web site hit counter Reason and Unreason in Western Philosophy: The Struggle of Certainty against Probability through History: A Layman's Notes on Philosophy - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Reason and Unreason in Western Philosophy: The Struggle of Certainty against Probability through History: A Layman's Notes on Philosophy

Availability: Ready to download

This book is an attempt to summarize Western Philosophy based on three primary sources: Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy, Will Durant's The Story of Philosophy, and R.H. Popkin and A. Stroll's Philosophy Made Simple. Why should anyone spend time reading a book on philosophy; much less one written by a non-philosopher? The author thinks he has found answers This book is an attempt to summarize Western Philosophy based on three primary sources: Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy, Will Durant's The Story of Philosophy, and R.H. Popkin and A. Stroll's Philosophy Made Simple. Why should anyone spend time reading a book on philosophy; much less one written by a non-philosopher? The author thinks he has found answers to these questions. Not THE answers, mind you, but answers nonetheless. Reasons that may be intriguing to some, but not to others. Arguments that don't intend to finalize things, but rather prompt new thoughts. Pondering. Contemplating... in the footsteps of those called philosophers who have done so through the millennia. Those that Bertrand Russell called the “lovers of vision of truth.” The kind of lovers, the author believes, unbeknown to us we all are. So; why philosophy? Because in the past 2500 years, this richest bundle of human thoughts has explored nearly every aspect of our existence. If we pay a little attention to it, philosophy can assist us in countless ways. It could open our minds to broad questions, such as, "why am I here?" It could give us templates to interpret large-scale concepts such as the US Declaration of Independence that is based on Locke’s natural rights. By evaluating arguments developed by history's brightest minds we could get guidance when facing burning questions permeating our daily life. What is a humanly and economically sensible way to look at the migrant crisis? How could we recognize and balance our short-term and long-term interests? How far should we go with placing our personal interest above the community's interests in global questions such as wealth distribution? Environmental protection? Climate change? But philosophy may also guide us in the nitty-gritty of every-day life. Can I use the pedestrian walkway with my bike? Is it ethical to download questionable content from the Internet? Do I have the right attitude in treating the opposite gender? Learning about how well-thought-out ideas have been proposed through the millennia—and how those same ideas were torn to pieces by other, equally powerful ideas holds valuable lessons for all of us. In the end, familiarity with the philosophical arguments may hone our ability to express ourselves with more clarity, more substance; and thus, earn us more well-deserved authority. So; why do so few people bother reading philosophy? The author is convinced that one of the obstacles between the layperson and the philosophical thoughts is the formidable language of philosophy. This was already recognized almost 300 years ago by David Hume who accused his colleagues with inventing a special language for communication amongst themselves. It is this aspect of philosophy where the author is hoping to offer additional value to his highly qualified primary sources. Through language simplification, thoughtful organization, a splash of unconventional interpretations and personal notes, he has attempted to improve the accessibility of the book’s source material. It is hoped that by offering a layman’s view on the difficult scholarly field of philosophy, a wider public interest will be generated in this treasure house of human intellectual achievement.


Compare

This book is an attempt to summarize Western Philosophy based on three primary sources: Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy, Will Durant's The Story of Philosophy, and R.H. Popkin and A. Stroll's Philosophy Made Simple. Why should anyone spend time reading a book on philosophy; much less one written by a non-philosopher? The author thinks he has found answers This book is an attempt to summarize Western Philosophy based on three primary sources: Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy, Will Durant's The Story of Philosophy, and R.H. Popkin and A. Stroll's Philosophy Made Simple. Why should anyone spend time reading a book on philosophy; much less one written by a non-philosopher? The author thinks he has found answers to these questions. Not THE answers, mind you, but answers nonetheless. Reasons that may be intriguing to some, but not to others. Arguments that don't intend to finalize things, but rather prompt new thoughts. Pondering. Contemplating... in the footsteps of those called philosophers who have done so through the millennia. Those that Bertrand Russell called the “lovers of vision of truth.” The kind of lovers, the author believes, unbeknown to us we all are. So; why philosophy? Because in the past 2500 years, this richest bundle of human thoughts has explored nearly every aspect of our existence. If we pay a little attention to it, philosophy can assist us in countless ways. It could open our minds to broad questions, such as, "why am I here?" It could give us templates to interpret large-scale concepts such as the US Declaration of Independence that is based on Locke’s natural rights. By evaluating arguments developed by history's brightest minds we could get guidance when facing burning questions permeating our daily life. What is a humanly and economically sensible way to look at the migrant crisis? How could we recognize and balance our short-term and long-term interests? How far should we go with placing our personal interest above the community's interests in global questions such as wealth distribution? Environmental protection? Climate change? But philosophy may also guide us in the nitty-gritty of every-day life. Can I use the pedestrian walkway with my bike? Is it ethical to download questionable content from the Internet? Do I have the right attitude in treating the opposite gender? Learning about how well-thought-out ideas have been proposed through the millennia—and how those same ideas were torn to pieces by other, equally powerful ideas holds valuable lessons for all of us. In the end, familiarity with the philosophical arguments may hone our ability to express ourselves with more clarity, more substance; and thus, earn us more well-deserved authority. So; why do so few people bother reading philosophy? The author is convinced that one of the obstacles between the layperson and the philosophical thoughts is the formidable language of philosophy. This was already recognized almost 300 years ago by David Hume who accused his colleagues with inventing a special language for communication amongst themselves. It is this aspect of philosophy where the author is hoping to offer additional value to his highly qualified primary sources. Through language simplification, thoughtful organization, a splash of unconventional interpretations and personal notes, he has attempted to improve the accessibility of the book’s source material. It is hoped that by offering a layman’s view on the difficult scholarly field of philosophy, a wider public interest will be generated in this treasure house of human intellectual achievement.

5 review for Reason and Unreason in Western Philosophy: The Struggle of Certainty against Probability through History: A Layman's Notes on Philosophy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Team Golfwell

    Albert Einstein said, “The definition of genius is taking the complex and making it simple.” That is what this book does. I sincerely enjoyed reading "Reason and Unreason in Western Philosophy: The Struggle of Certainty against Probability through History: A Layman's Notes on Philosophy,” written by Dr. Laszlo Hopp, an extremely intelligent pediatrician who wrote a comprehensive and easy to understand analysis of the great minds in philosophy. In the author’s “General Notes” in Foreword of the Albert Einstein said, “The definition of genius is taking the complex and making it simple.” That is what this book does. I sincerely enjoyed reading "Reason and Unreason in Western Philosophy: The Struggle of Certainty against Probability through History: A Layman's Notes on Philosophy,” written by Dr. Laszlo Hopp, an extremely intelligent pediatrician who wrote a comprehensive and easy to understand analysis of the great minds in philosophy. In the author’s “General Notes” in Foreword of the book Dr. Hopp’s explains his purpose in writing this book, “The nerve of me…. Being but a simple admirer of philosophy armed with nothing but a medical degree and a curious mind, I couldn’t have possibly aimed at opening the door to scholarly deliberations. Instead, the book is meant to reveal the path a layman took while attempting to reconcile his personal experience in life with the philosophical thoughts of millennia.” As I read this book, I formed an opinion this author did an amazing and excellent explanation over the next 500+ fascinating pages of the greatest philosophers who ever lived since Thales (624 -526 BC – The Seed of Materialism) to John Dewey (1859 – 1952 – Truth is Outcome Itself; Our Limitless Power) and, of course, Jean-Paul Sartre. As I read this book, the author became the lead character and guide through the philosophies of humankind. Although I have never met this writer, I felt I really became to know him and admired his neutral but intricate reviews as he went on from ancient history step by step to 20th Century Trends in Philosophy, such as the political philosophy of Professor John Rawls, who taught at Harvard for 40 years and inspired many other well-known philosophers. I felt the some of the philosophical ideas of John Rawls are appropriate and remedial for today’s confusing and troubled world. The author writes: “Rawls fell into…(an) appreciation of liberal democracy which had its roots in the social system promoted by Locke, Mill, and Kant: a…society where people freely choose their representatives and … participate in every aspect of the political procedure.” I keep this book as a reference and a guide to the great minds of past and present, and as a wonderful way to reconcile your own life and feel good about it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carmen Marina

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laszlo Hopp

  4. 5 out of 5

    Johnny Dang

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alva

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.