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Join best-selling author Scott Snyder and discover the rich history of Gotham City in this deluxe version of the New York Times best-selling graphic novel, Batman: Gates of Gotham. At the turn of the century, three prominent families shaped the construction of modern-day Gotham City. Now a madman with 300 pounds of explosives and a century-old grudge is threatening to bring Join best-selling author Scott Snyder and discover the rich history of Gotham City in this deluxe version of the New York Times best-selling graphic novel, Batman: Gates of Gotham. At the turn of the century, three prominent families shaped the construction of modern-day Gotham City. Now a madman with 300 pounds of explosives and a century-old grudge is threatening to bring it all crashing down. Beginning with the simultaneous destruction of some of Gotham's oldest bridges, the mysterious villain is targeting the holdings and legacies of Gotham's most notable families--including the Waynes. To uncover the truth behind the villainous Architect and his link to the city's violent past, Batman unites with Robin, Red Robin and Batman Inc.'s Hong Kong operative, the Black Bat. But can they stop their new foe's plans before it's too late? The future of Gotham started with an explosion, and it could end the very same way... The critically acclaimed author of Batman, Scott Snyder, teams with writer Kyle Higgins (Nightwing) and Ryan Parrot for a mystery that stretches back to the earliest days of Gotham, with art by the creative team of Trevor McCarthy, Dustin Nguyen, Graham Nolan and Derec Donovan. Batman: Gates of Gotham Deluxe Edition collects the full Gates of Gotham miniseries issues #1-5, stories from Detective Comics Annual #12 and Batman Annual #28 and sketchbook bonus material.


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Join best-selling author Scott Snyder and discover the rich history of Gotham City in this deluxe version of the New York Times best-selling graphic novel, Batman: Gates of Gotham. At the turn of the century, three prominent families shaped the construction of modern-day Gotham City. Now a madman with 300 pounds of explosives and a century-old grudge is threatening to bring Join best-selling author Scott Snyder and discover the rich history of Gotham City in this deluxe version of the New York Times best-selling graphic novel, Batman: Gates of Gotham. At the turn of the century, three prominent families shaped the construction of modern-day Gotham City. Now a madman with 300 pounds of explosives and a century-old grudge is threatening to bring it all crashing down. Beginning with the simultaneous destruction of some of Gotham's oldest bridges, the mysterious villain is targeting the holdings and legacies of Gotham's most notable families--including the Waynes. To uncover the truth behind the villainous Architect and his link to the city's violent past, Batman unites with Robin, Red Robin and Batman Inc.'s Hong Kong operative, the Black Bat. But can they stop their new foe's plans before it's too late? The future of Gotham started with an explosion, and it could end the very same way... The critically acclaimed author of Batman, Scott Snyder, teams with writer Kyle Higgins (Nightwing) and Ryan Parrot for a mystery that stretches back to the earliest days of Gotham, with art by the creative team of Trevor McCarthy, Dustin Nguyen, Graham Nolan and Derec Donovan. Batman: Gates of Gotham Deluxe Edition collects the full Gates of Gotham miniseries issues #1-5, stories from Detective Comics Annual #12 and Batman Annual #28 and sketchbook bonus material.

30 review for Batman: Gates of Gotham Deluxe Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B+) 78% | Good Notes: It’s Gotham’s origin story as a city built from oligarchy and ambition; forever run, ruined and rescued by its families.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    It's basically the story of past and present Robins working together to solve the mystery of Steampnk Dude! Gotham's old sins have (once again) risen from the grave to haunt it. *crickets chirping* I'm not sure what to even say about this one. I didn't hate it, but it didn't make much of a lasting impression, either. It was a good solid story, lovely art, and a decent conclusion. Ta-da! There's was a bonus issue at the end about a Muslim Batman in Paris. I thought it was gimmicky, cheesy, and irritatin It's basically the story of past and present Robins working together to solve the mystery of Steampnk Dude! Gotham's old sins have (once again) risen from the grave to haunt it. *crickets chirping* I'm not sure what to even say about this one. I didn't hate it, but it didn't make much of a lasting impression, either. It was a good solid story, lovely art, and a decent conclusion. Ta-da! There's was a bonus issue at the end about a Muslim Batman in Paris. I thought it was gimmicky, cheesy, and irritating. The end.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Someone is blowing up Gotham City landmarks and it points to someone with links to Gotham's founding fathers. Can Batman, Red Robin, Robin, and Black Bat stop the menace of... the Architect? After the awesomeness of The Black Mirror, this was a little bit of a letdown but still pretty good. Dick continues to adjust to his role as Batman as he pieces together the identity of the Architect with the help of his partners. Hush and the Penguin play important roles but Gotham City itself is almost a cha Someone is blowing up Gotham City landmarks and it points to someone with links to Gotham's founding fathers. Can Batman, Red Robin, Robin, and Black Bat stop the menace of... the Architect? After the awesomeness of The Black Mirror, this was a little bit of a letdown but still pretty good. Dick continues to adjust to his role as Batman as he pieces together the identity of the Architect with the help of his partners. Hush and the Penguin play important roles but Gotham City itself is almost a character. While I didn't think the art was that great, Scott Snyder's writing was superb. He really makes me believe Gotham is a real place. The interplay between Damian and the other team members was probably my favorite part of the book. Man, that Damian is an arrogant little shit. Then if your dad was Batman... Three stars. It's good but not in the same league as The Black Mirror.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    So this was a half and half type of story. The story is basically someone blowing shit up. We don't know who, or why, until later, but the mission is to cause havoc. Dick as Batman decides to go investigate with his team of Damien, Tim, and my favorite Bat-family member, Cassandra! On their investigation they work on discovering who is behind these terrible things while we get the backstory of the villain here and why he's trying to destroy the city after being betrayed. Good: The art is pretty So this was a half and half type of story. The story is basically someone blowing shit up. We don't know who, or why, until later, but the mission is to cause havoc. Dick as Batman decides to go investigate with his team of Damien, Tim, and my favorite Bat-family member, Cassandra! On their investigation they work on discovering who is behind these terrible things while we get the backstory of the villain here and why he's trying to destroy the city after being betrayed. Good: The art is pretty solid throughout though it does dip at times. I also thought the interactions between the heroes is great. Damien with his quick wit and assholish comments make it a ton of fun. Watching the Bat-family work together was also a blast. The ending was satisfying and all in all anything to do with the Bat-family worked. Bad: The other side of this is a past of a villain and how he was wronged, which isn't new, but this is also really boring as well. While the story is by two writers, the dialog is written by Kyle Higgins, but it doesn't really captivate you. It's weird since I'm loving his power rangers. Overall this was a okayish Batman story. As much as I love Dick as Batman, this one wasn't all that memorable. Still okay to check out, it's not bad, but I read better. A 2.5 out of 5.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Someone in Gotham is blowing up the bridges of the city and enacting some strange vengeance against the descendants of the families who built Gotham - the Elliotts, the Kanes, the Cobblepots, and the Waynes. But who, and why? The adventure collects the three Robins - Dick Grayson as Batman, Tim Drake as Red Robin, and Damian Wayne as Robin - along with the Cassandra Cain, the Batgirl currently stationed by Bruce Wayne in Hong Kong, to stop this terrorist before more of Gotham's historic buildings Someone in Gotham is blowing up the bridges of the city and enacting some strange vengeance against the descendants of the families who built Gotham - the Elliotts, the Kanes, the Cobblepots, and the Waynes. But who, and why? The adventure collects the three Robins - Dick Grayson as Batman, Tim Drake as Red Robin, and Damian Wayne as Robin - along with the Cassandra Cain, the Batgirl currently stationed by Bruce Wayne in Hong Kong, to stop this terrorist before more of Gotham's historic buildings are destroyed. The story jumps from the 19th century when Gotham was being built to the present day to explain the actions and it was great to see a young Gotham and see how the city came into its gothic look. The new villain in this book, "the Architect", has a steampunk look, something a lot of comics are doing these days, and looks very cool. I'm enjoying these stories of the young heroes of Gotham more and more and think that Bruce Wayne can safely retire with these guys taking care of things. That said, the book shows the difference between Wayne's Batman and Grayson's in the lack of knowledge Grayson currently has about the city he's supposed to be protecting. Its touches like that that makes for a more engrossing read. Also included is a story about the Night Runner of Paris and how he comes across Bruce Wayne/Batman and is recruited into Batman Inc., to become the Batman of Paris. The story contained political elements that I thought DC could've avoided as they showed a contemporary France with its racial and cultural issues in full view, but they included it and I thought that was a very ballsy move. The Batman of Paris is very cool too and Batman Inc is shaping up to be a tremendous concept. One side-note though - the book lists Scott Snyder and Kyle Higgins under "story" and Higgins under "dialogue" so I don't know whether Higgins wrote the script and Snyder wrote the outline with Higgins but it seems like an odd distinction. Anyway, Snyder is quickly becoming one of the best Batman writers working today and for anyone who hasn't read "The Black Mirror" I highly recommend it. "The Gates of Gotham" is a fine Batman story with plenty of action and mystery, as well as continuing to build the new Batman world strongly, subtly and in new inventive ways.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    A new adversary, The Architect, is targeting historical properties in Gotham City and it’s up to Batman, Red Robin, Robin and Black Bat to bring him to justice. That one sentence summary would seemingly apply to 99% of Batman stories but hey, that’s OK, it’s Batman after all. With Gates of Gotham, writer Scott Snyder, alongside Kyle Higgins, returns to the Caped Crusader to pen a follow-up to his successful Black Mirror story arc from the prior year. This time around, while we still have Dick Gra A new adversary, The Architect, is targeting historical properties in Gotham City and it’s up to Batman, Red Robin, Robin and Black Bat to bring him to justice. That one sentence summary would seemingly apply to 99% of Batman stories but hey, that’s OK, it’s Batman after all. With Gates of Gotham, writer Scott Snyder, alongside Kyle Higgins, returns to the Caped Crusader to pen a follow-up to his successful Black Mirror story arc from the prior year. This time around, while we still have Dick Grayson (formerly Robin/Nightwing) under the cowl as Batman, he’s joined by the extended Bat-Family to assist capturing The Architect. I really enjoyed the layout of the story as Snyder and Higgins jump back through time to tell the history of Gotham’s “founding fathers”. I’m not sure if this is a story that has been told before, but it was interesting learning about the history of some of Gotham’s most revered architecture – for a fictional city, its history is extremely well-developed. There’s a short one-issue story tacked onto the end about the Paris branch of Bruce Wayne’s Batman Incorporated but I didn’t care too much for it. I’m not a fan of these “extras” slapped onto the end of a book, they always feel like padding. While Gates of Gotham isn’t quite as good as Black Mirror, it’s some solid work on the part of Snyder and Higgins that likely helped solidified Snyder as the next writer of the then forthcoming Batman “New 52” reboot.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Many are quick to judge Gotham as one of the worst places to live in with the omnipresent criminal activity that pollutes its alleys and sewers. They aren’t wrong. With it being the ideal dark underbelly for your most evil ambitions, you could imagine that it would be easy to blend with the rest of the criminals and not stick out as a sore thumb in a city like Metropolis for example. It’s its vile and dangerous atmosphere that ultimately leads t You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Many are quick to judge Gotham as one of the worst places to live in with the omnipresent criminal activity that pollutes its alleys and sewers. They aren’t wrong. With it being the ideal dark underbelly for your most evil ambitions, you could imagine that it would be easy to blend with the rest of the criminals and not stick out as a sore thumb in a city like Metropolis for example. It’s its vile and dangerous atmosphere that ultimately leads the city to need heroes who act outside the law in order to purge it of its criminality, but Gotham is much more than just a city. It has a life of its own and a story that goes with it. From its geographic location to its rich history, the city is drenched in the sweat and blood of many philanthropist and some ill-intentioned evil-doers. Their decisions are what brings to life a city that desperately needs heroes to assure the safety of everyone. Batman: Gates of Gotham is the story of Gotham and its founding families. While at the turn of the century some of the most prestigious and rich individuals reunited their efforts in order to modernize Gotham City, today a madman runs loose with explosives tearing it all down into the ground. With unclear motivations and an impatience that drives him to act recklessly but also dangerously, this brand-new villain with a steam-punk’ish design looks to give Gotham its proper send-off. Looking to end the madness, Batman works with Robin, Red Robin and Black Bat to uncover the mystery behind this new villain who goes by the name of the Architect. This deluxe edition collects the full Gates of Gotham miniseries issues #1-5, Higgins’ and McCarthy’s debut story ‘The Nightrunner’ where the Batman of Paris makes an appearance, variant covers of single issues as well as sketchbook bonus material. Since the story is set around the end of Grant Morrison’s famous Batman run, especially closer to the Return of Bruce Wayne story arc, you’ll find yourself with good ol’ Dick Grayson in the mantle of Batman. Trying to fill the shoes of Bruce Wayne, he shows throughout the story that there’s nothing easy to the task, but that the task is without a doubt a necessary one for the people of Gotham and their hopes of a safer place to live in. While still a rookie as Batman, his skill set is still undeniable. After all, he has the most experience among the Bat family, especially as someone who has understood Bruce Wayne better than anyone else—besides Alfred. To help him out, the story also integrates and develops Robin (Damian Wayne), Red Robin (Tim Drake) and Black Bat (Cassandra Cain). While the cast is huge, the writers on this mini-series does marvelous job in each of their characterization and creates a very authentic dynamic between each other. The mystery that essentially serves as the foundation to this story is also intriguing and not too complicated to follow, giving fans the opportunity to indulge Gotham and its history. Nonetheless, the story does a great job in balancing the plot with rich characters and great artwork. While it alternates between two timelines (past and present), the artwork definitely worked better for the sequences set in the past as it gave it a Victorian edge with some vintage opulence. With the help of Scott Snyder, Higgins and McCarthy definitely make an excellent creative duo. However, it is worth mentioning that the inclusion of their ‘The Nightrunner’ story was completely unnecessarily. The story of a Sunni Muslim living in France who is invited to become the Batman of Paris after showing some parkour skills made no sense in itself, and even less when you try to understand the pertinence of including it in this volume. Batman: Gates of Gotham gives Gotham an alluring origin story that leads to inevitable family warfare with its historical buildings as the ultimate collateral damage. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  8. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    This book delves into the history of Gotham and the four families. An interesting one to read around the time that the TV series "Gotham" just finished an arc involving one of the historical Gotham family's feud with the Waynes. In this story, it's not so much a feud with Wayne, but a historical Gotham vendetta that puts modern Gotham and its inhabitants in jeopardy. I think the artwork was very well-done, and it delves into Steampunk territory with some of the design. I would have liked it bett This book delves into the history of Gotham and the four families. An interesting one to read around the time that the TV series "Gotham" just finished an arc involving one of the historical Gotham family's feud with the Waynes. In this story, it's not so much a feud with Wayne, but a historical Gotham vendetta that puts modern Gotham and its inhabitants in jeopardy. I think the artwork was very well-done, and it delves into Steampunk territory with some of the design. I would have liked it better if the layout was better arranged. It was a big confusing reading the panels and the story jumps forward and backward in time. I liked that all of Batman's team is working together to save Gotham. I squeed when I saw that Black Bat aka Cassandra Cain is actually in this book. It was good, but not great. Overall rating: 3.5/5.00 stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Frank Eldritch

    "How can you hope to deal with Gotham's future when you know so little about its past?" Current Batman series writer Scott Snyder used to write for Detective Comics back when Dick Grayson took the mantle of Bruce Wayne as Batman. Final Crisis complications and whatnot demanded such a change in heroes; much like for today's post-Convergence event whete Bruce Wayne is once more a goner. You just have to be there to understand. In any case, this is the second major story arc collected in as a gr "How can you hope to deal with Gotham's future when you know so little about its past?" Current Batman series writer Scott Snyder used to write for Detective Comics back when Dick Grayson took the mantle of Bruce Wayne as Batman. Final Crisis complications and whatnot demanded such a change in heroes; much like for today's post-Convergence event whete Bruce Wayne is once more a goner. You just have to be there to understand. In any case, this is the second major story arc collected in as a graphic novel that I've read from Snyder's Detective Comics run with Grayson as the Dark Knight. The first one is The Black Mirror which you better believe is worth the trouble. I cannot stress how much I recommend the bejesus out of it. In contrast Gates of Gotham is a thinner compilation with a story that ran only for five issues. The two stories are fundamentally different but just as enjoyable for the same reason which would be Synder's uncanny skill to weave together compelling murder mysteries/conspiracy tales. After all, this story does come straight out of the Detective Comics line so that's something that should be a given. While The Black Mirror is more of a psychological thriller, Gates of Gotham is an action-suspense pseudo-steampunk narrative concerning a forgotten pillar of Gotham and his deranged journey to destroy the city--or at least that's what he fancies himself to be: a revolutionist who felt deprived and abused by Gotham, particularly by its elite. And by its elite I mean the Kanes, Cobblepots, Elliots and the Waynes. These are the four founding families who have respective skeletons in their closets and demons to contend with. Grayson is Batman now while Bruce is busy with this global vigilante organization (Batman Incorporated) so he had to do this alone but not without the support and assistance of Tim Drake (Red Robin), Hong Kong operative Black Bat and the arrogant Damian Wayne who is still a prickly and insecure pre-teen who is always disagreeable just for the sake of it. I say this with all the love and affection I have for his Peter J. Tomasi counterpart in the recent comics. "Like it or not, Gotham has royalty and they stretch back to the origins of the city. She protects her own but if you don't belong here, she'll never keep you." I really loved reading Gates of Gotham because it was briskly-paced and wasted no time with the finer details; it packed and threw some serious punches. Each installment propelled you to keel reading, to look forward to the resolution and pay-off of the mystery surrounding the villain known as the Architect. Once again, Snyder, together with co-writer Kyle Higgins, employed Gotham city not just as a setting piece but as a participatory character itself. This was established through the flashback sequences concerning the city during its humble beginnings that also tied back to the villain's own arc and whatever motivated his nefarious actions in the present. The transition between past and present was seamless and suspenseful, and I could definitely see readers waiting in anticipation back then when Gates of Gotham was only released as a monthly issue during its run. Gates of Gotham was reminiscent of the tonality and approach of his Owls saga in New 52 particularly the concept of secrets from the past and the historical style of storytelling. Unlike Owls, however, this was a brief exploration about one madman's quest to avenge a perceived wrongdoing which actually helped it because it wasn't unnecessarily drawn out. The confrontation between Batman and the Architect was an impressive display of how perception especially a narrow-minded and hateful one can destroy oneself and his connections with the present which was what the Architect wholly represents. "Gotham doesn't change you. She just reveals things, whether you like them or not. And today she showed me that I can be Batman." ~Dick Grayson On the other side of the coin, Dick Grayson also gets some insight concerning his role as the new Batman and why he has more than lived up to the code of the Dark Knight while also not losing himself in the process. While The Black Mirror story arc has already tackled the tricky disadvantage of becoming the mask you wear, Gates of Gotham reveals what lurks under that mask and why we can only wear it for so long until it rots away our real face and erases who we are. Scott Snyder and Kyle Higgins' Gates of Gotham may only be less than 200 pages but it's a purchase you will never forget. I can easily see a well-adapted animation film for it. There are great action and narrative panels within its pages that are just begging to be realized on screen. The collection also has a bonus story about Bat-Inc's Muslim operative the Nightrunner as written by Kyle Higgins. Other supplements include the variant covers by Dustin Nguyen which werr as awesome as Trevor McCarthy's published ones. This is a highly-stylized action-adventure meant to be picked up by anyone and sooner rather than later. RECOMMENDED: 8/10 DO READ MY BATMAN COMICS REVIEWS AT:

  10. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    A history of Gotham, with architecture, whodunnit, revenge, and a faint Court of Owls vibe. Fantastic artwork that gives a purposeful nod to Batman The Animated Series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Scott Snyder is (and may always be) best known for American Vampire. His take on Batman shows that background most in the historical backdrop that adds depth to an already interesting story. As a note, the credits say that Snyder provided the story and Kyle Higgins the dialog. I suspect that means that Snyder wrote the plot and Higgins did most of the sentences that you see on the page, but there's really no telling. We all know that Gotham drives people mad. It's almost comforting to know that i Scott Snyder is (and may always be) best known for American Vampire. His take on Batman shows that background most in the historical backdrop that adds depth to an already interesting story. As a note, the credits say that Snyder provided the story and Kyle Higgins the dialog. I suspect that means that Snyder wrote the plot and Higgins did most of the sentences that you see on the page, but there's really no telling. We all know that Gotham drives people mad. It's almost comforting to know that it always has. Case in point, the Gates brothers, whose steampunk flavored architecture brought them into close quarters with the first families of Gotham. Familiar names, more than a century later: Wayne, Cobblepot, Elliott, Kane. One of their descendents sets out to avange his family, by causing massive destruction with really big bombs by wearing a cool set of steampunk armor. As one does, in Gotham. The story is really far more about Gotham city itself than it is about Batman, and I really liked that. Gotham is a fascinating place. I really liked seeing Dick Grayson as Batman, and this story is from his tenure, after Bruce returned and left Gotham to him. He's backed up by Tim Drake (still Red Robin, still not fond of the name), Damien, and Cassandra Cain, now Hong Kong's Black Bat. She was especially good to see, as she hasn't been treated very well by editorial in the past. It's a good team, and they balance each other nicely. I was surprised to see Dick struggling so much with his doubts. I get that he'll always wonder how he measures up to Bruce, but it seemed like a step backwards from previous stories. As a bonus, there's an additional story about Nightrunner, the Muslim, Parisian member of Batman Incorporated. It's his own backstory, and it's very well done. I really did like the idea of Bruce using his billions to fund Batman-inspired heroes around the world. Gotham isn't the only place that needs him, after all. Too bad that seems to have gone with the reboot.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    This was okay. I didn't love it. The backstory about the Gotham families was kind of interesting. I loved the art for that era and the borders of the pages for those scenes. The story itself was a little confusing at times but it was fine. I didn't love the art for the present day stuff. Cass, Damian and Tim looked different from panel to panel. Not like, "the colorings changed" different but "who's this character standing in the exact same spot in the same exact outfit" different. It was weird. This was okay. I didn't love it. The backstory about the Gotham families was kind of interesting. I loved the art for that era and the borders of the pages for those scenes. The story itself was a little confusing at times but it was fine. I didn't love the art for the present day stuff. Cass, Damian and Tim looked different from panel to panel. Not like, "the colorings changed" different but "who's this character standing in the exact same spot in the same exact outfit" different. It was weird. Still, I read this for Batfam interactions and I kind of got them. I got Damian interacting with Cass and Tim. I got Dick leading his brothers and sister. I got Cass being protective over Damian even after he was a little shit to her. It was enjoyable but I felt like Snyder had no idea what to do with Cass. She seemed a little bland here. Oddly enough, there was a story from Batman, Incorporated at the end about Nightrunner, the Batman of Paris that was a lot more interesting. I kind of enjoyed that more than the rest of this story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    The "Gates of Gotham" is a five-part story that's as much as a present-day mystery as well as an origin story of Gotham City (of sorts). Reason for that is simple: the two stories are related. "But how?" you ask. Well... Someone's blowing up the bridges of Gotham City and Batman needs to find the dude responsible and make him stop (I guess he does that in every story, come to think of it). The real interesting part of this book is what happens in the late 19th century, as Alan Wayne and 2 other p The "Gates of Gotham" is a five-part story that's as much as a present-day mystery as well as an origin story of Gotham City (of sorts). Reason for that is simple: the two stories are related. "But how?" you ask. Well... Someone's blowing up the bridges of Gotham City and Batman needs to find the dude responsible and make him stop (I guess he does that in every story, come to think of it). The real interesting part of this book is what happens in the late 19th century, as Alan Wayne and 2 other power players of Gotham City [not telling you who] hire two architects to design and build "the Gotham of Tomorrow". Everything's going swimmingly for a while for the two architects, but then [of course] something bad happens and, well... Fast forward to present-day and the bad guy is wearing a special suit first used by those same two architects. What's the connection? You'll have to read this book to find out! If you're a fan of Batman, you need to get this book. "Gates of Gotham" is such a good story, it makes it easy to disregard the throwaway "bonus" story included at the end of the book. 5 stars!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    I was fascinated at the prospect of getting to learn some actual history of Gotham City - who built it and how it ended up the way it was - but ended up disappointed with how limited this vision turned out to be: it concerned mostly of one (admittedly influential) character's personal history in it all, and most of it involved a bomb threat in the present day. Shame. I was fascinated at the prospect of getting to learn some actual history of Gotham City - who built it and how it ended up the way it was - but ended up disappointed with how limited this vision turned out to be: it concerned mostly of one (admittedly influential) character's personal history in it all, and most of it involved a bomb threat in the present day. Shame.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    Batman: Gates of Gotham takes place during the Scott Snyder "Everybody is Batman" phase. That's the Batman Inc trend I am speaking of. A Batman on every corner- no skill or training required. Perhaps if you're the kind of person who finds excellence only through the elevation of mediocrity, then you are a fan of the Batman Inc concept. I am not. That's why I was so surprised by this graphic novel. While it does have some of the annoying aspects of the pedestrian, if not downright amateurish, asp Batman: Gates of Gotham takes place during the Scott Snyder "Everybody is Batman" phase. That's the Batman Inc trend I am speaking of. A Batman on every corner- no skill or training required. Perhaps if you're the kind of person who finds excellence only through the elevation of mediocrity, then you are a fan of the Batman Inc concept. I am not. That's why I was so surprised by this graphic novel. While it does have some of the annoying aspects of the pedestrian, if not downright amateurish, aspects of the Batman Inc world view and the prosaic members that make up the B-squad Batpeople (seriously at one point there are four of these inept Batpeople running around trying to do something that the REAL Batman could have solved within the first act). But ignore all that, Scott Snyder writes a pretty damn good origin story here and it's not what you think. Gotham City stars front and center as the main character of this story. In the early 1800's two brilliant architect brothers (the Gates) move to Gotham City at the behest of Alan Wayne. Mr. Wayne, along with the similarly wealthy Mr. Cobblepot and Mr. Elliott, form the foundation of the great Gotham families. These men wish Gotham to be ushered into a new age and the Gates were the right architects to do it. Made famous by building three bridges that linked Gotham island to various other counties, the bridges were called the Gates of Gotham since they allowed access to the main island itself. In present day Gotham someone named the Architect (yeah I know..a very terrifying villain-name..right up there with the Actuary) is blowing up many of the historical buildings of Gotham City. What is his agenda? Why is he doing this? This is the mystery put forth to Dick Grayson, our substitute Batman and his merry band that includes TWO Robins and someone called the Black Bat (Cassandra something or the other from somewhere-yet another utterly random person to wear the Bat symbol in uhhh Japan? China? Laos? Mongolia?Actually..I don't care. At all.) then try to unravel this mystery. This doesn't read like a 3 star review does it? Well my rants aren't about the story or the plot, per se, but rather about the world it inhabits in this case Batman Inc. But aside from that irritation, there is a pretty good tale here. We learn a lot about the motivations of the Gotham city founders and designers. We see Gotham sprout from the 1820's to the 1840's. The story is complemented by an interesting art style. It has noir elements that worked well with this tale and its historical setting. The art doesn't quite translate as well when it is in the current time, but the 19th Century parts mesh very well with this particular style. Thus Gates of Gotham is a good detective-style story. It truly shines when it gets into the history of Gotham City. I won't say any more about the story since that would spoil a good mystery. It is worth your time to read, even if you dislike the whole Batman Inc mess like I do. If you don't dislike it-then you'll really like this story. Gates of Gotham by itself- 4/5. Oh and to top it off, or add insult to injury depending on your view, there is a crappy PC story of no consequence whatsoever other than to promote the silly Batman Inc concept. The plot is contrived and offensive to what Batman is as a concept. It starts in a destitute banlieue (neighborhood on the outskirts of a city, similar to suburbs) of Paris where the vast majority seem to be from Islamic countries of the Sunni faith. We are introduced to forgot-his-name already and his very devout mother. She prays a LOT, at the drop of a hat..riots? Pray. Tough economic times? Pray. But at least she's a good person, if a bit too much of a religious type. Anyways her idiot son and his best friend decide that it's a brilliant idea to run into the middle of a riot in their neighborhood (it's a fairly common situation it seems-but for some inexplicable reason these two idiots are confused and don't know what to do). Anyways running right at the Parisian Riot Police is generally not considered a high-IQ thing to do and they get beat down. Later ,in the hospital, they lament that the police weren't able to discern their peaceful intentions, as opposed to the thousands of hooligans rioting right next to them who were dressed in the same way and from the same neighborhood. Then they lament about their treatment and decide that they will use this act as motivation. Naturally, instead of wanting to become lawyers and fight injustice, they decide to blow up the police station. But once the habitually-praying mother gets wind of it, she says "no" and the boy drops out of the attack (strange how that never seems to work in the real world). His friend goes on to attempt that attack, fails miserably and gets blown away by the cops. Kid, mother is still praying, decides to write a diary and do parkour. Flinging himself around Paris with reckless abandon, jumping park benches, climbing on cabs, sliding down guardrails and writing in his diary make him outstanding material to become the Batperson of Paris. At least so says Scott Snyder's Bruce Wayne. I say 2/5 for this story. I also dropped the whole overall score for making me read this garbage. Why is it even included in a book called Gates of Gotham? It is set in Paris. About a Parisian. Seriously. I'd just skip this pap, but some people enjoy this shit. *lol* A guy does some parkour and now he's Batman....that about sums it up for me. Stick to the Gates of Gotham story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    JB

    This is the second story by Scott Snyder I've read and it was again a great read! He knows how to write a Batman story and he knows how to portray Gotham. I find it very intersting that he portrayed Gotham as a living breathing thing, a city that can corrupt someone in the Black Mirror and that here in Gates of Gotham he does the exact opposite. In Gates of Gotham Snyder emphasises on the fact that Gotham doesn't change you, it just reveals things whether you like them or not and everything else This is the second story by Scott Snyder I've read and it was again a great read! He knows how to write a Batman story and he knows how to portray Gotham. I find it very intersting that he portrayed Gotham as a living breathing thing, a city that can corrupt someone in the Black Mirror and that here in Gates of Gotham he does the exact opposite. In Gates of Gotham Snyder emphasises on the fact that Gotham doesn't change you, it just reveals things whether you like them or not and everything else is just an excuse. The art fits the story, which is a little steampunky, well. I especially like the coloring. The story itself is great, very interesting and original. I always love reading about the origin or past of Gotham. And this story gives you a lot of that. It gives you a backstory to the first families of Gotham (the Elliots, the Cobblepots and of course the Waynes). What we didn't know is that there was another family heavily involved in building Gotham City and in this case you can take that quite literally. Dick Grayson is still the Batman of Gotham, while Bruce Wayne is travelling the world looking for Batmen and Batwomen for Batman Incorporated. Red Robin, Black Bat and Damian Wayne as Robin are also involved. The little story in the back of this book was great too. It showcases Bruce finding his "Batman" for the city of Paris. I can't wait to read Batman Inc. after this. The premise is very promising and this book gave me a little taste of what it can be.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    With Gates of Gotham, Snyder does a great job giving history to Gotham City. Though the actually mystery was set in the modern day Gotham, Snyder did a solid job building the backstory and setting the tone with an historical look into how the city was designed and created. This may attest to my ultimate nerdiness, but some of the frames depicting the early Gotham skyline gave me chills - I loved seeing one of my favorite skylines develop. This book features Dick Grayson as Batman and shows that With Gates of Gotham, Snyder does a great job giving history to Gotham City. Though the actually mystery was set in the modern day Gotham, Snyder did a solid job building the backstory and setting the tone with an historical look into how the city was designed and created. This may attest to my ultimate nerdiness, but some of the frames depicting the early Gotham skyline gave me chills - I loved seeing one of my favorite skylines develop. This book features Dick Grayson as Batman and shows that he is still getting used to his new role. As much as I didn't know how I would feel about Dick in this role, I am really starting to like him. He works so well with Tim as Red Robin. In contrast, Damien is quite the little asshole, something that I thought would annoy me but which ultimately seems to entertain me. I was surprised to find myself rooting for his success at one key moment in the story. All in all, I really enjoyed this book. I initially felt that it wasn't fantastic and maybe not a four star read, but I changed my mind when I thought of all the people that I could recommend it to.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    I really enjoyed this book, with Dick as Batman, alongside Damian as Robin, Tim as Red Robin and Cassandra Cain as Black Bat, along with very brief appearance of Bruce. The story ties together 19th Century Gotham with 21st Century Gotham and the families that built Gotham: Cobblepots (Penguin) Elliots (Hush), Kane and of course the Waynes. It also ties together a new Antagonist, "The Architect" along with introducing the brothers who helped literally construct/build Gotham. Well written, relativ I really enjoyed this book, with Dick as Batman, alongside Damian as Robin, Tim as Red Robin and Cassandra Cain as Black Bat, along with very brief appearance of Bruce. The story ties together 19th Century Gotham with 21st Century Gotham and the families that built Gotham: Cobblepots (Penguin) Elliots (Hush), Kane and of course the Waynes. It also ties together a new Antagonist, "The Architect" along with introducing the brothers who helped literally construct/build Gotham. Well written, relatively new for a Batman story (not a throwaway or rehash of others) and very entertaining. Well worth a read, also for the doubts that raise in Dick's mind as Batman and his capabilities as well as the family dynamics.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    An okay read! So first off this book features the Dick Grayson Batman, that was nice to see, i really enjoyed him as batman for that short period. The Story follows bridges being blown up in Gotham, they were build in the 1800s. So each issue, would first have a flashback segment where you see the origins oF The Architect(the main villain) and whats going on in the present! For the most part i really enjoyed the villain, the art was very good as well! The story however was okay at best, also i'm An okay read! So first off this book features the Dick Grayson Batman, that was nice to see, i really enjoyed him as batman for that short period. The Story follows bridges being blown up in Gotham, they were build in the 1800s. So each issue, would first have a flashback segment where you see the origins oF The Architect(the main villain) and whats going on in the present! For the most part i really enjoyed the villain, the art was very good as well! The story however was okay at best, also i'm noticing a trend that Scott Snyder likes to link his stories to the origins of Gotham city, which what we see here, in Court of The Owls and Endgame; which is pretty cool! Overall its an okay read!

  20. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Interesting story, but it keeps you completely off guard which diminishes your ability to enjoy it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Koen

    Definitely liked this one! Great story.. exciting, thrilling.. Also liked the story about Bilal ! The art was darn good too ;) All in all a firm 3,75/5

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Good solid story that both expanded and deepened the "history" of Gotham but also did so without running roughshod over established character continuities or personalities. Very well done collection of stories and far better than many of the past few years, in my opinion. Good solid story that both expanded and deepened the "history" of Gotham but also did so without running roughshod over established character continuities or personalities. Very well done collection of stories and far better than many of the past few years, in my opinion.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Danny

    Fun little mystery about the origins of Gotham. I enjoy stories where the city is the main charcater. Snyder has a fun time with this and his New 52 Batman run saying with the notion of uncovering secrets of the place you call home. Makes for a fun, albeit, light romp.

  24. 5 out of 5

    victoria

    enjoyable! the plot was concise, tight, and didn't wander off into tangents. overall it was perhaps less interesting than other batman stories have been, (view spoiler)[i.e., this was a classic things-blow-up and people-are-trying-to-get-revenge-for-old-dead-family-members (hide spoiler)] , but which such a short run i imagine anything more complicated would've simply been too overwhelming. (view spoiler)[i will say i was disappointed in the stigmatization of psychosis and its use yet again as a enjoyable! the plot was concise, tight, and didn't wander off into tangents. overall it was perhaps less interesting than other batman stories have been, (view spoiler)[i.e., this was a classic things-blow-up and people-are-trying-to-get-revenge-for-old-dead-family-members (hide spoiler)] , but which such a short run i imagine anything more complicated would've simply been too overwhelming. (view spoiler)[i will say i was disappointed in the stigmatization of psychosis and its use yet again as a vehicle for destruction. before the truth was revealed, i was much more interested in the idea that alan wayne was actually an asshole. i do think thomas cobblepot did kill his brother, though. some great tidbits of rich people controlling a massive city. i wish they had done a little more visually with the idea of an infestation of evil beneath a city in the clouds. (hide spoiler)] the dialogue left a little to be desired, but nothing egregious. i thought the overlapping stories (aside from the obvious plot relevance) brought up wonderful parallels between the gate brothers and the batfamily drake-wayne-grayson brothers (a fact brought to my attention by my wonderful and intelligent friend ana). the art wasn't horrible -- certainly the first three issues were not my favorite, but dick did look very pretty, which was gratifying. the fourth issue including dustin nguyen, one of my favorite artists, was excellent. cass looked wonderful. by far my favorite parts were the batfamily interactions. while i love team-ups and seeing my batfamily with other heroes, my personal favorite runs are where there's a combination of them working together by themselves. i thought everyone was characterized well -- notably, dick's insecurities about being batman, cass being able to read body language, tim coding, damian's insecurity about his position...in life, really. i was especially thrilled to see tim and damian working together, even if it was only for, like, half an issue. frankly i'm really upset this was the year right before reboot number one, because it really feels like the company was beginning to hit their stride with characterizations and dynamics. tim especially felt like he was growing into a competent hero of his own, while damian had been starting to work toward an outright confrontation of these issues. i really think a tim and damian team-up would be so cool, and i think it could've realistically happened if the writers had them be on more missions together and interact more. a slow attachment is possible. but this is all moot because new52. and then rebirth. lol. it's also always great to see damian and cass interact, due to their unique backgrounds. cass really brings out damian's fears and anxieties into full force, as he tries to downplay her abilities and achievements which, as tim adroitly notes, is because "the only real reason you don't like her...is that she's just one more person your father picked over you." it's so nice to have writers who understand. bruce showing up at the end was funny because the timeline is so weird and confusing. and speaking of bruce...dick saying he could be batman/bruce saying he could be a better batman than him...i take issue. i think dick can perform as batman, absolutely, but i do not think he has the mentality to maintain a batman persona longer than what he did. i'm assuming this little bit in the dialogue was written for a nice conclusion, a feel-good answer to dick's insecurities lining the run (and also to allow for bruce to mention that he's coming back to gotham), so i get it, but i don't agree. i think, actually, the best batman to follow bruce would be tim -- something dick actually notes earlier in the run as well. i could talk at length about why, but i'm sure most people understand my thoughts and there is only a tangential relevance to these actual five issues. overall fun, cute, i love when our squad of bat-related people are yelling at/laughing with/traumatizing/etc each other; a world rife with emotions and dynamics!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wesley

    This book collects the five issue Gates of Gotham mini-series. It has a number of creators involved. The story was by Scott Snyder and Kyle Higgins with the dialogue by Kyle Higgins with Ryan Parrott on the last three issues. The art was mainly by Trevor McCarthy except for issue 4 where the art was by Dustin Nguyen and Derec Donovan. Batman has to deal with a bombing campaign in Gotham targeted at landmarks associated with the founding families of the city - the Waynes, Elliots and Cobblepots. W This book collects the five issue Gates of Gotham mini-series. It has a number of creators involved. The story was by Scott Snyder and Kyle Higgins with the dialogue by Kyle Higgins with Ryan Parrott on the last three issues. The art was mainly by Trevor McCarthy except for issue 4 where the art was by Dustin Nguyen and Derec Donovan. Batman has to deal with a bombing campaign in Gotham targeted at landmarks associated with the founding families of the city - the Waynes, Elliots and Cobblepots. With Robin, Red Robin and Black Bat all helping, Batman discovers a vendetta that stretches back to the end of the 19th century when the expansion of the city was at its height. He must stop the bomber before half the city is destroyed by floods. This story is set before the DC universe reboot and is set after Batman: RIP and after Bruce Wayne's return and the set up of world wide Batman franchises. So it features Dick Grayson as Batman with Bruce's son Damien as Robin. And this is one of the problems of this book for me. Yes Bruce Wayne was always going to be a tough act to follow as Batman but you would think that if anyone could pull it off it would be his one time protege, Dick Grayson. Not only did he train under Batman in his time as Robin but he moved on and became a hero in his own right. However, in this story he is almost crippled by self-doubt and would be lost without Tim Drake to help him crack the case - of course he is not helped by the bitter Robin criticising him at every turn. Also the story, despite having four writers working on it, is just not very inspiring - the plot is pedestrian and the new villain boring and formulaic. All in all a bit of a disappointment. The only real bright spot was the art by Trevor McCarthy, whose work I have not seen before but enjoyed looking at here - though why they took an issue away from him is beyond me.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    Originally read this in issues; now reading the collected trade. One of the last pre-new-52 Batman miniseries. The destruction of three of Gotham's bridges leads Batman and company into an investigation that takes them deep into the history of the city. This works great as a standalone arc and features a mystery that gives the reader a sense of Gotham's history. I like Batman stories that take Gotham as a place seriously. This also has the benefit of bringing all of Bruce Wayne's kids together--D Originally read this in issues; now reading the collected trade. One of the last pre-new-52 Batman miniseries. The destruction of three of Gotham's bridges leads Batman and company into an investigation that takes them deep into the history of the city. This works great as a standalone arc and features a mystery that gives the reader a sense of Gotham's history. I like Batman stories that take Gotham as a place seriously. This also has the benefit of bringing all of Bruce Wayne's kids together--Dick Grayson as Batman, Tim Drake as Red Robin, Cass Cain as Black Bat, and Damian Wayne as Robin. That's a brilliant setup for character conflict, and one that's remained sadly unexplored in most other Batman stories. I mean--there's Cass! Putting up with Damian! Being sisterly with Tim! I love it. I do have a few quibbles, which is why I think this is a very good Batman story rather than a great one. First, it's extraordinarily text heavy--there's just so much narration and infodumping. I realize that's somewhat necessary given the flashback structure, but I keep thinking it could have been done more skillfully. Second, there's the art. I like what McCarthy's art does for the setting and sense of place, and he generally does a good job of making the action feel genuinely kinetic, but I hate how he draws faces. Dustin Nguyen's fill-in work on issue 4 comes as such a relief. (Seriously, Dustin Nguyen should draw ALL the Bat-comics, except Marcus To can draw Tim and Pere Perez can draw Steph. You see I have strong feelings about this stuff. /geekery) The other fill-in artist on #4, Derec Donovan, is not an artist I am familiar with, and his work there is not all that promising either. Anyway, not my favorite Batman arc ever, but still a pretty good one. Definitely worth picking up if you enjoy the other work of the creators involved here.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dr Rashmit Mishra

    Saw Goodreads recommend this to me and remembered i have read this as well , it was one of the first works of Scott Snyder that i had come across. The Comics was based on the pre-Flashpoint era ..( you know , when even the non batman DC comics were good ) . It was the time of Dick Grayson as batman working with Tim Drake as Red Robin and others such as Damian Fucking Wayne (ugh!) to figure out the identity of a new terrorist who is bombing the iconic structures of Gotham while still comparing hi Saw Goodreads recommend this to me and remembered i have read this as well , it was one of the first works of Scott Snyder that i had come across. The Comics was based on the pre-Flashpoint era ..( you know , when even the non batman DC comics were good ) . It was the time of Dick Grayson as batman working with Tim Drake as Red Robin and others such as Damian Fucking Wayne (ugh!) to figure out the identity of a new terrorist who is bombing the iconic structures of Gotham while still comparing himself to Bruce Wayne's legacy as batman and trying to live up to it . It was a fun comics (and sometimes that's all the criteria that i need for a comics) and as per me 9 out of 10 Batman fans will like it . The problem as per me was that although it had all the elements of Batman comics neither the Detective parts were properly or thoroughly explained and nor was the Action part , in fact there's barely any action in it except for a few pages in the last part . Anyways definite recommendation to all DC and Batman fans who don't cringe at when apart from Bruce Wayne wears the cape and cowl

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    While Scott Snyder (who I discovered through American Vampire) turns out to be co-writer of this tale, I think his hand shows is the story's well developed plotting and use of characters. Snyder and co-writer Kyle Higgins work here is to show the reader the history of Gotham City, and to make the city itself a character. I would say Snyder and Higgins succeed, and even give us a glimpse at the ancestors of modern Batman characters (Wayne, Kane, Cobblepot, and Elliot). While is some aspects the a While Scott Snyder (who I discovered through American Vampire) turns out to be co-writer of this tale, I think his hand shows is the story's well developed plotting and use of characters. Snyder and co-writer Kyle Higgins work here is to show the reader the history of Gotham City, and to make the city itself a character. I would say Snyder and Higgins succeed, and even give us a glimpse at the ancestors of modern Batman characters (Wayne, Kane, Cobblepot, and Elliot). While is some aspects the answer as to who the gates are is kind obvious, the story is worth it for Batman fans (and i would say non-fan also). an additional, for me not minor plus, was the return of Cassandra Cain. She's has been horribly handled by editorial and writers over the past few years, and Snyder and Higgins handle her well.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Riju Ganguly

    Scott Snyder's 'take' on Batman has been unique, to say the least. Unlike Grant Morrison, who makes his stories multi-layered to the point where we need some annotated versions (or at least the Wikipedia) handy, Snyder presents crisp stories that are, nevertheless, very-very dark. To do so, interestingly, he chooses to 'play' with NOT the dark & brooding Batman of Bruce Wayne, but the relaxed & compact Batman of Dick Grayson. In "The Black Mirror" he had gifted us with probably the most dark & m Scott Snyder's 'take' on Batman has been unique, to say the least. Unlike Grant Morrison, who makes his stories multi-layered to the point where we need some annotated versions (or at least the Wikipedia) handy, Snyder presents crisp stories that are, nevertheless, very-very dark. To do so, interestingly, he chooses to 'play' with NOT the dark & brooding Batman of Bruce Wayne, but the relaxed & compact Batman of Dick Grayson. In "The Black Mirror" he had gifted us with probably the most dark & menacing case in Dick Grayson's career as Batman, and here he follows closely with a less darker, but rather labyrinthine story involving Gotham's past, and its 4 major families (no points for guessing). I would not like to summarise the story since that would reduce its impact. Rather positively recommended.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    As usual, the city lives and breathes in Snyder's work. I should have read this one before starting his Batman, Vol. 1: The Court of Owls series. This volume is a nice transition between the Grayson era and the return of Bruce Wayne to Gotham to resume being Batman. Well-written, but less emphasis is given to character development and more to the set-up of Gotham's history as a precursor to the Court of Owls saga. Still good stuff and the last time for the foreseeable future we'll see Dick Grays As usual, the city lives and breathes in Snyder's work. I should have read this one before starting his Batman, Vol. 1: The Court of Owls series. This volume is a nice transition between the Grayson era and the return of Bruce Wayne to Gotham to resume being Batman. Well-written, but less emphasis is given to character development and more to the set-up of Gotham's history as a precursor to the Court of Owls saga. Still good stuff and the last time for the foreseeable future we'll see Dick Grayson wearing the mantle. Sad face.

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