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Een anonieme tip Een groot schandaal Een nieuwe zaak voor Theo Boone De dertienjarige Theo Boone kent elke rechter, politieagent en rechtbankmedewerker in Strattenburg. Hij heeft zelfs geholpen een voortvluchtige crimineel terecht te laten staan. Maar zelfs een toekomstige steradvocaat als Theo ontkomt niet aan verplichte schooltoetsen. Wanneer er een anonieme tip binnenkomt Een anonieme tip Een groot schandaal Een nieuwe zaak voor Theo Boone De dertienjarige Theo Boone kent elke rechter, politieagent en rechtbankmedewerker in Strattenburg. Hij heeft zelfs geholpen een voortvluchtige crimineel terecht te laten staan. Maar zelfs een toekomstige steradvocaat als Theo ontkomt niet aan verplichte schooltoetsen. Wanneer er een anonieme tip binnenkomt bij Theo’s schoolbestuur over te hoge toetsuitslagen op een andere middelbare school, belandt Theo in het onderzoek naar een grootschalig fraudeschandaal. Zijn toekomst als advocaat staat op het spel, dus moet Theo voorzichtig handelen en zijn instinct volgen voor een rechtvaardige afloop.


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Een anonieme tip Een groot schandaal Een nieuwe zaak voor Theo Boone De dertienjarige Theo Boone kent elke rechter, politieagent en rechtbankmedewerker in Strattenburg. Hij heeft zelfs geholpen een voortvluchtige crimineel terecht te laten staan. Maar zelfs een toekomstige steradvocaat als Theo ontkomt niet aan verplichte schooltoetsen. Wanneer er een anonieme tip binnenkomt Een anonieme tip Een groot schandaal Een nieuwe zaak voor Theo Boone De dertienjarige Theo Boone kent elke rechter, politieagent en rechtbankmedewerker in Strattenburg. Hij heeft zelfs geholpen een voortvluchtige crimineel terecht te laten staan. Maar zelfs een toekomstige steradvocaat als Theo ontkomt niet aan verplichte schooltoetsen. Wanneer er een anonieme tip binnenkomt bij Theo’s schoolbestuur over te hoge toetsuitslagen op een andere middelbare school, belandt Theo in het onderzoek naar een grootschalig fraudeschandaal. Zijn toekomst als advocaat staat op het spel, dus moet Theo voorzichtig handelen en zijn instinct volgen voor een rechtvaardige afloop.

30 review for De fraude

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Grisham returns with another 'Theo Boone: Child Lawyer' stories, sure to entertain the young reader as well as those who are young at heart. As high school is on the horizon, so begins the onerous task of eighth grade standardised testing, something that Theo cannot stand. After a rigourous week of testing and waiting for the results, Theo fails to make the cut for high school honor classes by a single point. Devastated, he and his best friend, April Finnemore, wallow in their own self-pity. Whe Grisham returns with another 'Theo Boone: Child Lawyer' stories, sure to entertain the young reader as well as those who are young at heart. As high school is on the horizon, so begins the onerous task of eighth grade standardised testing, something that Theo cannot stand. After a rigourous week of testing and waiting for the results, Theo fails to make the cut for high school honor classes by a single point. Devastated, he and his best friend, April Finnemore, wallow in their own self-pity. When April confides that she has learned about another of the middle schools fudging test answers in order to elevate their standing, Theo is outraged. April takes it upon herself to anonymously complain about the issue to the school board, sure that nothing will come of it. When fraud charges are levied against a number of teachers who changed test answers and their jobs are lost, Theo comes to realise that he cannot stand idly by, even if their actions are deplorable. Bringing his mother into the mix, Theo ensures the teachers receive legal counsel ahead of the trial. An interested party to the matter, namely because the revised results could change his academic standing in high school, Theo aptly watches the trial and has an epiphany of his own, rooted in his own dislike for the testing process. On the subject of trials, no Theo Boone novel would be the same without a trip to Animal Court, where Theo works his magic to save an otter from a potential capital sentence. A great story for the targeted audience that touches on a matter close to their hearts, Grisham dazzles yet again. Grisham seeks not only to entertain, but also touches on issues of interest to youths and adults alike. Placing not only the testing process, but the actions taken based on results, Grisham forces the reader to think a little more about the subject at hand. Using a cast of characters familiar to series fans, Grisham offers the right dose of cheesy storylines that layer nicely with serious matters. He is able to touch on a new generation of readers, educating and enthralling them before they leap into the murky world of the law, where Grisham has been thriving with bestsellers for three decades. Even though the target is the young adult reader, any fan of Grisham's work can surely enjoy this piece. Kudos, Mr. Grisham, for another wonderful piece of writing. No matter your audience, as long as the law is your theme, you seem to captivate and succeed. Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/

  2. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Tollefson

    My husband and I , both in our 60s, love the THEODORE BOONE series ! This one was as good as all the others - clever, amusing and heart-warming. The " kid lawyer" parts are hysterical- laugh-out-loud funny. This was a delightful,quick backporch read My husband and I , both in our 60s, love the THEODORE BOONE series ! This one was as good as all the others - clever, amusing and heart-warming. The " kid lawyer" parts are hysterical- laugh-out-loud funny. This was a delightful,quick backporch read

  3. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Theodore Boone: The Scandal This is the most enjoyable series, I look forward to every new book published. It was a cute and quick read. John Grisham is a wonderful adult fiction writer but an even better young adult writer. What a wonderful little series. Theodore Boone is an enjoyable character.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amrina Albab

    If you haven't read this, my review will make no sense. If you want a summary, read someone else's. Um.... WHAT HAPPENED TO THEO!!???? Since when does he refuse to do something if something wrong happened? Theo, you just can't help getting into the middle of everything, ok? It. Is. Your. Job. As a kid lawyer. You're supposed to make sure rules are followed. Not stand by, do nothing, and try to make your best friend do nothing, too! Speaking of that, what happened to April? She didn't have anythin If you haven't read this, my review will make no sense. If you want a summary, read someone else's. Um.... WHAT HAPPENED TO THEO!!???? Since when does he refuse to do something if something wrong happened? Theo, you just can't help getting into the middle of everything, ok? It. Is. Your. Job. As a kid lawyer. You're supposed to make sure rules are followed. Not stand by, do nothing, and try to make your best friend do nothing, too! Speaking of that, what happened to April? She didn't have anything to feel that guilty about. Theo was right, if she'd sent that letter she would just be all caught up in the whole mess. Also, about April, all she's supposed to care about is art. She's not the type of person who'd care if a high school girl wanted to hang out with her, but in the book (somewhere) it says something like that's it was the best thing they ever happened to her! And why did they give the teachers criminal charges in the first place? You could've had this book a lot shorter without that pretty unrealistic obstacle. And what's with the whole side story with Pete? Actually, that part was a good story. And, the whole sorting kids into different classes doesn't make sense either. Some random test shouldn't have to decide your high school classes! Oh yeah, and Ike. Like, since when does he even care about what people think of him? In one of the other books, it said he wears socks and sandals all the time. He is not supposed to care about people's opinions. Except for Theo, but he's the one he calls to get him out of jail! Like, really? Why is everyone so different?????? Really, when are we gonna find out what Ike did?????? Even if I didn't like this book as much, I want the series to keep going just to find out. Also, it'd be pretty cool if it went on until Theo became a lawyer or a judge, or at least until he finally made up his mind about being a lawyer or a judge. On the other hand, if you're not comparing it to other Theo Boone books, it's a perfectly good book. P.S. No offense to anyone who may be offended by this review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jude Pietrucha

    “Theodore Boone The Scandal” By, John Grisham ~Jude Pietrucha~ Right as I entered my School Media Center, I was scouting for the John Grisham book section, because I think his books were amazing. I managed to pick up, Theodore Boone The Scandal. When I finished reading the book, I thought it was marvelous! The book is about a scandal in Strattenburg, at East Middle school which gets taken to court! With all the dialogue in the courtroom, it played an special role in the story. I feel like as a pe “Theodore Boone The Scandal” By, John Grisham ~Jude Pietrucha~ Right as I entered my School Media Center, I was scouting for the John Grisham book section, because I think his books were amazing. I managed to pick up, Theodore Boone The Scandal. When I finished reading the book, I thought it was marvelous! The book is about a scandal in Strattenburg, at East Middle school which gets taken to court! With all the dialogue in the courtroom, it played an special role in the story. I feel like as a person who loves court and trials I thought John Grisham did a magnificent job. He has many other books like this that he has wrote, I have finished every other book and I was eager to read more from him. As I jumped in the book he already explained many, detail just about Theo waking up and doing his daily routine. I would rate this book a 5 star for the detail of Theo’s friends, and life! I enjoyed the plot, the characters and the dialogue. I just thought it was definitely remarkable! I would recommend this book to kids in middle school level grade reading, or anyone who likes Realistic-Fiction Law books……...Like me!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    This series is 👌👌👌 would 10/10 recommend if you want something easy to read but rly gripping

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bookish Indulgenges with b00k r3vi3ws

    Theodore Boone hasn’t ever been my favourite character nor have I ever felt that this was the best John Grisham can do. However, I have to admit that this is the first book in this series that I actually enjoyed reading thoroughly. Theodore Boone may be a whiz kid and have a number of connections in the judicial world, but even he cannot escape the standardized tests no matter how much he dislikes them. Not only does he have to take the tests, but these tests also determine if he can take honor c Theodore Boone hasn’t ever been my favourite character nor have I ever felt that this was the best John Grisham can do. However, I have to admit that this is the first book in this series that I actually enjoyed reading thoroughly. Theodore Boone may be a whiz kid and have a number of connections in the judicial world, but even he cannot escape the standardized tests no matter how much he dislikes them. Not only does he have to take the tests, but these tests also determine if he can take honor classes in High school. After all the preparations and grueling testing sessions, when the results are out, Theo is surprised and heartbroken to find out that he hasn’t made the cut for honor classes. That is when he hears about the scandal involving cheating the standardized tests. Theo brings in his mother to help when fraud charges are made against those who were involved when he realizes that he cannot be just a bystander in this case. Like all John Grisham novels, this too is a fast paced and engaging book. I finished reading this book in one sitting. What I liked about this book was the questions and issues raised and discussed in this book, particularly about the standardized testing system that rules the lives of the students. The storyline is narrated in such a manner that those who have never spared a moment to think about it will be forced to stop and take notice. I never knew about how the standardized test results affect the teachers in turn as well. As such I found this book educative in other ways rather than just the courtroom procedures. I found Theo to be a bit more likeable in this book and April plays a big part in it all. This was, I feel, the best Theodore Boone book so far and could interest not only young adults but also adults as well.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sunmin

    Now the plot was extremely interesting and well built, but it sounded too much as if an adult thriller writer were trying to turn himself into a 13 year old boy, and not quite succeeding. Which is true, I guess. The sentences didn't flow well, if you had a musical mind it would be described as very stacatto Now the plot was extremely interesting and well built, but it sounded too much as if an adult thriller writer were trying to turn himself into a 13 year old boy, and not quite succeeding. Which is true, I guess. The sentences didn't flow well, if you had a musical mind it would be described as very stacatto

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Another good addition to the series. Theodore & his friends deal with being taught to the test & a scandal involving teachers changing the test grades due to pressure. Well done both in form & ideas. As usual, John Boy Walton did a great job of narrating it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carson J. Eisner

    This final book in the Theo Boone series experiments with something a bit different than what we are used to from Theo: Standardized testing. I loved how in this book, we see Theo away from the courthouse, dealing with the turmoils of middle school.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sandi

    This time around Theo gets caught up in a scandal involving teachers at his junior high school altering S.A.T. scores to help underprivileged kids get a leg up. In each of the Theo Boone stories, Grisham provides the reader an opportunity to assess where he/she stands on an issue where a wrong has been committed. All in all he does a fairly good job of not pushing his own viewpoint, although you can always recognize it. In The Scandal you can sympathize with the reasoning behind the teachers' ac This time around Theo gets caught up in a scandal involving teachers at his junior high school altering S.A.T. scores to help underprivileged kids get a leg up. In each of the Theo Boone stories, Grisham provides the reader an opportunity to assess where he/she stands on an issue where a wrong has been committed. All in all he does a fairly good job of not pushing his own viewpoint, although you can always recognize it. In The Scandal you can sympathize with the reasoning behind the teachers' actions, yet altering scores which can negatively impact other students is not the way to right a wrong.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Connor Cho

    Wow! This book was great, just as all of John Grisham's other books are. This mystery book is about a boy who plans on becoming a lawyer when he grows up. He experiences some unjust actions. This book will keep you on your toes. This book was one of my personal favorites. It had a conflict within the main character and even his best friend. It shows that you should always trust your close friends when time are tough. Wow! This book was great, just as all of John Grisham's other books are. This mystery book is about a boy who plans on becoming a lawyer when he grows up. He experiences some unjust actions. This book will keep you on your toes. This book was one of my personal favorites. It had a conflict within the main character and even his best friend. It shows that you should always trust your close friends when time are tough.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dr.J.G.

    Grisham makes a seemingly serious, promising beginning, about the question of domestic violence, strapping burly males who endanger lives of their own families. "An hour later, Theo was suffering through a review of basic biology when his mind drifted back to his conversation with Pete. The poor kid was living a nightmare, afraid of getting punched by his brute of a father and afraid for his mother’s life. How was a kid like Pete supposed to sit through four days of testing, concentrate on the ex Grisham makes a seemingly serious, promising beginning, about the question of domestic violence, strapping burly males who endanger lives of their own families. "An hour later, Theo was suffering through a review of basic biology when his mind drifted back to his conversation with Pete. The poor kid was living a nightmare, afraid of getting punched by his brute of a father and afraid for his mother’s life. How was a kid like Pete supposed to sit through four days of testing, concentrate on the exams, and score well enough to get properly placed on the right track for high school? And that placement could well determine his future. It made little sense, at least to Theo." Theo has his parents help the family, and Pete's father arrives at night creating a ruckus, demanding to see his family, and even throwing rocks at the house, shattering the glass screen, before being taken away by police. Grisham doesn't carry through with the serious issue, however, at least not immediately, but shies away instead from the really serious phenomenon, and instead compromises with a man who went astray due to his drinking and repeats after a few nights in prison. It's perhaps too demanding on courage to deal with this universal issue that plagues across time and around the globe. He plunges instead into another serious issue, that of tests, grading, and cheating. But again, as with the domestic violence issue, he ducks in the typical style of - incorrectly labeled - "liberal" attitude and stance, to excuse it with a short paragraph about kids who are bright but lack support from parents due to their being low income group. ............ Seriously, are higher income society kids doing well in U.S.? Who's kidding who?!!!! Fact is, kids from higher income groups do well only when their parents expect them to do so and to earn their way in life to match, or do better than, the life they were given as children. But if their level is higher economically, for any reason, such as being amonst the rich or otherwise high social strata such as royals, or titles landed gentry, then the usual attitude is of entitlement rather than otherwise, and teachers are treated like servants rather than givers of knowledge, with expectations of automatic good grades, with a whip of careers of those teachers who might be honest enough to not cheat, being completely destroyed, the very first time they do so. It's only that when teachers at a low income group school cheat, they are punished when caught. At the other end, the punishment is the same but for reverse crime, that of honest grading. In another typical twist though, it's the person who complained about the cheating is the one worried about whether the complaint was a crime! Typical, because - as often enough reflected even on screen - U.S. culture holds someone complaining about a crime as morally lower than the actual criminal, and this is so often enough even when it's the victim who complains; this bulky culture pervades so much it's held up not only in schools but at homes too, with families teaching the children to not "snitch", instead of seeing that without complaints against criminals, crime flourishes. It's as if one expects clean surroundings without a cleaner, and despises anyone who discovers or points out unclean spots. But surely, if one has a lack of ability to deal with crime, it couldn't be morally more correct to suffer it in silence rather than speak about it to authorities? That attitude of blaming the complainant rather than the criminal has roots in church supporting a silent suffering from those not in power, whether it's about domestic violence or not a domestic one. And while one is on the topic, the middle strata that can support a child during education but with a clear understanding that the child must do one's best at performance and the future must depend on it, is a very thin strata in most societies. The upper strata has its future assured via properties far too secure, so the child has only to learn to keep the status quo at the very least, and isn't burdened with expectation of learning anything at school, much less aspire to a demanding profession. ............ In a bizarre twist April feels guilty about sending the complaint so much so she writes to the authorities identifying herself as the source of the trouble! There's that bully culture again, making snitching worse than crimes such as physical assault or theft. And Theo has a class where everyone agrees that cheating on tests isn't a crime! Everyone also agrees that suspension or expulsion is appropriate punishment for cheating. If it isn't a crime, why punishment? Because U.S. turns everything upside down, and defines crime as strictly those activities punishable with prison time? ............ Another point through the story is about Theo and his friend April being victims of this cheating by the teachers, since the cheating brought the grades of several others up. But this ignores the basic fundamental difference between U.S. where they use competitive grading and elsewhere where they do it objectively. In U.S. they expect a bell curve for grades because statistics tells them to, and they aren't prepared to deal with the whole class doing one hundred percent correct, or simply refusing to take the test, or walking out after answering half the questions correctly. Or any such variations thereof. In reality anything can happen, though, and objective grading without strict adherence to the curve makes far more sense. Which would have meant that schools would know that anyone over a certain percentage would be automatically sent up, and cheating by others would only mean that some perhaps undeserving candidates were sent up too. Theo and April were victims, not of the cheating by teachers, but of the stupid competitive grading system of U.S.. ............ The conclusion of the case is typical of the, again, - falsely labled - "liberal" attitude. "No more standardized testing. No more “teaching to the tests.” No more tracking. No more competition for the Honors track. No more special classes for gifted students and lesser classes for lesser students." In reality this merely is a convenient escape, one that has been practiced increasingly in last half of the twentieth century in U.S.. along with other such "liberal" freedoms as holding all subjects an equal choice. Which, in reality, translates to students in college taking algebra when they haven't done mathematics in high school and cannot do fractions, a really pathetic state. It ends up with a volatile situation in college because the students expect every subject to be easy on par with, say, rock or films, which they were allowed to do as an alternative to mathematics during high school. But that's just as stupid as expecting a lifelong donut munching couch potato to suddenly be the star of American Ballet in one semester, or a quarter! In intellectual terms, since things aren't visible or physically touchable, this fact escapes most, and they think that holding all subjects equal is the golden attitude. But really it's only the most convenient escape sought and found by the once beleaguered educators who were then constantly at warpath with those telling them to go easy, make "math" "fun", and so on, alon with how tests are bad and everyone deserves promotion equally. If that were true, why won't everyone be considered a U.S. doctor and a lawyer, legally able to write prescriptions and getting paid like every rich lawyer? Because fraud stops at end of college? ............

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dr.J.G.

    Grisham makes a seemingly serious, promising beginning, about the question of domestic violence, strapping burly males who endanger lives of their own families. "An hour later, Theo was suffering through a review of basic biology when his mind drifted back to his conversation with Pete. The poor kid was living a nightmare, afraid of getting punched by his brute of a father and afraid for his mother’s life. How was a kid like Pete supposed to sit through four days of testing, concentrate on the ex Grisham makes a seemingly serious, promising beginning, about the question of domestic violence, strapping burly males who endanger lives of their own families. "An hour later, Theo was suffering through a review of basic biology when his mind drifted back to his conversation with Pete. The poor kid was living a nightmare, afraid of getting punched by his brute of a father and afraid for his mother’s life. How was a kid like Pete supposed to sit through four days of testing, concentrate on the exams, and score well enough to get properly placed on the right track for high school? And that placement could well determine his future. It made little sense, at least to Theo." Theo has his parents help the family, and Pete's father arrives at night creating a ruckus, demanding to see his family, and even throwing rocks at the house, shattering the glass screen, before being taken away by police. Grisham doesn't carry through with the serious issue, however, at least not immediately, but shies away instead from the really serious phenomenon, and instead compromises with a man who went astray due to his drinking and repeats after a few nights in prison. It's perhaps too demanding on courage to deal with this universal issue that plagues across time and around the globe. He plunges instead into another serious issue, that of tests, grading, and cheating. But again, as with the domestic violence issue, he ducks in the typical style of - incorrectly labeled - "liberal" attitude and stance, to excuse it with a short paragraph about kids who are bright but lack support from parents due to their being low income group. ............ Seriously, are higher income society kids doing well in U.S.? Who's kidding who?!!!! Fact is, kids from higher income groups do well only when their parents expect them to do so and to earn their way in life to match, or do better than, the life they were given as children. But if their level is higher economically, for any reason, such as being amonst the rich or otherwise high social strata such as royals, or titles landed gentry, then the usual attitude is of entitlement rather than otherwise, and teachers are treated like servants rather than givers of knowledge, with expectations of automatic good grades, with a whip of careers of those teachers who might be honest enough to not cheat, being completely destroyed, the very first time they do so. It's only that when teachers at a low income group school cheat, they are punished when caught. At the other end, the punishment is the same but for reverse crime, that of honest grading. In another typical twist though, it's the person who complained about the cheating is the one worried about whether the complaint was a crime! Typical, because - as often enough reflected even on screen - U.S. culture holds someone complaining about a crime as morally lower than the actual criminal, and this is so often enough even when it's the victim who complains; this bulky culture pervades so much it's held up not only in schools but at homes too, with families teaching the children to not "snitch", instead of seeing that without complaints against criminals, crime flourishes. It's as if one expects clean surroundings without a cleaner, and despises anyone who discovers or points out unclean spots. But surely, if one has a lack of ability to deal with crime, it couldn't be morally more correct to suffer it in silence rather than speak about it to authorities? That attitude of blaming the complainant rather than the criminal has roots in church supporting a silent suffering from those not in power, whether it's about domestic violence or not a domestic one. And while one is on the topic, the middle strata that can support a child during education but with a clear understanding that the child must do one's best at performance and the future must depend on it, is a very thin strata in most societies. The upper strata has its future assured via properties far too secure, so the child has only to learn to keep the status quo at the very least, and isn't burdened with expectation of learning anything at school, much less aspire to a demanding profession. ............ In a bizarre twist April feels guilty about sending the complaint so much so she writes to the authorities identifying herself as the source of the trouble! There's that bully culture again, making snitching worse than crimes such as physical assault or theft. And Theo has a class where everyone agrees that cheating on tests isn't a crime! Everyone also agrees that suspension or expulsion is appropriate punishment for cheating. If it isn't a crime, why punishment? Because U.S. turns everything upside down, and defines crime as strictly those activities punishable with prison time? ............ Another point through the story is about Theo and his friend April being victims of this cheating by the teachers, since the cheating brought the grades of several others up. But this ignores the basic fundamental difference between U.S. where they use competitive grading and elsewhere where they do it objectively. In U.S. they expect a bell curve for grades because statistics tells them to, and they aren't prepared to deal with the whole class doing one hundred percent correct, or simply refusing to take the test, or walking out after answering half the questions correctly. Or any such variations thereof. In reality anything can happen, though, and objective grading without strict adherence to the curve makes far more sense. Which would have meant that schools would know that anyone over a certain percentage would be automatically sent up, and cheating by others would only mean that some perhaps undeserving candidates were sent up too. Theo and April were victims, not of the cheating by teachers, but of the stupid competitive grading system of U.S.. ............ The conclusion of the case is typical of the, again, - falsely labled - "liberal" attitude. "No more standardized testing. No more “teaching to the tests.” No more tracking. No more competition for the Honors track. No more special classes for gifted students and lesser classes for lesser students." In reality this merely is a convenient escape, one that has been practiced increasingly in last half of the twentieth century in U.S.. along with other such "liberal" freedoms as holding all subjects an equal choice. Which, in reality, translates to students in college taking algebra when they haven't done mathematics in high school and cannot do fractions, a really pathetic state. It ends up with a volatile situation in college because the students expect every subject to be easy on par with, say, rock or films, which they were allowed to do as an alternative to mathematics during high school. But that's just as stupid as expecting a lifelong donut munching couch potato to suddenly be the star of American Ballet in one semester, or a quarter! In intellectual terms, since things aren't visible or physically touchable, this fact escapes most, and they think that holding all subjects equal is the golden attitude. But really it's only the most convenient escape sought and found by the once beleaguered educators who were then constantly at warpath with those telling them to go easy, make "math" "fun", and so on, alon with how tests are bad and everyone deserves promotion equally. If that were true, why won't everyone be considered a U.S. doctor and a lawyer, legally able to write prescriptions and getting paid like every rich lawyer? Because fraud stops at end of college? ............

  15. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Absolutely awful. The writing is atrocious. The dialogue is wooden and the entire story is boring. There's no grit in the story, no reason to believe it. Teens will find it dull and far below their level of sophistication and vocabulary. I could not like the main character because the story is so flawed. Glaring examples of the author's lack of knowledge about middle-schoolers included a pair public school boys shaking hands and going to class after a frank discussion about the dysfunctional fam Absolutely awful. The writing is atrocious. The dialogue is wooden and the entire story is boring. There's no grit in the story, no reason to believe it. Teens will find it dull and far below their level of sophistication and vocabulary. I could not like the main character because the story is so flawed. Glaring examples of the author's lack of knowledge about middle-schoolers included a pair public school boys shaking hands and going to class after a frank discussion about the dysfunctional family of one (its not 1940. guys are not shaking hands in the hall), everyone in town knows standardized testing is taking place (very few outside the school community would know, many parents don't know), and recess in a public middle school (recess is only in elementary school). Encyclopedia Brown was much more original and entertaining. The Hardy Boys were edgier. Artemis Fowl is much cooler. Read them instead.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Maura

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Theo and his 8th grade class have a week of standardized testing and they hate it. When the results come out, Theo learns that his test scores were just barely too low and keep him out of the Honors track in high school. But his friend April, learns that one of the schools in the county apparently cheated and, also being bumped from Honors, April decides to write an anonymous letter revealing the cheating scandal. This has consequences she never expects and before long, six teachers are on trial Theo and his 8th grade class have a week of standardized testing and they hate it. When the results come out, Theo learns that his test scores were just barely too low and keep him out of the Honors track in high school. But his friend April, learns that one of the schools in the county apparently cheated and, also being bumped from Honors, April decides to write an anonymous letter revealing the cheating scandal. This has consequences she never expects and before long, six teachers are on trial for conspiracy. Theo of course, feels himself to be essential to the case, since he was one of the "victims" of the scandal, and wants to experience as much of the trial as possible. I gotta wonder what happened here. My first and foremost question, especially reading this right after "The Fugitive" and knowing that this is the last book in the series, is what happened to Omar Cheepe's promise to make Theo pay? The author never delivered on the promise to keep going after Theo (in some way or another) because Omar and his buddy Paco aren't even in this story. So what was the point of that little mini-cliffy? That was disappointing. My second question is what happened to Theo's personality in this one? There's a major cheating scandal and he has inside information and for once he doesn't want anything to do with it? This is the same character that would butt his nose into other people's business and be a part of everything, but in this case he just wants him and April to stay out of it? Especially when it directly affects him? That didn't make much sense. But Theo's personality returns towards the end as he's making every possible effort to get into the court room during the trial, because now suddenly he's a victim and this case is very important to him. Mostly, this story felt fairly disjointed and there were plenty of events that felt really unconnected...kinda like the 3rd story. The Boyscouts and that whole episode with the abusive father at the beginning - they all felt so pointless. What was the connection to them? Why was so much time spent on them when there was apparent purpose? Maybe the abusive father was meant to show that a kid couldn't possibly concentrate on testing in those conditions, but did we need to spend 30% of the book on it? I also took issue with the ending of the story. As a teacher, I totally understand the ins and outs of testing, their evils (although not many schools I know of use them to place kids on future tracks) and some of their benefits (more rigorous testing forces teachers to increase the rigor of curriculum and challenge kids...which also has benefits and repercussions). But I don't know many school districts who would just throw away state testing and the connected state funding without some SERIOUS discussion about exactly where else that budget money is coming from. It's all well and good to get rid of the testing, but the money that school district just lost is probably going to result in teachers losing jobs, larger class sizes and less money for materials and building maintenance. That won't exactly make the situation any better. That felt like a lazy ending for Grisham and a huge cop out. Side note: In what ACTUAL school do 8th graders still get recess on a playground?!?!?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Oliver

    It’s the time every elementary and middle school student dreads, standardized testing time. Theo is in eighth grade, and this test now decides what courses he will be able to take in high school. He is very tired of testing all week, and is relieved when his boy scout troop offers a camping trip for all of its eighth grade members. After he returns, he has a frozen yogurt with his good friend April, and they discuss their test scores. They are disappointed that they both missed honors classes b It’s the time every elementary and middle school student dreads, standardized testing time. Theo is in eighth grade, and this test now decides what courses he will be able to take in high school. He is very tired of testing all week, and is relieved when his boy scout troop offers a camping trip for all of its eighth grade members. After he returns, he has a frozen yogurt with his good friend April, and they discuss their test scores. They are disappointed that they both missed honors classes by one point. He is surprised to learn though, that a friend of her friend knows that some teachers at East middle school, one of three schools involved in the statistics, cheated on the tests. April wants to take action, but Theo is not so sure. I enjoyed this book, and found that Theo’s experiences are very relatable when testing arrived. I do feel that the teachers were in the wrong, but had a reasonably good reason for doing it. If I were in Theo’s situation, I probably would have done the same thing, but try to stay out of it as much as possible. I would definitely recommend this series to a friend, and read any new books that are released (the book is set up for a following one).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    The Story hinges on Standardized testing in middle grade schools, a matter of contemporary controversy. Teachers in a local middle school have been accused of cheating. Thirteen year old Theodore knows every judge, police officer, and court clerk in Strattenburg. He has even helped bring a fugitive to justice. But even a future star lawyer like Theo has to deal with statewide standardized testing. When an anonymous tip leads the school board to investigate a suspicious increase in scores another The Story hinges on Standardized testing in middle grade schools, a matter of contemporary controversy. Teachers in a local middle school have been accused of cheating. Thirteen year old Theodore knows every judge, police officer, and court clerk in Strattenburg. He has even helped bring a fugitive to justice. But even a future star lawyer like Theo has to deal with statewide standardized testing. When an anonymous tip leads the school board to investigate a suspicious increase in scores another local middle school, Theo finds himself thrust in the middle of a cheating scandal. With insider knowledge in scores, Theo must follow his keen instincts to do what's right in the newest case for clever kid lawyer Theo Boone. "Not since Nancy Drew has a nosy crime obsessed kid been so hard to resist." The New York times "Smartly written."--USA Today "Edge of your seat Drama, sophisticated plotting, and plently of spunk." I'm hooked to this series. Even though Theo is just 13 years old, doesn't mean i can't like him too. Recommend.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kishore Krishnamoorthy

    The thirteen year old Theodore Boone is involved (secretly) in yet another burning issue in Strattenburg. But this time it’s his friend April who becomes cause for his involvement. To be honest, the plot looks ‘just okay’ type and written for the sake of continuity. The same Animal Court & Judge Yeck in the exact middle part of the story is very much predictable though as it comes across all the previous books. I thought the story of this part would be much more engaging as it was in the previou The thirteen year old Theodore Boone is involved (secretly) in yet another burning issue in Strattenburg. But this time it’s his friend April who becomes cause for his involvement. To be honest, the plot looks ‘just okay’ type and written for the sake of continuity. The same Animal Court & Judge Yeck in the exact middle part of the story is very much predictable though as it comes across all the previous books. I thought the story of this part would be much more engaging as it was in the previous parts. The main highlight is the involvement of Marcella & Woods Boone against Jack Hogan for the scandal. The little partnership between Henry Gantry and Theo is very cute and very much encouraging. Overall, the plot could have been a bit more intense. Having said that, this book would still keep you interested only because of the young Theodore Boone. A very good book and hopefully there’s an upcoming part and a much more gripping storyline for it. Fingers Crossed!!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kellen Shannon

    "The Scandal" is a fictional mystery novel following the life of Theodore Boone, a thirteen year old kid who is known around town as "kid lawyer" because of his knowledge of law and court. During his 8th grade end of the year exams, East High School takes a dramatic rise in test scores since the previous year and the town's suspicions rise. As Theo and his two lawyer parents get involved in the case, Theo's future in school hangs in the balance. I liked this book mostly because of the non stop co "The Scandal" is a fictional mystery novel following the life of Theodore Boone, a thirteen year old kid who is known around town as "kid lawyer" because of his knowledge of law and court. During his 8th grade end of the year exams, East High School takes a dramatic rise in test scores since the previous year and the town's suspicions rise. As Theo and his two lawyer parents get involved in the case, Theo's future in school hangs in the balance. I liked this book mostly because of the non stop conflicts. Many different problems arise from the suspicious test scores. Others are irrelevant and just pure filler but they still are interesting. I would recommend this book to readers who enjoy mystery and drama. I would however recommend reading the first book "Kid Lawyer" before reading any of the others so the characters can be better introduced and understood so then reading the other books won't be as confusing.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    This was another adorable installment in this series. I adore Theo and his compassion and curiosity. The fact that his BFF, April, learns a valuable lesson about selfish motives and meddling, makes this a unique mystery/court case. This book did feel a touch disjointed as it starts with a case about a drunk and abusive father and takes a sharp turn toward the case about teachers and test scores, however because both cases were interesting, I tolerated the whiplash. I also thought the Boy Scout a This was another adorable installment in this series. I adore Theo and his compassion and curiosity. The fact that his BFF, April, learns a valuable lesson about selfish motives and meddling, makes this a unique mystery/court case. This book did feel a touch disjointed as it starts with a case about a drunk and abusive father and takes a sharp turn toward the case about teachers and test scores, however because both cases were interesting, I tolerated the whiplash. I also thought the Boy Scout and hiking stuff was thrown in haphazardly. Good, cute, just a touch sloppy for Grisham.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bob Vandam

    A different theme to John Grisham's writing. The series describes a 13 year old boy who's parents are lawyers and his desire is to become one as well. Describes school's standardized testing and what occurred in scoring those tests. Not that much of a plot, but did leave me tired for all the activity this kid did. A different theme to John Grisham's writing. The series describes a 13 year old boy who's parents are lawyers and his desire is to become one as well. Describes school's standardized testing and what occurred in scoring those tests. Not that much of a plot, but did leave me tired for all the activity this kid did.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Anderson

    While I did enjoy the book, found it to be one long soapbox against standardized testing. His viewpoint didn't annoy, just got to be a little preachy and got me to feeling like come on, just move on, we get it, you don't like standardized testing of children! While I did enjoy the book, found it to be one long soapbox against standardized testing. His viewpoint didn't annoy, just got to be a little preachy and got me to feeling like come on, just move on, we get it, you don't like standardized testing of children!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn

    This book was a simple side plot of the overall plot of the story. It was about five teachers that have been caught cheating on the students' standardized tests that determines the course of the eighth graders track for high school. I especially enjoy the fun court trials that Grisham writes about in his books. This book was a simple side plot of the overall plot of the story. It was about five teachers that have been caught cheating on the students' standardized tests that determines the course of the eighth graders track for high school. I especially enjoy the fun court trials that Grisham writes about in his books.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jill Farr

    Enjoyed the series and I'm sad to see it end. Enjoyed the series and I'm sad to see it end.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    I love this series! “Teddy,” as his mother calls him in private moments, never shrinks from the big questions nor does his loyalty sway at all. He is 1000% devoted to his family and friends!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bidhi Dangol

    I think it was good

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bev Hudson

    Motor fun with Theo.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    For my written review, please check out the link below: Debra's Book Cafe Debs :-) For my written review, please check out the link below: Debra's Book Cafe Debs :-)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Smith

    this one was ok.

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