat. How to talk about sending nudes (sexting) 1. Define sexting (sending, receiving, forwarding sexually explicit or suggestive images, messages, video). Explain that sending sexts of or between minors is a crime in most states. Look up laws in your state. 2. Tell them not to send or ask for nudes. 3. Tell them to delete any nudes they receive. 4. Tell them to speak up if they find out about nudes being circulated. Tell them to first tell the person whose image it is. 5. Explain that once a message is sent, it can't be taken back. 6. Share a cautionary tale and ask questions about what they'd do in that situation. How to handle cyberbullying 1. Take screenshot of evidence. 2. Block and report bully. 3. Talk to trusted adult or STOMP Out Bullying HelpChat Line about anything that makes them uncomfortable. Inform service provider about bullying. Privacy Tell your kids they should never meet someone in real life that they first met online. Thinking Critically Teach kids to think critically online • Search effectively and analyze search results. • Understand how Wikipedia works. • Understand copyright laws and plagiarism. • Stay out of filter bubbles. • Cite online sources. Detecting CRAP online • Currency: How recently was it posted? Has it been updated? • Reliability: How reliable is the info? Are there references or sources? • Author: Who's the creator of the info? What are their credentials? Who's the publisher or sponsor? • Purpose, point of view: What's the purpose (inform, entertain, persuade)? Does it sound like fact or opinion? Is creator biased? Is creator trying to sell something? Media Bias/Fact Check exposes media bias and deceptive news practices. Encourage media participation (creation, curation, etc.) versus consumption. Questions to ask about media use • Did you spend more time producing or consuming? • What did you produce? • What skills did you use? • In what ways can you produce more and consume less in the future? Shift focus from amount of time spent online to positive use of time spent online. Digital Leadership Celebrate and empower good use of tech, rather than focusing on bad. Don't think you can't help your kids with online issues because you're not tech-savvy. Most of the issues kids face with tech aren't tech issues, they're social issues, which you can help with.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    Took me a while to get through this one--it was assigned for my job and nonfiction, let alone "professional" books are never my first choice is reading material. That said, I highly recommend this book for parents, teachers, and pretty much anyone else. We hear a lot these days about the evils of technology/the internet/social media, especially for kids. What we don't hear nearly enough of are the positives, the wonderful potential for good that humanity, assisted by technology, can accomplish. T Took me a while to get through this one--it was assigned for my job and nonfiction, let alone "professional" books are never my first choice is reading material. That said, I highly recommend this book for parents, teachers, and pretty much anyone else. We hear a lot these days about the evils of technology/the internet/social media, especially for kids. What we don't hear nearly enough of are the positives, the wonderful potential for good that humanity, assisted by technology, can accomplish. This book is a clear-eyed look at both, and how we as parents, teachers, and a society can educate and influence young people to avoid the evils and create the positives.

  5. 4 out of 5

    John Herman

    Straightforward and smart, a must read for parents. Really appreciate that there is no fear mongering in this book, just wise and well thought out reasons for why we need to control our children’s tech usage. A good focus on the fact that our children need to build their social skills before we hand them access to anything and everyone in the world.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I can't say enough about this book. Anyone who is around youth should read this in addition to expectant parents. Thank you Diana-your time spent developing this resource is much appreciated! I can't say enough about this book. Anyone who is around youth should read this in addition to expectant parents. Thank you Diana-your time spent developing this resource is much appreciated!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Hudson

    As an educator teaching middle-school students the basics of “Cyber Civics,” Diana Graber has heard her share of stories where kids get into trouble using technology. Yet she prefers to focus on the positive things that technology brings to young lives and how kids can become digitally literate. It’s a necessary skill she believes will help usher the next generation into using their devices in positive ways while staying safe online. Graber’s book, Raising Humans in a Digital World: Helping Kids As an educator teaching middle-school students the basics of “Cyber Civics,” Diana Graber has heard her share of stories where kids get into trouble using technology. Yet she prefers to focus on the positive things that technology brings to young lives and how kids can become digitally literate. It’s a necessary skill she believes will help usher the next generation into using their devices in positive ways while staying safe online. Graber’s book, Raising Humans in a Digital World: Helping Kids Build a Healthy Relationship with Technology, provides guidance for parents who are not sure what to do about such things as setting limits on screen time, delaying social media activity, nurturing relationships both on and offline, and more. She suggests activities parents can do with their kids to help them learn some of the same concepts she teaches. She also suggests responses to clear problems like online bullying, fake news, privacy, and other concerns that come along with using many of the popular applications. Graber’s suggestions provide a great primer for parents on how to guide their children on using technology in a positive way while avoiding some of the major pitfalls. I can also see it being used by educators who want to advocate for digital literacy training in their schools. The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    It’s essentially required reading as a parent. And where the book leaves one with numerous nuggets of wisdom, chapters are long and in some cases quite sterile or medicinal. Fear can be strummed up in the pages, but at least the content diffuses ignorance. And there is always a thread of looking for the positive.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Alvarez

    As a mother of three (two are teenagers), I found the tips in this book invaluable. Smartphones and digital streaming and social media are here to stay. In fact, it is difficult to avoid the technology even if you want to. There is an app for everything--for students, community sports teams, fundraising, car insurance, travel, shopping--apps make everything easier but they require a plugged-in device, and that plugged-in device is Pandora's box. What we need now is education about how to use thi As a mother of three (two are teenagers), I found the tips in this book invaluable. Smartphones and digital streaming and social media are here to stay. In fact, it is difficult to avoid the technology even if you want to. There is an app for everything--for students, community sports teams, fundraising, car insurance, travel, shopping--apps make everything easier but they require a plugged-in device, and that plugged-in device is Pandora's box. What we need now is education about how to use this technology and how to set boundaries. It can be a wonderfully creative tool but also a mental health disaster and hunting ground for predators. There is no right way to approach it, rather many paths based upon age, personality, and needs. This timely book understands the advantages and disadvantages of a digital world and works to help kids develop a healthy relationship with said world. It is incredibly informative, relevant, and compassionate. A must-read for families and educators! Review based upon advance copy from the publisher.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sue Scheff

    Armed with digital empowerment for anyone raising connected kids. Raising Humans in a Digital World is challenging - however when CyberCivic's teacher Diana Graber shares her journey, it's not in high-tech fashion, this book is relatable to parents, teachers and adults that work with young people today that are digitally connected (which is the majority of them). Full of first-hand stories, straight from the mouths of students (and backed-up with research) - we finally are able to understand why s Armed with digital empowerment for anyone raising connected kids. Raising Humans in a Digital World is challenging - however when CyberCivic's teacher Diana Graber shares her journey, it's not in high-tech fashion, this book is relatable to parents, teachers and adults that work with young people today that are digitally connected (which is the majority of them). Full of first-hand stories, straight from the mouths of students (and backed-up with research) - we finally are able to understand why some parenting tips and tricks work - and some don't. Diana shares what tweens and teens are really thinking (and doing) - and talks about how we can work with them - not against them and learn from each other. This is a timeless book that you will find yourself re-reading - highlighting and constantly going back to. Refer it to friend, but keep it for yourself.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stevo Brock

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of January, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1... This book was a Best of the Best for the month of January, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I didn't find this revelatory or anything, but it is a helpful overview of Important Conversations To Have with kids about technology use, including both the dangers we need to be aware of and ways kids can learn about citizenship that apply to real life as well as online. Some of the author's suggestions and examples were really useful, such as the idea that you should name what you're doing with your screens when you use them in front of very small children - a good suggestion, in my opinion, I didn't find this revelatory or anything, but it is a helpful overview of Important Conversations To Have with kids about technology use, including both the dangers we need to be aware of and ways kids can learn about citizenship that apply to real life as well as online. Some of the author's suggestions and examples were really useful, such as the idea that you should name what you're doing with your screens when you use them in front of very small children - a good suggestion, in my opinion, because it provides some context and information about where your attention is for the sake of the child (who might otherwise just see it as sort of black hole into which our attention is drawn) and because it forces a certain amount of accountability for the adult about the usefulness (or lack thereof) of what we're doing. The author isn't anti-technology, which is important, though sometimes the rhetoric borders on feeling just a little bit hand-wring-y to me. Mostly though, the concerns are legitimate concerns we all have to contend with and have an approach for, and it's helpful for that.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Finally a Relatable "Home Improvement" Guide for Families! Diana Graber has created one of the most down-to-earth, relatable and necessary parenting books I’ve come across in a long time! Her user-friendly approach to raising kids in a digital world is like reading through a home-improvement guide for families. Instead of being bogged down with long, scientific jargon, Diana uses relatable, real life examples and solutions to connect families with the vital skills needed to a build a healthy foun Finally a Relatable "Home Improvement" Guide for Families! Diana Graber has created one of the most down-to-earth, relatable and necessary parenting books I’ve come across in a long time! Her user-friendly approach to raising kids in a digital world is like reading through a home-improvement guide for families. Instead of being bogged down with long, scientific jargon, Diana uses relatable, real life examples and solutions to connect families with the vital skills needed to a build a healthy foundation of responsible tech in their lives. Her education and wealth of experience as a parent and educator are fortified by expert commentary from some of the most notable thought leaders in the field. Timely and accessible, it’s a perfect read for anyone who cares about how to manage the costs and benefits of tech use by their kids in a positive and proactive manner.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rafael Ramirez

    Libro de lectura obligada para todos los papás que quieran ayudar a sus hijos a hacer un uso positivo de las tecnologías digitales. Un mensaje fundamental es que el comportamiento de nuestros hijos en sus interacciones en línea será un reflejo de cómo los educamos en general, especialmente en temas de autocontrol y respeto a los demás. Este es un libro práctico con muchos consejos y ejemplos concretos. Llama la atención que los expertos en tecnología sugieran que no se les de ningún tipo de pant Libro de lectura obligada para todos los papás que quieran ayudar a sus hijos a hacer un uso positivo de las tecnologías digitales. Un mensaje fundamental es que el comportamiento de nuestros hijos en sus interacciones en línea será un reflejo de cómo los educamos en general, especialmente en temas de autocontrol y respeto a los demás. Este es un libro práctico con muchos consejos y ejemplos concretos. Llama la atención que los expertos en tecnología sugieran que no se les de ningún tipo de pantalla a los menores de 2 años y que su uso sea limitado y supervisado de cerca por lo menos hasta la pre-adolescencia. Y, por supuesto, tener muy presente que lo primero que deben hacer los papás es dejar un momento sus propias pantallas y ponerle más atención a sus hijos!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Genes2Teens

    The safest approach is for parents to deny access to devices, streaming, and social media. But isn’t that shortsighted? Diana Graber suggests that this only serves to deny your child the possibility to thrive in a connected world. Adults are equally, if not more, disengaged and complicit. This book aims at helping kids nurture a healthy relationship with the saturated world of technology, instead of denying them that opportunity. It's a must read for anyone raising our wonderful digital natives! The safest approach is for parents to deny access to devices, streaming, and social media. But isn’t that shortsighted? Diana Graber suggests that this only serves to deny your child the possibility to thrive in a connected world. Adults are equally, if not more, disengaged and complicit. This book aims at helping kids nurture a healthy relationship with the saturated world of technology, instead of denying them that opportunity. It's a must read for anyone raising our wonderful digital natives! My full review is here https://genes2teens.com/parenting-in-...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    1) Necessary 2) Sensible 3) Encouraging Enjoyment: 3 This book advocates for the need of robust digital literacy skills particularly for our younger generations. Graber shares invaluable insights, stories, and curriculum ideas to offer expert practical tools and advice. Her criticism of social media remains balanced and extremely fair - Graber's respect and enthusiasm for technology is apparent, as well as her compassionate concern for youth to be empowered and not victimized by their relationship 1) Necessary 2) Sensible 3) Encouraging Enjoyment: 3 This book advocates for the need of robust digital literacy skills particularly for our younger generations. Graber shares invaluable insights, stories, and curriculum ideas to offer expert practical tools and advice. Her criticism of social media remains balanced and extremely fair - Graber's respect and enthusiasm for technology is apparent, as well as her compassionate concern for youth to be empowered and not victimized by their relationship with technology. Contains a substantial Endnotes section, citing articles, websites, and other resources.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Speer

    Most parents (myself included) are worried about how to guide and keep their kids safe online. This book is the perfect answer. Filled with facts, insights, and tips, Raising Humans in a Digital World gives parents the knowledge to navigate the world of screens and screentime. As the founder of the school program CyberCivics, Graber users her teaching experience and understanding of devices to distill this complicated new world. After reading this book, I feel informed and inspired to help my ki Most parents (myself included) are worried about how to guide and keep their kids safe online. This book is the perfect answer. Filled with facts, insights, and tips, Raising Humans in a Digital World gives parents the knowledge to navigate the world of screens and screentime. As the founder of the school program CyberCivics, Graber users her teaching experience and understanding of devices to distill this complicated new world. After reading this book, I feel informed and inspired to help my kids learn to be good digital citizens and stay safe.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    This was required reading this year in my media specialist cohort. It's an easy and insightful read for someone in this field. Random parents would also enjoy it because it promotes family communication and basic human life skills as the basically two number one requisites for healthy usage of digital paraphernalia. I've been teaching this stuff for eight years and still got a lot out of it. Recommended for anyone with kids. This was required reading this year in my media specialist cohort. It's an easy and insightful read for someone in this field. Random parents would also enjoy it because it promotes family communication and basic human life skills as the basically two number one requisites for healthy usage of digital paraphernalia. I've been teaching this stuff for eight years and still got a lot out of it. Recommended for anyone with kids.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lori Simpson

    There were some really good topics in this book to discuss with your children. Also to see if their school is teaching any kind of cyber civics, which is going to influence their lives as much as the traditional academics. I found this refreshing because its main objective was not to make parents feel guilty, but to educate us and our children how to navigate the digital world that is not going away. Also points out some of the good that comes out of technology.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This was insightful and gave me lots of food for thought. It inspired me to have lots of conversations with Kevin and the kids about all of our internet use as well as my presence on social media in relation to their lives.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Birdsall

    This is billed as a parenting book, and it’s a valuable one. However, I also highly recommend it for school administrators, digital learning leaders, and teachers. We all must work together to help kids/students know how to be good, kind, and happy online and off.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Smith

    It was a good book that I'll likely consult again but it wasn't what I thought it would be. Not really the book's fault. It was a good book that I'll likely consult again but it wasn't what I thought it would be. Not really the book's fault.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Linda Shapiro

    This book gives excellent advice for parents about how to harness the benefits of technology and how to minimize the negative aspects of technology. I highly recommend this book for all parents.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marmot

    Good practical book for introducing your kids to technology in an intentional manner. I liked the activities to do together.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dion

    As a mother of three teenager, I found the tips in this book invaluable. Smartphones and digital streaming and YouTube are here to stay. In fact, it is difficult to avoid the technology even if you want to. There is an app for everything--for students, community sports teams, fundraising, car insurance, travel, shopping. Technology can be a wonderfully creative tool but also a mental health disaster. Kids/adults are so concerned about how many likes they get our keeping up with their friends. Dia As a mother of three teenager, I found the tips in this book invaluable. Smartphones and digital streaming and YouTube are here to stay. In fact, it is difficult to avoid the technology even if you want to. There is an app for everything--for students, community sports teams, fundraising, car insurance, travel, shopping. Technology can be a wonderfully creative tool but also a mental health disaster. Kids/adults are so concerned about how many likes they get our keeping up with their friends. Diana explains very well the complex world of technology and how it affects our kids,our schools and our family life. She offers tools and tips on having a healthy relationship with technology and being a good digital citizen.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex Chapman

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gillian

  28. 4 out of 5

    Audra Socinski

  29. 4 out of 5

    TEELOCK Mithilesh

  30. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Schwartz

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