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A breathtaking discovery at the top of the world . . . A terrifying collision between modern science and Native American legend . . . An electrifying new thriller from New York Times bestselling author Lincoln Child. Two hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle lies Alaska's Federal Wildlife Zone, one of the most remote and inhospitable places on Earth. But for paleoecologis A breathtaking discovery at the top of the world . . . A terrifying collision between modern science and Native American legend . . . An electrifying new thriller from New York Times bestselling author Lincoln Child. Two hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle lies Alaska's Federal Wildlife Zone, one of the most remote and inhospitable places on Earth. But for paleoecologist Evan Marshall and a small group of fellow scientists, an expedition to the Zone represents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to study the effects of global warming. Everything about the expedition changes, however, with an astonishing find. On a routine exploration of a glacial ice cave, the group discovers an enormous ancient animal, encased in solid ice. The media conglomerate sponsoring their research immediately intervenes and arranges the ultimate spectacle; the creature will be cut from the ice, thawed, and revealed live on television. Despite dire warnings from the local Native American village, and the scientific concerns of Marshall and his team, the docudrama plows ahead . . . until the scientists make one more horrifying discovery. The beast is no regular specimen; it may be an ancient killing machine. And they may be premature in believing it dead. In this riveting new thriller, Lincoln Child weaves together a stunning Arctic landscape, a terrifying mythic creature, and a pervasive mood of chaos—and fear. With Terminal Freeze, Child demonstrates why he has become a major bestselling author, and why his novels electrify and enthrall so many.


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A breathtaking discovery at the top of the world . . . A terrifying collision between modern science and Native American legend . . . An electrifying new thriller from New York Times bestselling author Lincoln Child. Two hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle lies Alaska's Federal Wildlife Zone, one of the most remote and inhospitable places on Earth. But for paleoecologis A breathtaking discovery at the top of the world . . . A terrifying collision between modern science and Native American legend . . . An electrifying new thriller from New York Times bestselling author Lincoln Child. Two hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle lies Alaska's Federal Wildlife Zone, one of the most remote and inhospitable places on Earth. But for paleoecologist Evan Marshall and a small group of fellow scientists, an expedition to the Zone represents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to study the effects of global warming. Everything about the expedition changes, however, with an astonishing find. On a routine exploration of a glacial ice cave, the group discovers an enormous ancient animal, encased in solid ice. The media conglomerate sponsoring their research immediately intervenes and arranges the ultimate spectacle; the creature will be cut from the ice, thawed, and revealed live on television. Despite dire warnings from the local Native American village, and the scientific concerns of Marshall and his team, the docudrama plows ahead . . . until the scientists make one more horrifying discovery. The beast is no regular specimen; it may be an ancient killing machine. And they may be premature in believing it dead. In this riveting new thriller, Lincoln Child weaves together a stunning Arctic landscape, a terrifying mythic creature, and a pervasive mood of chaos—and fear. With Terminal Freeze, Child demonstrates why he has become a major bestselling author, and why his novels electrify and enthrall so many.

30 review for Terminal Freeze

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nick Borrelli

    Lincoln Child is my go-to author for techno-thrillers now that Michael Crichton is no longer with us. The guy can simply do not wrong in my eyes. Fast-paced, tight story, archeological mystery, it's all there. This one was no exception. A saber tooth tiger is found frozen in the ice on a military base in Alaska. The fun just takes off from there. Great stuff and I devoured it in three days. Lincoln Child is my go-to author for techno-thrillers now that Michael Crichton is no longer with us. The guy can simply do not wrong in my eyes. Fast-paced, tight story, archeological mystery, it's all there. This one was no exception. A saber tooth tiger is found frozen in the ice on a military base in Alaska. The fun just takes off from there. Great stuff and I devoured it in three days.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    This was a little 'blah' for me. But I think I don't care for monster stories. I don't like twiddling my fingers and waiting for characters to be picked off by the monster. I also didn't like how predictable it was for who would die. It was like Child was mainly killing off the jerky characters. While I am not saying that I want to see likable characters killed off, it seems too calculated to establish a character as a putz and then kill them off. It was a bit sadistic of the author, quite frank This was a little 'blah' for me. But I think I don't care for monster stories. I don't like twiddling my fingers and waiting for characters to be picked off by the monster. I also didn't like how predictable it was for who would die. It was like Child was mainly killing off the jerky characters. While I am not saying that I want to see likable characters killed off, it seems too calculated to establish a character as a putz and then kill them off. It was a bit sadistic of the author, quite frankly. Also, there were characters I didn't know if they made it at the end of the book. Honestly though, I wasn't too sad about one of the characters who got eaten. That's terrible of me, I realize it. I did like the descriptions of the frozen North a lot, but that's because I love cold weather and winter settings. I live in Texas, so I don't get nearly enough 'winter.' When I feel hot and I really miss winter, I even day dream about there being a good two feet of snow on the ground and playing in the snow. That crunching sound it makes when it's a newly fallen powder. Yup, that's how much I love winter and snow. Probably my favorite part of this book was the look at winter as a brutal adversary in itself. Now that I could get behind. My favorite part was when the refugees from Camp Fear had to drive across two ice lakes. That was fascinating and it was probably the most exciting moments of the story. I didn't quite like the concept of the predator itself. It never came together as concretely as it should have. Also, some characters who had promise were underutilized. Logan promised to be an intriguing character, but he was barely in the book. Also, Marshall didn't have much charisma as a lead. Considering his tragic past, I think he didn't have his fears challenged enough in the long run. Usuguk felt a bit one-dimensional to me. The native shaman who provides spiritual/cultural background for the story. I think this book is a low three stars for me. I rarely give under 3 stars, so getting a three isn't a compliment per se. It's more like saying it's a blah book that didn't offend me enough or I didn't dislike enough to rate lower. It wasn't a bad book, by any means. Just mediocre. I am thankful for the suggestion to read this for our Action/Adventure Aficionados group read. It was pretty listenable as an audiobook. I am grateful that I found it at my library in audiobook, but I don't think I could have committed to finishing this in print. It just didn't get me excited enough.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marvin

    Lincoln Child is better known for the horror centered Pengergast series on which he collaborated with Douglas Preston. Terminal Freeze is one of Child's solo novels but is still dead center in the genre of modern techno-horror. It is a light read, aka supermarket bestseller, aka airplane novel, aka summer read, aka any somewhat derogatory label you want to give a book that is purely for entertainment value and will be forgotten about two days later. That's isn't to say it is not fun. It is the l Lincoln Child is better known for the horror centered Pengergast series on which he collaborated with Douglas Preston. Terminal Freeze is one of Child's solo novels but is still dead center in the genre of modern techno-horror. It is a light read, aka supermarket bestseller, aka airplane novel, aka summer read, aka any somewhat derogatory label you want to give a book that is purely for entertainment value and will be forgotten about two days later. That's isn't to say it is not fun. It is the literary equivalent of Twinkies. But I did enjoy it for what it was. This fun romp takes place in the wintery cold regions of the Alaskan wilderness and involves a monster frozen in ice. It is not a spoiler to tell you it doesn't remain frozen for long. I can't help wondering if the author was giving a nod and a wink to the classic sci-fi story Who Goes There by John Campbell although their monsters are quite different. Lots of mayhem takes place with tut tutting native Americans, bewildered scientists, an evil film crew, and a troop of semi-competent military types that might well have been wearing red shirts from a Star Trek TV set... Yes, there's a bloodbath and bad decisions (why oh why do smart men and women think it is a really great idea to split up and explore all those corners the monster might be hiding?) and questionable science...everything you want in a guilty pleasure. So I'm going to give this a very generous three stars and give it a shaky recommendation for those who like literary Twinkies.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    'Testost(erone) tosh' is self-evidently the male version of chick-lit and I must admit I much prefer the manly rubbish compared to the entirely unpalatable (IMHO) female polemic. This genre is always fast, furious, vicious and improbable - wonderful comfort reads. 'Testost(erone) tosh' is self-evidently the male version of chick-lit and I must admit I much prefer the manly rubbish compared to the entirely unpalatable (IMHO) female polemic. This genre is always fast, furious, vicious and improbable - wonderful comfort reads.

  5. 5 out of 5

    WendyB

    Reminded me a little bit of The Thing. Fun creature feature. Loved the ending.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Freda Malone

    Top of the world, Alaska. Scientist and military make a base for an experiment 50 years ago, find the creature 'it', science team gets brutally mutilated, base shuts down. 50 years later, another science team re-opens the base, finds 'it' AGAIN and the science teams gets picked off one by one again, or until someone figures out how to kill 'it'. Yada, yada, yada. Jeremy Logan was NOT the main character in this one and it was like 'huh'?? His reason for being at the base went way over my head and Top of the world, Alaska. Scientist and military make a base for an experiment 50 years ago, find the creature 'it', science team gets brutally mutilated, base shuts down. 50 years later, another science team re-opens the base, finds 'it' AGAIN and the science teams gets picked off one by one again, or until someone figures out how to kill 'it'. Yada, yada, yada. Jeremy Logan was NOT the main character in this one and it was like 'huh'?? His reason for being at the base went way over my head and I couldn't figure it out. The evacuation of the civilians by an ice road semi trucker was more thrilling and scary than what was actually happening at the base. The first book in this series really had me excited about getting back to Jeremy Logan but not sure I want to pick up the next book in this series. Blah. I finished it only to add it as an easy addition to my yearly book challenge.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    This was pants. Truly crap. Basically Lincoln Child has re-written Relic, (a book I really like) his début with Douglas Preston but set in a frozen army base rather than the New York Natural History Museum. He's also sapped any sense of excitement, mystery or threat. Everything is telegraphed from miles away and there are no twists that catch you, no surprises, no subtlety and not much of interest. Purely a by the numbers creature feature wrapped up in some pseudoscience. To add insult to injury This was pants. Truly crap. Basically Lincoln Child has re-written Relic, (a book I really like) his début with Douglas Preston but set in a frozen army base rather than the New York Natural History Museum. He's also sapped any sense of excitement, mystery or threat. Everything is telegraphed from miles away and there are no twists that catch you, no surprises, no subtlety and not much of interest. Purely a by the numbers creature feature wrapped up in some pseudoscience. To add insult to injury the creature physically appears to be the same as the Kothoga/Mbwun (with a few small quirks) and he even draws attention to it by mentioning Dr Frock and the Callisto Effect (which makes it worse as if you've read Relic it's starkly obvious how any of them could kill it with the huge forward facing eyes...). Plus, we get stuck with some stock characters and an hysterically clichéd Italian documentary maker. Sigh. Where's the creativity? Despite a very slow start and build up, I was starting to warm up to it but then things just went further south. "Goose the decibels" started it off followed by the moment the creature's vast leap forward was instantly arrested by a mid-air seizure - basic laws of physics anyone? You don't suddenly drop to the floor if you've already leapt just because of a seizure. You may land badly... Anyway, nitpicking. If you get to the end and are particularly forgetful the main surviving characters helpfully present and explain the plot to you as an epilogue. Bad. Looking around it seems some of his other solo books are a lot better so maybe this was a poor choice. I just love creature features. Really, I just want to be able to read Jurassic Park for the first time again. Sigh...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Devon

    Holy macaroni, but this was a really good book. It happens in Alaska's Federal Wilderness Zone. They are studying the mounting effeccts of climate change at the base of a glacier when they discover an enormous pre-historic animal encased in ice. The local villagers (a fair ways away, actually) tell them not to disturb it, no, no, leave, you fools or you will die, die, aaaahhhaaaa. But they don't leave. Many die. aaaahhhaaaa, And the afterthought is just.... creepy. Holy macaroni, but this was a really good book. It happens in Alaska's Federal Wilderness Zone. They are studying the mounting effeccts of climate change at the base of a glacier when they discover an enormous pre-historic animal encased in ice. The local villagers (a fair ways away, actually) tell them not to disturb it, no, no, leave, you fools or you will die, die, aaaahhhaaaa. But they don't leave. Many die. aaaahhhaaaa, And the afterthought is just.... creepy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Terri ♥ (aka Mrs. Christian Grey)

    I had a sense of deja vu while reading. I think I may have listened to this years before I started on GRs? Maybe not. Maybe it sounded like another story? IDK All I can say is I never felt that thriller on the edge of your seat moments. So I must have read. It’s not the story which was good. I’m not really sure why this series is named after Logan. His presence was fleeting. Overall, good read. The narrator was really good but hardly modulated his voices for men and women making it hard to tell who I had a sense of deja vu while reading. I think I may have listened to this years before I started on GRs? Maybe not. Maybe it sounded like another story? IDK All I can say is I never felt that thriller on the edge of your seat moments. So I must have read. It’s not the story which was good. I’m not really sure why this series is named after Logan. His presence was fleeting. Overall, good read. The narrator was really good but hardly modulated his voices for men and women making it hard to tell who was talking in a conversation without dialogue tags or characters context to know who was speaking.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael Adamchuk

    Scientists studying global warming at a remote outpost in the Arctic discover an animal frozen in the ice. When they inform the media company that is sponsoring the research, the execs take control. they want to thaw it out in a controlled environment on live TV. The scientists and a local Shaman who was involved in earlier exploration at the same base a warning against it. When the animal thaws out, their fears are realized. A quick read, pretty predictable, but enjoyable.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lorrie

    This was my 2nd Jeremy Logan story, I think, maybe 3rd. Just the thought of being in a 20 degree below zero environment freaks me completely out--not to mention a thawed "thing". Jeremy didn't have a lot of time to think about his wife in this story! This was my 2nd Jeremy Logan story, I think, maybe 3rd. Just the thought of being in a 20 degree below zero environment freaks me completely out--not to mention a thawed "thing". Jeremy didn't have a lot of time to think about his wife in this story!

  12. 4 out of 5

    itchy

    read this is a daze (had to travel a lot lately, plus multiple instances of waiting in line); understood the general flow of the story, not enough to critique it, though; i must say that logan chap's a lot less frisky than their (him and preston) other heroes i do hope to see the aurora borealis for real someday read this is a daze (had to travel a lot lately, plus multiple instances of waiting in line); understood the general flow of the story, not enough to critique it, though; i must say that logan chap's a lot less frisky than their (him and preston) other heroes i do hope to see the aurora borealis for real someday

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dagny

    Not a favorite of his, but a good enough read and action packed, especially near the end. It has an interesting premise and left the door open for a sequel.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    This book wasn't bad. I gave it four stars instead of three because I didn't want to discourage a fan of this author from reading it. This reads a bit like any arctic monster story ever written, and is more plot driven than character driven. Jeremy Logan almost seems like background material rather than a main character. He appears, wanders around bit, gives some opinions, but doesn't really involve himself much at all. The characters that are new are fairly well developed despite the size of th This book wasn't bad. I gave it four stars instead of three because I didn't want to discourage a fan of this author from reading it. This reads a bit like any arctic monster story ever written, and is more plot driven than character driven. Jeremy Logan almost seems like background material rather than a main character. He appears, wanders around bit, gives some opinions, but doesn't really involve himself much at all. The characters that are new are fairly well developed despite the size of the book and the amount of space needed to accommodate the action- this is a very action driven plot. Despite all of the short comings and although I typically prefer character driven material, I like the author and I like this book. While not awe inspiring, this series has been consistently entertaining. 3.5 stars

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    After impressing me with Deep Storm last year, Lincoln Child sort of missed the boat with Terminal Freeze. While there was nothing bad about it, it suffered from being a retread of Relic, Child's thriller debut with Douglas Preston. He even seems to recognize this when he refers to Frock and his Callisto Effect theory. Swap out Relic's natural history museum for a military base in Alaska, change some character names and throw in a documentary team from a television channel, and you've got Termin After impressing me with Deep Storm last year, Lincoln Child sort of missed the boat with Terminal Freeze. While there was nothing bad about it, it suffered from being a retread of Relic, Child's thriller debut with Douglas Preston. He even seems to recognize this when he refers to Frock and his Callisto Effect theory. Swap out Relic's natural history museum for a military base in Alaska, change some character names and throw in a documentary team from a television channel, and you've got Terminal Freeze. Creativity isn't terribly high on my list of requirements for a good book, so this isn't the whole of my complaints. As long as a book is well-written and has interesting characters, I tend to overlook the fact that it doesn't bring anything new to the table. Terminal Freeze, however, lacks the punch and pizazz that Relic and other Preston/Child books have. It is completely without any element of surprise. I heartily recommend not reading any synopsis, including the book jacket's inside flap, because it lays out the entire plot. There aren't any game-changers, no moments of "Ah ha, gotcha!" After Child did such a good job taking Deep Storm in an unforeseen direction several times, I'm really disappointed he didn't do that here. The next Preston/Child collaboration is out in two months, and I'm hoping that it's more interesting than this one was.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Vocat

    Yes, I like stories that take place in the stone cold, eerie north. This book is reasonably well written. There are many interesting and flawed, likable and unlikable characters. But too soon it was all too easy to figure out, what was going to happen next. It was still entertaining to find out, whether I was right or not (Btw. I was.). Only the ending was aggravating: overwritten, and consisting mostly of blood and gore. Nothing wrong with that, but it left too many questions open. (view spoiler Yes, I like stories that take place in the stone cold, eerie north. This book is reasonably well written. There are many interesting and flawed, likable and unlikable characters. But too soon it was all too easy to figure out, what was going to happen next. It was still entertaining to find out, whether I was right or not (Btw. I was.). Only the ending was aggravating: overwritten, and consisting mostly of blood and gore. Nothing wrong with that, but it left too many questions open. (view spoiler)[ I could not figure out, for the life of me, what happened to Wolfe, the TV representative? It kept bothering me for days. And how exactly did the characters get their hearing back in the end? Shaman Magic? And why was Logan there? His contributions to the story were dubious and few. As far as I remember, the events in the book took place in the summer months above the Arctic Circle, when the sun basically never sets. So how exactly were the characters able to see the red northern lights at nighttime without actual darkness? Now that's supernatural. And oh, this one amused me greatly: why can’t the soldiers or the guys with some sort of military training, remember to not drop their weapons when they face the enemy. It’s okay if this happens once, but if almost everyone who is toting weapons in this book suffers from the butterfingers syndrome I call cheap plot device. Yeah, and thing with the supernatural monster is never truly resolved or explained, not that it matters, it is dead anyways, or not. (No, I won’t be reading the sequel.) (hide spoiler)]

  17. 4 out of 5

    Traci Haley

    There's nothing better than a good adventure-horror-sci-fi novel... there's something comforting in the predictability of some of the plot points: Take a group of scientists, mucking about in something they shouldn't (in this case, unearthing a large creature frozen in ice and thawing it out), in a remote location (a remote Alaskan glacier), throw in something evil (large, man-eating creature, possibly prehistoric), a few stupid characters (a filmmaker who stops at nothing to get the perfect sho There's nothing better than a good adventure-horror-sci-fi novel... there's something comforting in the predictability of some of the plot points: Take a group of scientists, mucking about in something they shouldn't (in this case, unearthing a large creature frozen in ice and thawing it out), in a remote location (a remote Alaskan glacier), throw in something evil (large, man-eating creature, possibly prehistoric), a few stupid characters (a filmmaker who stops at nothing to get the perfect shot for his documentary AND an uncaring reality TV host caught in her own celebrity), and you're sure to have a fun, bloodthirsty time as the body count grows. Of course, you'll also have the brave hero who plots the escape route (in this case, an ice road trucker who wears hawaiian shirts in subzero temps) AND the other brave hero who figures out how to defeat the evil creature AND woo the SMART female character who manages to not get herself killed. Yup, yup... all there... Lincoln Child's latest thriller, while not the next great Pulitzer winner, had all the necessary plot points to entertain for a fair amount of time. If you're a fan -- or if you have thus far avoided the adv-horror-sci-fi genre altogether -- I'd say give it a whirl.

  18. 5 out of 5

    C.J.

    I am somewhat biased because I am a huge Preston / Child fan. Their prose really resonates with me and I enjoy the experience of reading their words. This book was not my favorite of their works. The exploration of the arctic and the assembly of the documentary crew, the scientists, the military and the Tunit shaman made for an interesting cast of characters. I read this book more quickly than many other thrilers that I read and this is a huge gauge for me as to how much I enjoy a book. As much I am somewhat biased because I am a huge Preston / Child fan. Their prose really resonates with me and I enjoy the experience of reading their words. This book was not my favorite of their works. The exploration of the arctic and the assembly of the documentary crew, the scientists, the military and the Tunit shaman made for an interesting cast of characters. I read this book more quickly than many other thrilers that I read and this is a huge gauge for me as to how much I enjoy a book. As much as I love Child's writing, something about this story left me wanting more. The technology and the history of the military base made interesting backstory, but in the end the work felt a little too predictable (which is my only real criticism.) As always Child delivered an interesting villian, which kept me turning pages to discover its origin and how it could possibly be defeated. I would recommend this book for thriller lovers and especially Preston / Child fans. CJ

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Whoa, what a terrible book! It reads like he was expecting someone to make a movie of the week out of it. But with a really low budget. The monster isn't even partially described until near the tedious long drawn out end of this silly story. "It plays with you! It PLAYYYSSS with YOUUUUU!!!" WTF? Seriously?! Cuz it doesn't. No where in the book. And what was up with the ice road trucker part of the story? It wasn't even part of the story. Just tossed in there because even this ridiculous monster Whoa, what a terrible book! It reads like he was expecting someone to make a movie of the week out of it. But with a really low budget. The monster isn't even partially described until near the tedious long drawn out end of this silly story. "It plays with you! It PLAYYYSSS with YOUUUUU!!!" WTF? Seriously?! Cuz it doesn't. No where in the book. And what was up with the ice road trucker part of the story? It wasn't even part of the story. Just tossed in there because even this ridiculous monster couldn't be expected to eat THAT many people. Had to get the extra people off the military base, right? Oh for Pete's sake...books like this are the reason too many people think they can write. The woman are one dimensional, the men are idiots and the monster? Well, I was hoping he was going to eat everyone. Every. Single. Person. And the author.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Well, maybe not the best story from this author, but a fast and fun "take me away from politics" read nonetheless! Scientists studying global warming two hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle in Alaska's federal Wildlife Zone discover what they believe to be a prehistoric animal in a glacial cave under layers of ice. What they discover is something much more otherworldly. With the help of a Tunit Shaman, remnants of a film documentary crew, military personnel and Doctor Jeremy Logan they mana Well, maybe not the best story from this author, but a fast and fun "take me away from politics" read nonetheless! Scientists studying global warming two hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle in Alaska's federal Wildlife Zone discover what they believe to be a prehistoric animal in a glacial cave under layers of ice. What they discover is something much more otherworldly. With the help of a Tunit Shaman, remnants of a film documentary crew, military personnel and Doctor Jeremy Logan they manage to survive and kill the beast... or do they?

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nelson Pahl

    Intelligent, well-plotted, unique, and captivating. I love Lincoln Child as simply "Lincoln Child," and he certainly doesn't disappoint with Terminal Freeze. I do wonder to where the cat ran off, though. :) Intelligent, well-plotted, unique, and captivating. I love Lincoln Child as simply "Lincoln Child," and he certainly doesn't disappoint with Terminal Freeze. I do wonder to where the cat ran off, though. :)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    Really enjoyed the concept and the Arctic setting, but the characters fell a little flat for me to feel much for their struggles. Still, it's a cool series, and I'll read on. Really enjoyed the concept and the Arctic setting, but the characters fell a little flat for me to feel much for their struggles. Still, it's a cool series, and I'll read on.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    Full Review at Foil the Plot Let’s take a journey, shall we? We’re going to the Alaska Federal Wildlife Zone, one of the most remote and inhospitable places on Earth. Sound like fun? Maybe not for you but for a small band of scientists this is a rare opportunity. Evan Marshall and his fellow researchers are there to study the effects of global warming on a glacier; however, everything changes when they make the discovery of a lifetime encased in the ice. Ready capitalize on the find, the media co Full Review at Foil the Plot Let’s take a journey, shall we? We’re going to the Alaska Federal Wildlife Zone, one of the most remote and inhospitable places on Earth. Sound like fun? Maybe not for you but for a small band of scientists this is a rare opportunity. Evan Marshall and his fellow researchers are there to study the effects of global warming on a glacier; however, everything changes when they make the discovery of a lifetime encased in the ice. Ready capitalize on the find, the media conglomerate sponsoring their research sends up a TV crew to make a documentary of the specimen despite dire warnings from the local Native Americans. The super mega “docudrama” proceeds as planned until a startling discovery comes to light—the creature they found was an ancient killing machine and it very well may not be dead. Before I get too far into my review I must admit, I’m no stranger to the stories of Lincoln Child. I’m a huge fan of the Pendergast Series, co-written with Douglas Preston. In fact, they are some of my all-time favourite books. Somehow Preston and Child manage to take the most ordinary settings—a museum, a small Kansas town, a cruise ship—and make them extraordinary. They do this by juxtaposing the bland locale against a smart combination of eccentric characters, supernatural elements and gripping suspense. Because of this, I’ve come to expect a lot out of Lincoln Child as a stand-alone writer. Let me just put this on the record right now--Terminal Freeze. Did. Not. Disappoint. I listened to the audio version of this book and if you ever have the chance to hear it, DO IT. It’s narrated by the wildly talented, Scott Brick, who also happens to be one of my favourite audiobook readers. Seriously, this guy will blow you away. I don’t doubt that a big part of the reason I enjoyed this book so much was because of his amazeballs narration skills. Another integral reason this book rocked was because of Child’s crafty storytelling. He weaves magic, mystery and science so seamlessly that the unbelievable suddenly becomes very believable. I’ll be the first to admit, I’m no rocket scientist but I’m no stranger to the subject either. Child obviously takes the time to research his facts and he does a wonderful job in weaving it into his fiction so that you, the reader, are able to understand and more importantly, believe that it is real. It almost reminds me of what Michael Crichton did with dino genetics in Jurassic Park. Terminal Freeze introduces us to a slew of personalities ranging from the main protagonist, Evan Marshall, and his team of scientists to the docudrama crew to the military personnel and a even few local tribesman. Normally with this many characters it’s easy to lose track of who is who or even care enough about any one of them. Child has done that tricky thing where distinguishing the main folks from the side-characters is really easy. I guess my only complaint would be that some of the film crew are somewhat stereotyped with the overly dramatic actress to the eccentric director and money-hungry executive producer. Generally speaking though, he strikes a good balance with the sheer volume of people in the book. There's also an inevitable flirtation between Marshall and field producer, Kari Eckberg. I really appreciated the buildup of romantic tension as opposed to the “insta-love” we’re used to seeing in so many novels these days. The relationship is left open-ended and doesn't consume the plot's direction in any way. The best thing about this book is that it is suspenseful and mysterious as a thriller should be! I was on the edge of my seat and couldn’t wait to find out what happened next. I needed to know who lived and who died and exactly how it happened. It might have taken awhile to get to that point but it’s so worth it in the end because it becomes a non-stop thrill ride with chills at every turn! Child painted a very vivid, very scary picture of the creature and if you're a creature feature fan, it put me in mind of John Carpenter's The Thing. At first, I wasn't sure if the murders were due to the beast or if it was one of the crew themselves! It left me guessing and wanting for more through to the very end. Genre success! Rating: 4/5 stars

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katia Arami

    to be honest i was disappointed with this book, i was hoping it would be frightening and a good thriller, but it frankly didn't. its not even comparable with the thrillers of micheal crichton but then again no books compare with micheal crichtons. based on the reviews i was hoping it would keep me up all night with excitement, but it didn't, although i did not put the book down it was merely cause i was bored. some of the things this booked lack were real interesting characters, the main scientis to be honest i was disappointed with this book, i was hoping it would be frightening and a good thriller, but it frankly didn't. its not even comparable with the thrillers of micheal crichton but then again no books compare with micheal crichtons. based on the reviews i was hoping it would keep me up all night with excitement, but it didn't, although i did not put the book down it was merely cause i was bored. some of the things this booked lack were real interesting characters, the main scientists in the story didn't have much of a personality, actually there was no story behind the characters. i wanted to know what are these people like outside of the expedition, i felt like they were just there to fill in a role, not really a part of the story. i was looking for something i had in common with the characters, how ever i could not find a way to relate to them. there were only a handful of characters with real interesting traits, one bring the director for his ambition and determination to get a good story and really sell it. the other character with a real story behind him was gonzales,but still he didn't really add much to the story. and the last character i enjoyed was logan he at least shared a small bit of his childhood and also a small section outside of the expedition grounds, so that you could find out more about him. oh, and my favorite was usuguk the native american, he had a real story. another thing that disappointed me was the creature itself, the one running the plot, adding more insentive to go on, but he didnt really bring that much excitement. i was expecting it to keep me on the edge of my seat, wanting more but seriously?! the thing with the yellow eyes and muscular limbs...is that all he could think of?! please elaborate, seriously!!! i do not agree at all with the "monster". but i have to add some of the things i enjoyed because the book wasnt a total failure, i enjoyed the description of the setting he really did a very good job on that. over all i just liked the fact that i kept me entertained, cause im twelve years old.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessie Seymour

    Eh. Not great, not terrible. I've read a little out of order with this series, so I now only have one more book to read. I'll probably read it just to put the series to bed, but it's not like I'm really loving this series. I think the big thing was listening on audio instead of actually reading a book. With Deep Storm, my only option was to do an e-book. Here and with The Forgotten Room, I opted for the audio option. I'm thinking with The Third Gate I might just do another e-book because this na Eh. Not great, not terrible. I've read a little out of order with this series, so I now only have one more book to read. I'll probably read it just to put the series to bed, but it's not like I'm really loving this series. I think the big thing was listening on audio instead of actually reading a book. With Deep Storm, my only option was to do an e-book. Here and with The Forgotten Room, I opted for the audio option. I'm thinking with The Third Gate I might just do another e-book because this narrator is just not working for me. Lincoln Child already writes in a somewhat dramatic tone, but with an e-book I can control that voice. With audio, the narrator is super melodramatic, and I can't just ignore it. Kinda leaves me rolling my eyes. I also wasn't as into the plot with this one as I was with the other books I've read in the series. With the others, there was an air of the unknown. We weren't completely sure what was happening. But this time, I knew exactly what to expect. It took the suspense out of it. I'm hoping with The Third Gate the suspense will come back and the plot will be more engaging.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Karin

    As a fan of Child and Preston books, I thought I would try this one out. It did not let me down.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    At the edge of northern Alaska a team of scientists are on a sponsored study of global warming near a glacier covered mountain/volcano. They make a startling discovery inside of a recently uncovered cave. A prehistoric animal, they think is a saber-tooth tiger, frozen in glacier ice. Upon returning to the military base they are using as a lab they find a group of native people telling them that they are in danger and need to leave. They ignore them and call in their find. The group sponsoring th At the edge of northern Alaska a team of scientists are on a sponsored study of global warming near a glacier covered mountain/volcano. They make a startling discovery inside of a recently uncovered cave. A prehistoric animal, they think is a saber-tooth tiger, frozen in glacier ice. Upon returning to the military base they are using as a lab they find a group of native people telling them that they are in danger and need to leave. They ignore them and call in their find. The group sponsoring the study begins sending in a ton of people for a film crew. Turns out they signed all their rights away for anything they find and the film company wants it. They want to document not only the state of the find but they want to cut the creature out of the mountain, thaw it out and show it off on live tv. But it turns out that their version of documentary is like shooting a fictional film and everyone is rubbing everyone else the wrong way from the start. But on the day of the unveiling of thawed creature they find it's missing and the film bosses think it's sabotage. As the day wears on and a storm settles in they find that the creature isn't as dead as it should be and they are trapped with it. Also it isn't any creature known to man...(view spoiler)[it's either some kind of crazy mutation that doesn't leave fossils, a spirit/god like animal or Jeremy Logan's theory, an alien/aliens pet that got left behind when aliens visited (like when they dropped off their weapons at the bottom of our ocean in the last book) (hide spoiler)] Now it's a race to kill it before it kills all of them and get back to civilization. While the story was good and the science behind it was interesting and believable and the fact that Mr. Jeremy Logan is an active character this time that's the only good parts. There are way too many characters to keep track of at first until they start getting killed off. Then the story pov starts splintering between three groups of people a quarter of the way through. Last is besides the fact that this takes place on land and mostly above ground instead of under the sea with a creature instead of a civilization this is pretty much a carbon copy of the first book in the series. It's like the author came up with a formula for a novel and is basing all of them on that exact same formula just changing the setting or object of interest. The military are smarter but a film crew take place of the protesters and now everyone is the same as the last book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    Lee Child's books are the equivalent of literary fast food - you know it's not really good for you, but it's so comfortable and familiar, you know exactly what you're getting, and sometimes you just have this craving for it that needs to be satisfied. The story is outrageously unlikely, the characters are the same cast that appears in pretty much every novel of this ilk, the outcome is predictable - and with a happy sigh you settle in, pull the blankets up and prepare to be thrilled, scared and Lee Child's books are the equivalent of literary fast food - you know it's not really good for you, but it's so comfortable and familiar, you know exactly what you're getting, and sometimes you just have this craving for it that needs to be satisfied. The story is outrageously unlikely, the characters are the same cast that appears in pretty much every novel of this ilk, the outcome is predictable - and with a happy sigh you settle in, pull the blankets up and prepare to be thrilled, scared and entertained for a couple of hours. It's not the best of its kind, but if you like supernatural thrillers in the vein of Crichton, you really can't go wrong with this. 3.5 stars.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Cochrill

    This was a decent story, but the author seemed to have to have forced a way to fit in his character Jeremy Logan. This story could have stood on its own without the far-fetched appearance and back story from this character. It also had a slow start that took me a little bit to get into the groove. I guess I'll have to read the next one before I pass judgement on the series. This was a decent story, but the author seemed to have to have forced a way to fit in his character Jeremy Logan. This story could have stood on its own without the far-fetched appearance and back story from this character. It also had a slow start that took me a little bit to get into the groove. I guess I'll have to read the next one before I pass judgement on the series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alisha White

    Fun adventure with a prehistoric horror In perfect Child fashion, the adventure book is a great escape for summer break. Suspenseful, but a little bit predictable.

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