web site hit counter Miles & Me: Miles Davis, the man, the musician, and his friendship with the journalist and poet Quincy Troupe - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Miles & Me: Miles Davis, the man, the musician, and his friendship with the journalist and poet Quincy Troupe

Availability: Ready to download

An intimate story of Miles Davis, the man, the musician, and his friendship with the young journalist and poet Quincy Troupe--soon to be a major motion picture. Poet, activist and journalist Quincy Troupe's candid account of his friendship with Miles Davis is a revealing portrait of a great musician and an engrossing chronicle of the author's own artistic and personal growt An intimate story of Miles Davis, the man, the musician, and his friendship with the young journalist and poet Quincy Troupe--soon to be a major motion picture. Poet, activist and journalist Quincy Troupe's candid account of his friendship with Miles Davis is a revealing portrait of a great musician and an engrossing chronicle of the author's own artistic and personal growth. Miles and Me describes in intimate detail the sometimes harrowing processes of Davis's spectacular creativity and the joys and travails Davis's passionate and contradictory temperament posed to the two men's friendship. Miles and Me shows how Miles Davis, both as an artist and as a black man, influenced Troupe and whole generations of Americans while forever changing the face of jazz. In 1985, Spin magazine hired Troupe to do an exclusive two-part interview with the by-then legendary jazz artist Davis. The hour-and-a-half scheduled interview stretched to ten hours. After it was published, Davis was so enamored of Troupe and the interview that he finally relented to a major publisher's request that he write his autobiography under the condition that they could get Quincy Troupe to write it. Miles: The Autobiography became an instant bestseller and opened up the entire field of popular music autobiography. Years later, Quincy went back to his notes of his time with Miles that had been so important to them both, and produced this more intimate book, Miles and Me, told from his side of their friendship. Miles and Me takes us from St. Louis, where both men grew up, to New York, where both men lived, to Malibu where Miles also kept a home. Troupe also takes us through the entire catalogue of Davis's recordings. Troupe calls his friend "irascible, contemptuous, brutally honest, ill-tempered when things didn't go his way, complex, fair-minded, humble, kind, and a son-of-a-bitch." The author's love and appreciation infuses Miles and Me with a rare quality of grace, and at the same time, throughout the book, Troupe's observations of his friend are keen, sometimes hilariously funny, and truthful, as he knows Miles would want him to be.


Compare

An intimate story of Miles Davis, the man, the musician, and his friendship with the young journalist and poet Quincy Troupe--soon to be a major motion picture. Poet, activist and journalist Quincy Troupe's candid account of his friendship with Miles Davis is a revealing portrait of a great musician and an engrossing chronicle of the author's own artistic and personal growt An intimate story of Miles Davis, the man, the musician, and his friendship with the young journalist and poet Quincy Troupe--soon to be a major motion picture. Poet, activist and journalist Quincy Troupe's candid account of his friendship with Miles Davis is a revealing portrait of a great musician and an engrossing chronicle of the author's own artistic and personal growth. Miles and Me describes in intimate detail the sometimes harrowing processes of Davis's spectacular creativity and the joys and travails Davis's passionate and contradictory temperament posed to the two men's friendship. Miles and Me shows how Miles Davis, both as an artist and as a black man, influenced Troupe and whole generations of Americans while forever changing the face of jazz. In 1985, Spin magazine hired Troupe to do an exclusive two-part interview with the by-then legendary jazz artist Davis. The hour-and-a-half scheduled interview stretched to ten hours. After it was published, Davis was so enamored of Troupe and the interview that he finally relented to a major publisher's request that he write his autobiography under the condition that they could get Quincy Troupe to write it. Miles: The Autobiography became an instant bestseller and opened up the entire field of popular music autobiography. Years later, Quincy went back to his notes of his time with Miles that had been so important to them both, and produced this more intimate book, Miles and Me, told from his side of their friendship. Miles and Me takes us from St. Louis, where both men grew up, to New York, where both men lived, to Malibu where Miles also kept a home. Troupe also takes us through the entire catalogue of Davis's recordings. Troupe calls his friend "irascible, contemptuous, brutally honest, ill-tempered when things didn't go his way, complex, fair-minded, humble, kind, and a son-of-a-bitch." The author's love and appreciation infuses Miles and Me with a rare quality of grace, and at the same time, throughout the book, Troupe's observations of his friend are keen, sometimes hilariously funny, and truthful, as he knows Miles would want him to be.

30 review for Miles & Me: Miles Davis, the man, the musician, and his friendship with the journalist and poet Quincy Troupe

  1. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    Quincy Troupe mourns the death of his friend Miles Davis. He relates some of their time together and what his music meant to him at different stages of his life. While Troupe is a poet, this book is an elegy with more music interpretation than poetry. Being from St. Louis, he first learned of Davis as a “local”. Davis played in the band of a first cousin, but Troupe first heard him on a juke box. The music was empowering. As a youth, it was something he could “get” that peers could not. He identi Quincy Troupe mourns the death of his friend Miles Davis. He relates some of their time together and what his music meant to him at different stages of his life. While Troupe is a poet, this book is an elegy with more music interpretation than poetry. Being from St. Louis, he first learned of Davis as a “local”. Davis played in the band of a first cousin, but Troupe first heard him on a juke box. The music was empowering. As a youth, it was something he could “get” that peers could not. He identified with its “cool”. Throughout his life, the music spoke to him. Knowing Miles, he appreciated how the music defined and represented his friend as an “unreconstructed” black man. Miles is a difficult friend to have. He is always challenges and can erupt at any time. He can embarrass, for instance by dropping your friend from his band without notice. Troupe is in awe of him, not only the music he makes, but his persona. Troupe tells how he wrote his friend's “autobiography”; how he reached for Miles’s voice and how Miles loved the result. There is information on the recordings and their cover art. You learn that Miles paints, likes expensive cars, was diabetic and lived in the present and future (avoiding any repeat of his work) but what really comes through is attitude. I read the 2018 publication that ends with an interview of the author which repeats too many of the anecdotes of the book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Declan

    Reheated off-cuts from Miles: The Autobiography together with some giddy gossip and lots of I-was-hanging-with-Miles stories fill up the first half of the book. The second half consists, in the main, of Troupe's pedestrian judgements of the main Miles recordings. Of course they're great but we don't need to be told that again and again. How about some critical distance? And not just of the music, but of the man. There is some tut-tutting about his attitude to women, but nothing about the way he Reheated off-cuts from Miles: The Autobiography together with some giddy gossip and lots of I-was-hanging-with-Miles stories fill up the first half of the book. The second half consists, in the main, of Troupe's pedestrian judgements of the main Miles recordings. Of course they're great but we don't need to be told that again and again. How about some critical distance? And not just of the music, but of the man. There is some tut-tutting about his attitude to women, but nothing about the way he used his position as a very successful African-American to merely replicate the tropes of the wealthy WASPs. How about using some of the wasted space to ask why he never defined a differentiated position for himself, one that was not about fast cars and Playboy. Troupe seems to have been in awe of the life, but what were its values? Women, drugs, a beachfront house on Malibu? Don't look to this ineptly written book for either critique or insight. It's like a celebrity magazine profile, breathless with awestruck befuddlement. Who cares? So what?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Otis Geddes

    Miles' personality under a microscope, but not a very sensitive one. I learned something about the man, enough to make me glad I read the book. But the something learned is that Miles Davis was a human being, meaning there is more to him than his public persona as untouchable, or "bad mother...". While not exactly a revelation, the horn is humanized for our listening pleasure. The book is more about friendship than anything else, and that is Troupe's doing. Miles is now your friend, you go to hi Miles' personality under a microscope, but not a very sensitive one. I learned something about the man, enough to make me glad I read the book. But the something learned is that Miles Davis was a human being, meaning there is more to him than his public persona as untouchable, or "bad mother...". While not exactly a revelation, the horn is humanized for our listening pleasure. The book is more about friendship than anything else, and that is Troupe's doing. Miles is now your friend, you go to his apartment to watch him paint, he puts on "Tutu" in your beat up Saab as you drive him around New York, harsh remarks and disputes are chalked up to Miles being Miles. In the end, it's not so much jazz legend Miles Davis that dies as it is Miles from around the corner who begrudgingly plays trumpet for your child son. Troupe is a poet, not a music critic, and it shows. To his credit, he does the unpopular thing of focusing more on Miles' later work. Unpopular, but perhaps preferable to someone salivating over "Kind of Blue" again. I liked the book, but my socks are on.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jordi Via

    Perfecto anexo a la autobiografía escrita por el mismo autor. Arroja algo más de información sobre la personalidad de Miles Davis, pero es ante todo un ensayo sobre cómo apareció en la vida del escritor Quincy Troupe antes de conocerle en persona y su posterior amistad; de cómo influyó en su vida y en la de miles de personas. También analiza por qué Miles Davis sigue siendo rechazado por los puristas del jazz, y debo decir que comparto todas las reflexiones que este hombre va dejando caer, ya no Perfecto anexo a la autobiografía escrita por el mismo autor. Arroja algo más de información sobre la personalidad de Miles Davis, pero es ante todo un ensayo sobre cómo apareció en la vida del escritor Quincy Troupe antes de conocerle en persona y su posterior amistad; de cómo influyó en su vida y en la de miles de personas. También analiza por qué Miles Davis sigue siendo rechazado por los puristas del jazz, y debo decir que comparto todas las reflexiones que este hombre va dejando caer, ya no sobre el estilo de este inigualable músico, sino sobre otros músicos y estilos, gustos, arte, problemas raciales, política... Muy recomendable para los que amamos a Miles Davis en todas sus etapas.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Davis Porath

    Miles and Me, by Quincy Troupe is a biography about Miles Davis, a well-known jazz composer and trumpet player from the 1940’s to the 1970s. Miles Davis whether we know it or not, has greatly influenced and changed music through his playing. The book follows Quincy Troupe, a journalist who meets, befriends, and ends up writing a book about Miles Davis life. Throughout the book, he gets Miles to slowly open up to him through stories about him for the book Quincy is writing. I think that this book Miles and Me, by Quincy Troupe is a biography about Miles Davis, a well-known jazz composer and trumpet player from the 1940’s to the 1970s. Miles Davis whether we know it or not, has greatly influenced and changed music through his playing. The book follows Quincy Troupe, a journalist who meets, befriends, and ends up writing a book about Miles Davis life. Throughout the book, he gets Miles to slowly open up to him through stories about him for the book Quincy is writing. I think that this book was definitely effective in its job of informing me, the reader on who Miles really is. The book offers a new insight into who Miles is other than his music, the reader gets to uncover many different aspects about Miles that are shocking. For example Miles is actually a very moody person who can be mean one sec and be intensely playful in another. He is also not usually willing to talk to new people so meeting him can be scary with him being known to outburst at his fans. The issue of racism and the role it plays is also often discussed in the book. For example at the time, Miles fanbase was mixed but heavily in the black community and his music almost helped bring together people. Overall I think that the book was worth reading and enjoyable, I would definitely recommend this book to any Miles Davis fans or anyone who knows or wants to know about who he is.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Peter Ruys

    Miles and Me. Quincy Troupe. 2000. . I was inspired to read this one after watching the fantastic documentary of Miles Davis called ‘Birth of the Cool 😎’ on Netflix recently. . Quincy Troupe is Miles’ official biographer and wrote ‘Miles, the Autobiography’ in 1989. ‘Miles and Me’ is is more of a personal account of his friendship with Miles while interviewing him for the biography. . This was a decent read but it ultimately just made me want to read the full biography. Quincy only met Miles in the 80 Miles and Me. Quincy Troupe. 2000. . I was inspired to read this one after watching the fantastic documentary of Miles Davis called ‘Birth of the Cool 😎’ on Netflix recently. . Quincy Troupe is Miles’ official biographer and wrote ‘Miles, the Autobiography’ in 1989. ‘Miles and Me’ is is more of a personal account of his friendship with Miles while interviewing him for the biography. . This was a decent read but it ultimately just made me want to read the full biography. Quincy only met Miles in the 80’s at the tail end of his life, so most of the info and anecdotes in this book are from that time. It does paint a picture of the good, the bad and the ugly side Miles’ personality but doesn’t really go too deep. I felt like there was a fair bit of filler and that it read a little too awestruck at times but I still enjoyed it. I thought the writing got better as it went along. It seems Miles was quite a hard man to strike up a close friendship with. . . 3/5 ⭐️. . . #peterruysbookreviews . . .

  7. 5 out of 5

    Troy

    This reads like hero worship, a recollection, and, near the end, a polemic about the direction of jazz. At first, I was put off my the tone of the writing. With quotes around slang and an overly deferential tone, I thought that he'd written this as a ode to those people who wanted Miles Davis 101. And this is NOT Miles 101. As the book went on, though, and the writer got comfy, it turned out to be an okay summation of the writer's reklation ship with Miles, his experience with working on the Mil This reads like hero worship, a recollection, and, near the end, a polemic about the direction of jazz. At first, I was put off my the tone of the writing. With quotes around slang and an overly deferential tone, I thought that he'd written this as a ode to those people who wanted Miles Davis 101. And this is NOT Miles 101. As the book went on, though, and the writer got comfy, it turned out to be an okay summation of the writer's reklation ship with Miles, his experience with working on the Miles autobiography, and some jazz reviews thrown in with a sheen of hero worship. I was okay with all of that, especially as both the writer and Miles feels the same way I do about Wynton Marsalis. All in all, a decent read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Julie Failla Earhart

    I picked this nonfiction piece as my August selection to meet my 2018 New Year’s resolution. As I was pondering what titles to add the list in December 27, I grabbed this one off the shelf. I’ve like jazz music, but I have to admit that I’m extremely knowledgeable about it. I was aware that Miles Davis is one of the greatest of all time. As I started to flip the pages, I landed on the title page, where lo and behold, was an inscription to me, personally, from the author. It was dated 10/7/06. I m I picked this nonfiction piece as my August selection to meet my 2018 New Year’s resolution. As I was pondering what titles to add the list in December 27, I grabbed this one off the shelf. I’ve like jazz music, but I have to admit that I’m extremely knowledgeable about it. I was aware that Miles Davis is one of the greatest of all time. As I started to flip the pages, I landed on the title page, where lo and behold, was an inscription to me, personally, from the author. It was dated 10/7/06. I must have picked it up at a booksigning, probably at St. Louis’ best indie bookstore, Left Bank Books, but I have absolutely no recollection of the event. So I figured it was time to read this little gem. The book is about Troupe and Davis and their collaboration on a book, “Miles: The Autobiography,” that was published in 1989. In the first chapter of Troupe’s memoir, “Meeting Miles,” Troupe pulls no punches telling about their rocky start and how Davis was not an easy many to get along with. In fact, he as a snob, a jerk ad used the most awful language. With that kind of drivel spewing from his mouth, no wonder he hid behind dark sunglasses most of the time. In the second chapter, “Up Close and Personal,” the two men become friends. Miles is hard to be friends with. He’s really just a jerk who can play the trumpet. I can’t say that I would even have like to have met the man after reading this book. I was struck about how much Davis hated how black he was and wondered if that didn’t contribute to his orneriness. The third chapter is about the music. I won’t say I can recognize a Davis piece when I hear it, but Troupe’s musical criticism seems right on. Of course, I would have no real clue if Troupe was accurate or not. The final chapter is about the last few years of Davis’s life (he died on 1991) and his legacy. “Miles and Me” receives 4 out of 5 stars in Julie’s world.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    The author is responsible for the most influential Miles Davis biography. This book is the story of the relationship that developed between the author and Davis. Davis could be a very difficult person and he had his share of quirks. It wasn't easy being his friend. It was an interesting book that contained some little known tidbits about Miles Davis. Nothing too deep. The author is responsible for the most influential Miles Davis biography. This book is the story of the relationship that developed between the author and Davis. Davis could be a very difficult person and he had his share of quirks. It wasn't easy being his friend. It was an interesting book that contained some little known tidbits about Miles Davis. Nothing too deep.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Part 3 was an education for me in understanding Miles' music. I used my phone to listen to the albums and particular tunes the author was describing, as I read his own personal reactions to and reflections of Miles' artistry. Thank you, Professor Troupe, for your descriptive art. Part 3 was an education for me in understanding Miles' music. I used my phone to listen to the albums and particular tunes the author was describing, as I read his own personal reactions to and reflections of Miles' artistry. Thank you, Professor Troupe, for your descriptive art.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rick Hammond

    This book should have another half star. While not a great book, it is a fun read. I would recommend reading the Miles Davis biography first

  12. 4 out of 5

    FunkMaster General

    The man, the music, the myths dispelled. Great followup read to The Autobiography.

  13. 4 out of 5

    William Enright

    Outstanding read for jazz fans. Definitely worth while.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    For a poet, Troupe's writing suffers from a severe lack of poetry. The writing in this memoir/critical retrospective is, by and large, somewhere between sparse and clumsy. Troupe's language and constructions certainly lack the musicality, grace, and refinement of his subject matter. More importantly, Troupe's critical voice is an unsteady one. Davis, as Troupe makes clear from the outset, was one of the author's earliest heroes and remained so throughout this his life -- including through their For a poet, Troupe's writing suffers from a severe lack of poetry. The writing in this memoir/critical retrospective is, by and large, somewhere between sparse and clumsy. Troupe's language and constructions certainly lack the musicality, grace, and refinement of his subject matter. More importantly, Troupe's critical voice is an unsteady one. Davis, as Troupe makes clear from the outset, was one of the author's earliest heroes and remained so throughout this his life -- including through their collaboration on Davis' autobiography. Troupe's self-admitted hero worship and close friendship with Davis prevents him from offering much in the way of insightful musical critique. Troupe is more critical of Davis' personal shortcomings, although he is also quick to explain these away, too. He acknowledges Davis' misogyny and history of abuse of women but then qualifies his criticism by noting that he never personally witnessed Davis strike a woman. That Troupe celebrates Davis as an "unreconstructed black man" further undercuts any real critical reckoning with the complexities of Davis the artist vs. Davis the man. If you've read Pearl Cleage on Miles, "Miles and Me" is probably not what you're looking for.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Harrison Saich

    Finally, a jazz biography with quality prose!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    I was assigned Miles Davis to do as a report for a music appreciation class I took. I grabbed this book at the library for some quick insight into the guy and I was surprised with myself reading nearly all of it. The book was a great introduction to the man. It helped my report go over really well.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Miles Davis is a legendary figure; I love his music. His autobiography and his music have the same tone: honesty. This book is the experiences of the poet who helped him put together his autobiography. It has the same honesty. Like his autobiography, it leaves me wondering, do you have to be a bastard to have an impact?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Larry-bob Roberts

    Troupe also collaborated with Miles on the latter's autobiography, but this is a more behind-the-scenes, intimate portrait. Miles doesn't hold back - you have got to read what he says about McCoy Tyner's piano playing! Troupe also collaborated with Miles on the latter's autobiography, but this is a more behind-the-scenes, intimate portrait. Miles doesn't hold back - you have got to read what he says about McCoy Tyner's piano playing!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Galicius

    This book was given to me autographed by a friend, the photographer Jon Stevens who photographed Miles Davis over many years, and for this volume.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rosemari

    I love both of Troupe's books on Miles. Excellent reads. I love both of Troupe's books on Miles. Excellent reads.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Celso Krause

    It's a great masterpiece,exactly like Davis music! It's a great masterpiece,exactly like Davis music!

  22. 4 out of 5

    R. Mark

    This is a different view into the life of Miles Davis. The author tells things through his personal vision.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    I decent read. Gave me a unique perspective on Miles' later work since Kind of Blue. Can't say I'm a fan of it now, but I do appreciate it more than I did. I decent read. Gave me a unique perspective on Miles' later work since Kind of Blue. Can't say I'm a fan of it now, but I do appreciate it more than I did.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lise

  25. 4 out of 5

    William

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Cumberland

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rush

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Bricker

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hugues Asdrubal

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.