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Grass Kings, Vol. 3

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With their brotherly bond fractured at the worst possible time, the Grass Kings must find a way to mend fences before the Feds stomp out their illegal trailer park fiefdom once and for all. The final chapter for the Grass Kings is here, as the illegal trailer park kingdom wards off attacks from the outside and within. Robert has become a manic, paranoid despot, Bruce has be With their brotherly bond fractured at the worst possible time, the Grass Kings must find a way to mend fences before the Feds stomp out their illegal trailer park fiefdom once and for all. The final chapter for the Grass Kings is here, as the illegal trailer park kingdom wards off attacks from the outside and within. Robert has become a manic, paranoid despot, Bruce has been exiled following the reveal of his secret partnership with the neighboring town of Cargill, and Ashur has been helpless to pick up the pieces--yet the three brothers must find a way to put their differences aside and defend the sacred land that’s been passed down through generations. From the lauded creative team of The New York Times bestselling author Matt Kindt (Mind MGMT) and illustrator Tyler Jenkins (Peter Panzerfaust), Grass Kings Vol. 3 concludes the critically-acclaimed rural mystery series that examines the lengths man will go to protect their own.


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With their brotherly bond fractured at the worst possible time, the Grass Kings must find a way to mend fences before the Feds stomp out their illegal trailer park fiefdom once and for all. The final chapter for the Grass Kings is here, as the illegal trailer park kingdom wards off attacks from the outside and within. Robert has become a manic, paranoid despot, Bruce has be With their brotherly bond fractured at the worst possible time, the Grass Kings must find a way to mend fences before the Feds stomp out their illegal trailer park fiefdom once and for all. The final chapter for the Grass Kings is here, as the illegal trailer park kingdom wards off attacks from the outside and within. Robert has become a manic, paranoid despot, Bruce has been exiled following the reveal of his secret partnership with the neighboring town of Cargill, and Ashur has been helpless to pick up the pieces--yet the three brothers must find a way to put their differences aside and defend the sacred land that’s been passed down through generations. From the lauded creative team of The New York Times bestselling author Matt Kindt (Mind MGMT) and illustrator Tyler Jenkins (Peter Panzerfaust), Grass Kings Vol. 3 concludes the critically-acclaimed rural mystery series that examines the lengths man will go to protect their own.

30 review for Grass Kings, Vol. 3

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    After having just read Educated, Tara Westover’s story of her extremist, “off the grid” Mormon upbringing in Idaho, it was interesting to read the third and concluding volume of this series about The Grass Kingdom, another anti-government group of people living in the American West. In both stories the extremism is associated with violence. Initially, I thought this was going to be more of an exploration into this Ruby Ridge/Waco phenomenon that seems to be expanding in this country, and I guess After having just read Educated, Tara Westover’s story of her extremist, “off the grid” Mormon upbringing in Idaho, it was interesting to read the third and concluding volume of this series about The Grass Kingdom, another anti-government group of people living in the American West. In both stories the extremism is associated with violence. Initially, I thought this was going to be more of an exploration into this Ruby Ridge/Waco phenomenon that seems to be expanding in this country, and I guess on some level it still is, but the focus turns out to be a serial killer making some of the Kingdom's residents "disappear." A kind of war ensues between the Kingdom and a neighboring town about just who might be responsible for the killings. There's plenty of red herrings and dead-ends and possible avenues to keep you interested. I am not disappointed that this novel turns out to be a series of loner mysteries within a mystery, because Kindt is a storyteller, not a historian, nor a social critic. The whole series is complete in 15 issues, a pretty short series considering how many characters are involved, but Kindt likes these spiraling, large-cast mysteries that appear to be spinning out of control such as Mind Mgmt and Dept H, though I seem to have a hard time putting Kindt's stories down, even as I sometimes struggle putting it all together. I've gone too long here in not saying that Tyler Jenkins' sketchy drawing and Hillary Jenkins' coloring are probably the stand-out aspects of this series, with its sketchy earth tones, trashed out trailers and broken down machinery, but their art helps make the desperate characters come alive, and helps us care for them. I like the central characters, the three brothers who are the Kings of this dystopian-like "Kingdom" that had once been named Paradise, and found them interesting, and ultimately sympathetic. I did not predict the resolution, for sure, and I like when that happens.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    And so Grass Kings comes to an ending. I can't say it was a satisfying one, but it was the one I expected. Hillary Jenkins colors did get a little better in this. She seems to be learning on the job, coloring Tyler Jenkin's sketchy pencils. And so Grass Kings comes to an ending. I can't say it was a satisfying one, but it was the one I expected. Hillary Jenkins colors did get a little better in this. She seems to be learning on the job, coloring Tyler Jenkin's sketchy pencils.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Václav

    Well, here comes the conclusion for the Grass Kingdom (and not only his inhabitants). I had serious doubts with the second book, and Kindt lost me there (again), but unlike with the other things he somehow managed to get my attention back with this, last, book. The conclusion was very satisfying, it could be considered as a happy ending (but not everyone can be happy, I guess) with strong satisfaction for justice. Matt's stories are for me like discussion - we start usually on same notes because Well, here comes the conclusion for the Grass Kingdom (and not only his inhabitants). I had serious doubts with the second book, and Kindt lost me there (again), but unlike with the other things he somehow managed to get my attention back with this, last, book. The conclusion was very satisfying, it could be considered as a happy ending (but not everyone can be happy, I guess) with strong satisfaction for justice. Matt's stories are for me like discussion - we start usually on same notes because Matt has the talent to pick topics which draws my attention. But usually sooner than later we adrift from each other, like when two people do understand each other their point on that topic and even when they basically are on the same page, they both think they are not and the discussion gets annoying (in this case obviously for me). But in this particular case, we got back on track and found common ground. And I'm happy about that because I can finally say I enjoyed Matt Kindt's story until the end. And besides the art from Jenkinses, which is intriguing for me thanks to its lightness and watercolours and disturbing thanks to its clumsiness, I really enjoyed Grass Kings. I must say the story is actually very good, and I love that it's smart. No stupid/rash characters or decisions to move the story around. And if someone is like that, it fits the character and the story. And I'm thankful for that because this particular thing annoys me as hell everywhere (comics, movies, TV series, books...). But Matt got it quite right here.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    The artwork throughout this series has been incredible, particularly the watercoloring done by Hilary Jenkins. The story is a bit less amazing, though...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Satisfying conclusion to a limited run.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ademption

    Global review for the whole series. The Grass Kings is a fifteen issue limited series concerning a squatter's outpost. The small community is called the Grass Kingdom, and its inhabitants are people with troubled pasts who want to be left alone. The sheriff in the next town over does not like the citizens of the Grass Kingdom and is concerned about a potential killer in the area. Tyler Jenkins' art and Hillary Jenkins' colouring are brilliant, autumnal standouts. Everything is wheat and reds, le Global review for the whole series. The Grass Kings is a fifteen issue limited series concerning a squatter's outpost. The small community is called the Grass Kingdom, and its inhabitants are people with troubled pasts who want to be left alone. The sheriff in the next town over does not like the citizens of the Grass Kingdom and is concerned about a potential killer in the area. Tyler Jenkins' art and Hillary Jenkins' colouring are brilliant, autumnal standouts. Everything is wheat and reds, leaves and broken down trucks. It is always old school Bruce Springsteen chic in the Grass Kingdom. Matt Kindt's story is serviceable. I was kept guessing about the outcome. All of the individual issue covers by Kindt, Jenkins and others are full of clever misdirection and randomness that add to the purposeful confusion. The Grass Kingdom is intricately detailed but fictionally solipsistic. How the Kingdom remained autonomous or even self-sufficient in economic and food security terms is anyone's guess. In this way, the Grass Kingdom reminded me of the titular, allegorical condo in High-Rise by J.G. Ballard. Although, I am unclear as to whether the Grass Kingdom is even allegorical. If so, what would it stand for? Secessionist movements in flyover states? Cuba? The deep south? Anything that wants to be left alone from police and the US government? I don't think it is allegorical. The Grass Kingdom may actually be more akin to Steve Zissou's boat in The Life Aquatic, just a cute little mechanism full of alienated loners, and a hunt. All to say, the art in these books is spectacular. I will seek out more of the Jenkins' work.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Cook

    Great series. This series was a blind purchase for me and based on the overall GoodReads rating, I had low expectations going in, but I have to say it was a pleasant surprise! I loved the development of the characters and story and the ending was very strong. The art is where this series shines. Beautiful watercolors. Absolutely perfect. This is a very underrated series; I highly recommend it!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Okay so.... I saw it coming and had to knock a star, but otherwise I loved the art, the setting, and I love the idea behind the villain. I could read so much more about the Grass Kingdom, even if it's mundane backstory... Okay so.... I saw it coming and had to knock a star, but otherwise I loved the art, the setting, and I love the idea behind the villain. I could read so much more about the Grass Kingdom, even if it's mundane backstory...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fariha

    Though I knew the murderer as soon as he was on page, the ending of this small town drama was still very satisfying. Especially how Robert’s story wraps up makes the maxi-series one for the memory.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    I like it when a book does not string out a finale because of success it makes for lazy writing. This book was a solid conclusion to the series, the ending was good. Recommended

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    A satisfying conclusion to a story that spanned generations and interwove with plotlines throughout the story from start to finish.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    Volume 3 brings the end of the Grass Kings series. "The Thin-Air Killer" has racked up numerous kills over the years and brought endless suffering to the people of Cargill, Raven, and the Grass Kingdom. The federal government have come to the conclusion that the Thin-Air Killer is hiding out in Grass Kingsom and they know just who it is. Robert believes the feds have the wrong man and the kingdom is willing to fight to protect their own. Meanwhile Bruce has traveled to Cargill to try to identify Volume 3 brings the end of the Grass Kings series. "The Thin-Air Killer" has racked up numerous kills over the years and brought endless suffering to the people of Cargill, Raven, and the Grass Kingdom. The federal government have come to the conclusion that the Thin-Air Killer is hiding out in Grass Kingsom and they know just who it is. Robert believes the feds have the wrong man and the kingdom is willing to fight to protect their own. Meanwhile Bruce has traveled to Cargill to try to identify the real identity of the killer. Though the story has a somewhat predictable ending, I still thought it was solid and thoroughly enjoyed it. My only complaint is I wish the series was longer and fleshed out more of the side characters and town. The biggest take away from this book is the art. It is simply beautiful. I recommend this series to any fans of Scalped or Postal.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Great wrap up. There are a whole lot of characters in this series and more than a few untied ends, but that's... OK. It really is. The endings you get are worth it. And the art is SO worth it. A beautiful series that has as all the atmosphere it needs. Great wrap up. There are a whole lot of characters in this series and more than a few untied ends, but that's... OK. It really is. The endings you get are worth it. And the art is SO worth it. A beautiful series that has as all the atmosphere it needs.

  14. 4 out of 5

    47Time

    This volume has a brilliant ending. And brutal AF. The Grass Kingdom is a nice, quiet place, but it instantly defends itself when threatened and severely punishes the ones responsible. The serial killer is revealed and it's a stomach turner. It's definitely worth reading. Recent events are starting to break up the townsfolk in the Grass Kingdom. It turns Robert against Bruce, it breaks up Archie and his wife, it sows more distrust in Robert's way of running the town, it makes Maria run away again This volume has a brilliant ending. And brutal AF. The Grass Kingdom is a nice, quiet place, but it instantly defends itself when threatened and severely punishes the ones responsible. The serial killer is revealed and it's a stomach turner. It's definitely worth reading. Recent events are starting to break up the townsfolk in the Grass Kingdom. It turns Robert against Bruce, it breaks up Archie and his wife, it sows more distrust in Robert's way of running the town, it makes Maria run away again. All this while Humbert calls for the FBI to investigate the Thin-Air serial killer - they bring in an army. Robert gets help from the rich veteran Barko who has been living isolated on an island. 'It's all about to hit the fan.' (view spoiler)[Surrounded on all sides, the Grass Kingdom turnes into a war zone. The feds demand that Archie be released to them. Right as Archie wants to give up, Barko shoots down the feds' helicopter. They seem screwed, but Robert brokers a truce. The army pulls back when Archie is in their custody. He admits to burning down Jen Handel's trailer and killing Big Dan. Bruce discovers Humbert kept some documents related to the Thin-Air investigation at home. It reveals that Humbert Sr. had a deal with the killer, one that extended to his son. The killer threatened Humbert Sr. with evidence that he killed his own wife. In turn the killer, through the murders he commited, promised to make Humbert's career and take down the Grass Kingdom. The killer is a writer living in the Grass Kingdom, a respected individual named Hemingway who has been writing a book about the murders since the very beginning. Nobody suspected he authored the murders too and reveled in the pain they inflicted on the living. Robert catches Hemingway and prepares a fitting punishment - he destroys his book, ties him down and let's the carrion birds peck away at him, killing him slowly and painfully. Though the town is hit hard by these events, it lives on. (hide spoiler)]

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael Emond

    And so – Grass Kings comes to an end. My review for this is similar to volume 2. I would say volume 1 still was by far the best of the series and I felt really captured the idea and feeling of these folks being on their own patch of land trying to live beyond the government in their own “Kingdom”. Just a nice tale of people trying to live off the grid. These last two volumes got into the murder mystery of the Thin-Air serial killer. They were shorter – the art wasn’t as polished (although still And so – Grass Kings comes to an end. My review for this is similar to volume 2. I would say volume 1 still was by far the best of the series and I felt really captured the idea and feeling of these folks being on their own patch of land trying to live beyond the government in their own “Kingdom”. Just a nice tale of people trying to live off the grid. These last two volumes got into the murder mystery of the Thin-Air serial killer. They were shorter – the art wasn’t as polished (although still good) – and we didn’t get the character building and interactions I loved in the first volume. Volume 1 is a classic – these last two volumes are great but not as strong. However, we do get a solid resolution of the Thin-Air killer so that alone makes it a satisfying read. The fight between the Grass Kingdom and the advancing FBI (who think they know who the Thin-Air killer is and want him turned over) was a bit weaker. I would strongly recommend the complete collection of Grass Kings as a whole and I would say the first volume is a top 20 graphic novel of all time.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Not thrilled with the shooting war with "the Feds" as a plotline, or the wealthy island-dwelling survivalist who appeared briefly. But I enjoyed the flashbacks to Humbert Sr., father of the current sheriff of neighboring Cargill. And when the "Thin-Air Killer" is revealed to be the author who has been interviewing family of his victims, it made sense to me. Overall, I bought the Grass Kingdom as a hot, dusty place where some unfortunates have managed to put together something resembling life. Not thrilled with the shooting war with "the Feds" as a plotline, or the wealthy island-dwelling survivalist who appeared briefly. But I enjoyed the flashbacks to Humbert Sr., father of the current sheriff of neighboring Cargill. And when the "Thin-Air Killer" is revealed to be the author who has been interviewing family of his victims, it made sense to me. Overall, I bought the Grass Kingdom as a hot, dusty place where some unfortunates have managed to put together something resembling life.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Grass Kings ends explosively and decisively. The latter adverb is a bit more surprising since Matt Kindt has a tendency to milk his series into nonsense non-endings. Here, the killer is identified and dealt with and the Grass Kingdom's showdown with the Feds is wrapped up neatly. Honestly, it's all kind of perfunctory. Still, Tyler and Hillary Jenkins's art is perfectly suited to the setting and Kindt's talent for storytelling shines through. Grass Kingdom is a decent little series, even if it's Grass Kings ends explosively and decisively. The latter adverb is a bit more surprising since Matt Kindt has a tendency to milk his series into nonsense non-endings. Here, the killer is identified and dealt with and the Grass Kingdom's showdown with the Feds is wrapped up neatly. Honestly, it's all kind of perfunctory. Still, Tyler and Hillary Jenkins's art is perfectly suited to the setting and Kindt's talent for storytelling shines through. Grass Kingdom is a decent little series, even if it's not terribly new or surprising.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    The watercolor art in this series is incredible. While this story could have dragged out for dozens of issues, I appreciate the overall length of this series. A tidy little story told in 15 issues. With such a large cast of characters in play, I'm impressed with the level of character development achieved in such a small number of overall pages. I didn't see the final reveal coming. With said reveal in the back of my mind, this series warrants a reread (as do most of Matt Kindt's books). The watercolor art in this series is incredible. While this story could have dragged out for dozens of issues, I appreciate the overall length of this series. A tidy little story told in 15 issues. With such a large cast of characters in play, I'm impressed with the level of character development achieved in such a small number of overall pages. I didn't see the final reveal coming. With said reveal in the back of my mind, this series warrants a reread (as do most of Matt Kindt's books).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mike Jorgensen

    Really nice ending with a good twist but not necessarily the happiest of endings. As a series it is a lot of characters to learn for a relatively short series, but that isn't necessarily a bad thing. I think I would have preferred scaling it back a little bit (fewer issues and fewer characters) or adding a few more elements to the story and going for another ten issues since there were so many subplots going on anyway. Really nice ending with a good twist but not necessarily the happiest of endings. As a series it is a lot of characters to learn for a relatively short series, but that isn't necessarily a bad thing. I think I would have preferred scaling it back a little bit (fewer issues and fewer characters) or adding a few more elements to the story and going for another ten issues since there were so many subplots going on anyway.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dave Sammath

    This entire series was well-written and beautifully illustrated. Kindt and Jenkins are definitely my current favourites for writing and illustrating. Solid wrap up to the entire series. 15 issues was just the right amount. Enjoyed some of the subtle hinting at the writer who enjoys killing off the characters he creates and the catharsis that comes with it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Reading this in volumes I felt that the first volume git me interested but the second went in a different direction than expected. This third volume just wrapped things up so easy. I wish we could have spent more time with the people of the Grass Kingdom rather than switching focus to the murder mystery. Still the illustration was wonderful and I enjoyed it overall

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Kindt and Jenkins end their mystery series well as the Thin-Air Killer is revealed and the Grass Kingdom deals with the ramifications. While the actual killer's identity wasn't a shock for me the motivations and history of the killer were. The creators did a very good job ending the series but I also think its a world that can be revisited. Overall, a very good ending to a great series. Kindt and Jenkins end their mystery series well as the Thin-Air Killer is revealed and the Grass Kingdom deals with the ramifications. While the actual killer's identity wasn't a shock for me the motivations and history of the killer were. The creators did a very good job ending the series but I also think its a world that can be revisited. Overall, a very good ending to a great series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Great art, completely unsatisfying conclusion to the story. I thought the revelation and resolution of the killer was stupid and didn't mean much to the overall story. The military standoff also seemed pretty pointless. I would have given up on this a long time ago if it wasn't for the art and that it was such a quick read. Great art, completely unsatisfying conclusion to the story. I thought the revelation and resolution of the killer was stupid and didn't mean much to the overall story. The military standoff also seemed pretty pointless. I would have given up on this a long time ago if it wasn't for the art and that it was such a quick read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tim Nowotny

    I am sad to see this series end but am thankful for the crisp length. Although it gets a bit predictable by the end, this series touched me with its characters and the feeling of their life. This was not too far away from the long earth series. But what I found naïve and unreasonable there, I could see in the character's eyes here I am sad to see this series end but am thankful for the crisp length. Although it gets a bit predictable by the end, this series touched me with its characters and the feeling of their life. This was not too far away from the long earth series. But what I found naïve and unreasonable there, I could see in the character's eyes here

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paul W.

    Dissatisfying. A rushed ending as the book was likely too long. The ending was both predictable and not, but was definitely not a satisfying conclusion. I feel the narrative could have been tightened and more could have been done with the book. I enjoyed the conceit, a collective of people squatting on land near a couple of cities, but the throughline just wasn't strong. Dissatisfying. A rushed ending as the book was likely too long. The ending was both predictable and not, but was definitely not a satisfying conclusion. I feel the narrative could have been tightened and more could have been done with the book. I enjoyed the conceit, a collective of people squatting on land near a couple of cities, but the throughline just wasn't strong.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Terry Mulcahy

    A quick ending, tying up loose ends and character arcs. Artwork is still superb, worth reading the book for. The entire is a good one, realistic and full of drama. But this last book in the series was a bit weak.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Manuel

    It took me longer then I like to admit to finish this, but I'm so glad I did. These books were amazing. I can't even begin to describe how beautiful the art is, it's just something you need to experience yourself. The story was thrilling and compelling and it's one I'll remember for a long time. It took me longer then I like to admit to finish this, but I'm so glad I did. These books were amazing. I can't even begin to describe how beautiful the art is, it's just something you need to experience yourself. The story was thrilling and compelling and it's one I'll remember for a long time.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shim

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. But of an anticlimactic, hurried ending. The shootout with the feds also doesn’t make much sense. All in all wrapped up an interesting premise into a pretty weak package. Artwork quite impressive though.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Givens

    This was shorter than the other two volumes, and I don't know if that was intentional or if they ran out of time, but this final volume definitely feels a bit rushed compared to the other two. But what you need to know is resolved, and there are just enough loose ends to keep it feeling real. This was shorter than the other two volumes, and I don't know if that was intentional or if they ran out of time, but this final volume definitely feels a bit rushed compared to the other two. But what you need to know is resolved, and there are just enough loose ends to keep it feeling real.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Micah Taylor

    Wrapped up too quickly, wish there was more to let the story and all its elements (not just the murder) rode out a little more. Assuming g that may not be the fault of the creators. Overall a great series!

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