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The Dichotomy of Leadership: Balancing the Challenges of Extreme Ownership to Lead and Win

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THE INSTANT #1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER From the #1 New York Times bestselling authors of Extreme Ownership comes a new and revolutionary approach to help leaders recognize and attain the leadership balance crucial to victory. With their first book, Extreme Ownership (published in October 2015), Jocko Willink and Leif Babin set a new standard for leadership, challenging readers THE INSTANT #1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER From the #1 New York Times bestselling authors of Extreme Ownership comes a new and revolutionary approach to help leaders recognize and attain the leadership balance crucial to victory. With their first book, Extreme Ownership (published in October 2015), Jocko Willink and Leif Babin set a new standard for leadership, challenging readers to become better leaders, better followers, and better people, in both their professional and personal lives. Now, in THE DICHOTOMY OF LEADERSHIP, Jocko and Leif dive even deeper into the unchartered and complex waters of a concept first introduced in Extreme Ownership: finding balance between the opposing forces that pull every leader in different directions. Here, Willink and Babin get granular into the nuances that every successful leader must navigate. Mastering the Dichotomy of Leadership requires understanding when to lead and when to follow; when to aggressively maneuver and when to pause and let things develop; when to detach and let the team run and when to dive into the details and micromanage. In addition, every leader must: · Take Extreme Ownership of everything that impacts their mission, yet utilize Decentralize Command by giving ownership to their team. · Care deeply about their people and their individual success and livelihoods, yet look out for the good of the overall team and above all accomplish the strategic mission. · Exhibit the most important quality in a leader—humility, but also be willing to speak up and push back against questionable decisions that could hurt the team and the mission. With examples from the authors’ combat and training experiences in the SEAL teams, and then a demonstration of how each lesson applies to the business world, Willink and Babin clearly explain THE DICHOTOMY OF LEADERSHIP—skills that are mission-critical for any leader and any team to achieve their ultimate goal: VICTORY.


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THE INSTANT #1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER From the #1 New York Times bestselling authors of Extreme Ownership comes a new and revolutionary approach to help leaders recognize and attain the leadership balance crucial to victory. With their first book, Extreme Ownership (published in October 2015), Jocko Willink and Leif Babin set a new standard for leadership, challenging readers THE INSTANT #1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER From the #1 New York Times bestselling authors of Extreme Ownership comes a new and revolutionary approach to help leaders recognize and attain the leadership balance crucial to victory. With their first book, Extreme Ownership (published in October 2015), Jocko Willink and Leif Babin set a new standard for leadership, challenging readers to become better leaders, better followers, and better people, in both their professional and personal lives. Now, in THE DICHOTOMY OF LEADERSHIP, Jocko and Leif dive even deeper into the unchartered and complex waters of a concept first introduced in Extreme Ownership: finding balance between the opposing forces that pull every leader in different directions. Here, Willink and Babin get granular into the nuances that every successful leader must navigate. Mastering the Dichotomy of Leadership requires understanding when to lead and when to follow; when to aggressively maneuver and when to pause and let things develop; when to detach and let the team run and when to dive into the details and micromanage. In addition, every leader must: · Take Extreme Ownership of everything that impacts their mission, yet utilize Decentralize Command by giving ownership to their team. · Care deeply about their people and their individual success and livelihoods, yet look out for the good of the overall team and above all accomplish the strategic mission. · Exhibit the most important quality in a leader—humility, but also be willing to speak up and push back against questionable decisions that could hurt the team and the mission. With examples from the authors’ combat and training experiences in the SEAL teams, and then a demonstration of how each lesson applies to the business world, Willink and Babin clearly explain THE DICHOTOMY OF LEADERSHIP—skills that are mission-critical for any leader and any team to achieve their ultimate goal: VICTORY.

30 review for The Dichotomy of Leadership: Balancing the Challenges of Extreme Ownership to Lead and Win

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lorilin

    Dichotomy of Leadership is the follow-up book to Jocko Willink and Leif Babin's wildly popular book on leadership, Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win. Both men are former Navy Seals and now run a consulting company together called Echelon Front. Dichotomy of Leadership follows the same general format as Extreme Ownership. The book is divided into three parts:  1) Balancing People, 2) Balancing the Mission, and 3) Balancing Yourself. Each part is then divided into four different c Dichotomy of Leadership is the follow-up book to Jocko Willink and Leif Babin's wildly popular book on leadership, Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win. Both men are former Navy Seals and now run a consulting company together called Echelon Front. Dichotomy of Leadership follows the same general format as Extreme Ownership. The book is divided into three parts:  1) Balancing People, 2) Balancing the Mission, and 3) Balancing Yourself. Each part is then divided into four different chapters---so twelve chapters all together---with each one covering common issues that leaders face. Special emphasis is put on balancing preferable leadership qualities without going to extremes. Here's a quick summary of each chapter: 1) Care about your individual team members, but accept that you might have to sacrifice individuals to save the group. 2) Claim ownership, but don't micromanage others so much that no one else has the opportunity to take control and feel ownership themselves. (One of my favorite chapters.)  3) Be resolute but not overbearing. 4) Do everything you can to help struggling team members, but know when it's time to fire them. 5) Train your team well, but don't be so hard on people that they become overwhelmed and can no longer learn. 6) Be aggressive but not reckless. 7) Be disciplined but not rigid. Allow for flexibility. 8) Hold people accountable, but don't smother them with direction. 9) Be a good follower if you want to be a good leader. (Another favorite!) 10) Plan, but don't over-plan. 11) Be humble, but don't be passive. Prioritize when to push back. 12) Know the details of the mission, but also be detached enough that you can see the big picture. The chapter on being a good follower was so eye-opening for me. I don't work in a business setting, but I am very active in the PTO at my kid's school. Sometimes the group I lead gets the support it needs...and sometimes it doesn't. And when it doesn't, truthfully, I get mad at my "boss." But this chapter showed me the importance of developing and maintaining a good relationship with my higher-ups, regardless of whether I agree with them or not. I loved this quote: Strive to have the same relationship with every boss you ever work for, no matter if they are good or bad. The relationship you should seek with any boss incorporates three things:  1) they trust you, 2) they value and seek your opinion and guidance, and 3) they give you what you need to accomplish your mission and then let you go execute. It's not easy to have patience when you're at odds with your boss, but I appreciate Willink and Babin's advice to breathe and remember my long term goals. Ultimately, I really enjoyed this book. It's well-written and well-organized, and I loved the real-life examples from the authors' lives. This is a great resource for anyone who works in groups, runs a team, or answers to a boss. In other words, there's something for everyone in here. See more of my reviews at www.BugBugBooks.com!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sau Cheung

    Their first book, Extreme Ownership, was excellent. Book two adds very little to the topics discussed in book one. Honestly, book two could be boiled down to 2-3 chapters and simply included in the back of Extreme Ownership as a revised or deluxe edition

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tara Brabazon

    This book is so ridiculous, I am amazed it is not written by Noddy and Big Ears. Seriously. Seriously. The book is filled with stories of war, particularly the Battle of Ramadi in 2006. The assumption is that experiences in the military - in war - are the ideal models of leadership for the rest of us. This type of pseudo-masculine, hutt hutt hutt, silliness demonstrates what is wrong with 'consultants' and how truly bonkers 'transferable skills' really are. Killing people is not the metaphor we re This book is so ridiculous, I am amazed it is not written by Noddy and Big Ears. Seriously. Seriously. The book is filled with stories of war, particularly the Battle of Ramadi in 2006. The assumption is that experiences in the military - in war - are the ideal models of leadership for the rest of us. This type of pseudo-masculine, hutt hutt hutt, silliness demonstrates what is wrong with 'consultants' and how truly bonkers 'transferable skills' really are. Killing people is not the metaphor we require for the public or private sector. "Cover and move" is not the advice we require to manage regulators. How someone behaves in war should not be moved to peace time. This silliness must stop. People who lead in the private and public sector are not hyper-masculine masters of the universe. Yawn. Don't take your leadership advice from the military. That's how we got into this capitalist excessiveness in the first place. We don't need 'war' to prove we are a 'man.' And just a reminder - many of us are not men...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rhett Reisman

    Jocko’s new book is a further explanation of extreme ownership. You should read extreme ownership first for full context. It is easy to take leadership and self help books and dissect them until they don’t make sense anymore. As an author it is impossible to cover the unlimited possibilities of a subject as broad as leadership. Readers of Extreme Ownership misinterpreted some of the key points in the book. Instead of being at an extreme of leadership you want to be in the middle of a dichotomy ( Jocko’s new book is a further explanation of extreme ownership. You should read extreme ownership first for full context. It is easy to take leadership and self help books and dissect them until they don’t make sense anymore. As an author it is impossible to cover the unlimited possibilities of a subject as broad as leadership. Readers of Extreme Ownership misinterpreted some of the key points in the book. Instead of being at an extreme of leadership you want to be in the middle of a dichotomy (don’t be a micro manager, but also don’t leave your subordinates to their own tasks all the time with no guidance / take interest in the lives of your employees but don’t let your friendship ruin the business etc) Dichotomy of Leadership has made me see the world in dichotomies now. A friend of mine just went through an interview and complained about how the interviewer failed to keep the conversation flowing by bringing the conversation back to small technical details. This made me consider the job of an interviewer - to vet a candidate with enough technical questions to see if they can handle the work while also carrying on a conversation with them to see if they will be a good cultural fit for the company. Too far to the extremes in either case would be bad. Not enough technical knowledge - employee will fail. Not a good cultural fit - the employee may be out of place or the culture may shift over time if enough of these employees are hired. This is one example, but dichotomies are everywhere. This isn’t a groundbreaking idea - extreme things usually have extreme drawbacks, but it is interesting to think about and is a good response for people who wanted to nitpick the last book. I’m a Jocko stan though so I was always going to like this book. It could have been a little shorter, and if you are not into war stories you won’t like the book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Abbie

    SO GOOD!! I started reading this book as soon as I finished Extreme Ownership and even with as much as I loved Extreme Ownership, I LOVE THE DICHOTOMY EVEN MORE. I really appreciate the whole message of balance: balance in everything, especially the leadership traits and principles taught in this book. The only thing I think would have improved this book (and Extreme Ownership too) is to demonstrate application to other areas of life besides business. I know Jocko does a lot of business consulta SO GOOD!! I started reading this book as soon as I finished Extreme Ownership and even with as much as I loved Extreme Ownership, I LOVE THE DICHOTOMY EVEN MORE. I really appreciate the whole message of balance: balance in everything, especially the leadership traits and principles taught in this book. The only thing I think would have improved this book (and Extreme Ownership too) is to demonstrate application to other areas of life besides business. I know Jocko does a lot of business consultation but I would love to read how one would apply these principles to life, family relationships, teacher/student relationships, etc. But the book is still STRAIGHT FIRE even without that. GO READ THIS BOOK IT WILL BLOW UR MIND.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian Gebski

    It's a very good book if you can somehow filter out all the American "pathos". I've struggled with assessing "Extreme Ownsership", so how come this one is easier for me to evaluate? The answer is simple: what authors (Willink & Babin) call "dichotomy" I call "balance". And this idea fully resonates with myself - I truly believe that the real leadership is ALL about balance and not falling under any extremes. The book illustrates the idea in a very clear & straightforward way - starting with the a It's a very good book if you can somehow filter out all the American "pathos". I've struggled with assessing "Extreme Ownsership", so how come this one is easier for me to evaluate? The answer is simple: what authors (Willink & Babin) call "dichotomy" I call "balance". And this idea fully resonates with myself - I truly believe that the real leadership is ALL about balance and not falling under any extremes. The book illustrates the idea in a very clear & straightforward way - starting with the actual "field of battle" examples & later mapping it onto more business-casual scenario. Actual chapters (each illustrates a particular dichotomy) make a lot of sense, examples are crispy enough (so you get the idea of what authors want to emphasize) & somehow I got less annoyed by clear differences between "band of brothers-alike" soldier-specific situations & more typical, business commercial situations. The end effect is one of the best leadership-related books I've read recently. Even with all these pathos I've already mentioned ;P

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kim Osterholzer

    I Loved Extreme Ownership, and I found I love The Dichotomy of Leadership even more. "The foremost requirement of potent leadership is humility." This is my favorite quote from the book, and is the theme that runs throughout. May this book engender a rising of truly powerful leaders who lead from such a powerful place as humility and integrity. I Loved Extreme Ownership, and I found I love The Dichotomy of Leadership even more. "The foremost requirement of potent leadership is humility." This is my favorite quote from the book, and is the theme that runs throughout. May this book engender a rising of truly powerful leaders who lead from such a powerful place as humility and integrity.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    One of my favorite books. Concise stories and simple lessons of leadership.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sandro Mancuso

    If you’ve read and liked Extreme Ownership, you will also like this book. This book provides a more balanced view on the principles described in Extreme Ownership.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Siah

    Jocko and Leif did it again. This book builds upon their other book, extreme ownership, and it’s similarly full of crap. There are plenty of books from which one can learn leadership, this is not one of them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jason X

    Audiobook grade: B-. I liked the author's own voices trading off. They have a very disciplined, clear militaristic way of speaking that is easy to listen to. The sound effects (machine guns, bombs) were cheesy. The Good: I really liked the stories of the Iraq war as told by the two authors' first hand experience. The leadership and teamwork lessons learned in training and battle were outstanding. Jocko and Leif are amazing and unique humans. I could listen to their stories all day. They exude exc Audiobook grade: B-. I liked the author's own voices trading off. They have a very disciplined, clear militaristic way of speaking that is easy to listen to. The sound effects (machine guns, bombs) were cheesy. The Good: I really liked the stories of the Iraq war as told by the two authors' first hand experience. The leadership and teamwork lessons learned in training and battle were outstanding. Jocko and Leif are amazing and unique humans. I could listen to their stories all day. They exude excellence and professionalism in all things. I thank them for their service to America, BTF style. The Bad: The ham fisted "business application" sessions were totally unnecessary. The lessons and basic fundamentals from their initial book "Extreme Ownership" were already brightly illuminated by the field stories. Repeating them in a made up quasi-real business setting using tons of clunky corporate jargon was boring. Honestly, these application sections seemed like commercials for their consulting business. "Here's how we helped this super duper awesome All American tech company CFO kick ass with new spin-off software doubleplus growth." I'm sure they make crazy bank from rich executives who can afford to get close to a real life Navy SEAL. I'd want to do that, too, if I were that awesome. The Ugly: Relating the lessons learned in war felt crass when wedged into the business environment, applied. I'm sorry if this is crass, too, but my observation is we have created a sad world if winning is defined by a middle manager playing Navy SEALs war fantasy to squeeze an extra 0.5 % quarterly profit from the mega call center staff in Omaha. Is this the Freedom these best and brightest fought for?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Seth Davis

    Giving this a five because of how much I enjoy Jocko's work. This book starts a bit slow and repetitive if you've read or listened to his other content. I was concerned that this was all going to be a rehash. However, we quickly move past the section on the soldiers that he lost that have impacted his life so much to the core content of the book. This is a book about finding balance with war and business examples to explain. It's positioned as a follow-up dive to extreme ownership and that's exa Giving this a five because of how much I enjoy Jocko's work. This book starts a bit slow and repetitive if you've read or listened to his other content. I was concerned that this was all going to be a rehash. However, we quickly move past the section on the soldiers that he lost that have impacted his life so much to the core content of the book. This is a book about finding balance with war and business examples to explain. It's positioned as a follow-up dive to extreme ownership and that's exactly what it is. You should certainly reach the other book first and only reach for this if you want more. I really enjoyed reading this and thinking through the examples. I know some folks have a hard time with the macho war aspects of these books. I don't. Whatever you think of war, it's certainly the highest-stakes pressure cooker of an environment that one can experience. Having examples from that environment that graph back to the business world I find engaging and helpful. If you aren't so fond of these you should probably skip the book altogether, but the intro and outro will be particularly challenging.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Haladuick

    Extension of Extreme ownership. Good lessons, but too much fluff and repetition. Take extreme ownership over everything in your world including leadership in balance. Q: Own It All, but Empower Others Resolute, but Not Overbearing When to Mentor, When to Fire Train Hard, but Train Smart Aggressive, Not Reckless Disciplined, Not Rigid Hold People Accountable, but Don’t Hold Their Hands A Leader and a Follower Plan, but Don’t Overplan Humble, Not Passive Focused, but Detached "To care deeply for each indivi Extension of Extreme ownership. Good lessons, but too much fluff and repetition. Take extreme ownership over everything in your world including leadership in balance. Q: Own It All, but Empower Others Resolute, but Not Overbearing When to Mentor, When to Fire Train Hard, but Train Smart Aggressive, Not Reckless Disciplined, Not Rigid Hold People Accountable, but Don’t Hold Their Hands A Leader and a Follower Plan, but Don’t Overplan Humble, Not Passive Focused, but Detached "To care deeply for each individual member of the team, well at the same time accepting the risks necessary to accomplish the mission... A leader must recognize that there is a job to do." "Supply a better understanding of why. Use accountability as a tool when needed, but don't rely on it as the sole means of enforcement. A reliance on heavy accountability consumes the time and focus of the leader and inhibits the trust, growth, and development of the subordinates. Instead, balance accountability with educating the team and empowering the members to maintain standards even without direct oversight from the top. " “As a leader, you have to balance the dichotomy, to be resolute where it matters but never inflexible and uncompromising on matters of little importance to the overall good of the team and the strategic mission.” "Leaders must be willing to listen and follow others, regardless if they are junior or less experienced... Confident leaders encourage junior members of the team to step up and lead when they put forth ideas that will contribute to mission success." Use the most effective manner possible. “So as a leader it is critical to balance the strict discipline of standard procedures with the freedom to adapt, adjust, and manoeuvre to do what is best to support the overarching commander's intent and achieve victory. For leaders, in combat, business, and life, be disciplined, but not rigid.”

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    This follow-up to Extreme Ownership emphasizes key points from the first book, and expands upon ideas. I liked that the authors used their own idea of extreme ownership to own that some leadership principles are a balancing act, or dichotomy. For example, you must be strong in your convictions to be a leader... but you also must be willing and able to accept input from your own leader, your colleagues, and even your subordinates at time. Good leaders really must hone the intuition to know when t This follow-up to Extreme Ownership emphasizes key points from the first book, and expands upon ideas. I liked that the authors used their own idea of extreme ownership to own that some leadership principles are a balancing act, or dichotomy. For example, you must be strong in your convictions to be a leader... but you also must be willing and able to accept input from your own leader, your colleagues, and even your subordinates at time. Good leaders really must hone the intuition to know when to lean to either side of each dichotomy. Like the first book, the authors spend the first half of each chapter illustrating a leadership principle in the field in Iraq and the second half illustrating the principle in the modern American business field. Just like the first book, most of the first half of each chapter went over my head. I could tell that the authors honestly tried to explain situations in a way that the average Joe would understand, and I appreciate that, but I just have absolutely no mental affordances upon which to hang the situations they were describing. Overall, not a bad book. It's not lengthy, so it really wouldn't cost you much to check it out! The audiobook was pretty good. The description in my library's online catalog didn't list the narrator explicitly and I got excited for a moment, hoping to hear the authors themselves. It is read instead by a cast member of the audiobook recording company. That's not bad: he's a professional. The tone, volume, and cadence are very even and diction is clear.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Ness

    What an incredible book! All the teachings in this book are lessons from both of the author’s experiences as Navy SEALs (the stories of which are super engaging; they’re incredible story tellers) but the skills attained are practical to all aspects of leadership. The book masterfully walks through each leadership situation from the story where it was learned in the war, the principal of the story, and how the same situation carried out in a business they’ve consulted with their consulting firm, What an incredible book! All the teachings in this book are lessons from both of the author’s experiences as Navy SEALs (the stories of which are super engaging; they’re incredible story tellers) but the skills attained are practical to all aspects of leadership. The book masterfully walks through each leadership situation from the story where it was learned in the war, the principal of the story, and how the same situation carried out in a business they’ve consulted with their consulting firm, Echelon Front. Jocko and Leif each read the chapters they wrote. But what makes it more engaging is that since they were deployed together, they play integral parts in each other’s stories. So even though Jocko may be telling the story, Leif is in it, and vice versa. Even though these are leadership lessons from the military and applied to business, I would argue these lessons are relevant not only to business men, but to every one who would read it as they’re valuable to all aspects of personal life, growth, and development. I learned that there’s a dichotomy, a balance, to leadership, and that even the best of qualities, when taken to an extreme, can be detrimental. That balance and adapting to change is to be strived for. As Thanos would say: “Perfectly balanced, as all things should be.” It’s a must read

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marcelo Bahia

    If you’re going to read one of those repetitive leadership books, at least do it in grand-style with a book featuring cool war stories in Iraq. A couple of years ago I decided not to read leadership books anymore unless they offered something really distinctive relative to similar literature on the subject. This book goes into detail on how leadership is developed in SEAL training, which is interesting enough for me. There are 12 different chapters diving into 12 different aspects of leadership If you’re going to read one of those repetitive leadership books, at least do it in grand-style with a book featuring cool war stories in Iraq. A couple of years ago I decided not to read leadership books anymore unless they offered something really distinctive relative to similar literature on the subject. This book goes into detail on how leadership is developed in SEAL training, which is interesting enough for me. There are 12 different chapters diving into 12 different aspects of leadership under a similar structure: an awesome Iraq war story, followed by the lessons and principles behind the story, and concluding with an actual application for business. Even though most chapters don’t have an extremely surprising lesson (seriously, do you really need to tell us that we have to balance between delegation and micromanaging?), some of them have interesting nuggets that are worth the whole book. Eg. why it’s important to seek the same relationship with every boss you ever work for, no matter if they are good or bad. Among the war stories, the routines and training of SEAL teams and leadership lessons, this book has something interesting for almost everyone, even though it can’t be perfect like most books of this genre.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David

    I didn't initially realize that this is the second book by these authors after Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy Seals Lead and Win. I just finished the first book but am behind on my reviews so I'll stick with the order read. The Dichotomy of Leadership: Balancing the Challenges of Extreme Ownership to Lead and Win by Jocko Willink and Lief Babin presents leadership skills as used by the Navy Seals in conducting combat operations. Each chapter gives an example from their experiences in Ramadi in I didn't initially realize that this is the second book by these authors after Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy Seals Lead and Win. I just finished the first book but am behind on my reviews so I'll stick with the order read. The Dichotomy of Leadership: Balancing the Challenges of Extreme Ownership to Lead and Win by Jocko Willink and Lief Babin presents leadership skills as used by the Navy Seals in conducting combat operations. Each chapter gives an example from their experiences in Ramadi in Iraq, then explains the leadership principles involved, and finally gives an example of how they applied that principle(s) to a business environment. Having worked for many years in large corporations in addition to earning an MBA degree with emphasis in management, I have to honestly say that there wasn't a lot of new ideas for me. My favorite parts were the combat situations. Also, since I just finished their first book I found a lot of material was duplicated, which isn't a bad thing by itself. If you have little management or leadership training or experience, you will probably get a lot more out of it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rod Roberts

    One of the best books on leadership that I've ever read. This book ties in with their first book on leadership, "Extreme Ownership" as it adds another level of depth into the concepts. Extreme Ownership was a great book on leadership with some very easy to implement concepts and procedures. Not only do I enjoy reading about the awesome war stories of our great men and women who fought for our country, but the value that these stories provide as it ties into real life business practices are absol One of the best books on leadership that I've ever read. This book ties in with their first book on leadership, "Extreme Ownership" as it adds another level of depth into the concepts. Extreme Ownership was a great book on leadership with some very easy to implement concepts and procedures. Not only do I enjoy reading about the awesome war stories of our great men and women who fought for our country, but the value that these stories provide as it ties into real life business practices are absolutely amazing. I will definitely recommend that anyone in a leadership role or would like to be someday to get this book as well as their other book, Extreme Ownership. Because they often refer back to the first book, it would probably make more sense if you read that one first.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cody Lasko

    If you’re a fan of Jocko you might as well save yourself the time and just get into it. It serves as a great read much in the vein of Extreme Ownership. But with that said, the book can be summed up all too quickly in one sentence: Leadership is about finding a balance between extremes across all aspects and all situations. Or something of a similar sort. Now that’s not to take anything away from it as a whole, but the reality is it doesn’t carry the same impact of his first book. Like most sequel If you’re a fan of Jocko you might as well save yourself the time and just get into it. It serves as a great read much in the vein of Extreme Ownership. But with that said, the book can be summed up all too quickly in one sentence: Leadership is about finding a balance between extremes across all aspects and all situations. Or something of a similar sort. Now that’s not to take anything away from it as a whole, but the reality is it doesn’t carry the same impact of his first book. Like most sequels it’s an extension of the original, and while it can be read as a stand alone, it’s simply not as effective in that regard either.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Timeo Williams

    It's certainly a question to be asked: In which domain in every industry/field in this world would you expect to find the best leaders. The military is certainly a good place to start. Tasked with leading men into and out of the hands of death, itself, requires very good leadership skills. The ability to be detached from camaraderie and analyze the situation, but at the same time, stressing the importance of the mission and the why is also essential. Hence, the dichotomy. Jocko and Leif express It's certainly a question to be asked: In which domain in every industry/field in this world would you expect to find the best leaders. The military is certainly a good place to start. Tasked with leading men into and out of the hands of death, itself, requires very good leadership skills. The ability to be detached from camaraderie and analyze the situation, but at the same time, stressing the importance of the mission and the why is also essential. Hence, the dichotomy. Jocko and Leif express their viewpoints on several leadership topics and the various nuances around it and tailor each principle with a business example from their experience with Echelon Front.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bartosz Majewski

    It's a 3rd of Jocko Books I've read so far. I've abandoned it for ~5 months after around 60% because I needed switching the context of my reading material to something unrelated to business. The structure of the book is identical as in Extreme Ownership (if you haven't read it I highly recommend, you should start there). The whole book is built around a concept of balance in various aspects of leadership. Is micromanaging good? No. But can you be too macromanaging your team? Absolutely. Can you in It's a 3rd of Jocko Books I've read so far. I've abandoned it for ~5 months after around 60% because I needed switching the context of my reading material to something unrelated to business. The structure of the book is identical as in Extreme Ownership (if you haven't read it I highly recommend, you should start there). The whole book is built around a concept of balance in various aspects of leadership. Is micromanaging good? No. But can you be too macromanaging your team? Absolutely. Can you invest in your team too little? Sure. But can you invest too much? 100%. That's what this book is about. Based on Jocko and Leif's military and consulting practice examples.

  22. 5 out of 5

    AJ Payne

    Audiobook. Solid leadership principles and good examples of them. However, since I find war stories to be exceedingly boring I did not like that aspect of the book - which, was the beginning part of every chapter with a story from Iraq or SEAL training. Blech. But that's just my personal preference, and like I said the leadership principles were solid and certainly things that I will be trying to incorporate into my life... just without the commensurate war stories. So overall I give it a 3 star Audiobook. Solid leadership principles and good examples of them. However, since I find war stories to be exceedingly boring I did not like that aspect of the book - which, was the beginning part of every chapter with a story from Iraq or SEAL training. Blech. But that's just my personal preference, and like I said the leadership principles were solid and certainly things that I will be trying to incorporate into my life... just without the commensurate war stories. So overall I give it a 3 star rating.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Aceves

    Really interesting book that goes through the perspective of army soldiers and how a mission and team will only succeed when a leader is present and vocal. The authors talk about being able to balance the role of being a leader, being able to step up when needed and back down for the good of the mission and team. It has a connection to business where it is necessary to have good leadership in order for it to succeed. This book can also be applied to other aspects of life or work which I think ma Really interesting book that goes through the perspective of army soldiers and how a mission and team will only succeed when a leader is present and vocal. The authors talk about being able to balance the role of being a leader, being able to step up when needed and back down for the good of the mission and team. It has a connection to business where it is necessary to have good leadership in order for it to succeed. This book can also be applied to other aspects of life or work which I think makes it valuable and a very good book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jens

    Read it in one day. It's simply the story of how the authors go about counseling based on their previous book. Each chapter gives an example of how a company failed to implement the concept of Extreme Ownership by overdoing it or coming short. Therein they find "dichotomy", but rectifiyng it doesn't really deliver new insights, rather another explanation of the same idea. Smart marketing, easy to write and to capitalize on, I guess. Read it in one day. It's simply the story of how the authors go about counseling based on their previous book. Each chapter gives an example of how a company failed to implement the concept of Extreme Ownership by overdoing it or coming short. Therein they find "dichotomy", but rectifiyng it doesn't really deliver new insights, rather another explanation of the same idea. Smart marketing, easy to write and to capitalize on, I guess.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jason Smith

    While this book is better than Extreme Ownership it is still bad. In the forward they explain that there was a problem with how they wrote Extreme Ownership and so this is the follow up to more fully explain the concept but also how to balance as a leader. But, throughout the book they keep referring to the other book as if they're still defending it. There are just so many better leadership books to read. While this book is better than Extreme Ownership it is still bad. In the forward they explain that there was a problem with how they wrote Extreme Ownership and so this is the follow up to more fully explain the concept but also how to balance as a leader. But, throughout the book they keep referring to the other book as if they're still defending it. There are just so many better leadership books to read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Justinas Rastenis

    Good, balanced book about leadership. It has real life examples that help to grasp overall concepts. However, the book answers the question "What?" quite well but the hardest question "How?" remains unanswered. Nevertheless, this book is worth reading as it provides new perspective on concepts that most of the leaders are aware of but often fail to live up to. Good, balanced book about leadership. It has real life examples that help to grasp overall concepts. However, the book answers the question "What?" quite well but the hardest question "How?" remains unanswered. Nevertheless, this book is worth reading as it provides new perspective on concepts that most of the leaders are aware of but often fail to live up to.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The Principles and Application sections of each chapter are worthwhile and solid. The war stories add little value to the subject. I began skipping them in the middle of Extreme Ownership and skipped them all in this one. The tone is quite masculine and there is too much self promotion for my style.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matt Allen

    This is a required read for anyone that has read and is practicing Extreme Ownership. I would say that anyone new to the subject must read both books back-to-back. Dichotomy of Leadership covers followership and clarifies/deepens many of the points from Extreme Ownership. Highly recommended.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Diego

    Great follow up to Extreme Ownership. Filled with more stories that apply to business leaders. Not a lot of eye opening material but better than re-reading the previous book. Very entertaining with good messages.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ken Josef

    Third book I've read from them... Best book on leadership I've ever read! Third book I've read from them... Best book on leadership I've ever read!

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