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Doré's Illustrations for Don Quixote

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"His Don Quixote … from its first to its last page [is] a marvel of imagination, poetry, sentiment, and sarcasm. . . . People still speak of it only as 'Doré's Don Quixote'." — Life and Reminiscences of Gustave Doré Doré himself had something of Quixote's chivalry and spent an arduous life drafting impossible dreams; he knew fame as well as pain, disillusionment, and failur "His Don Quixote … from its first to its last page [is] a marvel of imagination, poetry, sentiment, and sarcasm. . . . People still speak of it only as 'Doré's Don Quixote'." — Life and Reminiscences of Gustave Doré Doré himself had something of Quixote's chivalry and spent an arduous life drafting impossible dreams; he knew fame as well as pain, disillusionment, and failure. At age 30 he was ready for Quixote and prepared to realize his dream of illustrating the world's great books. Doré never became the painter he yearned to be, but he came very close to realizing his desired intimacy with the classics. His sympathy with Cervantes' satire was so close that, of the numerous Quixote interpretations by many outstanding artists, Doré's has become the standard. The French translation of Cervantes that Doré illustrated is forgotten; here is the memorable remnant of that work — all 120 full-page plates, plus a selection of 70 characteristic headpiece and tailpiece vignettes. As can be seen in the backgrounds, Doré was ready professionally as well as emotionally for Quixote. He had traveled through Spain preparing an earlier work, and his graphic memory was as strong and indelible as that of another great Quixote interpreter, Picasso. From Sancho's village through Spanish hills and dry plateaus, in the Pyrenees and by the sea, in rural castles and Barcelona luxury, Doré illuminated the seventeenth-century setting with a nineteenth-century acquaintance with the scene. Doré was also a careful student of Renaissance costume and architecture; his minutiae, so copious, are invariably correct. Captions written especially for this edition describe the action with reference to the original Spanish text, capturing high points of the story. But of course Doré conveys it all in a picture: the famous windmill charge, traversing the Sierra Morena, battling the Knight of the White Moon, visions of giants, dragons, flaming lakes, and damsels, the Dulcinea never found, all in full-page wood engravings. Doré's marvelous penchant for ghostly effects in panoramic landscapes and seascapes finds large scope here, carefully engraved by one of the best of his longtime studio engravers, H. Pisano. Doré's Man of la Mancha glows with the artist's own enchantment and humor. Artists and illustration aficionados will add this royalty-free volume to other Dover editions of Doré's works — art he created to stand with great literature that now stands alone. Doré's Quixote indeed stands alone, unique among the knights and graphic castles in Spain.


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"His Don Quixote … from its first to its last page [is] a marvel of imagination, poetry, sentiment, and sarcasm. . . . People still speak of it only as 'Doré's Don Quixote'." — Life and Reminiscences of Gustave Doré Doré himself had something of Quixote's chivalry and spent an arduous life drafting impossible dreams; he knew fame as well as pain, disillusionment, and failur "His Don Quixote … from its first to its last page [is] a marvel of imagination, poetry, sentiment, and sarcasm. . . . People still speak of it only as 'Doré's Don Quixote'." — Life and Reminiscences of Gustave Doré Doré himself had something of Quixote's chivalry and spent an arduous life drafting impossible dreams; he knew fame as well as pain, disillusionment, and failure. At age 30 he was ready for Quixote and prepared to realize his dream of illustrating the world's great books. Doré never became the painter he yearned to be, but he came very close to realizing his desired intimacy with the classics. His sympathy with Cervantes' satire was so close that, of the numerous Quixote interpretations by many outstanding artists, Doré's has become the standard. The French translation of Cervantes that Doré illustrated is forgotten; here is the memorable remnant of that work — all 120 full-page plates, plus a selection of 70 characteristic headpiece and tailpiece vignettes. As can be seen in the backgrounds, Doré was ready professionally as well as emotionally for Quixote. He had traveled through Spain preparing an earlier work, and his graphic memory was as strong and indelible as that of another great Quixote interpreter, Picasso. From Sancho's village through Spanish hills and dry plateaus, in the Pyrenees and by the sea, in rural castles and Barcelona luxury, Doré illuminated the seventeenth-century setting with a nineteenth-century acquaintance with the scene. Doré was also a careful student of Renaissance costume and architecture; his minutiae, so copious, are invariably correct. Captions written especially for this edition describe the action with reference to the original Spanish text, capturing high points of the story. But of course Doré conveys it all in a picture: the famous windmill charge, traversing the Sierra Morena, battling the Knight of the White Moon, visions of giants, dragons, flaming lakes, and damsels, the Dulcinea never found, all in full-page wood engravings. Doré's marvelous penchant for ghostly effects in panoramic landscapes and seascapes finds large scope here, carefully engraved by one of the best of his longtime studio engravers, H. Pisano. Doré's Man of la Mancha glows with the artist's own enchantment and humor. Artists and illustration aficionados will add this royalty-free volume to other Dover editions of Doré's works — art he created to stand with great literature that now stands alone. Doré's Quixote indeed stands alone, unique among the knights and graphic castles in Spain.

30 review for Doré's Illustrations for Don Quixote

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kalliope

    With the name of Gustave Doré (1832-1883), the illustrations of Dante, of Ariosto and of Cervantes come first to mind. He also carried out others now less well known, such as Paradise Lost, the Bible and Rabelais. Doré had embarked at an early age, in his twenties, to illustrate the great books of Western culture. But while with other works we can also think of other major illustrators who vie with Doré for stamping on our minds the visual equivalent to text-- for we also have, in the case of Dan With the name of Gustave Doré (1832-1883), the illustrations of Dante, of Ariosto and of Cervantes come first to mind. He also carried out others now less well known, such as Paradise Lost, the Bible and Rabelais. Doré had embarked at an early age, in his twenties, to illustrate the great books of Western culture. But while with other works we can also think of other major illustrators who vie with Doré for stamping on our minds the visual equivalent to text-- for we also have, in the case of Dante Botticelli’s, Blake’s and Dalí’s astounding series--with Cervantes Doré has imprinted the definite image. And even if he has somewhat falsified Quijote’s looks, since he continues to hat the chivalric hero with the barber’s basin in the Second part of the book, when Quijote no longer wore it, it does not really matter. For us now, thanks to Doré, Quijote always wore his back. This is an extraordinary selection of the total of 379 illustrations of the original collection. It includes the full 120 large, folio size, engravings, as well as 70 of the smaller ones. This edition comes with a very brief preface which mentions other illustrators. The main ones were the also French Antoine Coypel (1661-1722), and a couple of examples of his are enough to disconcert the modern reader, so fixed are we with Doré’s version. or, even in an engraved version, medium which we now also come to expect as more appropriate for the illustration of a text than an oil painting: Couple's version of Quijote's meeting with the windmills (episode to which I will return with Doré), cannot drop the inclination to use allegorical figures to express abstract concepts, so we see the flying female figure of Madness and the frivolous Cupid figuring Love as always. Coypel was using the visual language of his times; the one with which he could express himself and the one with which he would be understood. And to us, now, it seems ironic that Coypel resorts to fantasy when illustrating a novel that ridicules overwrought fantasy. Much harder to find in the web are examples of the German Daniel Chodowiecki (1726-1801), and I have found only one in the web and only of Sancho, when he is prevented from eating while he is Governor of his Ínsula, but which I have been unable to paste . I detect however a theatrical approach to his images. We also have the iconic version by Picasso, but sadly, he did not illustrate the text. Just created an image. Returning to Doré, and in particular to his large plates, I have been marvelled by several aspects: his framing and fragmentation of spaces; his use of light and dark; his use of texture (owes a great deal to Rembrandt); his command of the various sceneries (whether these are Oriental, Courtly, Rural, or Natural-Romantic). But the most striking aspect is his intelligence and this is best exemplified by my favourite scene, selected as the cover of the book by Dover, showing Quijote and Rocinante being lifted off by one of the wings of the gigantic windmill. The foreshortened Quijote together with a fraction of the mill’s arm give wings and make Rocinante fly and convert him back to a fantastic horse that not even Pegasus could equal. Having this on the side, while reading Cervantes, has been a lot of fun. The process I followed was to read first and then run to Doré’s illustrations excited with the anticipation of finding which scenes had he chosen to illustrate and see them in their visual splendour. I always embraced Doré’s proposal and I just feel sad that Cervantes himself had not seen them. Ah, if I could command a Time-Travel machine and sit Miguel de Cervantes to leaf through Doré's version of his masterpiece.....

  2. 4 out of 5

    E. G.

    Introduction --Doré's Illustrations for Don Quixote Author Biographies Introduction --Doré's Illustrations for Don Quixote Author Biographies

  3. 4 out of 5

    Fionnuala

    Gustave Doré was born on the sixth of January, 1832 at no 16, rue de la Nuée-Bleue, Strasbourg, Alsace. Doré was one of those children who are never happier than when drawing on any surface in sight so his artistic talent was spotted early. By the age of fifteen, and while still at school, he was already working as an illustrator for the satirical newspaper Journal pour Rire. Over the next few years, he drew more than one thousand cartoons for the newspaper and honed his skill for caricature. Late Gustave Doré was born on the sixth of January, 1832 at no 16, rue de la Nuée-Bleue, Strasbourg, Alsace. Doré was one of those children who are never happier than when drawing on any surface in sight so his artistic talent was spotted early. By the age of fifteen, and while still at school, he was already working as an illustrator for the satirical newspaper Journal pour Rire. Over the next few years, he drew more than one thousand cartoons for the newspaper and honed his skill for caricature. Later he branched out into illustrating the work of such famous literary figures as Dante, Rabelais, Milton, Ariosto, and many more. While Doré's illustrations for Dante's Divine Comedy are sober as befits the subject, for Don Quichotte, his caricatural skill comes to the fore, exactly suiting Cervantes' satire of the literature of chivalry: a world of disorderly notions, picked out of his books, crowded into his imagination His 379 drawings for the French translation of Don Quichotte were done around 1863 and demonstrate some of the characteristics that became part of his method: dispensing with a frame for his drawings, for example: Don Quichotte destroys the puppet theatre frame and all ;-) Doré also experimented with unusual angles and perspectives, sometimes viewing a scene almost from above: or as if from below: But Doré's life wasn't all devoted to comedy and caricature. The huge body of illustration work was intended to fund a future career as a serious painter: "Soir en Alsace" Unfortunately, the art world of his day rated the illustrator higher than the painter and Doré never got an opportunity to devote himself entirely to painting. Like Don Quichotte and Sancho Panza, taking to the road again and again, Doré pursued the career of illustrator into the sunset. The last book he illustrated before he died at the age of fifty-one was Poe's The Raven:

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Adams

    A collection of 190 of Gustave Doré's illustrations for Don Quixote published by the time he was thirty-one. Absolutely mind-blowing! While the detail and craftmanship are stunning, I was surprised to find a shift in my sense of the narrative tone. In the first few images, I contemplated Doré's technique with light and dark. I remembered how the novel often depicted things happening at night that were monumental. How do night/obscurity relate to Don Quixote's sense of reality? And, of course, whe A collection of 190 of Gustave Doré's illustrations for Don Quixote published by the time he was thirty-one. Absolutely mind-blowing! While the detail and craftmanship are stunning, I was surprised to find a shift in my sense of the narrative tone. In the first few images, I contemplated Doré's technique with light and dark. I remembered how the novel often depicted things happening at night that were monumental. How do night/obscurity relate to Don Quixote's sense of reality? And, of course, where is the line between reality and our Don's creation of his own story? Doré's work seems to take a critical stance. Scenes sympathetic to Don Quixote's chivalric vision are incredibly intricate. They feel real. Tangible. By contrast, the scenes where the earthly world takes precedence are depicted in less sophisticated, almost cartoonish style. I'll be appreciating this artwork for a long time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mario Cruz

    Este libro no es para leer el Quijote sino para disfrutar de los prodigiosos grabados del artista francés Paul Gustave Doré. Estas ilustraciones en algún momento decoraron las paredes del restaurante de emparedados "Sancho Panza" en el centro comercial Perisur de la Ciudad de México. En ese lugar fue donde descubrí las ilustraciones de Doré. El libro es una joya deliciosa para cualquier aficionado a Don Quijote o a los grabados. Este libro no es para leer el Quijote sino para disfrutar de los prodigiosos grabados del artista francés Paul Gustave Doré. Estas ilustraciones en algún momento decoraron las paredes del restaurante de emparedados "Sancho Panza" en el centro comercial Perisur de la Ciudad de México. En ese lugar fue donde descubrí las ilustraciones de Doré. El libro es una joya deliciosa para cualquier aficionado a Don Quijote o a los grabados.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Good illustrations with explanation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wetdryvac Wetdryvac

    Working largely with the illustrations, a most excellent experience.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Larissa

    Doré's drawings, as usual, are a spectacular understanding of line and black and white contrast. I have yet to read Don Quijote but this book gives one a bit of an overview through the illustrations and captions. This is not a book to read as there is only a brief introduction followed by many illustrations engraved in woodblock. Doré's drawings, as usual, are a spectacular understanding of line and black and white contrast. I have yet to read Don Quijote but this book gives one a bit of an overview through the illustrations and captions. This is not a book to read as there is only a brief introduction followed by many illustrations engraved in woodblock.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Gustave Dore's illustrations were created for an 1863 French translation of the Cervante's classic. Dore's quickly became the definitive drawings for Don Quixote. A splendid companion piece to Cervante's most famous work. Gustave Dore's illustrations were created for an 1863 French translation of the Cervante's classic. Dore's quickly became the definitive drawings for Don Quixote. A splendid companion piece to Cervante's most famous work.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jenaro

    A must have!!!!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jedkimball

    Amazing images and insightful attention to detail

  12. 4 out of 5

    Thom Ffolkke

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eric M. Leonard

  14. 4 out of 5

    Konrad Crnkovic

  15. 4 out of 5

    José Francisco Dávila

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rakhshi

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chris Rule

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alexandre Alphonse

  19. 4 out of 5

    Noran Miss Pumkin

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  21. 4 out of 5

    J

  22. 5 out of 5

    Boris

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marthe

  24. 5 out of 5

    SALLY HAVERLY

  25. 5 out of 5

    Floris

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Bingaman

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kait

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jake Mosberg

  29. 4 out of 5

    John

  30. 4 out of 5

    Georgi

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