web site hit counter Getting the Garden Right: Adam's Work and God's Rest in Light of Christ - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Getting the Garden Right: Adam's Work and God's Rest in Light of Christ

Availability: Ready to download

This is an important book. The Bible tells the story of God’s salvation of sinners in Christ. But that story does not begin in Bethlehem. It begins, well, at the beginning, in the garden. Adam’s work and God’s rest set the stage for the rest of history.


Compare

This is an important book. The Bible tells the story of God’s salvation of sinners in Christ. But that story does not begin in Bethlehem. It begins, well, at the beginning, in the garden. Adam’s work and God’s rest set the stage for the rest of history.

30 review for Getting the Garden Right: Adam's Work and God's Rest in Light of Christ

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chuck

    Getting the Garden Right is a treatment of the Covenant of Works and the Sabbath. The positive: This book has made me think more deeply about these issues than I otherwise would have. Barcellos treats the subject very thoroughly. Further, Barcellos is careful to say that those on the other side of this argument are not enemies, but friends. The negative: The book covers these topics in a polemical fashion. So, a person is, for the most part, reading one side of an argument. Also, because the book i Getting the Garden Right is a treatment of the Covenant of Works and the Sabbath. The positive: This book has made me think more deeply about these issues than I otherwise would have. Barcellos treats the subject very thoroughly. Further, Barcellos is careful to say that those on the other side of this argument are not enemies, but friends. The negative: The book covers these topics in a polemical fashion. So, a person is, for the most part, reading one side of an argument. Also, because the book is a polemic, some issues are argued beyond the point that the average reader will care to be engaged. I believe the book would receive a wider reading if the author had taken a different approach. As a part of the very thorough argumentation, conclusions are sometimes drawn based upon inferences that are being treated as if they are not inferences. Where this occurs, it does not completely discount the point Barcellos is making, because it is perhaps reason number 6 why this point is true. Leave off number 6, and there are still 5 other reasons. But, it occurs frequently enough to be a distraction to me.  The statement is made that if we do not get the garden right, we will misunderstand the rest of Scripture. The idea seems to be that we can only understand the work of Christ fully as we understand the events of Genesis 1-3 fully. Certainly, if we do not grasp the fall of Adam as our federal head, we will not give sufficient weight to the depravity of man and the redemption of Christ. However, much of the nuance of Genesis 1-3 that Barcellos is writing about is understood by reading the New Testament. It is, in effect, saying that because Jesus accomplished "x", "y" must be true of the fall. Based on this approach, it seems more correct to say that we only understand the enormity of what happened in the garden by understanding the full scope of Jesus's mediatorial work. 

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andrzej Stelmasiak

    Excellent book, one of the best treatments of hermeneutics of the Reformed orthodoxy. Contains a very reasonable analysis of some peculiarities of NCT (New Covenant Theology), and interacts with it by presenting convincing case for the Covenant of Works and Christian Sabbath. I appreciated the author's irenic tone and how he built his arguments brick after brick explaining every step and answering objections, so in the end his case was solid like a brick wall. Tolle lege! Excellent book, one of the best treatments of hermeneutics of the Reformed orthodoxy. Contains a very reasonable analysis of some peculiarities of NCT (New Covenant Theology), and interacts with it by presenting convincing case for the Covenant of Works and Christian Sabbath. I appreciated the author's irenic tone and how he built his arguments brick after brick explaining every step and answering objections, so in the end his case was solid like a brick wall. Tolle lege!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gabe Mira

    This was a great book and I would recommend it for all Christians to read. It definitely helps to grasp a better understanding of the entire scope of Scripture, excellent hermeneutics to understand the Bible better and I think it has helped me and will continue to help me to love Jesus and my neighbor more.

  4. 4 out of 5

    P.J. Mills

    "Understanding the garden of Eden is important in order to understand the Bible correctly. It sets the context for understanding man's identity and vocation, the Creator's rest as it relates to man, the fall, the first gospel promise of Genesis 3:15, the unfolding of that promise throughout the Old Testament, the relation of the Biblical covenants to that promise, ancient Israel's vocation, and, most importantly, the vocation of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ... Our Lord is both the last Adam "Understanding the garden of Eden is important in order to understand the Bible correctly. It sets the context for understanding man's identity and vocation, the Creator's rest as it relates to man, the fall, the first gospel promise of Genesis 3:15, the unfolding of that promise throughout the Old Testament, the relation of the Biblical covenants to that promise, ancient Israel's vocation, and, most importantly, the vocation of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ... Our Lord is both the last Adam and faithful Israel" (Barcellos, 271). This book is very important. As a polemical work, it draws a clear line between covenant theology and new covenant theology (NCT), yet it does so in an irenic manner. Dr. Barcellos masterfully blends biblical exegesis, hermeneutical nuance, and historical theology in a way that is both engaging to the reader and palatable to both the layman and the pastor. This work lays out what I believe to be a faithful hermeneutic when examining the subjects of the covenant of works and the Christian Sabbath. These are two hotly debated subjects in our day and Dr. Barcellos does an excellent job in comparing the NCT and Covenant positions on these subjects in a fair yet firm manner. I enjoyed this book and learned much from it. This book has much to offer the church and I hope it will build up and edify the church for years to come. I am grateful for Dr. Barcellos labor on this book and I highly recommend it as a useful, instructive, and edifying work. -P.J.

  5. 4 out of 5

    M.D. Perkins

    A good overview of the historical-redemptive hermeneutic as it applies specifically to understanding the Covenant of Works existing in the Garden of Eden. It is strongest when it helps the reader know how to approach scripture and pull out some of the riches of the inferences and implications. There is also a lengthy argument about the continuation of the Sabbath as exemplified in the Lord’s Day—an expression of the final rest awaiting all creation in the New Heavens and the New Earth. Barcellos A good overview of the historical-redemptive hermeneutic as it applies specifically to understanding the Covenant of Works existing in the Garden of Eden. It is strongest when it helps the reader know how to approach scripture and pull out some of the riches of the inferences and implications. There is also a lengthy argument about the continuation of the Sabbath as exemplified in the Lord’s Day—an expression of the final rest awaiting all creation in the New Heavens and the New Earth. Barcellos is very thorough, sometimes to the point of tedium. Because the bigger themes of the book are couched within a polemic against a sub-section of Calvinistic Baptists, it keeps the real riches of the book from wider usefulness to the church, hiding them away for the diligent and curious seminarian. Still, there are moments I found immensely helpful scattered throughout lots of pages of elaborate and dense argumentation that attempted to dot every i and cross every t.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Simon Wartanian

    Dr. Richard Barcellos has delivered a long awaited book which is deeply theological and biblical. My main purpose for getting the book was to read the second part on the Christian Sabbath. There he provides a deeply biblical case for a Christian Sabbath on the Lord's Day. He examines all the relevant texts concerning the Sabbath and always building upon what he said before. He lays a foundations and continues building upon it to construct a strong biblical case for the Lord's Day Sabbath. The dis Dr. Richard Barcellos has delivered a long awaited book which is deeply theological and biblical. My main purpose for getting the book was to read the second part on the Christian Sabbath. There he provides a deeply biblical case for a Christian Sabbath on the Lord's Day. He examines all the relevant texts concerning the Sabbath and always building upon what he said before. He lays a foundations and continues building upon it to construct a strong biblical case for the Lord's Day Sabbath. The discussion of the Covenant of Works was likewise helpful and deeply theological, aware of the literature on both sides of the debate. The discussion of the creation of man, the image of God and Eden as a temple were very eye-opening and clear. Barcellos knows how to be technical yet understandable. This is an excellent book which I will often revisit because of the many insights which it offers.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mitch Bedzyk

    This is an outstanding work from Richard Barcellos. Through biblical, systematic, and historical theology, he defends the confessional understanding of the Covenant of Works and the doctrine of the Christian Sabbath while also providing a firm, irenic, and persuasive critique of New Covenant Theology (NCT). While a polemical work, Barcellos strives to present NCT accurately while emphasizing points of agreement as often as possible. He writes with the hope that his friends who embrace NCT will c This is an outstanding work from Richard Barcellos. Through biblical, systematic, and historical theology, he defends the confessional understanding of the Covenant of Works and the doctrine of the Christian Sabbath while also providing a firm, irenic, and persuasive critique of New Covenant Theology (NCT). While a polemical work, Barcellos strives to present NCT accurately while emphasizing points of agreement as often as possible. He writes with the hope that his friends who embrace NCT will continue to develop and refine their positions and be more consistent in the application of their hermeneutical principles. While the book deals primarily with discussions within Baptist/NCT circles, it is still a valuable resource that will serve all believers regardless of one's interest in NCT, especially his introductory chapter on hermeneutics.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michaël St-Amour

    Overall, it's a very great book. A major part separate historical/confessionnal defense with Biblical and hermeneutical defense. I didn't much appreciate the fact that it's mostly a polemical book. I would have appreciate it to be more a defense of orthodoxy without all those parts on the NCT. But in summary, it's well written and some parts are very great. Overall, it's a very great book. A major part separate historical/confessionnal defense with Biblical and hermeneutical defense. I didn't much appreciate the fact that it's mostly a polemical book. I would have appreciate it to be more a defense of orthodoxy without all those parts on the NCT. But in summary, it's well written and some parts are very great.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kyle McC

    A great work on recovering the biblical teaching of Christian sabbath. This book was very helpful on understanding the role of Adam in the garden and the Rest of God. I am a layperson, and I do recommend this to lay people,with a caveat, that it must be read carefully. It’s strength is that it clearly lays out the rest that Adam would attained had he not fell into sin. Another aspect is how the book lays out the reason for why Christians gather on Sunday for many reasons including the resurrecti A great work on recovering the biblical teaching of Christian sabbath. This book was very helpful on understanding the role of Adam in the garden and the Rest of God. I am a layperson, and I do recommend this to lay people,with a caveat, that it must be read carefully. It’s strength is that it clearly lays out the rest that Adam would attained had he not fell into sin. Another aspect is how the book lays out the reason for why Christians gather on Sunday for many reasons including the resurrection of Christ. A lot of the arguments about new covenant theology seem relevant to the majority of the evangelical church. I’d love to see a renewed love for Lords day worship and I believe this book could help.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    This book is a very intelligent, fair, and helpful refutation of New Covenant Theology. Primarily, Barcellos is arguing against our NCT brothers by showing their errors on the Adamic Covenant of Works and the Sabbath, and he does both of these exceptionally well. Though it is written at a technical level and is an exhaustive treatment of the subject, it is written in such a way that I expect that someone new to the debate could understand exactly what Barcellos is saying.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    "The end is the beginning glorrifed, an end to which the beginning pointed." -pg. 114- Eschatology precedes soteriology. Barcellos masterfully shows the biblical basis for the covenant of works and affirms the Lord's day Christian Sabbath. He brings to light the trends of new covenant theologians and their denying of these doctrines, and he exposes their incorrect hermeneutics using specific examples from their works. This is a polemical work, yet done in an irenical fashion. "The end is the beginning glorrifed, an end to which the beginning pointed." -pg. 114- Eschatology precedes soteriology. Barcellos masterfully shows the biblical basis for the covenant of works and affirms the Lord's day Christian Sabbath. He brings to light the trends of new covenant theologians and their denying of these doctrines, and he exposes their incorrect hermeneutics using specific examples from their works. This is a polemical work, yet done in an irenical fashion.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tim Lawhead

    This book does a quality, fair job at critiquing NCT and defending the Lord's Day. However, to me, the best quality of this book is that it teaches solid hermeneutics, allowing Scripture to interpret Scripture. This book does a quality, fair job at critiquing NCT and defending the Lord's Day. However, to me, the best quality of this book is that it teaches solid hermeneutics, allowing Scripture to interpret Scripture.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Varnado

    Getting The Garden Right is a great work dealing with the Christian Sabbath and also the Covenant Of Works. I would highly recommend it! There’s a lot of information in it so have a highlighter, paper and pen, or both.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris Wells

    Excellent book! Convinced me of the Covenant of Works and the Christian Sabbath!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Decker

    I enjoy Barcellos very much. I do believe, however, that his other works on this matter were just as good if not better.

  16. 4 out of 5

    John Wilson

    Excellent critique of NCT and positive presentation for a traditional hermeneutic.

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Roush

    Excellent answer to NCT critiques of 1689 Federalist understandings of God's rest and the covenant made with Adam. Not written for the layman or a general audience. As the author suggests toward the outset, this is more suitable for very serious students and pastors only. Some parts are overly tedious with seemingly overmuch quotations from other sources (though they do always seem to advance the point somewhat). Sound and thorough expositions of the relevant passages in Hebrews and Genesis, lik Excellent answer to NCT critiques of 1689 Federalist understandings of God's rest and the covenant made with Adam. Not written for the layman or a general audience. As the author suggests toward the outset, this is more suitable for very serious students and pastors only. Some parts are overly tedious with seemingly overmuch quotations from other sources (though they do always seem to advance the point somewhat). Sound and thorough expositions of the relevant passages in Hebrews and Genesis, like Hebrews 4:9,10. As a volume, it is a sound addition to the confessional Baptist pastor's library, but the general reader could certainly give this a pass.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

    Barcellos lays out a very compelling and detailed argument in favor of the covenant of works made with Adam and the perpetuity of the sabbath in the New Covenant. To support his argument, Barcellos relies heavily on Scripture, historic confessions of the church, and even allows New Covenant Theologians to speak for themselves by quoting them at great length. Unfortunately the narrow scope of the book is perhaps the greatest weakness, in my opinion. Barcellos subscribes to a 1689 Baptist Confessio Barcellos lays out a very compelling and detailed argument in favor of the covenant of works made with Adam and the perpetuity of the sabbath in the New Covenant. To support his argument, Barcellos relies heavily on Scripture, historic confessions of the church, and even allows New Covenant Theologians to speak for themselves by quoting them at great length. Unfortunately the narrow scope of the book is perhaps the greatest weakness, in my opinion. Barcellos subscribes to a 1689 Baptist Confession and produces a polemical argument specifically targeting New Covenant Theology (which is still being developed, and has few notable supporters who apparently claim the title). So for anyone outside the 1689 Baptist or NCT camps, you may often find yourself confused and wondering why so much ink was spilled in that regard. The book could have received a wider audience if Barcellos just simply focused on Scripture (in particular the final 4 chapters) and allowed Scripture to reveal the beauty of the Covenant of Works and the Sabbath. The title of the book was compelling enough for anyone to grab a copy and begin reading. However, I think a more appropriate title might be, "Getting the Garden Right: A 1689 Baptist Polemical Response to New Covenant Theology's Objections to the Covenant of Works and the Sabbath." If you are a subscriber to the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith or align with the recent New Covenant Theology movement, then this book is for you. If not, I'd recommend you pass.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Howell

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Nuckols

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

  22. 5 out of 5

    Drew Norwood

  23. 5 out of 5

    J B

  24. 5 out of 5

    Simon Chammo

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cruz Trevino

  26. 4 out of 5

    Travis

  27. 5 out of 5

    Heather Malmberg

  28. 5 out of 5

    Wilson Hines

  29. 4 out of 5

    Randy Rzetelny

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Tobler iii

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.