web site hit counter Measure What Matters - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Measure What Matters

Availability: Ready to download

The revolutionary movement behind the explosive growth of Intel, Google, Amazon and Uber. With a foreword by Larry Page, and contributions from Bono and Bill Gates. Measure What Matters is about using Objectives and Key Results (OKRs), a revolutionary approach to goal-setting, to make tough choices in business. In 1999, legendary venture capitalist John Doerr i The revolutionary movement behind the explosive growth of Intel, Google, Amazon and Uber. With a foreword by Larry Page, and contributions from Bono and Bill Gates. Measure What Matters is about using Objectives and Key Results (OKRs), a revolutionary approach to goal-setting, to make tough choices in business. In 1999, legendary venture capitalist John Doerr invested nearly $12 million in a startup that had amazing technology, entrepreneurial energy and sky-high ambitions, but no real business plan. Doerr introduced the founders to OKRs and with them at the foundation of their management, the startup grew from forty employees to more than 70,000 with a market cap exceeding $600 billion. The startup was Google. Since then Doerr has introduced OKRs to more than fifty companies, helping tech giants and charities exceed all expectations. In the OKR model objectives define what we seek to achieve and key results are how those top­ priority goals will be attained. OKRs focus effort, foster coordination and enhance workplace satisfaction. They surface an organization's most important work as everyone's goals from entry-level to CEO are transparent to the entire institution. In Measure What Matters, Doerr shares a broad range of first-person, behind-the-scenes case studies, with narrators including Bono and Bill Gates, to demonstrate the focus, agility, and explosive growth that OKRs have spurred at so many great organizations. This book will show you how to collect timely, relevant data to track progress - to measure what matters. It will help any organization or team aim high, move fast, and excel.


Compare

The revolutionary movement behind the explosive growth of Intel, Google, Amazon and Uber. With a foreword by Larry Page, and contributions from Bono and Bill Gates. Measure What Matters is about using Objectives and Key Results (OKRs), a revolutionary approach to goal-setting, to make tough choices in business. In 1999, legendary venture capitalist John Doerr i The revolutionary movement behind the explosive growth of Intel, Google, Amazon and Uber. With a foreword by Larry Page, and contributions from Bono and Bill Gates. Measure What Matters is about using Objectives and Key Results (OKRs), a revolutionary approach to goal-setting, to make tough choices in business. In 1999, legendary venture capitalist John Doerr invested nearly $12 million in a startup that had amazing technology, entrepreneurial energy and sky-high ambitions, but no real business plan. Doerr introduced the founders to OKRs and with them at the foundation of their management, the startup grew from forty employees to more than 70,000 with a market cap exceeding $600 billion. The startup was Google. Since then Doerr has introduced OKRs to more than fifty companies, helping tech giants and charities exceed all expectations. In the OKR model objectives define what we seek to achieve and key results are how those top­ priority goals will be attained. OKRs focus effort, foster coordination and enhance workplace satisfaction. They surface an organization's most important work as everyone's goals from entry-level to CEO are transparent to the entire institution. In Measure What Matters, Doerr shares a broad range of first-person, behind-the-scenes case studies, with narrators including Bono and Bill Gates, to demonstrate the focus, agility, and explosive growth that OKRs have spurred at so many great organizations. This book will show you how to collect timely, relevant data to track progress - to measure what matters. It will help any organization or team aim high, move fast, and excel.

30 review for Measure What Matters

  1. 4 out of 5

    Martin Brochhaus

    This book is bad. The first 18% of the book is simply silicon valley hero worshipping, basically the author bragging about all the cool people he has worked with and why they are so important and genius and surely everything that follows must be of importance because he has worked with important people. This book is nothing more than a bunch of case studies. As always with these case studies, they are extremely specific to the companies under observation and you will not learn anything from this t This book is bad. The first 18% of the book is simply silicon valley hero worshipping, basically the author bragging about all the cool people he has worked with and why they are so important and genius and surely everything that follows must be of importance because he has worked with important people. This book is nothing more than a bunch of case studies. As always with these case studies, they are extremely specific to the companies under observation and you will not learn anything from this that you can repeat in your own company. Most importantly, the book fails to provide any proof that OKRs were what actually drove the companies to success. These were all companies that were faced with some existential threat and therefore the management decided what is the most important new metric and then made everyone work long hours in order to meet that metric. You can achieve that with any management technique. Furthermore, there is not a single chapter that defines in detail what OKRs are, how they are implemented in a company, what software should be used to guide the implementation, what should be done when someone fails their objectives, and so on and so forth. Instead, in each case study you will find one orange box that shows a sample OKR that was presumably taken from that company at the time. I assume these are all bullshit and made up by the author, but even if not, they are so glaringly obvious, and simple, you don't need to be a manager or expert to make them up. These can't be what drove those companies to success, no way, the secret sauce lies somewhere else and is not revealed in this book. By the way, if you are in the tough spot of trying to find that magic thing that matters the most for your business to measure, don't read this book - despite the clickbait title - this book isn't about that. Sure you can use OKRs to measure things and be transparent about it - but WHAT TO MEASURE is still up to you to figure out. As far as I can tell, the entire OKR idea fits on one DIN A4 page, so I would say, this book isn't at all about how to use OKRs, instead it is to celebrate a few lucky silicon valley success stories. And granted: that alone can be quite inspiring. I will try to implement this in my own companies, but I'll need some other reading material to succeed with that. This book is merely here to kindle the flame.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Keith Martin

    Solid methodology that could be adequately summarized in two pages, padded to 300+ pages with self-aggrandizement and surface-level case studies.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Romans Karpelcevs

    Did I learn how to set OKRs? No. Did I find out what's the difference between Os and KRs when you choose them? No. Do I know how to align departments with non-trivial objectives? No. Did I understand what to do when things go wrong? No. Do I feel confident about doing OKRs now? No. Am I inspired about OKRs more than I was when I started the book? No. Did I at least heard about how to measure what matters? No. Did I learn anything at all from this book?! Hm... I heard empty case studies where people, mo Did I learn how to set OKRs? No. Did I find out what's the difference between Os and KRs when you choose them? No. Do I know how to align departments with non-trivial objectives? No. Did I understand what to do when things go wrong? No. Do I feel confident about doing OKRs now? No. Am I inspired about OKRs more than I was when I started the book? No. Did I at least heard about how to measure what matters? No. Did I learn anything at all from this book?! Hm... I heard empty case studies where people, mostly Silicon Valley superstars, and sometimes just ex-Googlers share their fascination with OKRs. Then again, I mostly heard pitching of their latest or even old companies and achievements and how "they wouldn't have done it without OKRs". I guess what I've understood for myself is if so many people actually believe in it, I shouldn't give up on OKRs just because of this book. This book should have the title "OKR Cargo Cult: How to Create One". I'm sure there's more to the framework, just don't try to see it in this book. It's an endless stream of selling the 3 golden letters, without an attempt of sharing anything below the surface. Also, 4+ rating for this empty book? Is it really because John Doerr managed to get many cool people to contribute? Gah. 4 stars doesn't mean anything even in non-fiction now.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    I've worked on the Google campus for 11 years, and have seen first-hand the impact OKRs have had on the company. John Doerr is single-handedly responsible for bringing OKRs to Google. He saw before anyone else the transformative power Andy Grove's system from Intel could have at Google, and this book is a great window into those early days. John does a great job showing how that early presentation at Google set the stage for so much of the growth and success that came later. Some of the best part I've worked on the Google campus for 11 years, and have seen first-hand the impact OKRs have had on the company. John Doerr is single-handedly responsible for bringing OKRs to Google. He saw before anyone else the transformative power Andy Grove's system from Intel could have at Google, and this book is a great window into those early days. John does a great job showing how that early presentation at Google set the stage for so much of the growth and success that came later. Some of the best parts of the book are the mini case studies from a variety of companies. One of the biggest complaints I hear from founders about OKRs is that it works for Google because, well, Google is *Google*. By letting you hear from founders in their own words - from small startups to fast-growth startups to non-profits - John makes it easy for the reader to model how OKRs could work at their company. It's not just Google: Doerr shows how any ambitious, outcome-oriented organization can benefit from implementing OKRs. Anyone who wants to understand what makes Silicon Valley tick will learn a lot from this book. So many of the giants from the last fifty years are captured in these pages – as relayed by John, their commitment and ambition shine through. John makes clear that they also shared an embrace of a simple framework for setting goals and communicating throughout their organization – which should be encouraging for any founder who wants to know how to build similarly effective organizations. (Disclaimer: a brief anecdote involving me is included in the book. I didn't tell John I was writing this review ahead of time - I bought the book last night and wanted to share my thoughts.)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Yevgeniy Brikman

    This book should've been a long blog post. At its core, it contains valuable advice about the power of OKRs (Objectives and Key Results) as a mechanism to help get everyone in a company moving in the same direction. Unfortunately, this nugget of wisdom is wrapped in loads of generic business book jargon, scattered through chapters that seem to be organized randomly, and padded out with lots of case studies, which while sometimes interesting, are not terribly useful, and often written in an unnat This book should've been a long blog post. At its core, it contains valuable advice about the power of OKRs (Objectives and Key Results) as a mechanism to help get everyone in a company moving in the same direction. Unfortunately, this nugget of wisdom is wrapped in loads of generic business book jargon, scattered through chapters that seem to be organized randomly, and padded out with lots of case studies, which while sometimes interesting, are not terribly useful, and often written in an unnatural style that sounds like an infomercial ("and all of this was only possible thanks to... OKRs!!!"). So, here, without all that extra padding, I've copied in my notes that contain most of the important takeaways from the book: - OKRs = Objectives and Key Results. Objectives are the "what" you're trying to achieve (e.g., become the best X in the world) and the key results are the "how" you're going to achieve it (e.g., X million page views per month, Y revenue per year, etc). - Why you should use OKRs: if you decide to meet up with a bunch of your friends in Central Europe, and some people end up in Germany, some in Italy, and some in France, whereas you really meant Switzerland, you won't be particularly happy. A company is like that: if the company's goals are not clearly defined, then everyone ends up working towards different goals, and all the vectors will cancel out to 0. OKRs are a way to make sure that your most important goals and the means of accomplishing those goals are clear, transparent, and visible to everyone, so everyone is aligned, and moving in the same direction. - There are two types of OKRs: committed OKRs, which are critical business goals that you are intended to accomplish 100% (e.g., improving security), and aspirational OKRs, which are designed to stretch you, and therefore, you expect to fail at many of them (~70% success rate with high variance). - You can have OKRs for the entire company, OKRs for each team, and personal OKRs. They should all be inter-connected (e.g., team OKRs must support those of the larger organization). - For aspirational OKRs, a big, bold, audacious goal is valuable in getting the best out of people. Many studies have shown that people produce far more/better output when they aim for goals that are well beyond their current abilities—especially if those goals are written and shared publicly. - All OKRs should be developed openly, written down, and shared publicly within the company. Everyone should commit to them publicly, review them publicly, and, ideally, you should see them every day as you work. Clear, written, public commitments to big goals are an incredibly powerful tool. - The key results MUST be measurable and preferably time-bound. In fact, the typical phrasing for an OKR is " as measured by "; e.g., "we will become the premier photo hosting website in the world as measured by getting to 100 million users and 1 billion photo uploads by the end of the year." They should be clearly defined (e.g., the "100 million users" in the previous example is ambiguous—is that monthly active users? daily active users? registered users?), so there's no ambiguity when reviewing the results later of whether you accomplished them or not. - The objectives should be defined in how the impact they have, not the thing you're building. E.g., "ship feature X" is not nearly as good of an objective as "ship feature X to increase sign ups by 25%" or even better, "increase sign ups by 25%." - The key results must be defined in such a way that when they are complete, the objective is completed. If you mark all the key results as "done" but you don't feel like the objective is accomplished, you didn't pick the right key results. - Try to balance the key results to avoid incentivizing the wrong behavior. For example, a key result like "make $X in revenue by date Y" could lead to negative behavior when someone is trying really hard to make their numbers (e.g., ripping customers off to boost revenue in the short term), so you can try to offset this by also having a key result like "customer NPS score of Y." Another example: a key result like "ship feature X by date Y" could lead to cutting a lot of corners as date Y approaches, so try to balance it by also having a key result like, "with fewer than X bugs per 1,000 lines of code." - OKRs are a tool. They are a great way to get everyone aligned, but they are not the end-all, be-all of decision making. If an OKR clearly cannot be accomplished, or the outside world has changed and the OKR no longer makes sense, it's OK to change it or discard it. Don't be dogmatic about it. - Less is more. You want no more than 3-5 OKRs per quarter and no more than 3-5 key results per OKR. Any more and it becomes hard to focus and decide what really matters. - It can take a long time (1-2 years) for an organization to get good at using OKRs. It's a skill that you must develop. - It's a good idea to regularly review how you did against your previous OKRs and to come up with updated ones. At Google, each employee scores themselves against their OKRs: 0 - 0.3 means you made no progress towards the OKR; 0.4 - 0.6 means you made some progress, but you're not done; and 0.7 - 1.0 means you made great progress or got the whole thing done. Or, analogously, you can mark each OKR as red, yellow, or green. - OKRs should not be directly tied to compensation. Otherwise, employees will fear taking any risks and will sandbag all the key results, only promising what they know they can easily deliver as to ensure they get their bonuses. If you want people to try for big, crazy, game-changing ideas, you need to expect that failures will happen, and you have to provide an environment where failing is not punished. That's pretty much it. The rest of the book mostly feels like fluff. Moreover, it fails to answer critical questions such as: - How do you implement OKRs at a company that hasn't used them before? - How often should you review and update OKRs? - What's the process for creating company OKRs, team OKRs, and personal OKRs, and having them cascade all the way down? - OKRs shouldn't be tied directly to compensation, but it seems impractical to ignore them completely too. How do you balance that? - How do you deal with failure? The book explains that failure for aspirational OKRs is expected, but many people are not used to failing—especially publicly, as is the case with OKRs—so how do you help them get used to that? One of the most useful parts of the book is an appendix that contains an excerpt from Google's OKR playbook. You can also find it online here: https://www.whatmatters.com/resources.... In fact, that website is arguably more useful than the book itself, so check it out!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Very disappointing that someone like John Doerr wrote such a shallow book. *It's extremely vague. Never gotten into the details of OKR or the shortcomings of this goal setting system. The most detail this book offered is the football analogy *90% of this book is brief case studies *Tons of plugs into companies Kleiner Perkins invested *Lots of reference to Intel and Andy Grove so if you are looking for solid mgmt advise read "High Output Management" instead Very disappointing that someone like John Doerr wrote such a shallow book. *It's extremely vague. Never gotten into the details of OKR or the shortcomings of this goal setting system. The most detail this book offered is the football analogy *90% of this book is brief case studies *Tons of plugs into companies Kleiner Perkins invested *Lots of reference to Intel and Andy Grove so if you are looking for solid mgmt advise read "High Output Management" instead

  7. 4 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    In 1999, John Doerr got his VC firm Kleiner Perkins to invest $11.8 million for 12% of the infant Google Corp. Current market cap (Dec 2018) for Google is around $743 billion, so Kleiner Perkins' 12% would be worth (say) $89 billion. Doerr himself has a personal net worth of around $7 billion. So, if he's writing a book on how to achieve those sorts of results, he has earned our respectful attention. Plus the book is clearly written, and short. There are caveats, as you can see in nearby reviews In 1999, John Doerr got his VC firm Kleiner Perkins to invest $11.8 million for 12% of the infant Google Corp. Current market cap (Dec 2018) for Google is around $743 billion, so Kleiner Perkins' 12% would be worth (say) $89 billion. Doerr himself has a personal net worth of around $7 billion. So, if he's writing a book on how to achieve those sorts of results, he has earned our respectful attention. Plus the book is clearly written, and short. There are caveats, as you can see in nearby reviews, such as https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Doerr started working at Intel in 1974. He’d come to California for the summer hoping to reconnect with an old girlfriend — who he found was also working at Intel. She wasn’t pleased to see him. But Doerr was persistent, and he married Ann Howland, another Rice electrical engineer, in 1978. They're still married, 40 years on.... At Intel, Doerr became one of the firm’s most successful sales engineers. He grew to admire Andy Grove, who he considers to be the father of the OKR idea, although Doerr traces the origins of the idea back to Peter Drucker, in the 1950s. Old-timers will recall MBO, Managemeent by Objectives, which was the foundation for the HP Way, https://www.hpalumni.org/hp_way.htm By 1975, Grove’s OKR system was fully developed, and was put to a severe test in 1979, when Motorola released its 68000 chip, a direct competitor to Intel’s 16-bit microprocessor, the 8086. Many thought the Motorola chip was superior. Groves found the Motorola chip a mortal threat to Intel’s very existence — a fight he wrote about in detail in his 1988 book “Only the Paranoid Survive". Intel won that battle through use of Groves’ OKR technique, in Doerr’s opinion, which he relates in detail. And I loved that Andy Groves kept a big red “BULLSHIT!” rubber stamp on his desk! In 1980, Doerr was offered a VC job with Kleiner Perkins. Andy Grove told him, "John, venture capital, that's not a real job. It's like being a real estate agent." Doerr continues as an apostle for the Andy Groves-style OKR system, and says Grove’s Intel was the best-run company he’d ever seen. By the time he pitched Google on the OKR system, he’d given his OKR pitch to at least 50 start-ups. He had the Google engineers sold at the metrics. Early Googler Marissa Myer would say, “It’s not a key result unless it has a number.” OKRs clearly work, but the book gets disjointed about how to actually implement them — one size doesn’t fit all, and clearly each company or org will have to experiment to get the method to work for them. The case studies are scattershot, but so what? If you’re not getting anything out of one, skip to the next (I skipped Bono!). The culture stuff: OK, company culture is important, and you want your company to have a good one -- but I don't think you will learn how to fix a bad culture here. This is probably the weakest part of the book. Somehow, I think there are consultants available to help you.... It's an uneven book, but these are good people, who've walked the walk. I learned interesting stuff, and Valley lore that was new to me. Such as, Susan Wojcicki's garage is where Google got its start, in 1998. I think she is employee #17, runs YouTube, and devised AdSense that supplies most of Google's revenue. "Only" a half-billionaire! Overall rating, 3.5 stars, rounded up. Best review I saw here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... And here's a good review, by an insider: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Website for the book: https://www.whatmatters.com/

  8. 4 out of 5

    CaptainWolfsborg

    I am a big proponent of written goals with systematic follow-ups. Otherwise, they are just the dreams in the sky, which might accidentally realize, but, most often, they will not. John Doerr presents his approach to goal-setting and ways for following them up. His system is called Objectives and Key Results (OKRs). The author’s system is solid and, apparently, has been implemented with great success at several outstanding companies like Google. I can’t agree with the proclamation that the method I am a big proponent of written goals with systematic follow-ups. Otherwise, they are just the dreams in the sky, which might accidentally realize, but, most often, they will not. John Doerr presents his approach to goal-setting and ways for following them up. His system is called Objectives and Key Results (OKRs). The author’s system is solid and, apparently, has been implemented with great success at several outstanding companies like Google. I can’t agree with the proclamation that the method is revolutionary. It is based on a well-known goal setting philosophy which stresses on importance of defining a few, challenging, realistic, and measurable goals, which are subject for a continuous follow-up. That is what, basically, suggested through the OKR method. More than half of the book are case studies with a lot of words which are quite tedious and seldom inspiring. The story often goes like this - we started a company, we implemented goal management system, we struggled with this and that, and whoops, now we are an extremely successful company. Anyway, the book was worth reading, since I found some for me new and excellent points about how to deal with stretched goals and some interesting angles on feedback management.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Piotr Pisarz

    As an ex-Googler, I’m quite familiar with OKRs - They are a key management tool in the company. While they sometime frustrate you, they are your key northstar. Having left a few years ago, i do have to say i miss them, and I encourage all companies and founders to instill them. John’s book is a great intro to the OKR system, used by all leading companies worldwide. It provides clear examples and use cases. If you’re a founder, this should be a new position on your must read list.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ScienceOfSuccess

    I hate to grade this kind of books. Any grade from 2 to 5 would be explainable. There is a clear message so simple you can't miss it... 'The OKRs system is better than goals because goals can measure anything and everything, and OKR's focus on measuring what matters.' ...and then there are 20 examples of how it works. For me, this book could be a blog post. I don't need quotes from Bono to believe this system works, but when I think more about it, I'd probably forget OKR's and just move one forgett I hate to grade this kind of books. Any grade from 2 to 5 would be explainable. There is a clear message so simple you can't miss it... 'The OKRs system is better than goals because goals can measure anything and everything, and OKR's focus on measuring what matters.' ...and then there are 20 examples of how it works. For me, this book could be a blog post. I don't need quotes from Bono to believe this system works, but when I think more about it, I'd probably forget OKR's and just move one forgetting this book in a few weeks. I just wish every manager would read it. Even life managers like you and me ;)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ali Sattari

    Could have been a ~10 page essay.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Herve

    Kleiner Perkins is a, not to say the VC brand name – but there is also Sequoia. When their partners write something, it is often worth reading. And this month two of them publish a book! I begin here with John Doerr and his Measure What Matters - www.whatmatters.com (though this is the paperback publication – the hardcover was published in 2017). In my next review I will write about Komisar’s Straight Talk for Startups Ideas are Easy. Implementation is Everything. Doerr is a Silicon Valley legend. Kleiner Perkins is a, not to say the VC brand name – but there is also Sequoia. When their partners write something, it is often worth reading. And this month two of them publish a book! I begin here with John Doerr and his Measure What Matters - www.whatmatters.com (though this is the paperback publication – the hardcover was published in 2017). In my next review I will write about Komisar’s Straight Talk for Startups Ideas are Easy. Implementation is Everything. Doerr is a Silicon Valley legend. He owes a lot to the pioneers of Silicon Valley, such as Noyce and Moore and particularly to Andy Grove, whom he mentions a lot: he calls him one of the father of OKRs. Chapter 2 is about Grove who said “there are so many people working so hard and achieving so little”. It reminds me of The Innovation Illusion: How So Little is Created by So Many Working So Hard. And many owe to him, beginning with the Google founders. Indeed Larry Page is the author of a short, 2-page and powerful foreword about OKRs: “OKRs are a simple process that helps drive varied organizations forward… OKRs have helped lead us to 10x growth, many times over.” And Doerr begins with a tribute to Google and its two founders (page 4): Sergey was exuberant, mercurial, strongly opinionated, and able to leap intellectual chasms in a single bound. A Soviet-born immigrant, he was a canny, creative negotiator and a principled leader. Sergey was restless, always pushing for more; he might drop to the floor in the middle of a meeting for a set of push-ups. Larry was an engineer’s engineer, the son of a computer science pioneer. He was a soft-spoken nonconformist, a rebel with a 10x cause: to make the internet exponentially relevant. While Sergey crafted the commerce of technology, Larry toiled on the product and imagined the impossible. He was a blue-sky thinker with his feet on the ground. So what are these OKRs? It’s an acronym for Objective and Key Results. “An objective is simply WHAT is to be achieved. Key Results benchmark and monitor HOW to get to the objective.” (Page 7) But there is no recipe. Each company or organization should have its own. “By definition, start-ups wrestle with ambiguity… You’re not going to get the system just right the first time around. It’s not going to be perfect the second or third time, either. But don’t get discouraged. Persevere. You need to adapt it and make it your own.” (Page 75) Now if you need that kind of advice, read Doerr’s book… But I need to add more: I was impressed by the last chapter dedicated to “Coach” Bill Campbell. It is a very moving portrait of one of the least known celebrities of Silicon Valley. The Coach, the coach of Steve Jobs and the Google triumvirate, Page, Brin and Schmidt and of so many others. I was also impressed by the subtlety of the message about OKRs. So difficult to explain as it may take a life to digest them. But the book is really enlightening. OKRs have four ingredients, focus, transparency, accountability and ambition (the BHAG – Big Hairy Audacious Goal). It is scary and at the same time generous. I think any leader should read that book…

  13. 5 out of 5

    Geoff

    I read a lot of these kind of books because I'm assuming that they'll be read by someone in the senior leadership of my company and then I'll need to respond to the new exciting fad they want to have the company embrace without critical thinking. This book demonstrated without fail that Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) can produce microprocessors, save people from malaria and HIV/AIDS and deliver HOT pizzas made by robots! If I bought into the silicon valley/startup hero worship echo chamber that I read a lot of these kind of books because I'm assuming that they'll be read by someone in the senior leadership of my company and then I'll need to respond to the new exciting fad they want to have the company embrace without critical thinking. This book demonstrated without fail that Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) can produce microprocessors, save people from malaria and HIV/AIDS and deliver HOT pizzas made by robots! If I bought into the silicon valley/startup hero worship echo chamber that it appears the author is very much invested in, then maybe I would have embraced this book more. But the problem is that this book doesn't dive into OKRs almost at all and really was an excuse for the author to wax poetic about some of the celebrities he's worked with in the past. Objective: Write an excruciating book about setting goals with a specific system Key Results: 1. Never specifically describe the system. 2. Have biased people come in and talk about how great their companies are but not specifically explain what OKRs had to do with their success except in vague platitudes. 3. In the audio version of the book make sure that you have a narrator who clearly has never read a book for audio listening before and that the celebrities read their own essays and also make the truly horrible decision to have a voice actor for someone to read anything Andy Grove's may have been quoted saying. Why is this not a one star? I don't know... Maybe because it was at least passible as an introduction to the idea of objectives and key results and I like the idea of sharing goals to allow for a greater chance of success for achievement.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Simon Eskildsen

    The right book at the right time for me. The central premise (backed up by numerous studies) is that hard goals drive performance more than easy or no goals. If the vectors or where people are going point in different directions, they add up to zero. But if you get everybody pointing in the same direction, you maximize the results. OKRs are a good way to get there, and the book goes into numerous examples. Don't get too focused on the results, or you end up placing the gas tank six inches from t The right book at the right time for me. The central premise (backed up by numerous studies) is that hard goals drive performance more than easy or no goals. If the vectors or where people are going point in different directions, they add up to zero. But if you get everybody pointing in the same direction, you maximize the results. OKRs are a good way to get there, and the book goes into numerous examples. Don't get too focused on the results, or you end up placing the gas tank six inches from the rear bumper. Or, you double the production of yams, but quadruple the cooking time. My favourite example of OKR is that of a sports team: the GM's goal is the super ball, and some revenue number. The coach's goals are along the lines of wins, the lead defence something else, and so on and so forth. These all cascade into the franchie's top-level goal. Really enjoyed his definition of an entrepreneur: Those who do more than anyone thinks possible, with less than anyone thinks possible. One thing I'd love for Doerr to have touched on are teams that have created systems that produce results without explicit goals. I've seen a few of those. They're rare, but why is it that this can at times work?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vishwanath

    Excellent read on implementing OKRs by the master of them. The google/intel/bono case studies are all detailed and provide a lot of examples on how you can implement these in your own organizations. John Doerr built on the method he learnt at Intel under the great Andy Grove and then helped more than 50 companies implement those OKRs with a lot of success. The system obviously works but the true challenge is influencing the leadership in organization to follow such a methodical approach. This bo Excellent read on implementing OKRs by the master of them. The google/intel/bono case studies are all detailed and provide a lot of examples on how you can implement these in your own organizations. John Doerr built on the method he learnt at Intel under the great Andy Grove and then helped more than 50 companies implement those OKRs with a lot of success. The system obviously works but the true challenge is influencing the leadership in organization to follow such a methodical approach. This book should help with that cause hopefully.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mindaugas Mozūras

    If we try to focus on everything, we focus on nothing. OKRs, as a tool, seems solid. The book itself is just ok. It's filled with a collection of stories of companies using OKRs. While some stories were fun to read, they fail to convince that OKRs were the catalyst for success. If we try to focus on everything, we focus on nothing. OKRs, as a tool, seems solid. The book itself is just ok. It's filled with a collection of stories of companies using OKRs. While some stories were fun to read, they fail to convince that OKRs were the catalyst for success.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Maciej Nowicki

    Measure What Matters, written by John Doerr, a successful investor and a venture capitalist, provides us with strategic thinking on how to how to set goals effectively and measure what really matters. I think, the best recommendation I could put here are words of Larry Page, a co-founder of Google, who once said that he wished he had this book 20 years ago when they founded Google. The book focuses on OKRs (Objectives and Key Results) a goal system used by Google, Intel, Oracle, LinkedIn, Sears a Measure What Matters, written by John Doerr, a successful investor and a venture capitalist, provides us with strategic thinking on how to how to set goals effectively and measure what really matters. I think, the best recommendation I could put here are words of Larry Page, a co-founder of Google, who once said that he wished he had this book 20 years ago when they founded Google. The book focuses on OKRs (Objectives and Key Results) a goal system used by Google, Intel, Oracle, LinkedIn, Sears and many other companies to create alignment, engagement and clarity around measurable goals. It is a collaborative goal-setting protocol for individuals, teams and companies. First, the book determines four “superpowers” to focus on as the outcome of OKRs. They are: Focus - High-performance organisations should aim at what’s important to dispell confusion and be aware of what doesn’t work for their business. As a leader, you have to make hard choices on that. Moreover, you have to be a precise communicator on each level, department, team and individual. Align - With right OKR transparency, everyone’s goals, from the CEO to first-line employees, are openly shared. In such an arrangement each individual can link their objectives to the company’s business plan, identify cross-dependencies and synchronise themselves with other teams. By connecting each employee to the organisation’s success, top-down alignment brings sense to work. By deepening contributor’s sense of ownership, bottom-up OKRs boost engagement and innovation. Track – possibility to be driven by proper data. It means that OKR’s should be aligned by periodic check-ins, objective classifying, and continuous revision — all in a spirit of no-judgment accountability. Key results in danger should trigger proper actions to get them back on track or to modify or alter them if warranted. Stretch – right OKRs motivate employees to excel by achieving more than they originally aimed at. By stretching their limits and giving the freedom to fail, people release their creativity, ambitions. Next, John Doerr explains how to implement the OKR system to maximise its benefits so in six steps you should: List approximately 3 objectives on each level Define 3 to 4 key results to be achieved for each objective Communicate key results and objectives to everyone Regularly track your results using a 0-100% scale When objective’s result reaches 70-80%, consider it done Review OKRs regularly and set new ones Then, the book talks a lot about what most of us know, that goals should be SMART. It uses interesting examples which put extra light on how to set goals and make it even... (if you like to read my full review please visit my blog https://leadersarereaders.blog/measur...)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Eugene

    The book about OKR (objectives - key results) goals management system invented by Peter Drucker and popularized by long time Intel CEO Andy Groove. Though the OKR system is well known now (see www.withgoogle.com) but this book provides the instruction and the details and nuances on the proper implementation along with interviews from managers and founders who are using OKR for the projects, including Bill Gates (Gates Foundation), Bono (U2), Sundar Pichai (Alphabet), Susan Wojcicki (YouTube) and The book about OKR (objectives - key results) goals management system invented by Peter Drucker and popularized by long time Intel CEO Andy Groove. Though the OKR system is well known now (see www.withgoogle.com) but this book provides the instruction and the details and nuances on the proper implementation along with interviews from managers and founders who are using OKR for the projects, including Bill Gates (Gates Foundation), Bono (U2), Sundar Pichai (Alphabet), Susan Wojcicki (YouTube) and others sharing their experience from using OKR. It also includes a part about Coach, the famous coach Bill Campbell who was coaching Google founders, Steve Jobes and many others in software industry in Silicon Valley.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    I truly don't get the negative reviews. I suspect some of them must have read a different book than I did. Anyway, this is a solid introduction to OKRs. If you want to learn how various companies have put them into practice, you'll get that and more. The resources at the end are especially helpful and I suspect I'll be referring to them repeatedly. I truly don't get the negative reviews. I suspect some of them must have read a different book than I did. Anyway, this is a solid introduction to OKRs. If you want to learn how various companies have put them into practice, you'll get that and more. The resources at the end are especially helpful and I suspect I'll be referring to them repeatedly.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Phil Calçado

    Repetitive but useful The first chapters are great, it gets quite repetitive after that. Too many case studies that repeat the message that OKRs are great, not enough interesting corner cases or other interesting tips.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vlad

    The best book on OKRs. Not the best book on measuring what matters. An indispensable guide for anyone implementing OKRs in an org, or working to succeed in an org where OKRs rule.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sumit Singla

    I've always been keenly interested in figuring out how to unlock high performance in an organization. Traditional models like MBO and the Balanced Scorecard have survived so far, but in the fast-changing digital age with shorter business cycles, a new approach is needed. And that's where OKRs are like a breath of fresh air. Cut the crap. Stop creating complex goal sheets that no one has the time or patience to fill and review. Keep it simple, and focus only on the top priorities for your business I've always been keenly interested in figuring out how to unlock high performance in an organization. Traditional models like MBO and the Balanced Scorecard have survived so far, but in the fast-changing digital age with shorter business cycles, a new approach is needed. And that's where OKRs are like a breath of fresh air. Cut the crap. Stop creating complex goal sheets that no one has the time or patience to fill and review. Keep it simple, and focus only on the top priorities for your business and function. A beautiful, simple concept - think of your core objective and how it links up with the larger organizational goal. Decide on 2-3 key results that you would need to drive to accomplish this. And finally, agree on the supporting actions/initiatives that will help you in getting there. With some elegant, powerful examples, this book is a great read for any performance management consultant or HR practitioner.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    I give this book 3.5 stars. The title suggests that it will guide you in defining objectives and key results. However, it's more of a memoir of how this method had worked for the many companies that the author was involved with (hence, the negative reviews for self-aggrandizing). The few important lessons from the book are select 3-5 objectives every quarter (specifically 'what' has to happen to increase business value), identify the key results needed ('how' to reach the goal - what are the inc I give this book 3.5 stars. The title suggests that it will guide you in defining objectives and key results. However, it's more of a memoir of how this method had worked for the many companies that the author was involved with (hence, the negative reviews for self-aggrandizing). The few important lessons from the book are select 3-5 objectives every quarter (specifically 'what' has to happen to increase business value), identify the key results needed ('how' to reach the goal - what are the incremental outcomes that will get you closer to the goal), and share/discuss/commit to the OKRs. The idea of the book is good, but the execution is poor. The author worked with all these great companies, yet he uses a football analogy to explain how to formulate an OKR. A business objective is not so clear cut like sports where all the teams' goal is to win the game.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kent

    There's nothing wrong with a goal-setting model, and John Doerr gives a pretty good one. I've seen a lot of chatter on here about how people don't understand how to set OKRs still. That surprises me. Doerr sets out a good playbook to do it: - Set a goal - Establish measurable, achievable, challenging metrics that, if met, would mean great strides to achieving that goal - Have goals that balance themselves (e.g. don't just set growth without quality goals). - Make goals and metrics transparent + pub There's nothing wrong with a goal-setting model, and John Doerr gives a pretty good one. I've seen a lot of chatter on here about how people don't understand how to set OKRs still. That surprises me. Doerr sets out a good playbook to do it: - Set a goal - Establish measurable, achievable, challenging metrics that, if met, would mean great strides to achieving that goal - Have goals that balance themselves (e.g. don't just set growth without quality goals). - Make goals and metrics transparent + public - Track them and keep people accountable to them but _do not_ tie them to compensation. - Revisit regularly - Pivot if needed (I suspect folks' frustration is that Doerr does not tell you how to pick what matters. That is maybe the hardest thing of all, and neither he nor anyone else can do that for you or for your business). That said, the bullet points above are basically the book. It's padded with case studies and could have instead been a NYT Magazine article. I'm also suspect of the case studies. First, the nonprofit examples are ridiculous: Gates' and Bono's nonprofits as case studies?! Why not use money-strapped orgs without celeb founders and resources - that would _really_ show you if OKRs work. Doerr also overlooks that Google had the best product in the market. That can do a lot to paper over other issues. I'm not saying OKRs didn't help, but Doerr's incentives as an OKR evangelist are to push them at all costs. If he has to have case studies, it would be more interesting and more useful if Doerr were to look at companies that adopted OKRs and it didn't work out. That, to me, would provide more clear lessons. Either way, if you need a goal model for yourself or to try at work, you could do worse. Skip the case studies, read the main chapters and the playbook at the end, and pick/choose/adapt what you think would work for you.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Soroosh Azary Marhabi

    this book is all about OKRs and how they have been critical to success of some tech giants, and most of it's chapters have been written by founders of companies that john doerr is an investor. while this book has some interesting stories, it could have been way shorter than this. reading it book is like having 20 people to a seminar all repeating "brushing your teeth is good for you" without adding any more information than the previous person. by the way, using OKRs is good for you :) this book is all about OKRs and how they have been critical to success of some tech giants, and most of it's chapters have been written by founders of companies that john doerr is an investor. while this book has some interesting stories, it could have been way shorter than this. reading it book is like having 20 people to a seminar all repeating "brushing your teeth is good for you" without adding any more information than the previous person. by the way, using OKRs is good for you :)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Dear past, present and future manager: please read this book. If you can, get a hard copy. Unless listening is the only way you will read it[1]. In particular, please pay attention to Chapters 15 and 17 about 1:1s. These are the best parts of the book. I wish I had read these pages when I was a manager, and I'll be referring to them again in the future. [1]: Yes, I listened to it and just bought the hardcover version so I did put my money where my mouth is thankyouverymuch. Dear past, present and future manager: please read this book. If you can, get a hard copy. Unless listening is the only way you will read it[1]. In particular, please pay attention to Chapters 15 and 17 about 1:1s. These are the best parts of the book. I wish I had read these pages when I was a manager, and I'll be referring to them again in the future. [1]: Yes, I listened to it and just bought the hardcover version so I did put my money where my mouth is thankyouverymuch.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Neil S W Murray

    I read this in two sittings as it was easy and enjoyable to read. Hardly groundbreaking stuff but a good reminder of the power of structured goals as well as the history of OKRs. The best part are the case studies/stories interwoven throughout the book. Useful resource section at the end too to help you set your own OKRs.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matt Hutson

    I wish I had read this book years ago. If you have ever heard of the goal setting system called SMART Goals, this system of OKRs beats it out like a long shot. OKRs (Objective Key Results) may be called a tool, or a protocol, or a process. But the authors image of choice is a launchpad, a point of liftoff for the next wave of entrepreneur and intrapreneurs. The Four Superpowers of OKRs: 1. Focus and commit to priorities 2. Align and connect for teamwork 3. Track for accountability 4. Stretch for amazi I wish I had read this book years ago. If you have ever heard of the goal setting system called SMART Goals, this system of OKRs beats it out like a long shot. OKRs (Objective Key Results) may be called a tool, or a protocol, or a process. But the authors image of choice is a launchpad, a point of liftoff for the next wave of entrepreneur and intrapreneurs. The Four Superpowers of OKRs: 1. Focus and commit to priorities 2. Align and connect for teamwork 3. Track for accountability 4. Stretch for amazing I want to mention something straight up about this book right now, it is designed for bigger organizations but you can simplify it for your own personal use. Each chapter introduces a company or organization that uses OKRs to reach their goals beyond what they had imagined before using this system. It helps you to stay organized, and reach for goals that are aligned with the individual or organization's mission. One of the best things about this system is that it incorporates reflection. Those of you who already know me well know that I am an advocate of reflection when it comes to reading and life experiences. In my opinion, the great thing about this system is that it is very clear if you use it in the correct way. The book does a great job of explaining each aspect of setting an OKR. Another great thing is the book does not beat around the bush. From the beginning to the end each page has a purpose. Here's a simplified version of how to use an OKR: ▪︎You should complete 3 to 5 OKRs per quarter. ▪︎Each Objective should have 2-5 ORs ▪︎Each KR should be specific and time-bound, aggressive yet realistic. Most of all, they are measurable and verifiable. OKRs surface your primary goals. They Channel efforts and coordination. They link diverse operations, lending purpose and unity to the entire organization. - 👉Measure What Matters was the #BMBookClub Book of Choice for October. If you are interested in joining my online book club please send me your email address and I will add you to the list.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Filipa

    This book is super insightful and I enjoyed reading it very much. I read this book primarily because I wanted to educate myself on this framework since at the company I work for we’re in the process of implementing OKRs. I wasn’t expecting this book to be so enjoyable, though. All the stories from many different companies that have implemented OKRs as well have enriched this book to no end. Furthermore, this book is also about culture, about leaders and about leading with purpose, so it ended up This book is super insightful and I enjoyed reading it very much. I read this book primarily because I wanted to educate myself on this framework since at the company I work for we’re in the process of implementing OKRs. I wasn’t expecting this book to be so enjoyable, though. All the stories from many different companies that have implemented OKRs as well have enriched this book to no end. Furthermore, this book is also about culture, about leaders and about leading with purpose, so it ended up being a real surprise on that regard. I’d definitely recommend this book to anyone who wants to become a better leader and wants to start measuring what really matters!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matias Myllyrinne

    Great book, took loads away from it and has helped me and our team.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.