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Forge of the Mind Slayers

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One man searching for peace in a land that knows only blood. Diran, once a feared assassin, has turned his back on murder. Seeking the life of a wandering priest. His travels have taken him north, into lands caught between warring political factions and plagued by lawless pirates. But Diran refuses to take sides. But when he stumbles upon a plot to restore an ancient relic a One man searching for peace in a land that knows only blood. Diran, once a feared assassin, has turned his back on murder. Seeking the life of a wandering priest. His travels have taken him north, into lands caught between warring political factions and plagued by lawless pirates. But Diran refuses to take sides. But when he stumbles upon a plot to restore an ancient relic and use its powers to create an army of assassins, remaining neutral is no longer an option. It's kill or be killed. Take the fight to the enemy... even if it means embracing the assassin's nature within his soul.


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One man searching for peace in a land that knows only blood. Diran, once a feared assassin, has turned his back on murder. Seeking the life of a wandering priest. His travels have taken him north, into lands caught between warring political factions and plagued by lawless pirates. But Diran refuses to take sides. But when he stumbles upon a plot to restore an ancient relic a One man searching for peace in a land that knows only blood. Diran, once a feared assassin, has turned his back on murder. Seeking the life of a wandering priest. His travels have taken him north, into lands caught between warring political factions and plagued by lawless pirates. But Diran refuses to take sides. But when he stumbles upon a plot to restore an ancient relic and use its powers to create an army of assassins, remaining neutral is no longer an option. It's kill or be killed. Take the fight to the enemy... even if it means embracing the assassin's nature within his soul.

30 review for Forge of the Mind Slayers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Forge of the Mindslayers by Tim Waggoner Forge of the Mindslayers is the second book in the Blade of the Flame trilogy. The first book is Thieves of Blood and the third book is Sea of Death. The Blade of the Flame trilogy is set in the Eberron setting of Dungeons and Dragons. Tim Waggoner has written one other Eberron novel titled Lady Ruin. He has written a vast amount of other novels. His work includes; a Hyperswarm novel titled Defender, the Godfire series (The Orchard of Dreams and Heart's Wo Forge of the Mindslayers by Tim Waggoner Forge of the Mindslayers is the second book in the Blade of the Flame trilogy. The first book is Thieves of Blood and the third book is Sea of Death. The Blade of the Flame trilogy is set in the Eberron setting of Dungeons and Dragons. Tim Waggoner has written one other Eberron novel titled Lady Ruin. He has written a vast amount of other novels. His work includes; a Hyperswarm novel titled Defender, the Godfire series (The Orchard of Dreams and Heart's Wound), the Nekropolis series (Nekropolis, Dead Streets, and Dark War), Last of the Lycans series (Monarch of the Moon), Dying for It, The Harmony of Society, a Dark Ages: Vampire book called Gangrel, Necropolis, an Exalted novel titled A Shadow Over Heaven, Like Death, Darkness Wakes, Pandora Drive, Cross Country, two novels in the Dragonlance: New Adventures series (Temple of the Dragonslayer and Return of the Sorceress), a novel based on Nightmare on Elm Street called Protegé, and a Stargate SG-1 novel titled Valhalla. He has written a vast amount of short stories for various anthologies and magazines, and has two story-collections title All Too Surreal and Broken Shadows. Forge of the Mindslayers was released in March 2007 and was published by Wizards of the Coast, Inc. The former assassin turned priest Diran Bastiaan and his half-orc companion Ghaji are on the hunt to take down a lich. The duo are accompanied by a halfling pirate, Hinto, and an old artificer named Tresslar, who have been with the duo since the fateful events that happened in Grimwall. After seemingly dispatching the lich, the group returns to the city of Perhata, and meet up with Yvka, an elf who works for the mysterious organization called the Shadow Network. She brings news to Diran about a man named Cathmore, a man from his past. However, trouble finds Diran and Ghaji and before they know it, they are captured and on their way to certain death. Luckily, someone else from Diran's past comes to his aid, but it's someone he'd rather have never seen again. Criticisms: 1) Flashbacks. The biggest problem with Forge of the Mindslayers is the usage of flashbacks. The flashbacks happened all at one time, instead of over the entire novel. This caused the flashbacks to feel like they were forced into the novel, instead of a natural inclusion. Because of this, these flashbacks take the reader out of the main plot and places them in something extra. Something almost unnecessary. The flashbacks did have a connection to the overall story, but they still felt unneeded. There is another side effect of the flashbacks. Diran and Ghaji were interesting in the first book of the trilogy, but as the mysteries of their past become unraveled, they become less interesting and more generic. They still are interesting character, but they did loss some of their appeal due to the revealing their pasts. The main issue with the flashbacks is that they happen in a clump, and causes you to be taken out of the story. 2) Characters. The characters in Forge of the Mindslayers were decent, but there was one problem. We are introduced to a number of new characters. While that number isn't a lot, it still causes problems. The antagonists never felt like they mattered. They just felt like stock villains. They weren't very memorable nor did they give off a feeling of menace. The reason for this is because there are two groups of them. The first, the main antagonists, never felt like they made an impact. This group was just generic characters. They didn't really have anything interesting about them other than the fact that Diran and Ghaji knew two of them. The second group, more like a duo, also didn't have any impact but were interesting. However, this group never did anything in the story and only appeared for maybe thirty pages out of the whole novel. They were a let-down. However, the main group that suffered the most is the protagonists. The main characters, Diran and Ghaji, issues aren't due to the added characters, but instead due to what I mentioned before. However, they were still decent and likable. Who suffered is the minor characters. Yvka, Tresslar, and Hinto were one-dimensional and that's it. They were tossed aside for newer additions and because of that their character development greatly suffered. All in all, the characters weren't as good, mostly because of the amount of new characters that were added. More characters meant less development for the older characters. Praises: 1) Side Stories. Forge of the Mindslayers did have a pretty interesting story, but the side plots that were introduced was far more interesting. The main storyline was fairly straightforward like the previous story was, but now there are some interesting side plots that are introduced. At first, the side plots did feel kind of unnecessary, but in the long run they really piqued my interest. The novel could have taken some interesting and different turns, so I was left guessing on what the group was going to do. This just opened up so many interesting places to go. Aside from that, the ending was really great. It was exciting and very unique in how things happened. I didn't expect it to be like that, but I was still very impressed. All and all, the main story was straightforward, but it leaves a lot open to what could come next. 2) Makala. Makala was the best character in the novel, by far. What made her interesting is her internal struggle with what she's become and who she was. You could almost feel and understand her struggle. It added a lot of depth to the character and made you feel for her. She was very well written and she was the most three-dimensional character out of the group. Even with the amount of time that she was given, which wasn't a lot, she still was the more developed and interesting character. Even in the scenes that she was in with others, she stole a lot of those scenes. Makala was the best character in the novel, and the most sympathetic. Side Notes: 1) Kalashtar. I don't really understand who these beings are. They seem human, yet not. I don't really get the difference between Kalashtar's and humans with psionic abilities. 2) Demothi Island. Is it just me, or did this issue seemed to be resolved too easily after all that build up? 3) Cover Art. Forge of the Mindslayers cover art is decent. It's not bad, but when compared to the first novel's it's not as good. It relays heavily on action, which the art work does reflect very well. Other than that it seems very generic, but still good. Diran looks okay, but not great. Cathmore, the guy grabbing Diran, looks really good. He looks intense and dangerous. The background looks decent. The colors are dark, but the background doesn't seem to work right. All in all, it's just decent. Overall: 3/5 Final Thoughts: Forge of the Mindslayers is a decent novel, but feels slightly disappointing. The flashbacks that occur throughout the story felt misplaced and forced in. They did serve a purpose, but they went on for far too long. There were too many characters added in as well. This caused a severe lack of character development in the older characters. The new characters were interesting, but I would rather have spent more time focused on the older ones who needed some more development. On the other hand, the best character in the novel was Makala. Her problems felt more developed and interesting compared to every one else. She came across as three-dimensional and you really felt her struggle. The story was decent and it did open up some interesting side plots, but it felt far too linear. I would have liked to seen the story go with one of the side plots instead of the straightforward story. Overall, Forge of the Mindslayers was a decent read, but left me wishing for more out of this sequel.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marvin

    A rather rambling and uninspired middle entry that sees a growing cast of characters constantly turning about and traveling without ever seeming to make headway as they face rowdy military captains, some undead, and some foes from the past with designs on a powerful magical device.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joel Flank

    Forge of the Mindslayers by Tim Waggoner is the second book in the Blade of the Flame trilogy of Eberron books. One of the things that was a nice change of pace for a series is that while this book is a sequel to the first book in the series, it wasn't a continuation of a huge story, and therefore you could just pick the book up and start reading and not really be missing out on anything. There are certainly references to events in the first book, but that book's story ended and this book starts Forge of the Mindslayers by Tim Waggoner is the second book in the Blade of the Flame trilogy of Eberron books. One of the things that was a nice change of pace for a series is that while this book is a sequel to the first book in the series, it wasn't a continuation of a huge story, and therefore you could just pick the book up and start reading and not really be missing out on anything. There are certainly references to events in the first book, but that book's story ended and this book starts a new story. Unfortunately, this did not continue, as the book ends on a cliffhanger to be directly picked up by the third book in the series. The book itself is set in the world of Eberron, which is one of the campaign setting worlds of D&D. For any book set in a shared world, how strictly it adheres to the existing rules and flavor of the world is an important factor, and overall Forge does a good job in this regard, in particular because it takes place in an area that isn't that well detailed in other published products. Unfortunately, one of the characters is a half orc, and his back story is presented in this book in a way that doesn't quite jive with the established setting. It works fine for most standard D&D or fantasy settings, but in Eberron, half orcs aren't particularly hated or despised by either humans or full blooded orcs. The story focuses on Diran, a former assassin, who has found religion in the faith of the Silver Flame, and his band of friends and fellow adventurers. Diran first appears in a short story in The Tales of the Last War, so if you want to read about all of his adventures, you should start there. He makes an effective hero, blending the dark brooding anti-hero of his past with a more reserved and traditional hero as a priest. In this book, he stumbles into the crossfire between several dangerous groups that are all out to cause him and his friends grief. This does lead to the one significant problem with the book, which is that for almost the entire novel, the protagonists are simply reacting to events around them. They don't have a central goal or quest, and personally, I prefer characters who are more actively pursuing a goal, rather than just "stop these bad guys who are out to get us." It's much more fun to read about their struggles to stop the Death Star, destroy the One Ring, etc. Overall, though, the book was a fun read, which captures the high action fantasy typical of a good D&D game, as well as fits the rules established by the game. I won't go so far as to say this was one of the best I've read, or even one of the best game based books I've read, but it was a fun read, and it was good fantasy escapism. One minor quibble though is that the title suggested to me that it would feature Mind Flayer's the iconic D&D monster. In fact, these super cool monsters weren't present in any way, shape or form.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marlon Manalese

    Forge of the Mindslayers is the 2nd installment of the Blade of the Flame series, but the first book I picked up from th trilogy, as well as first book ever from the D&D based novels. In this case, the Eberron world. There's way too much I can say about how much I love this book but I'll make it brief to save my self from spiralling out of control. Diran Bastiaan is a solid fantasy protagonist because he's an EX-ASSASSIN turned PRIEST!!! Already, you know what kind of dilemmas he must face as a w Forge of the Mindslayers is the 2nd installment of the Blade of the Flame series, but the first book I picked up from th trilogy, as well as first book ever from the D&D based novels. In this case, the Eberron world. There's way too much I can say about how much I love this book but I'll make it brief to save my self from spiralling out of control. Diran Bastiaan is a solid fantasy protagonist because he's an EX-ASSASSIN turned PRIEST!!! Already, you know what kind of dilemmas he must face as a warrior of faith "trying to find peace in a land that only knows blood." If his single character conflictions aren't enough, he has a companion who is also a greater contrast to him; Ghaji the half orc, half human warrior. Together they venture the land of Eberron purging evil with unexpected results. I can think of the other characters at the top of my head, but there's too many to list and would so ruin the surprise as to how they encounter them all. This book felt like I was playing an RPG because of the equal balance of deep in depth storytelling mixed with well detailed action scenes. It progresses like an RPG in the sense that they come into contact with other characters who so then join their party to battle evil. The cliche of good vs evil is shattered when [spoiler]Diran and co discover that his exgirlfriend Makala has turned into a vampire. Torn by what his faith requires of him, she also ends up teaming with the main villains of this installment:] Aldarik Cathmore schemes to erect an army of Mindslayers after reviving a Warforged who has been enhanced with Psyonic abilities. Cathmore is also the former assassination teacher of Makala AND Diran so there's a ton load of backstory substantiating the history the two have with this dastardly villain. Ahhhh I will go out of control here because I know this book like the back of my hand. It's the one book that gets me into reading again if I ever stray from the path. Of course along with part 1 and 3 to follow. I usually read it in 2, 3, 1 sequence, but anyways enough about my personal experience with this. POINT IS: highly recommend this to anyone who likes assassins, fantasy, hot evil babes, and well constructed battle scenes in TEXT. I have too many more reasons, just close down this review and get this book if yo don't have it already!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert Carlberg

    Really good second book. The idea of an assassin that becomes a cleric of the Silver Flame is pretty great. Diran, Ghaji, Yvka, Hinto and Tesslar are back. Now they are battling an old trainer of Diran's and an old aquaintance of Ghaji's. In the background a lich the battled has her eyes on one of the magical pieces Tesslar uses. Great pacing, and some really good characters to get to know have kept me wanting more. Ohh yeah, I did forget Diran's old girlfriend Makala reappears as well :) Really good second book. The idea of an assassin that becomes a cleric of the Silver Flame is pretty great. Diran, Ghaji, Yvka, Hinto and Tesslar are back. Now they are battling an old trainer of Diran's and an old aquaintance of Ghaji's. In the background a lich the battled has her eyes on one of the magical pieces Tesslar uses. Great pacing, and some really good characters to get to know have kept me wanting more. Ohh yeah, I did forget Diran's old girlfriend Makala reappears as well :)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Some

    Master story-weaver Tim Waggoner weaves us deeper into the struggle of former assassin - turned Cleric of the Silver Flams Diran Bastiian as he battles old demons from his past as well as threats to his friends in this extremely well-written speculative fiction (fantasy) thriller). All the elements are fully exploited, ranking this among the best written fiction across the board. Enjoy!!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    John

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bryce

  9. 5 out of 5

    Connor

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scott Vaughn

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert Havrilla

  12. 5 out of 5

    A.J.Booth

  13. 5 out of 5

    Walt

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zachary Parsons

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

  16. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jason Griffith

  18. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Suh

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carl

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  23. 5 out of 5

    liam

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Mayes

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tezz Blake

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marko Bajić

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Friesen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Spshuster

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mike Howe

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