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The Mormon Way of Doing Business: Leadership and Success Through Faith and Family

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The Founder of JetBlue. The CEO of Dell Computers. The CEO of Deloitte & Touche. The Dean of the Harvard Business School. They all have one thing in common. They are devout Mormons who spend their Sundays exclusively with their families, never work long hours, and always put their spouses and children first. How do they do it? Critically acclaimed author and investigative The Founder of JetBlue. The CEO of Dell Computers. The CEO of Deloitte & Touche. The Dean of the Harvard Business School. They all have one thing in common. They are devout Mormons who spend their Sundays exclusively with their families, never work long hours, and always put their spouses and children first. How do they do it? Critically acclaimed author and investigative journalist Jeff Benedict (a Mormon himself) examines these highly successful business execs and discovers how their beliefs have influenced them, and enabled them to achieve incredible success.With original interviews and unparalleled access, Benedict shares what truly drives these individuals, and the invaluable life lessons from which anyone can benefit.


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The Founder of JetBlue. The CEO of Dell Computers. The CEO of Deloitte & Touche. The Dean of the Harvard Business School. They all have one thing in common. They are devout Mormons who spend their Sundays exclusively with their families, never work long hours, and always put their spouses and children first. How do they do it? Critically acclaimed author and investigative The Founder of JetBlue. The CEO of Dell Computers. The CEO of Deloitte & Touche. The Dean of the Harvard Business School. They all have one thing in common. They are devout Mormons who spend their Sundays exclusively with their families, never work long hours, and always put their spouses and children first. How do they do it? Critically acclaimed author and investigative journalist Jeff Benedict (a Mormon himself) examines these highly successful business execs and discovers how their beliefs have influenced them, and enabled them to achieve incredible success.With original interviews and unparalleled access, Benedict shares what truly drives these individuals, and the invaluable life lessons from which anyone can benefit.

30 review for The Mormon Way of Doing Business: Leadership and Success Through Faith and Family

  1. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Not the best writing I've ever seen (he repeats himself a lot) but the subject matter is great. I was especially interested in his portrayal of these men as fathers & heads of households. I was talking to my sister-in-law & we want him to write the flip side of the story: how do the WIVES of these successful businessmen do it? How did they keep their families strong even though their husbands were gone so often? Not the best writing I've ever seen (he repeats himself a lot) but the subject matter is great. I was especially interested in his portrayal of these men as fathers & heads of households. I was talking to my sister-in-law & we want him to write the flip side of the story: how do the WIVES of these successful businessmen do it? How did they keep their families strong even though their husbands were gone so often?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    Favorite Quotes from the book: "The true defining situation for a person is what they do when they are alone and don't have to do anything else. What do they do? Do they do frivolous things? That's when you define what you are." -Rollins "Everyday you should do something you don't want to do." -Neelman's family saying "I ran my home like a business. Practice management skills in the home are just as important as they are in business." -Deb Checkett (wife to Dave Checkett) The men in the book were ve Favorite Quotes from the book: "The true defining situation for a person is what they do when they are alone and don't have to do anything else. What do they do? Do they do frivolous things? That's when you define what you are." -Rollins "Everyday you should do something you don't want to do." -Neelman's family saying "I ran my home like a business. Practice management skills in the home are just as important as they are in business." -Deb Checkett (wife to Dave Checkett) The men in the book were very motivated men and believed in giving back. One gives his entire salary to his employees (as he doesn't need the income thanks to other successful endeavors) and another made sure all of his employees had a stock in the company (down to the clerks in the storage room) and when it came time to sell everyone walked away with thousands of dollars or even a millionaire. And of course all pay 10% tithing. I also liked how they all spoke on the importance of taking a family vacation withOUT their phones. And when they are home, they are home. Only when kids are in bed do they work and that is rare and they do NOT work on Sunday's unless an emergency. This all kept them close to their wife and kids even when working 70+ hrs a wk. And they all held church positions. High church positions. Stake presidents and bishop which require many hrs each wk. They all said when they served in the church they were more successful at work. I think there are many great tip's in here for someone going out in the business/working world and want to make sure they don't get caught up in money, but walk away with integrity.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Juergen John Roscher

    The title of this book intrigued me since I am a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) and wanted to see what was so unique about Mormon businessmen that would warrant a book titled “The Mormon Way of Doing Business”. I had a friend that had shared with me a couple of stories from the book, which further increased my desire to buy a copy to read. I wanted to find out if the businessmen in the book were successful because they were Mormons and lived according to the p The title of this book intrigued me since I am a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) and wanted to see what was so unique about Mormon businessmen that would warrant a book titled “The Mormon Way of Doing Business”. I had a friend that had shared with me a couple of stories from the book, which further increased my desire to buy a copy to read. I wanted to find out if the businessmen in the book were successful because they were Mormons and lived according to the principles taught in the Mormon faith, or if they would have been successful regardless of their Mormon beliefs. The book examines the professional lives of seven prominent Mormon businessmen to see what makes them successful. Benedict finds the men are successful not only in their vocation but are also Mormon Church leaders and intensively dedicated to their families. These men have the usual traits that successful businessmen and leaders have like a great work ethic, integrity and superior business acumen; but these Mormon business men have other characteristics that may seem odd such as paying a full tithe, keeping the Sabbath-day holy and donating their limited non-work time to serve in Church leadership positions. One interesting portion of the book detailed the response of some of the Mormon businessmen to the events of 9-11-2001. Several of the businessmen and their companies were near the twin towers in NYC. The book portrayed how instrumental and almost heroic their efforts were in assuring their employees were safe and then coordinating their companies’ response to the emergency situation. I learned the men highlighted in the book are exceptional and I believe would have been successful even if they were not Mormon. Each of them showed an unusual work ethic as do many business leaders. They have dedicated almost their entire lives to be successful in their vocation. I do believe they are successful in a different way than most other successful business in that they sacrifice other things such as personal time and hobbies, and even time with family to be involved with the LDS Church. Another thing I learned is that the wife and children of the highlighted businessmen had to sacrifice so that their husband and father could be successful in business. Each of the businessmen made exceptionally efforts to be available for their families, but in such demanding positions the wife and children had to be independent and understand that their husband or father would not always be available. I see the wife of each of these men to be a great woman and the source that made the man available to serve as a business and Church leader. After reading the book, I do wonder how affective they could be as lay ministers with such demanding business commitments. I found it interesting that one man held only a single meeting a week when he served as a Stake President (leader over several congregations in a geographical area) or another who interviewed congregation members over the telephone. Both of these practices seem highly unusual in facilitating the close relationships and understanding that a church leader needs with his support leaders and congregation members. A normal lay leader in the LDS Church will spend 20+ hours a week with meetings, services, and interviews. These gentlemen must have had superior counselors who shouldered a great deal of the Church work load. I would recommend this book to those who want to understand what it takes to be successful in business. The book documents the dedication and total commitment of time, lack of much personal life and time with family that it takes to be successful in the business world. Also, I think those who are non-Mormon would get a better understanding of what Mormons do to live their beliefs and religion.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Having a passion for reading business leadership books, I have had this one on my radar for many years, finally picking it up after years on my shelf. I expected it to be a gushing pontification of how being a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints makes people better at doing business. I know too many members of my church with whom I wouldn't do business to be ready to accept that line of thinking. While there is a little gushing, it was not what I expected. Instead, it was a Having a passion for reading business leadership books, I have had this one on my radar for many years, finally picking it up after years on my shelf. I expected it to be a gushing pontification of how being a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints makes people better at doing business. I know too many members of my church with whom I wouldn't do business to be ready to accept that line of thinking. While there is a little gushing, it was not what I expected. Instead, it was an analytical view of several successful CEO's traits, work ethic and habits and a deep dive into how those align with the values espoused by the gospel. Let's face it. CEOs have a very large, difficult job. When Jeff Benedict mentioned to his publisher, who called him on a Sunday to discuss business once, that he tried to not do business on the Sabbath and that there were several CEOs who, as members, tried to do the same, the publisher was intrigued. That unleashed a research project for Benedict on the topic of how these CEOs can balance their extremely time-consuming business life, their families and church, which often asks them to give 20+ hours / week in volunteer work. Perhaps it was because Benedict happened to be in the same congregation with three of these men in New Canaan, CT, but he was able to get in with these and several other CEOs to tease out how they do it. Through interviews with the CEOs, their wives, and their admins, he developed a pretty good picture of how they do it. Benedict then found common threads of what values were important to the men and their wives and cross linked them into the teachings of the Church. That was what I found interesting, but not surprising. Being a member, I have heard these teachings all my life. So have these men, all but one being life-long members themselves. The other joined later in life, but has the same convictions of the importance of family and service. The examples of how these men handle their business duties, family responsibilities and still find time to be leaders in the Church was fascinating. What kept me up late finishing the book was the test of fire these men went through. The last three chapters highlight the impact of 9/11 on their businesses - quite literally for Gary Crittenden of American Express and Jim Quigley of Deloitte & Touche who where in their offices in the World Trade Center that day. Benedict detailed their struggles, along with David Neeleman of JetBlue, of trying to save their employees and companies that day. I cannot imagine how hard that was and I had tears in my eyes on more than one occasion as I read. The integrity and grit showed by these men in this refiner's fire took a lifetime of experience to forge. They pulled their companies through and then turned to help others. His final story highlighted how to walk away. Kim Clark was the Dean of the Harvard Business School when he was asked to walk away from the pinnacle of academia and become president of a tiny church school, BYU-Idaho in rural Idaho. His thought process and approach was well laid out by the author. It confused the media and much of Harvard, but to members of the Church, it all made sense. Priorities play in heavily into decisions and this book shows how and why these men place priorities on their families and their religion ahead of their careers. Those priorities govern how they make decisions. The epilogue of the book was telling. Are these men infallible? No. They make mistakes. Their businesses don't always succeed. Being a member of the Church does not guarantee success, and the author didn't want that being thought. He related the story of how these men came together to do a panel discussion around the launch of the book. The final presentation happened on the exact day David Neeleman was ousted from his company, JetBlue. The 'Mormon Way' of doing business doesn't guarantee success, not make a leader perfect. But it was interesting to see how having one's priorities and values direct their response to adversity. That is what I enjoyed most out of this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    KC

    Although a bit dated now, I thought I should read this book that was influential right about the time I was graduating from BYU. The premise is quite simple: several prominent Latter-day saint business leaders are interviewed, and the ways in which their faith, upbringing, and lifestyle contribute to their success are cataloged. It is quite predictable, in a focus on hard work early in life, the discipline of missionary work, and the commitment to family responsibility shape a character that ends Although a bit dated now, I thought I should read this book that was influential right about the time I was graduating from BYU. The premise is quite simple: several prominent Latter-day saint business leaders are interviewed, and the ways in which their faith, upbringing, and lifestyle contribute to their success are cataloged. It is quite predictable, in a focus on hard work early in life, the discipline of missionary work, and the commitment to family responsibility shape a character that ends up succeeding in professional contexts. The second part of the book recounts the events of Septemeber 11, a relevant incident considering several of the leaders featured in the book were in New York on that day, and each had their own perspectives on the event. The most notable omission is Mitt Romney, but I am told that a revision of this book ended up including him in an additional chapter. The most refreshing bit was the epilogue, which contains a much more somber “where are they now” round up. The high-flying success highlighted in the main chapters is dampened by public relations gaffes, shuttered industries, and dismissals from positions. A reminder that when at the top, the only place to go is back down.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Angulo

    It was quick and expressed some traits of big-time business people that helped lead them to success. It was limited in its scope. He focused only on business men, and those who had the same traits. It would've been nice to have a more diverse selection of mormons and how their traits differ. It was a short, informative read though. It's a quick pick-me-up when you need motivation to do better. It was quick and expressed some traits of big-time business people that helped lead them to success. It was limited in its scope. He focused only on business men, and those who had the same traits. It would've been nice to have a more diverse selection of mormons and how their traits differ. It was a short, informative read though. It's a quick pick-me-up when you need motivation to do better.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    As a Mormon, what I found most interesting about the men and their families profiled in this book was how they "balanced" high demand jobs, family, and church. In general, I came away from it thinking, I have no desire to work in those types of environments and positions. I find it hard enough to make the time I want for my family as it is. I'm impressed with what these men are/were able to do, but am not inclined to try to move into their positions. I almost gave the book two stars, because the As a Mormon, what I found most interesting about the men and their families profiled in this book was how they "balanced" high demand jobs, family, and church. In general, I came away from it thinking, I have no desire to work in those types of environments and positions. I find it hard enough to make the time I want for my family as it is. I'm impressed with what these men are/were able to do, but am not inclined to try to move into their positions. I almost gave the book two stars, because the author repeats himself incessantly. Some of the repetition is warranted, because of the way it is written. Each chapter is on a given topic and the author highlights how some or all of the men profiled deal with or exemplify the topic being discussed. This leads to one of the main issues I have with the book. It feels like the author cherry picks in selecting how the people exemplify the topic. In one chapter he might discuss three or four of the people and not mention the others. Then in the next chapter he discusses a four of five who exemplify, in a positive way, the new topic. It leaves you uncertain whether he just didn't have material for the ones not mentioned in a given chapter or if they didn't fit the point he was trying to make. There are some ideas shared in the book that would likely benefit pretty much any professional to implement in their own lives; however, contrary to the book's title, their isn't really a "Mormon Way of Doing Business" that is outlined. At least in the sense that it is necessarily all that different from what likely many people already do, especially those who try to adhere to their faith (almost regardless of what their faith is). If anything, I think this book has less to do with a "Mormon Way of Doing Business" and more to do with a CEO way of doing business. Similarly, in some ways it feels less like rather than having their faith in common, what they have in common is that at least half of them went to Harvard Business School and/or worked for Bain Capital. Essentially, these men happen to be Mormon as well, so it creates some minor peculiarities, like the fact that they don't smoke or drink and do tend to have larger families and pay tithing. My review probably sounds more negative than my rating would suggest. I think it is a decent read and generally enjoyed it. There probably some aspects of what they do that I will try to incorporate to be more effective in my own profession. So I do see benefit to reading the book. If you were already interested in reading it, you will probably enjoy it as well.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    Synopsis: Jeff Benedict explores how eight men who grew up in the Western US were able to rise to the top of their professions while paying 10 percent tithing, keeping the Sabbath day holy, serving as Bishops, Stake Presidents and Young Men's Presidents and still finding time to spend with their families. The book specifically profiles JetBlue founder and former CEO David Neeleman, former Madison Square Garden CEO Dave Checketts, Former Harvard Business School dean Kim Clark, CEO of Dell Kevin R Synopsis: Jeff Benedict explores how eight men who grew up in the Western US were able to rise to the top of their professions while paying 10 percent tithing, keeping the Sabbath day holy, serving as Bishops, Stake Presidents and Young Men's Presidents and still finding time to spend with their families. The book specifically profiles JetBlue founder and former CEO David Neeleman, former Madison Square Garden CEO Dave Checketts, Former Harvard Business School dean Kim Clark, CEO of Dell Kevin Rollins and four others. Persistence, expecting a miracle, daily prayer and scripture study, Sabbath day service and putting first things first are all skills and commitments that have blessed their lives. My Review: I'll be honest. I really enjoyed this book. I found it inspiring and uplifting and loved reading about how these men are able to balance work, family life, demanding church callings and personal time. The book is especially enjoyable because each principle is presented and then substantiated with life experiences from a few of these men. Stories of Checkett's hard-nosed negotiations with Patrick Ewing and Pat Riley, Jim Quigley's and Gary Crittenden's stories of leadership at ground zero on 9/11 and David Neeleman working as a flight attendant or baggage handler on busy days. Each of these leaders has qualities to emulate and skills that have allowed them to rise to the top. This is a book that I'll read again.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    This book detailed the business experiences and preparations of various CEOs including Dave Checketts (New York Knicks & MSG), Kevin Rollins (Dell Computers), David Neelman (Jet Blue), Jim Quigley (Deloitte), Kim Clark (Dean HBS), Clayton Christensen, among others all of whom are Mormons. I had actually read this book a few years ago, but it was nice to remember how dedicated they are to their careers, family and church. They work big hours during the week and most are bishops in the Mormon Chur This book detailed the business experiences and preparations of various CEOs including Dave Checketts (New York Knicks & MSG), Kevin Rollins (Dell Computers), David Neelman (Jet Blue), Jim Quigley (Deloitte), Kim Clark (Dean HBS), Clayton Christensen, among others all of whom are Mormons. I had actually read this book a few years ago, but it was nice to remember how dedicated they are to their careers, family and church. They work big hours during the week and most are bishops in the Mormon Church, which also requires a big time commitment. They live up to their values and beliefs, work extremely hard, and are blessed for their efforts. I'm not sure I have the dedication or desire to work as much as they do to become CEOs of Fortune 500 companies. I did take some good nuggets from this book that I can apply in my career and recommend this book to others who are trying to juggle work, family, and church obligations and be successful in all areas.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kimball

    This book was like an emotional roller coaster. In the beginning part I felt on top of the world because I had served a mission. Even though I feel like I didn't earn many of those skills these gentleman had learned (At least from what I can tell now; even 7 years later), it was exciting knowing I had been part of a successful organization that produces high-caliber people and that I have that potential. Then the author began to describe their work ethic for decades and all the time and hours th This book was like an emotional roller coaster. In the beginning part I felt on top of the world because I had served a mission. Even though I feel like I didn't earn many of those skills these gentleman had learned (At least from what I can tell now; even 7 years later), it was exciting knowing I had been part of a successful organization that produces high-caliber people and that I have that potential. Then the author began to describe their work ethic for decades and all the time and hours they commit to their careers and I began to get discouraged because they were portrayed as these Giants and Men Among Men and I thought that I could never amount to be a fraction of who they are. After trudging through those Depths of Despair the book finished had me feeling somewhat hopefully and confident in my future. Dang good though.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    My impression of this book changed from the moment I picked it up. I think I was expecting an organizational how-to and instead gained insight into the souls of several big, BIG business leaders of our time. And guess what? They are human! They cook breakfast, drive the kids around, cry, worry, and most of all love. It was an easy, page-turning read until I got to the chapters about 9/11 and then it became a couldn't-put-it-down. Three of these men had parallel experiences during those terror at My impression of this book changed from the moment I picked it up. I think I was expecting an organizational how-to and instead gained insight into the souls of several big, BIG business leaders of our time. And guess what? They are human! They cook breakfast, drive the kids around, cry, worry, and most of all love. It was an easy, page-turning read until I got to the chapters about 9/11 and then it became a couldn't-put-it-down. Three of these men had parallel experiences during those terror attacks. The true measure of their character came out during that tough time. Read it for yourself to see how they handled themselves and the lives of thousands of employees. Excellent, excellent writing, awesome material, strong ethics, colorful personalities. Good read!

  12. 5 out of 5

    KU

    I had an extremely early flight on Monday morning, and I forgot to go to the library on Saturday(libraries are not open on Sunday)to pick up my hold books. So, I went to my father-in-law's bookself and found this book for my trip. If there was a half rating, I would rate this book as a 3.5. The book was more biographical than I thought it would. Likes: 1) inspiring 2) good guys do finish first 3) quick read Dislikes: 1) I feel that the CEO's in the book are driven, selfish, motivated, and goal orie I had an extremely early flight on Monday morning, and I forgot to go to the library on Saturday(libraries are not open on Sunday)to pick up my hold books. So, I went to my father-in-law's bookself and found this book for my trip. If there was a half rating, I would rate this book as a 3.5. The book was more biographical than I thought it would. Likes: 1) inspiring 2) good guys do finish first 3) quick read Dislikes: 1) I feel that the CEO's in the book are driven, selfish, motivated, and goal oriented. They would of been successful CEO's regardless of their faith, it just happened that they are LDS. 2) The perfect image dragged on too long...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lee Ann

    This book was SO disappointing. I expected a business book and looked forward to learning about the Mormon way of doing business, but it was a purely religious book instead. The author was preachy throughout and profiled only a select group of Mormon CEO millionaires, insisting that they were living the right life and so were successful. Although there were some good points about how to live one's life, it wasn't worth the time spent reading. This book was SO disappointing. I expected a business book and looked forward to learning about the Mormon way of doing business, but it was a purely religious book instead. The author was preachy throughout and profiled only a select group of Mormon CEO millionaires, insisting that they were living the right life and so were successful. Although there were some good points about how to live one's life, it wasn't worth the time spent reading.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Critchfield

    Interesting ideas, probably more so for a non-LDS reader. It did seem to repeat points a lot and I think incorrectly portrayed Latter-day Saints as always being successful, even though in the real world there are many people who practice these habits and still don't have the business success these men do. It isn't super relatable to non-CEOs, but I did gain some quality ideas and habits I would like to focus on as I pursue educational degrees and a career. Interesting ideas, probably more so for a non-LDS reader. It did seem to repeat points a lot and I think incorrectly portrayed Latter-day Saints as always being successful, even though in the real world there are many people who practice these habits and still don't have the business success these men do. It isn't super relatable to non-CEOs, but I did gain some quality ideas and habits I would like to focus on as I pursue educational degrees and a career.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie

    Interesting topic but I found myself thinking how I would do the same book so much differently if I was given the opportunity to write it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Micah Smurthwaite

    The only interesting anecdote of this book was that Kim Clark doesn't talk to anyone between 7 and 12. Effective people gather momentum by working without interruption. The only interesting anecdote of this book was that Kim Clark doesn't talk to anyone between 7 and 12. Effective people gather momentum by working without interruption.

  17. 5 out of 5

    William Ng

    Jeff Benedict illustrates for us a compelling narrative of some prominent Mormon CEOs and business leaders in what should be called "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Way of Doing Business". I would echo some of the other reviews in that Jeff was at times repetitive (sometimes it was good, most of the times it was unnecessary), links their faith to their success (causal vs correlative relationship), and draws an almost too perfect picture (CEO cooks breakfast for son at 5 am in the Jeff Benedict illustrates for us a compelling narrative of some prominent Mormon CEOs and business leaders in what should be called "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Way of Doing Business". I would echo some of the other reviews in that Jeff was at times repetitive (sometimes it was good, most of the times it was unnecessary), links their faith to their success (causal vs correlative relationship), and draws an almost too perfect picture (CEO cooks breakfast for son at 5 am in the morning AND makes it to work by 6:30 for a 12-hour work day AND holds family prayer AND reads the scriptures an hour a day AND holds leadership callings). The pros: It was an interesting look into the lives of very busy and prominent Mormons. It was fascinating to see how they juggled their work/family/spiritual/personal lives, and how driven they are to succeed in each of those areas. He managed to tie in the effect their faith had on them and how early experiences in the LDS Church managed to shape how they approached life later on. I was personally inspired and resolved to do better in those spheres. The cons: A little preachy. I know the title states "The Mormon" way of doing business, but in all respects, it's kind of like the CEO way of doing business while also being Mormon. Not all Mormons become CEOs and not all Mormon CEOs do business in this regard. While Jeff does devote a chapter to the wives of the CEOs, he paints a very traditional and conservative picture of LDS women when it came to motherhood, child rearing, and general support role they took. While that's not inherently negative, I wish Jeff didn't make it out to be the default path. There are certainly a number of successful female LDS business leaders Jeff could have included, or mentioned. Finally, Jeff almost makes a causal relationship between faith and success. Because of their dedication to the LDS Church, their success ensued. I believe they would've been successful regardless of their religious background. All in all, a book worth reading... If not just for a peak into the lives of very busy and very devoted individuals who are also very successful.

  18. 4 out of 5

    John Stone

    I was astounded when I first saw this book. Can you imagine a book entitled "The Catholic Way of Doing Business" or, how about "The Jewish Way of Doing Business"? The one I want to read is "The Scientologist Way of Doing Business." So I read the book. My favorite quote was from Dave Checketts, “In business situations we get well prepared and we go in undaunted. I don’t know if this is unique to the Mormon culture.” Umm, Dave, I don't think so. Obviously, I'm not a Mormon. Reading how their Missions I was astounded when I first saw this book. Can you imagine a book entitled "The Catholic Way of Doing Business" or, how about "The Jewish Way of Doing Business"? The one I want to read is "The Scientologist Way of Doing Business." So I read the book. My favorite quote was from Dave Checketts, “In business situations we get well prepared and we go in undaunted. I don’t know if this is unique to the Mormon culture.” Umm, Dave, I don't think so. Obviously, I'm not a Mormon. Reading how their Missions after High School prepared them for success in the business world was a hoot. As a child of the sixties, I had a "mission" after High School. It was called the draft and I was sent to Vietnam. When Mitt Romney, a Mormon who's my age, ran for president, I read about his Mission and learned that it qualified him for a religious exemption to the draft. So, instead of having a mission like mine, he went to France. Too bad Benedict didn't include his story. I almost quit reading when I got to the part about Checketts and the Knicks. In Benedict's telling, the Knick's lawyers had no idea that the Warriors' planned actions might constitute player tampering, but Dave Checkett did and saved the day. New York certainly has its share of incompetent lawyers, but they don't usually get such high profile jobs. One interesting thing I did learn about Mormons is that they are under the impression that Sunday is the sabbath. Of course, a lot of professing Christians make the same mistake. In his Author's Note, Benedict says this about the men he interviewed, "They put only one request to me: "Don’t write a book about us that is self-congratulatory or self-righteous." Too bad he didn't follow their advice. This book isn't much more than hagiography.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Predictable from the point of view of someone who was raised Mormon. Integrity, family, keeping the sabbath holy, tithing, prayer, reading scriptures, are all things I expected to hear from this book. Mormons have a tendency to believe that religion and being righteous brings about success. I don’t subscribe to that belief anymore. I am also frequently turned off by the notion that we need to, as women, not put off child bearing. What I find interesting is the Mormon church is very much a patria Predictable from the point of view of someone who was raised Mormon. Integrity, family, keeping the sabbath holy, tithing, prayer, reading scriptures, are all things I expected to hear from this book. Mormons have a tendency to believe that religion and being righteous brings about success. I don’t subscribe to that belief anymore. I am also frequently turned off by the notion that we need to, as women, not put off child bearing. What I find interesting is the Mormon church is very much a patriarchy and men are trained from birth to be the providers of their family and are taught good managerial skills, and encouraged more than girls in the faith and girls are taught from birth to be stay at home moms, which was briefly touched on in this book. Notice that this was a book about successful men and not one woman was featured for her success, not even Sherry Dew. That should speak volumes. It’s not that women don’t want this, or can’t accomplish it, but there is a suppression of women within this culture. That’s disappointing. It’s also disappointing that if I as a woman want to see how execs achieve success, I have no females to exemplify for their accomplishments, I have to hope that the men will allow me to see their insight and wisdom. For those reasons, I’m disappointed with this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Shumway

    This is a good book that sheds a lot of light and insights into the lives of LDS members who were top tier players in global companies. I appreciated the depth that this book went to in discussing business practices, opportunities for these men to cut corners and choosing integrity and explaining how that blesses them in the long run. Throughout the book I did feel a little disappointed that there weren’t any references to LDS female CEOs or chief officers of businesses. The author does give hug This is a good book that sheds a lot of light and insights into the lives of LDS members who were top tier players in global companies. I appreciated the depth that this book went to in discussing business practices, opportunities for these men to cut corners and choosing integrity and explaining how that blesses them in the long run. Throughout the book I did feel a little disappointed that there weren’t any references to LDS female CEOs or chief officers of businesses. The author does give huge credit and accolades to women who support their husbands and play a key role in helping raise the family. I felt like he gave full attention and kudos to the women who sacrifice so much on behalf of raising a family. I just wish that there were a discussion on women in business as well, and there weren’t any brought to attention here. This book is quite good beyond my opinion about lack of women chief offers. It is a bit old so I recognize that it’s a bit outdated, but otherwise it’s a great read for the Latter Day Saint or non member alike.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris Doelle

    I have spent a lot of time researching anti-Mormon texts, learning about the depraved activities of the Fundamentalist offshoot (FLDS) of the church and doing what I can to point out just how different those folks are from the LDS church that I know. What I haven't done (until now) is read pro-Mormon books - well, other than The Book of Mormon and the like. This book isn't a religious text but instead a look at some of the big players in the business world that are members. It points out some thi I have spent a lot of time researching anti-Mormon texts, learning about the depraved activities of the Fundamentalist offshoot (FLDS) of the church and doing what I can to point out just how different those folks are from the LDS church that I know. What I haven't done (until now) is read pro-Mormon books - well, other than The Book of Mormon and the like. This book isn't a religious text but instead a look at some of the big players in the business world that are members. It points out some things these business leaders have in common, honesty, faithfulness and a strong work ethic. After all the negative I have dug through, it was refreshing to find something that doesn't bash and doesn't apologize for touting some of the good related the church.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Oleh Myroshnichenko

    Though the book is not very exciting at the beginning, as the story unfolds, it made me feel quite uncomfortable while projecting the ideas and principles the author lays out in the text upon myself. Here is why 5-stars. Since everyone has to justify what he/she does, it makes you think and sincerely answer why you should or should not follow the rules the top CEOs follow to keep perfect balance between spiritual, family and professional obligations.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Overy

    This book helped me reflect on what my goals should be in life and how to balance the many responsibilities I have and will have in this life. Near the end, I really enjoyed the phrase “Recognizing the difference between success and significance”. It really helps me put life in a proper perspective.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Hennore

    Phenomenal book! I have read a ton of business books, but most don’t resonate with me as a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, yet this one certainly did. I loved how vulnerable these leaders were in sharing their personal follies and the almost universal keys to their success that has inspired me to be my absolute best in all that is worthwhile. Thanks, Jeff!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Peterson

    I loved the idea the book shared that the callings we have in the church play a large part in strengthening our skillset and improve our career standing. Some cool stories from business leaders shared throughout the book

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Fulton

    The theme that struck me most was how committed these men were to using their time effectively and didn't less trivial things eat up the more important issues. And then there were the values they made of putting family first. The theme that struck me most was how committed these men were to using their time effectively and didn't less trivial things eat up the more important issues. And then there were the values they made of putting family first.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eremite

    Worth a quick listen.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mike Maughan

    He had so much great material. He could have made this a much more impactful book than it is. That said, still a worthwhile read. Phoenix, Arizona. Recommended by Susan Maughan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    I enjoyed this book. I always like to hear people's stories and I like business stories too, so this was a perfect mix. I enjoyed this book. I always like to hear people's stories and I like business stories too, so this was a perfect mix.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Asparagus

    Interesting to read about mormon businessmen strongly representing the interests of their company to the point of being aggessive and threatening at times. An eye opener.

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