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Sixteen million mutants dead - and that was just the beginning! In one bold stroke, writer Grant Morrison propelled the X-Men into the 21st century - masterminding a challenging new direction for Marvel's mutant heroes that began with the destruction of Genosha and never let up. Sixteen million mutants dead - and that was just the beginning! In one bold stroke, writer Grant Morrison propelled the X-Men into the 21st century - masterminding a challenging new direction for Marvel's mutant heroes that began with the destruction of Genosha and never let up.


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Sixteen million mutants dead - and that was just the beginning! In one bold stroke, writer Grant Morrison propelled the X-Men into the 21st century - masterminding a challenging new direction for Marvel's mutant heroes that began with the destruction of Genosha and never let up. Sixteen million mutants dead - and that was just the beginning! In one bold stroke, writer Grant Morrison propelled the X-Men into the 21st century - masterminding a challenging new direction for Marvel's mutant heroes that began with the destruction of Genosha and never let up.

30 review for New X-Men by Grant Morrison: Ultimate Collection, Book 3

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    “Kicks just keep getting’ harder to find And all your kicks ain’t bringin’ you peace of mind” Because I’m a relatively mean and shallow person, I’m always ready to jump on a writer’s pretentions or missteps and there’s no one with a bigger target on his back than Grant Morrison. He’s written some seriously misguided crap; peppering his work with allusions to Keats or Milton and quoting The Kinks or William S. Burroughs or Little Lulu that I’m usually just too stupid to get. Yet the man is capable “Kicks just keep getting’ harder to find And all your kicks ain’t bringin’ you peace of mind” Because I’m a relatively mean and shallow person, I’m always ready to jump on a writer’s pretentions or missteps and there’s no one with a bigger target on his back than Grant Morrison. He’s written some seriously misguided crap; peppering his work with allusions to Keats or Milton and quoting The Kinks or William S. Burroughs or Little Lulu that I’m usually just too stupid to get. Yet the man is capable of some extraordinary work – brilliant, funny with plenty of love and respect for the history of comics. With New X-Men, one of a handful of Marvel titles he wrote, Morrison, in his manifesto included in this book, wanted the X-books to return to the halcyon days of Byrne and Claremont, exciting times before the X-titles became inert and mind-numbing. For the most part he succeeded. Back in the day, I remember looking forward to picking up this title in single issues. This is the culmination of the run that Morrison had planned out from the beginning with the only head scratcher being the final story line from the future. Wolverine recruits a drunken Cyclops at the Hellfire Club. Along with Fantomax (Vive le Fanotmax!), their mission is to infiltrate Weapon X. Logan learns Weapon X history stuff. After hiding behind his Xorn disguise, Magneto, hopped on Kick (the song lyrics at the beginning of the review finally make sense), a humdinger mutant-power enhancing crack, does the full reveal and finally punks the X-Men. However, his (Xorn’s) special-ed class is confused. But Magneto goes balls to the wall to create a new mutant paradise in Manhattan. …until the inevitable showdown. Future times are a mixed bag. Yep, Wolverine dies for like the millionth time… The art’s also a mixed bag. Frank Quietly helped set the tone with Morrison in the beginning of the run. In this volume, a different artist takes a turn for each story arc. That includes Chris “Just-what-the-hell-am-I-looking at” Bachalo. Bottom line: Aside from a recommended cracker jack run on this title, we owe Morrison an X-debt for Fantomax, Quentin Quire, the Cuckoo Sisters and Emma Frost’s white ho outfit. Thanks, Grant!! No worries for Wolverine, being pee-shy is not a secondary mutant ability.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Assault on Weapon Plus: Wolverine, Cyclops, and Fantomex go looking for the Weapon Plus HQ so Wolverine can access their files and find out who he was before he became Weapon X. Assault on Weapon Plus was an action-fest. The who shot Emma Frost subplot didn't really move forward at all, though. I liked that Marvel finally had the guts to reveal something about Wolverine's past after more than 30 years. Planet X: Xorn leads a revolt inside Xavier's school and his true identity is revealed. Meanwhi Assault on Weapon Plus: Wolverine, Cyclops, and Fantomex go looking for the Weapon Plus HQ so Wolverine can access their files and find out who he was before he became Weapon X. Assault on Weapon Plus was an action-fest. The who shot Emma Frost subplot didn't really move forward at all, though. I liked that Marvel finally had the guts to reveal something about Wolverine's past after more than 30 years. Planet X: Xorn leads a revolt inside Xavier's school and his true identity is revealed. Meanwhile, Wolverine and Jean Grey are on an asteroid that's headed into the sun, Beast and Emma Frost go down in a plane crash, and Cyclops and Fantomex have crashed a space shuttle into the ocean. All the seeds Morrison planted earlier in his run have bore fruit. The Phoenix is unleashed, Cyclops steps up, and lots of mutants die. That's about all I can say without spoiling too much. Here Comes Tomorrow: 150 years into the future, Tom Skylark and his Sentinel Rover have the Phoenix egg and the minions of The Beast will do anything to get it. Here Comes Tomorrow is to Morrison's X-Men run what Batman #666 is to his Batman run. Instead of a glimpse of Damian as Batman, we get a dark future where The Beast is a maniacal super villain. It was okay but ultimately pointless. It was no Days of the Future Past. Thus concludes Grant Morrison's run on the X-Men. It wasn't perfect but it was damn good. Too bad a pretty big plot twist was revealed on the cover.

  3. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Finished the run that is considered one of the best of all time for X-men and I'm inclined to agree now that it is finished. The story starts with Summers not having a good day. So Logan goes to check up on him at a bar and ask him for a favor. This leads to going after X-15. Wolverine, Weapon 13, and Cyclops go together to track him down. On top of that Xorn makes his move, and we finally see his true intentions. Last but not least is a story of the possible future and what could be. I loved th Finished the run that is considered one of the best of all time for X-men and I'm inclined to agree now that it is finished. The story starts with Summers not having a good day. So Logan goes to check up on him at a bar and ask him for a favor. This leads to going after X-15. Wolverine, Weapon 13, and Cyclops go together to track him down. On top of that Xorn makes his move, and we finally see his true intentions. Last but not least is a story of the possible future and what could be. I loved the hell out of the Xorn storyline. It has everything you hope. Political message, great fights, epic scale, and wonderful character moments. I also enjoyed the heck out of weapon 15, he was scary, but also kind of sad. The last storyline was the weakest by far in the whole run and could have been better. Overall though Grant's run ends strong and I have to agree, as a X-Men fan, it's one of the best. A 4 out of 5.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    SPOILERS With this third Ultimate Collection volume, we witness the conclusion of Grant Morrison’s New X-Men with three story arcs that are not only resolution but starting a new beginning. Following the last volume’s cliffhanger about the disappearance of Cyclops, this book opens with his current whereabouts at the Hellfire Club, boozing and no longer declaring himself an X-Man. #142 is an action-free issue that centralises on the conversation between Scott Summers and Wolverine, two men who have SPOILERS With this third Ultimate Collection volume, we witness the conclusion of Grant Morrison’s New X-Men with three story arcs that are not only resolution but starting a new beginning. Following the last volume’s cliffhanger about the disappearance of Cyclops, this book opens with his current whereabouts at the Hellfire Club, boozing and no longer declaring himself an X-Man. #142 is an action-free issue that centralises on the conversation between Scott Summers and Wolverine, two men who have always butted heads over the decades of X-Men history and for Morrison to take a break from the main narrative and discuss their shaky relationship through a drinking game, is spot-on characterisation. However, once Europe’s most wanted super-thief Fantomex makes a reprisal, it’s baggy business as usual as I’ve always thought his entire arc was the least interesting aspect of Morrison’s run. Although the story of amnesiac Wolverine’s journey to discovering his own past has always been a fascinating one, “Assault on Weapon Plus” never really reaches a major reveal for Logan but another obstacle to showcase the history of Weapon Plus, going all the way back to the origin of Captain America. Following his impressive Vertigo work such as Neil Gaiman’s Death, Chris Bachalo started his time here as an X-Men artist and given a lot of the arc is action-heavy, his art isn’t as slick and polish though serviceable. As for those who purchased this volume will be very aware of the front cover as it gives away a major spoiler: Xorn – the Chinese mutant with a "star for a brain" – is the Master of Magnetism himself. As “Planet X” is about the return of Magneto and his rise to power whilst the X-Men are at their most vulnerable point, this is the darkest New X-Men has ever been with Magneto being a drug-crazed power-minded homo superior whose methods are as ruthless as the Nazis. No doubt the grim nature will be unpleasant for some readers, but certainly the most touching moment is a quiet scene between Jean Grey and Wolverine who are left stranded in space. As much as a romance was never blossomed between the two as Wolverine previously stated that it could never work, they have always respected each other and how they share feelings (telepathically) in front on certain death, is truly heart-breaking and special praise to artist Phil Jimenez and inker Andy Lanning who nailed this emotional scene. With the appearance of a Phoenix egg which segues into the final arc, “Here Comes Tomorrow” presents a dark future that culminates everything that Morrison established in his entire run. Much like what he did later on with his Batman run, Morrison presents a future for the X-Men that isn’t as definitive as say "Days of Future Past". No doubt the ideas here are so out-there that how it all adds up is ultimately nonsensical, especially how it alters a broken timeline. This final arc was in the hands of artist Marc Silvestri who has previously drawn X-Men as his Jim Lee-ish illustrations are a nice fit to the bleak future. Ending on an emotional down-note, Grant Morrison concludes his revamp of Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s mutant superheroes. Not without faults but as a writer who is known for outlandish ideas and establishes in a world that is colourfully vibrant as the X-Men’s, an overall thumbs-up.

  5. 4 out of 5

    RG

    There were 3 separate story arcs in here. Some were a little confusing, some awesome, and others didnt really end, were building other stories for future comics. I didn't find this as interesting as the previous 2 books. A solid read though. Definitely would recommend this Morrison run though. There were 3 separate story arcs in here. Some were a little confusing, some awesome, and others didnt really end, were building other stories for future comics. I didn't find this as interesting as the previous 2 books. A solid read though. Definitely would recommend this Morrison run though.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    SPOILERS So Grant Morrison ends his run on X-Men with this final third “Ultimate” volume and it’s a bit of a mixed bag. I really liked the “Assault on Weapon Plus” storyline which has Wolverine (Weapon X), Scott/Cyclops, and Fantomex (Weapon XIII) attacking this strange shadowy organisation which has created the ultimate Weapon – XV - which could destroy all mutants in the world. It also has Wolverine finding out his true past, though this is more of an aside from Morrison as he doesn’t really go SPOILERS So Grant Morrison ends his run on X-Men with this final third “Ultimate” volume and it’s a bit of a mixed bag. I really liked the “Assault on Weapon Plus” storyline which has Wolverine (Weapon X), Scott/Cyclops, and Fantomex (Weapon XIII) attacking this strange shadowy organisation which has created the ultimate Weapon – XV - which could destroy all mutants in the world. It also has Wolverine finding out his true past, though this is more of an aside from Morrison as he doesn’t really go into this much – a shame. Then we get the big reveal which is on the cover – turns out Xorn, the Chinese mutant with a sun in his head was in fact Magneto all along! Which is a bit disappointing as Xorn was turning out to be a pretty interesting character but then it explains why he’s not been included in any X-Men storylines following this book. Then of course Magneto tries to destroy humanity and make mutants the superior race on Earth (yet again) but this time when the X-Men are scattered and vulnerable he just sits around brooding, biding his time for no real reason to set his plan in motion. He’s frustratingly like all Bond villains, all bark and no bite. And he’s defeated with such a weak ploy it’s laughable and doesn’t seem worthy of the great Magneto. The book ends with the futuristic yet confusing storyline set 150 years following Magneto’s death called “Here Comes Tomorrow”. Things get very topsy-turvy as all of the X-Men characters get flipped around and re-configured: Beast turns out to be this evil overlord-geneticist who harnesses the power of the Phoenix. Going against them is Cassandra Nova, Wolverine, and a couple new characters, one of them Fantomex’s EVA (who resembles The Authority’s Engineer almost exactly). It’s not a bad storyline but it’s an odd choice to end this massive run on this note as it has nothing to do with what happened before it. While there are minor niggles with the series (the crappy characters of Beak and Angel, Magneto’s sudden and bizarre stupidity, the strange dystopian future ending), it is worth reading and this final volume is pretty fun for the most part. I thought Fantomex was an excellent character and enjoyed his storylines, the “E for Extinction” storyline was brilliant, and the beginning of Scott and Emma’s relationship has its roots in this series. Probably the best part of the book though is the final 12 pages called “The Morrison Manifesto” which shows how Morrison plotted out his entire run, giving an overview of the X-Men, his ideas for the characters and storylines, and how he was going to bring the X-Men to a new 21st century audience. It’s a fascinating read especially as Morrison is very frank in his evaluation of some of the X-Men’s previous adventures and current (at the time circa 2000) appearances and storylines. The third volume was slightly better than the second but still felt a bit weaker than I expected and didn’t really end as well as I’d hoped. Phil Jiminez and Chris Bachalo’s artwork is pretty good but it would’ve been better to have Frank Quitely end the series. But if you’ve read the first two books then it’s definitely worth finishing out the Grant Morrison X-Men Trilogy with this volume; it’s not amazing but pretty good in places.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    4.5 stars This was a mixed bag of crazy good and just plain crazy. (view spoiler)[Even though the actual spoiler is the front cover, I'm still going to mark this...just in case anyone managed to miss it. So yeah, the Magneto is Xorn thing? I'm still not sure how I feel about that. It was equal parts cool and cheesy, and I'm not sure I understood the part where Xorn seemed to be talking to Magneto...does he have a split personality now, or did I just miss something? I also thought the way that Emma 4.5 stars This was a mixed bag of crazy good and just plain crazy. (view spoiler)[Even though the actual spoiler is the front cover, I'm still going to mark this...just in case anyone managed to miss it. So yeah, the Magneto is Xorn thing? I'm still not sure how I feel about that. It was equal parts cool and cheesy, and I'm not sure I understood the part where Xorn seemed to be talking to Magneto...does he have a split personality now, or did I just miss something? I also thought the way that Emma was healed happened too fast. Considering it was the main reason I chose to read this volume so quickly, I felt a little cheated that bringing her back wasn't all that big a deal. I liked that Beast was the designated villain in the alternate future. Nothing is quite as delicious as seeing a really good guy go really bad. Ok. So it turned out that he wasn't in charge of his actions, but still... As far as the ending went, the Future sequences were decent, but confusing at times. You just barely get a grasp on what's going on, and then Poof!, it's over. P.S.Does anyone know if there is some kind of a limit on the number of times they can kill off and bring back Jean? 'Cause if there is, they're already pushing it! (hide spoiler)] Even with all the problems I had with it, there was still an overwhelming amount of the Fun Factor present in this thing. In the end, I'd have to say that Morrison's New X-Men is definitely not to be missed!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Assault on Weapon Plus (#142-145). A good continuation of the Fantomex/Weapon Plus story from New X-Men, Volume 3: New Worlds, and it's exciting to see both the plots against mutantkind and the idea of Logan finally learning his origins, but it's a bit slow at times and ends on an abrupt non-ending [4/5]. Planet X (#146-150). [spoilers] Could Xorn have possibly been Magneto? That's the question you have to ask yourself at the end of Morrison's run, even when you read through it all knowing that's Assault on Weapon Plus (#142-145). A good continuation of the Fantomex/Weapon Plus story from New X-Men, Volume 3: New Worlds, and it's exciting to see both the plots against mutantkind and the idea of Logan finally learning his origins, but it's a bit slow at times and ends on an abrupt non-ending [4/5]. Planet X (#146-150). [spoilers] Could Xorn have possibly been Magneto? That's the question you have to ask yourself at the end of Morrison's run, even when you read through it all knowing that's the end game. It's a hard sell that you can just barely imagine when you consider how Xorn does (or doesn't) use his powers, but otherwise it seems ... unlikely. Really: you gotta squint to believe the twist.[/spoilers] Nonetheless, this is a splendid end to Morrison's run. After the sudden by inevitable betrayal, we get the final Magneto story. Yes, perhaps he's lost the nuance of the Claremont years, but he's just seen his entire country of 16 million mutants killed. That is ... believable. And we also get a rather magnificent last Jean Grey and Wolverine story, as they're about to fall into the sun. And Morrison so nicely brings together the young rejects of Xavier's school into a new Brotherhood ... that doesn't end like you'd expect. A really great` tying together of so many elements from Morrison's run, plus a sufficiently apocalyptic finale. (Too bad the idiots at Marvel ruined some of the major plot points before even a month had gone by.) [5/5]. Here Comes Tomorrow (#151-154). The first time I read this, I found it confusing and opaque. However, read with more care, it's a refreshing take on X-Men futures and a really a nice coda to Morrison's run that reveals some of its hidden plots. We get great explanations and great endings. Perhaps more notably it's a great setup for what was a tremendous run of X-Men following on Morrison, all the way up to Secret Wars (when things got wonky). The way that Emma and Scott come together is particularly moving. [5/5]

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    This is one of the most amazing X-Men comics I've ever read. The story of xorn and finding out xorn isn't who we thought he was and the final death of Jean Grey. I love the last four issues that were based in the future world everything was great the art the story everything. This is one of the most amazing X-Men comics I've ever read. The story of xorn and finding out xorn isn't who we thought he was and the final death of Jean Grey. I love the last four issues that were based in the future world everything was great the art the story everything.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    The end of Morrison's run disappointed me as badly as all the rest. His relentless barrage of Big Idea after Big Idea never did gel into a cohesive whole. Even reading them straight through I felt lucky to make heads or tales of half of what was happening. I can't imagine how it read in monthly installments. There are some really good moments between Wolverine and Cyclops, reaffirming the mutual respect that must exist even through all the bickering. But that's about as deep as the characterizati The end of Morrison's run disappointed me as badly as all the rest. His relentless barrage of Big Idea after Big Idea never did gel into a cohesive whole. Even reading them straight through I felt lucky to make heads or tales of half of what was happening. I can't imagine how it read in monthly installments. There are some really good moments between Wolverine and Cyclops, reaffirming the mutual respect that must exist even through all the bickering. But that's about as deep as the characterization was allowed to get. Magneto got a few cool moments to shine, but his overall story just left me uncomfortable. Seeing Marvel's most complex villain hopped up on mutant drugs and smacking teenagers around was bad, but having him herd humanity into concentration camps and turn on the gas chambers was just... wrong. He's not a monster. And having him resort to the inhuman tactics that scarred him as a child cheapens the character. Someone calls him on it in a throwaway line, but the Nazi parallels are dismissed too quickly and the whole scheme ends up another failed Evil Supervillain Plan, rather than the dramatic finale it was built up to be. The closing story set in the future seemed to come from left field and didn't make a lick of sense. It lent the run no closure or payoff. Even the major deaths didn't feel substantial enough. Morrison is a mad genius and I sincerely love a lot of his work. But his X-Men fell flat for me, even if he can be credited with helping the entire franchise "grow up" and set it on its (mostly positive) current course.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Klaus

    This was awesome, especially the last 1/3 (#151-154). Strong artwork, creative storyline, major and long-lasting events happened, what more can you want?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    OK so this was a very solid conclusion to the Grant Morrison run on X-Men. Some of the stuff I didn't like about the first 2 volumes wasn't present as much in this collection, but some still was. This is a case of all the set up work done by Morrison finally coming to fruition. Xorn and his importance are revealed, the death of a few major characters happens, as well as some very good sections of Logan and Scott actually seemingly bonding in their own unusual way. Beast is still very prominently OK so this was a very solid conclusion to the Grant Morrison run on X-Men. Some of the stuff I didn't like about the first 2 volumes wasn't present as much in this collection, but some still was. This is a case of all the set up work done by Morrison finally coming to fruition. Xorn and his importance are revealed, the death of a few major characters happens, as well as some very good sections of Logan and Scott actually seemingly bonding in their own unusual way. Beast is still very prominently featured, which is nice. There's also a rise from the dead of someone who will literally turn the world upside down. One of the greatest parts of this is showing the world 150 yrs in the future in the aftermath of what happens, and it's all down to one fateful decision by one of the X-Men. The nice part is, that the future section is given a fair bit of time to be shown and developed and to see who makes it into the future and who's nowhere to be seen, who's kept it together and who's gone stark raving mad. It also features a future return of a character long thought dead, who might be able to influence the past even while in the future, and may even be able to save the future too. The real stroke of genius is that after all this, Morrison returns to the exact same panels that were shown before the flash to the future, and this time the character makes a different decision, but we're left to wonder what caused the change, or who, and it just leaves the storyline with a perfect conclusion point that can go anywhere. Fantastic work by Morrison, essential for sure, as is most of his work. *SPOILER* The revelation of Captain America as Weapon I is a mindfuck I just LOVED. Really makes me want to go through and figure out who the other 8 were before Wolverine...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lavell

    Artwork: Great, Story: Great. Grant Morrison's run on X-men was excellent. The artwork was great except for a few issues. The storyline was the best I've read in X-men in a while. It is the end for a while and I will miss him greatly. Artwork: Great, Story: Great. Grant Morrison's run on X-men was excellent. The artwork was great except for a few issues. The storyline was the best I've read in X-men in a while. It is the end for a while and I will miss him greatly.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    The first chapter of "Planet X" is one of my favorite single issues. The first chapter of "Planet X" is one of my favorite single issues.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Parts of this was so good and other parts just werent... the dialogue felt off to me also especially from Magneto. 3.5stars

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brandt

    While this one sat on my shelf for a while, I never really felt the need to read it immediately, until a hold placed on the copy at my local library forced me to move this up in the queue. In my review for the previous volume, I noted that since I was familiar with Morrison's rhythms from reading Animal Man, JLA and especially Doom Patrol (who were just the DC X-Men anyway, right?) I knew that Morrison was building to something even if I didn't know what. Well lucky for anyone picking up this vo While this one sat on my shelf for a while, I never really felt the need to read it immediately, until a hold placed on the copy at my local library forced me to move this up in the queue. In my review for the previous volume, I noted that since I was familiar with Morrison's rhythms from reading Animal Man, JLA and especially Doom Patrol (who were just the DC X-Men anyway, right?) I knew that Morrison was building to something even if I didn't know what. Well lucky for anyone picking up this volume, that something is blown by the front cover of the collection. But I guess we can treat this like an Avengers: Endgame spoiler--does knowing that at one point Thor gets fat and drunk really stop you from wanting to see it? (I'm going to assume all of you know what I am talking about anyway. If you're reading New X-Men collections from almost twenty years ago.) Of course, this collection and the appearance of the X-Men's greatest nemesis is exactly the sort of thing that made volume 2 so unsatisfying to me--Morrison had more invested in the end of his run than the middle of it seems, and the Magneto arc in particular pays off. However, that is not the last word for Morrison and he ends his run with a four issue coda that takes place 150 years in the future. This being Marvel, these sorts of future stories are fine, as Marvel was always more concerned with story rather than continuity, and hearkens back to the Claremont/Byrne story "Days of Future Past" (which would be the second to last thing those two would collaborate on in Uncanny X-Men) This of course leads me to discuss the hidden gem in this volume--Morrison's original pitch for New X-Men. In the pitch, he references the Claremont/Byrne era X-Men as being the high water mark of the team. Readers can agree or disagree whether Morrison was able to reach that bar (I say he missed, but not by much), but the fact that he went for it is impressive.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    While I enjoyed Morrison’s X-Men run as a whole, I have mixed feeling about this final collection. First up is “Assault on Weapon Plus” which is an action- and dialogue-heavy romp where Fantomex, Wolverine, and Cyclops uncover information about the program. It’s a fun read - especially the first hilarious issue - but too busy at times. Wolverine is the star here for me, and his actions in this arc really speak to his rugged yet lonely character. Then there’s “Planet X,” the big reveal of who Xorn While I enjoyed Morrison’s X-Men run as a whole, I have mixed feeling about this final collection. First up is “Assault on Weapon Plus” which is an action- and dialogue-heavy romp where Fantomex, Wolverine, and Cyclops uncover information about the program. It’s a fun read - especially the first hilarious issue - but too busy at times. Wolverine is the star here for me, and his actions in this arc really speak to his rugged yet lonely character. Then there’s “Planet X,” the big reveal of who Xorn is and final showdown. While it plays out well (and would be surprising if I didn’t already know the twist), I found myself laughing at parts in this when I’m not sure I was supposed to be. Some of the dialogue and situations are silly and I legitimately don’t know if Morrison is being ironic or not. Magneto doesn’t have the nuance I usually associate with him; his dialogue consists almost entirely of over-the-top villain monologuing, while the back-and forth between him and his students is - I’ll say it again - silly. Maybe Morrison is channeling Silver and Bronze Age storytelling, which he often does, but I was a little taken aback reading this. Am I alone here? Was I supposed to be laughing? I still don’t know. His run finishes with “Here Comes Tomorrow.” This is an alternate future story that, at its core, is about Scott coming to terms with Jean's death. It’s obtuse at first, but also fascinating, and I found myself totally invested in what was happening. Morrison pulls off some nice storytelling here with a touching ending to boot. And there you have it. I’m not a big X-Men reader, but I quite enjoyed this run. I knew enough about the X-Men not to be lost, and I think Morrison’s bold storytelling paid off more often than not. It’s a fun, rewarding read overall. (Be sure to read the “Morrison Manifesto” at the end of this volume. He gives a VERY frank assessment of the X-Men franchise and outlines his approach to writing. A great look into the process and where the property was at the turn of the century.)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    If the final volume of Morrison's X-Men run had a theme song it would be Dog's Eye View's "Everything Falls Apart". There's a two issue overlap between this and New X-men: Assault on Weapon Plus Vol. 5: New X-men #139-145. That's the highlight of this collection, and it's not very good. The problem with this part of the run is editorial mismanagement. Morrison had a fun, inventive run going on, and editorial told him that before his story was over, he had to put the book back where it was when he s If the final volume of Morrison's X-Men run had a theme song it would be Dog's Eye View's "Everything Falls Apart". There's a two issue overlap between this and New X-men: Assault on Weapon Plus Vol. 5: New X-men #139-145. That's the highlight of this collection, and it's not very good. The problem with this part of the run is editorial mismanagement. Morrison had a fun, inventive run going on, and editorial told him that before his story was over, he had to put the book back where it was when he started, making it a more traditional X-story. "More traditional?" Morrison said, in an angry Scottish accent, like he's Proteus, which he actually might be. "Fine, the villain turns out to be Magneto, Jean Grey dies, and then we're in the future for no bloody reason." From an artistic point, it's a beautiful giant middle finger to Marvel's insistence on telling the same boring stories over and over and rarely allowing any of their characters to grow. But as someone who was enjoying what Morrison was building to, it's a huge disappointment. I liked Xorn. I liked the younger generation of mutants Morrison introduced. While I did enjoy the change in direction that Jean's death allowed for in Cyclops, I don't think killing Jean Grey yet again was interesting. And the story in the future was as boring as most of the "I've run out of ideas, let's peek outside of continuity" Marvel storylines. The only reason this book gets even two stars is that the art is excellent.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brian Longtin

    Morrison went a bit off the deep end and lost me at the conclusion of this run... Magneto makes no sense as a character and the story starts cramming a million ideas in without taking the time to care about them. A sadly rushed finale after such a cool buildup.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chris W

    It was good besides the alternate future storyline that goes nowhere. That storyline takes up a significant chunk of this volume and besides being a mediocre story, doesn't add much or make much sense. It was good besides the alternate future storyline that goes nowhere. That storyline takes up a significant chunk of this volume and besides being a mediocre story, doesn't add much or make much sense.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    This was probably my favorite of the 3 volumes. Still not sure I'm in love with Grant Morrison's stuff... But this was good. Good twist that I didn't see coming. This was probably my favorite of the 3 volumes. Still not sure I'm in love with Grant Morrison's stuff... But this was good. Good twist that I didn't see coming.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Edward Davies

    A little disappointing in hindsight when you know that Xorn coms back. Why can’t characters stay dead?

  23. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. First off, the cover of this volume should have "Spoiler!" written across it. Secondly, there were a lot of things I did not like about the last leg of Morrison's run. But, we'll start with the good. Highlights: -Jean and Wolverine's connection. The arc of Wolverine and Jean being stuck inside a run-away ship was probably my favorite section of this part of the collection. But there were a lot of moments between Jean and Wolverine that really highlighted their friendship and did it in a way that ( First off, the cover of this volume should have "Spoiler!" written across it. Secondly, there were a lot of things I did not like about the last leg of Morrison's run. But, we'll start with the good. Highlights: -Jean and Wolverine's connection. The arc of Wolverine and Jean being stuck inside a run-away ship was probably my favorite section of this part of the collection. But there were a lot of moments between Jean and Wolverine that really highlighted their friendship and did it in a way that (for once) I could actually understand why they would have such affection for one another. -Magneto. I really enjoyed the arc of Magneto as this aging and outdated radical activist that didn't know how to connect with the people he was trying to sway anymore. It was almost heartbreaking watching him struggle to gather people to him like he was once able to do. I loved the internal conflict we kept seeing as he tried to be the man he once was. I only wish that his arc hadn't been so rushed. I would've loved to have seen it given more attention and time to develop instead of whipping through it. The Annoying Things: -Pacing My main issue with all three of these volumes is the pacing. I got whiplash from how many things happened in such a small amount of time. Plots would be over in the blink of an eye and it never gave the characters' time to react properly to anything that was happening or to explore an interesting concept. And Morrison had so many interesting stories that got only a fraction of the time they deserved dedicated to them. -Cyclops. Throughout the whole Morrison run I kept waiting for Scott to get his shit together and step-up. Sadly, he never does and it drove me nuts. He's supposed to be a leader but all we got was an emotionally stunted man who spends the better part of his scenes whining and getting dragged around. Sometimes quite literally. In this book, Wolverine carries a passed-out Scott into a dangerous mission because he wants him there as backup. And that's a huge issue I had with Scott's character here. Scott plays a purely reactionary role throughout the entire Morrison run. Stuff goes wrong and he reacts to it. He gets dragged into situations and just does what he needs to get out alive or because "it's the right thing to do". Even at the end he doesn't have to deal with the fall-out of his cheating on Jean because he ran away when it was discovered and Jean dies before he has to actually talk to them about it. (And yes, even though it was telepathically, I'm counting his thing with Emma Frost as cheating.) -Jean's Death. I absolutely hated the way Jean died. Not because I enjoyed her character in the story and didn't want to see it happen. No, it was because I loved her character in the story and her death made me feel nothing. If you kill a character off, it should invoke an emotion. When Jean died all I thought was, "Well that was stupid." The entire scene felt extremely trite. When Jean dies, the battle with Magneto is essentially over. She reaches down to touch him and he uses a last burst energy to give her a stroke. After watching her and Wolverine survive a plunge into the sun on a run-away spaceship, this was extremely anti-climatic. She dies in Scott's arms who expresses grief. Wolverine goes feral. Everyone stands around in sadness. It's all very...boring. I got the feeling that the whole reason for Jean's death was purely to allow Scott to be with Emma without guilt or having to outright make the choice to leave Jean. It was extremely frustrating. The collection ends on the lackluster scene of a Phoenix Jean giving Scott her blessing to be with Emma as she joins all the other Phoenixes. A very "meh" ending to an otherwise good run.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abe

    here's where it gets really complicated. the first volume is genius; the second volume is exciting but mediocre; and then we have the grand finale. suffice it to say that, even on a second reading, the last parts of morrison's run are gripping but still don't really add up. the cover of this collected volume sadly gives away the surprise twist that literally caused me to fall out of my chair when i read it in single-issue format, back in high school. but the twist and its consequences still hold here's where it gets really complicated. the first volume is genius; the second volume is exciting but mediocre; and then we have the grand finale. suffice it to say that, even on a second reading, the last parts of morrison's run are gripping but still don't really add up. the cover of this collected volume sadly gives away the surprise twist that literally caused me to fall out of my chair when i read it in single-issue format, back in high school. but the twist and its consequences still hold power. the most compelling idea in the book (and, arguably, in all of morrison's run) is here: what if magneto's dream actually came true? what if there was a race war, and somebody won? what happens on day 2? morrison pretty much nails that aspect of the book, i'd say. but the dialogue and character development is subpar at best. people just sort of go through the motions, in terms of their banter, and there's a lot of wasted time. the first story in the volume, "assault on weapon plus," is beautifully illustrated by the criminally underrated chris bachalo, but the story ends up with a big ball of nothing, thematically. however, we do get two absolute gems in this final third of morrison's historic run: (1) logan's final words to jean as they leap into the abyss. i won't spoil them. (2) the epilogue story, "here comes tomorrow." it's classic morrison: overstuffed with information, so complicated that no reader can possibly process it all, but utterly compelling at every turn. funny, reverent, thought-provoking, and, at the very end, touchingly beautiful. all in all, morrison's run is probably overrated. and it's certainly far from his best work. but he shot for the moon and landed in the stars.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Raja99

    I'm not a fan of Marvel comics, but the (first) X-Men movie by Bryan Singer impressed me, so I decided to give the X-Men another shot. I believe that I checked New X-Men Vol. 1: E is for Extinction out from my library, and thoroughly enjoyed it. I found Frank Quitely's artwork rather off-putting, but it's grown on me. And I loved Grant Morrison's writing, especially the "manifesto" printed in the back, in which he said it was time to seriously shake things up, and to be accessible to people who I'm not a fan of Marvel comics, but the (first) X-Men movie by Bryan Singer impressed me, so I decided to give the X-Men another shot. I believe that I checked New X-Men Vol. 1: E is for Extinction out from my library, and thoroughly enjoyed it. I found Frank Quitely's artwork rather off-putting, but it's grown on me. And I loved Grant Morrison's writing, especially the "manifesto" printed in the back, in which he said it was time to seriously shake things up, and to be accessible to people who found out about the X-Men from the movie. In other words, he was aiming directly at me. One annoyance about Marvel's book collections is that the trade paperbacks and hardcovers use the same title for very different books. Thus, "New X-Men Volume 3" can either refer to a trade paperback from the middle of Morrison's run, or the large hardcover that collects the end of Morrison's run. I'm reviewing the latter. As much as I enjoyed Morrison's run, I couldn't finish reading it; I found issue 151 and on incomprehensible (the sequence entitled, "Here Comes Tomorrow"), and assumed that it must make sense to people who've been reading X-Men for the last several decades. I stumbled across an entry in the Wikipedia, of all places, that said it wasn't so; the Wikipedia clarified the transition for me, and noted that "Here Comes Tomorrow" was controversial among fans. I decided to try it again, and didn't have any trouble this time (as long as I kept the Wikipedia info in mind). It looks to me now like Morrison's coda to his run on New X-Men, and I can see his love for it all in the last page. (Finished the evening of 2008-10-05.)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Grant Morrison's 'Manifesto' that was written prior to embarking on his New X-Men journey can be found at the end of this collection, detailing what he aimed to achieve with this series. It's clear to see that Morrison had some excellent storylines and a very clear image of what he wanted, but I can't help but feel New X-Men fell a little short of these expectations. One of my main issues with New X-Men is with the quality of art. I understand that it is commonplace for comics to feature a varie Grant Morrison's 'Manifesto' that was written prior to embarking on his New X-Men journey can be found at the end of this collection, detailing what he aimed to achieve with this series. It's clear to see that Morrison had some excellent storylines and a very clear image of what he wanted, but I can't help but feel New X-Men fell a little short of these expectations. One of my main issues with New X-Men is with the quality of art. I understand that it is commonplace for comics to feature a variety of artists within an ongoing series; however I feel that some of the artwork was quite inconsistent and did New X-Men a serious injustice. For example, I found Chris Bachalo's 4 issue story arc at the beginning of this collection a real struggle to get through, however once getting past this, Phil Jimenez's art is a breath of fresh air, and definitely worth the wait. His work and attention to detail is certainly a highlight within Morrison's final run of New X-Men. Whilst the genius of Grant Morrison’s work cannot be denied, I feel that New X-Men didn’t live up to it’s reputation as one of the highlights of modern-age X-Men. Had the series not had Morrison’s name attached to it, I’m not sure I would have made it to the end. Whilst Morrison had some excellent concepts and characterisation (such as Emma Frost, Fantomex and I have to admit, the E.V.A we meet 150 years in the future), I felt that New X-Men lacked the depth it so desperately needed to succeed. I feel that readers new to the X-Men universe would possibly enjoy New X-Men a lot more than those who are a lot more familiar with the world of X-Men.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Lanter

    I was excited to read the conclusion to New X-Men and while it is a little disjointed, it definitely has some very strong issues. Like other reviewers, I think it is a shame how the cover gives a big secret away. The Magneto story arc was quite intense and enjoyable. It made up for another mediocre Fantomex story. At first I didn't enjoy the story that came last but as it went on, I could see the concept of the alternate future for the X-Men more clearly and I enjoyed it more and more. Also, Rov I was excited to read the conclusion to New X-Men and while it is a little disjointed, it definitely has some very strong issues. Like other reviewers, I think it is a shame how the cover gives a big secret away. The Magneto story arc was quite intense and enjoyable. It made up for another mediocre Fantomex story. At first I didn't enjoy the story that came last but as it went on, I could see the concept of the alternate future for the X-Men more clearly and I enjoyed it more and more. Also, Rover is seriously one of the coolest characters I've seen in X-Men. The idea of a beat-up, but friendly Sentinel was very endearing somehow. My only criticism is that while every arc is related to each other, it feels like Morrison had to move too quickly between each one and that makes it feel like the plot jumps which is jarring for the reader. Thankfully, some of the issues are so good that you won't mind it too much. The art here is not the worst in the series, but it is also not the best. New X-Men is the kind of series where you just don't know exactly what you're going to get issue to issue and you just have to roll with it. If that bothers you or you prefer a more stable art direction then this may be a downside to the book, but most of the artists never stuck around long enough for me to be annoyed. Overall, this is my second favorite X-Men series I've read and really propelled the characters to my second favorite Marvel title (Daredevil is still first). I'm looking forward to reading more and seeing what the next writers and artists did with this universe that Grant Morrison created.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amal El-Mohtar

    Man, the big reveal about Xorn's identity just annoyed me. Sure it makes me want to reread volumes 1 and 2 to see how much foreshadowing there was and how much that I took as read is deniable, but it just irked. I'm sure that was intentional, honestly, but it just disappointed me. After all the nuance and interesting exploration of intra-mutant politics and social dynamics (the more human-looking ones vs. the less human-looking ones, charismatic vs. less charismatic, class and race aspects that Man, the big reveal about Xorn's identity just annoyed me. Sure it makes me want to reread volumes 1 and 2 to see how much foreshadowing there was and how much that I took as read is deniable, but it just irked. I'm sure that was intentional, honestly, but it just disappointed me. After all the nuance and interesting exploration of intra-mutant politics and social dynamics (the more human-looking ones vs. the less human-looking ones, charismatic vs. less charismatic, class and race aspects that could've been more interestingly explored), it felt like going backwards to have (view spoiler)[Magneto come back and be the big bad gnawing on his same old KILL ALL THE HUMANS chestnut! I mean blargh! He masterminded something blahdeblah fine. How did he escape Genosha? I am SURE there is stuff with Xorn that could not have been faked. Every time I think about the ins and outs of the plot requirements of this I just start rolling my eyes. It felt cheap. (hide spoiler)] And then after that to read the whole 150 years in the future thing was MORE ANNOYING. And I just flat out REFUSE to believe that THE WHOLE ENTIRE FUTURE hinges on whether or not (view spoiler)[Cyclops gets together with Emma Frost. (hide spoiler)] Seriously? Meh. I still mostly enjoyed it but compared to the previous 2 volumes it just didn't measure up.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Will Robinson Jr.

    I have been told that Grant Morrison is the genius writer of comics. I will admit I have been reading a few graphic novels by Mr. Moorison and they are pretty good. First, I enjoyed this collection of Grant's run on X-men. We get a good understanding of Cyclops and Wolvewrine's relationship. Though these two heroes have been bickering for years Grant establishes that these two really have a deep repect for one another. The magneto master plan and disguise reveal were trully shocking and there is I have been told that Grant Morrison is the genius writer of comics. I will admit I have been reading a few graphic novels by Mr. Moorison and they are pretty good. First, I enjoyed this collection of Grant's run on X-men. We get a good understanding of Cyclops and Wolvewrine's relationship. Though these two heroes have been bickering for years Grant establishes that these two really have a deep repect for one another. The magneto master plan and disguise reveal were trully shocking and there is alot of the action/drama your suppose to get from a X-men book. However there a few weak areas to Mr. Morrison's run in this volume. Grant has place too many big ideas/plots in this story arc. Weapon Plus HQ world out of time, Xorn the pacifist deceiver who is really Magneto, Jean the Pheonix losing control, a future Beast taking over the world, and etc... The reader will be a bit disorienting by all the plot and hidden plots here. The pacing colud have been bit better as well. I'm reading Grant's New 52 Superman run and there these same issues. Its like you a force to jump from subplot to subplot and finally your surprisingly reveal what the main plot really is. Like a fly being trapped in a web. Don't get me wrong when the main plot takes hold in this book it is fantastic but I still think Joss Whedon's run on X-men is much better.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Corvus

    Spoilers This book has the best artwork of the 3 volumes and is worth reading for that alone. I liked the other two and I got to the cover of this one, excited about Magneto and the continuing story. I know from some of Morrison's other work that as a series progresses it basically goes batshit insane and it's often for the better. I didn't mind the last story doing this, despite it being hard to follow and seeming so oddly disconnected (I am sure intentionally) from the rest. But, the handling of Spoilers This book has the best artwork of the 3 volumes and is worth reading for that alone. I liked the other two and I got to the cover of this one, excited about Magneto and the continuing story. I know from some of Morrison's other work that as a series progresses it basically goes batshit insane and it's often for the better. I didn't mind the last story doing this, despite it being hard to follow and seeming so oddly disconnected (I am sure intentionally) from the rest. But, the handling of Xorn and Magneto... I don't even know what to say. For someone who added so much interesting dialogue to comics that often are all action, how could you turn Magneto- a perfect vessel for that kind of dialogue- into a one-dimensional Hitlerian drug addict? At first I thought it was funny- sort of a jab at his epic deliveries of ridiculous statements. I laughed at "Vegetable!" and other things. But, then it kept going and got worse and worse. I know Morrison takes risks, but this just felt lazy. I also don't see anywhere along the way how Xorn was setting things up for this... This short stint of badly handled Magneto soured the rest for me. Luckily I was on the last book. And the art was spectacular enough to keep me immersed. The end was ok. I wish he would have left Magneto out of it entirely.

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