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‘Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’ A portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird remains as important today as it was upon its initial publication in 1960, during the turbulent year ‘Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’ A portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird remains as important today as it was upon its initial publication in 1960, during the turbulent years of the Civil Rights movement. Now, reborn as a graphic novel. Scout, Jem, Boo Radley, Atticus Finch and the small town of Maycomb, Alabama, are all captured in illustrations by artist Fred Fordham.


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‘Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’ A portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird remains as important today as it was upon its initial publication in 1960, during the turbulent year ‘Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’ A portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird remains as important today as it was upon its initial publication in 1960, during the turbulent years of the Civil Rights movement. Now, reborn as a graphic novel. Scout, Jem, Boo Radley, Atticus Finch and the small town of Maycomb, Alabama, are all captured in illustrations by artist Fred Fordham.

30 review for To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel is a 2018 Harper publication. I’m not going to review the plot of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, but will instead offer you a review of the graphic novel version of the beloved classic. I am new to the graphic novel category and am still getting my sea legs, so to speak, but I have discovered one of the best ways to acclimate myself is by reading familiar stories in the graphic novel format. So far, I am having a blast re-reading a few classics and having that e To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel is a 2018 Harper publication. I’m not going to review the plot of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, but will instead offer you a review of the graphic novel version of the beloved classic. I am new to the graphic novel category and am still getting my sea legs, so to speak, but I have discovered one of the best ways to acclimate myself is by reading familiar stories in the graphic novel format. So far, I am having a blast re-reading a few classics and having that experience enhanced by graphic art or drawings, depicting the scenes in the book. One of my initial concerns was for the respect of the material, especially when we are talking about one of the most cherished books ever written. I was equal parts skeptical and excited. I initially thought it was a cool idea, but, I worried that it might somehow reduce the impact of the story. However, the artwork is simply wonderful! Lovely and detailed, colorized illustrations capture the essence of the novel, and will appeal to anyone who loves the story, but will certainly entice younger readers to read this important story, without thinking of it as homework. I soon forgot my skepticism and reacquainted myself with this story all over again, enjoying it anew in a fresh and revitalized way. There are many ways to enjoy stories and every one of them are valid and useful. Graphic novels are one more way to enjoy books and I’m very pleased to have discovered, and approached it with an open mind, this format, which gives me an even deeper appreciation for classic or familiar stories, but also brings new and imaginative ones to my attention, broadening my scope of learning and entertainment.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    This graphic novel really does justice to the original book! This is one of my favorite books and I love the movie! Anyone who is a fan of this book will love this graphic novel. I have went a little overboard on the pictures I added so bear with me 😊 Happy Reading! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾 This graphic novel really does justice to the original book! This is one of my favorite books and I love the movie! Anyone who is a fan of this book will love this graphic novel. I have went a little overboard on the pictures I added so bear with me 😊 Happy Reading! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Well. . . it's official. I'm in love again. This time it's a widower, a man in his late 40s. . . father of two. . . an attorney. His name is Atticus Finch. He lives in the Deep South, among an appalling racism that is shoulder deep, yet he has taught his children that being a racist is like cheating. . . cheating at being human. He takes every difficult case, even if the client can't properly pay him, and he raises his kids, rather than pawning them off on female relatives, and he is always there. . Well. . . it's official. I'm in love again. This time it's a widower, a man in his late 40s. . . father of two. . . an attorney. His name is Atticus Finch. He lives in the Deep South, among an appalling racism that is shoulder deep, yet he has taught his children that being a racist is like cheating. . . cheating at being human. He takes every difficult case, even if the client can't properly pay him, and he raises his kids, rather than pawning them off on female relatives, and he is always there. . . always there. . . for his children, his community, his clients, his neighbors. Yep, he's there for his neighbors, and that Miss Maudie across the street knows it, too. It's so obvious that she wants to get her gloved hands all over him. But, guess what, Maudie? I make a meaner casserole than you. I make a meaner cobbler, too. (Disclaimer: this is absolutely untrue). Either way, back away, Maudie, 'cause Atticus Finch is my dream man, right up there with Augustus McCrae and Rhett Butler. . . and, rumor has it. . . he looks a lot like Gregory Peck, too. Hell, even as a drawing. . . he's a giant of a man. It was times like these when I thought my father, who hated guns and had never been to any wars, was the bravest man who ever lived.

  4. 4 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    Ok wow how long ago did I read the prose version!? Maybe in highschool, so roughly 200 years ago yes 😌I always remember liking the book (I named my dog Atticus lol but I just loved the name; also my dog is a menace so that backfired) and I was really keen to reread. I know the book is always hailed as a leading voice on racism discussion...which is pretty absurd considering it's by a white POV and author. So I side-eye a lot of things now that I didn't think a lot about back when I read it as a t Ok wow how long ago did I read the prose version!? Maybe in highschool, so roughly 200 years ago yes 😌I always remember liking the book (I named my dog Atticus lol but I just loved the name; also my dog is a menace so that backfired) and I was really keen to reread. I know the book is always hailed as a leading voice on racism discussion...which is pretty absurd considering it's by a white POV and author. So I side-eye a lot of things now that I didn't think a lot about back when I read it as a teen. And so Atticus is here, a literary icon for being not racist, and he is so racist the whole book. You don't get a clap for viewing POC as human. (Don't talk to me about "but for the era..." because I am disappointed in humans in general for the entire of history.) Obviously books are here to make us think, especially classics like this, and bad content in a book ≠ bad book. But so much wasn't contended (like how sexist everyone was ugh) and the way they treated Calpernia. Atticus remains silent for SO MANY THINGS that he should have spoken up against. He could go defend a black man in court but in his home, he'd let his sister speak disgustingly about Calpernia. Also...???? Boo Radley???? Like this isn't a criticism of the book, but I forgot his backstory. 😳So as a teen he was a bit troublesome so his dad just locked him up in the house and he never went out again?!?!? Everyone's like "Oh yeah those are the Radley's, they're just recluses." Holy frick, people, pretty sure it is inferring that the Radley father abused his son for decades until he lost his mind. (At one point the neighbour, I think, talks about how Mr. Radley was the kind of bible-basher who thought anything pleasant was a SIN and happiness was a SIN. Etc. etc.) Anyway. I'm just over here like 0_0 Boo Radley really didn't get free or saved here. But the comic panel with "hey Boo" was so emotional 😭 wow so this book is so weird in retrospect. I do love the kids and their childhood perspectives and shenanigans. Dill is a gift; I forgot Dill. Anyway things to think about; but I definitely am more skeptical about it than I used to be. ABOUT THE GRAPHIC NOVEL ASPECT LOVED. It's full colour, the illustrations are gorgeous and expressive and it captures the prose so succinctly without weird gaps or confusing breaks. A really really good adaption!! And I just read a really crappy adaption of Way of Shadows today; so it this was refreshing with A+ art.

  5. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    The first graphic adaptation of this American classic that I taught several times a day every semester I taught high school, also showing the Gregory Peck film version, which if you haven't ever seen, is a must. Fordham, a Brit, who also illustrated an adaptation of Philip Pullman's Golden Compass, is faithful to the story, and says so in his afterword. This is not a creative interpretation of/reflection on To Kill, but as in the first Harry Potter film adaptation of Harry Potter and the Sorcere The first graphic adaptation of this American classic that I taught several times a day every semester I taught high school, also showing the Gregory Peck film version, which if you haven't ever seen, is a must. Fordham, a Brit, who also illustrated an adaptation of Philip Pullman's Golden Compass, is faithful to the story, and says so in his afterword. This is not a creative interpretation of/reflection on To Kill, but as in the first Harry Potter film adaptation of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's/Philosopher's Stone, it is very very true to the text, and to those who have seen the film, feels familiar. Of course you would not only read this version, but use it as a chance to reflect on the story. Or compare versions. Or use to help struggling readers "see" the text. The illustration/comics work here is lovely. I won't retell the plot, but I can say you get to fall in love with the story all over again. I will say I see it as somewhat different than I did decades ago when I taught it to exclusively white kids as an anti-racist text. Now, living in a large urban city, I can see how some non-white readers might view it as a book directed almost exclusively to white people with, as some people now say, a Great American White Savior speaking for the seemingly passive victims, the "mockingbird" blacks (and people with disabilities, the autistic Boo Radley), and I appreciate that point, but as a portrait of the American South in a particular time (Fordham defends his and Harper Lee's use of the "n"-word), it has very powerful moments, and Scout is one of the absolutely central girl characters in the history of American literature.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    "I simply want to tell you that there are some men in this world who were born to do our unpleasant jobs for us. Your father is one of them . . . We're so rarely called on to be Christians, but when we are, we've got men like Atticus to go for us." -- neighbor Miss Maudie to siblings Jem and Scout, regarding their father Atticus Finch's burdensome courtroom defense of Tom Robinson An American cultural touchstone, To Kill a Mockingbird is considered a classic both as the best-selling, Pulitzer Pri "I simply want to tell you that there are some men in this world who were born to do our unpleasant jobs for us. Your father is one of them . . . We're so rarely called on to be Christians, but when we are, we've got men like Atticus to go for us." -- neighbor Miss Maudie to siblings Jem and Scout, regarding their father Atticus Finch's burdensome courtroom defense of Tom Robinson An American cultural touchstone, To Kill a Mockingbird is considered a classic both as the best-selling, Pulitzer Prize-winning 1960 novel AND the 1962 blockbuster film featuring Gregory Peck, who deservedly took home Oscar gold for his dignified portrayal as Atticus. (Peck's porch swing conversation with Mary Badham's Scout is one of my absolutely favorite moments in any film.) With these indelible versions still solid after 50+ years is there really need for a graphic novel adaptation? Pleasingly, illustrator Ford Fordham's interpretation more than holds its own against the book and the movie. The story - a tomboy girl's recollection of her widowed lawyer father defending a black man accused of sexual assault in Great Depression-era Alabama - loses none of its power or impact. In fact, it even improves somewhat on the film version by including some characters and scenes that were excised for time constraints. By the story's conclusion I'd like to think we'd all agree that if our country (or our world) currently had more men like Atticus Finch - who is still routinely voted as a favorite fictional character / father / attorney, etc. - making decisions it would be a better place.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tucker (TuckerTheReader)

    I really, really enjoyed this! I loved the original book and it was so so cool to see it as a graphic novel. The drawings are amazing and the color is perfect. The story is just as funny and great as it was originally. View my review of To Kill A Mockingbird here Thank you so much Harper Collins for an Advanced Reader's Copy! | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram I really, really enjoyed this! I loved the original book and it was so so cool to see it as a graphic novel. The drawings are amazing and the color is perfect. The story is just as funny and great as it was originally. View my review of To Kill A Mockingbird here Thank you so much Harper Collins for an Advanced Reader's Copy! | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    Uncle Jack Finch: "You want to grow up to be a lady, don't you?" Scout: "Not particularly." Until this book fell into my hands, I would have scoffed, "Ah, yes, a graphic novel . . . for those who are too lazy to read the Cliffs Notes version." But, oh, this is gorgeous: the familiar story told through dialogue, and sun-dappled watercolors. From my original reading of the book, I mostly remembered the trial, but this book brought back the story of Scout, and Jem, and their magical childhood before Uncle Jack Finch: "You want to grow up to be a lady, don't you?" Scout: "Not particularly." Until this book fell into my hands, I would have scoffed, "Ah, yes, a graphic novel . . . for those who are too lazy to read the Cliffs Notes version." But, oh, this is gorgeous: the familiar story told through dialogue, and sun-dappled watercolors. From my original reading of the book, I mostly remembered the trial, but this book brought back the story of Scout, and Jem, and their magical childhood before life became too real, and too sad, and they were forced to suddenly grow up. Reading this was a lovely way to spend a lazy summer afternoon.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    To my surprise, I’ve actually rated this higher than Harper Lee’s original; I’d attribute that to the fact that I read the novel in high school and haven’t reread it since then, so I tend to associate it with boring essay assignments and a sense of duty. I’m also surprised by how little I remembered of the plot from the book or the Gregory Peck movie, such that there were a few moments here that actually made me gasp. Fordham’s version is highly faithful, including plenty of direct quotes from t To my surprise, I’ve actually rated this higher than Harper Lee’s original; I’d attribute that to the fact that I read the novel in high school and haven’t reread it since then, so I tend to associate it with boring essay assignments and a sense of duty. I’m also surprised by how little I remembered of the plot from the book or the Gregory Peck movie, such that there were a few moments here that actually made me gasp. Fordham’s version is highly faithful, including plenty of direct quotes from the book, and the artwork is very effective. My only gripe would be that I think Scout looks a bit too old at times, more of a preteen than a tomboy. Look out for the mockingbird on the fence on three pages. (What do you want to bet high school students will start reading this instead of the full novel?! In all honesty, if it gets them engaged in the story and characters in a way they wouldn’t be otherwise, that’s no bad thing in my opinion.) A favorite line: (Atticus to Scout) “Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.”

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Really beautiful version of the book, true to the original. I borrowed this from the library but o e day I’d like to have a copy of my own.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Fauchelle

    I really love this story and it was lovely to read it as a graphic novel. This story is important because it teaches us to accept people for who they are, the colour of our skin should not have any affect on how we treat a person, God gave us our skin and He loves us all. I love atticus, the way he treats his children with kindness and teaching them to see people and to respect their choices to look past their grumpiness, their colour and their fears and always show them kindness. This stuck out I really love this story and it was lovely to read it as a graphic novel. This story is important because it teaches us to accept people for who they are, the colour of our skin should not have any affect on how we treat a person, God gave us our skin and He loves us all. I love atticus, the way he treats his children with kindness and teaching them to see people and to respect their choices to look past their grumpiness, their colour and their fears and always show them kindness. This stuck out to me in reading this format. Just wonderful and so important. My dream would be that we would all love and respect all people, no person is greater than another we are all on this journey called life. Help not hate.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: 5 STARS 2018; Harper/HarperCollins Canada To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is one of my favourite books. As cliche as it sounds, this book changed my life. It made me aware that the colour of one's skin can be enough for someone to hate you, that truth and justice wasn't always going to be fair and the good guys don't always win. Lee's writing also inspired me as a writer. When I saw that Lee's book was getting adapted into a graphic novel, I had mixed feelings as I didn't know how fait RATING: 5 STARS 2018; Harper/HarperCollins Canada To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is one of my favourite books. As cliche as it sounds, this book changed my life. It made me aware that the colour of one's skin can be enough for someone to hate you, that truth and justice wasn't always going to be fair and the good guys don't always win. Lee's writing also inspired me as a writer. When I saw that Lee's book was getting adapted into a graphic novel, I had mixed feelings as I didn't know how faithful it would be to the original story. Were they going to add or take big things out. Phew, Fordham did an amazing job! Not only were the illustrations great, but the story is faithful to the book and hits all the great scenes. This is one I hope to buy as it a must for any collection, especially fans of the writer and the book. ***I received an eARC from EDELWEISS*** My Novelesque Blog

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sassy Sedusa

    i read the non illustrated version of this book years ago and i enjoyed it. i enjoyed it even more as a graphic novel. it was entertaining and easy to follow because of the illustrations. i highly recommend it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Swann

    This is a fantastic adaptation of the original novel. It’s great for a quick revisit and to refresh on the story. The artwork is fantastic and represents the story so well. I loved it!

  15. 4 out of 5

    J & J

    There's nothing quite like the full version novel but this was well done in graphic form.

  16. 5 out of 5

    katyjanereads

    1. The novel is my favorite book of all time and this graphic novel has become my favorite graphic novel. 2. I loved the pictures. 3. As soon as I started reading, it was like going back to an old friend. Scout made me laugh, Atticus made me want to marry him, my heart soared with the mockingbirds. 4. I read this book in high school and gravitated towards the kindness themes, but I don’t guess I understood the Mockingbird theme. I would say both Boo and Tom are Mockingbirds. 5. I learned a flivver 1. The novel is my favorite book of all time and this graphic novel has become my favorite graphic novel. 2. I loved the pictures. 3. As soon as I started reading, it was like going back to an old friend. Scout made me laugh, Atticus made me want to marry him, my heart soared with the mockingbirds. 4. I read this book in high school and gravitated towards the kindness themes, but I don’t guess I understood the Mockingbird theme. I would say both Boo and Tom are Mockingbirds. 5. I learned a flivver is a cheap car. 6. It always makes me sad that Boo’s dad plugged up the knothole. 7. One of my favorite parts is when Scout runs over to Mr. Cunningham in the mob and talks about how nice his son is and her being nice breaks up the mob. 8. I learned that my grandma has scuppernongs in her yard and I’ve eaten them all my life but just called them grapes. 9. Breaks my heart that Boo saves Scout and Jem and then they never see him again. 10. Still some favorite quotes: -“I’m Charles Baker Harris. I can read.” “So what?” “I just thought you’d like to know I can read. You got anything needs readin’ I can do it.” “In all his life, Jem has never declined a dare. The bet was settled at Dill’s copy of The Gray Ghost against two of Jem’s Tom Swifts. “Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing.” “When I asked Jem what entailment was, and Jem described it as a condition of having your tail in a crack.” “If you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never understand a person until you consider things from his point of view-until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” “Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.” “Talking to Francis gave me the sensation of settling slowly to the bottom of the ocean.” “Uncle Jack?” “Ma’am?” “What’s a whore lady?” “Remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” When Atticus made Jem read to Mrs. Dubose: “I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand.” When Scout wasn’t going to tell that Boo killed Mr. Ewell: “Well, it’d be sort of like shootin’ a Mockingbird wouldn’t it?” “Atticus, he was real nice.” “Most people are, Scout. When you finally see them.”

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bookish

    My dad bought me a copy of the To Kill a Mockingbird graphic novel for Christmas. I have been a huge To Kill a Mockingbird fan ever since I was a kid and read it for the first time (seriously, I have a tattoo homage and a dog named Scout). I was embarrassed to admit I didn’t realize they released a graphic novel, and thought of the gift as more of a novelty, since I have never read a graphic novel before. This weekend my curiosity got the best of me and I cracked the cover and never turned back. My dad bought me a copy of the To Kill a Mockingbird graphic novel for Christmas. I have been a huge To Kill a Mockingbird fan ever since I was a kid and read it for the first time (seriously, I have a tattoo homage and a dog named Scout). I was embarrassed to admit I didn’t realize they released a graphic novel, and thought of the gift as more of a novelty, since I have never read a graphic novel before. This weekend my curiosity got the best of me and I cracked the cover and never turned back. It was great! I’m not sure what I was expecting, but I thought the illustrator, Fred Fordham, did such an amazing job of bringing the characters to life and adapting the original text. I was so happy to be in the world of the book again. One of my reading resolutions was to try reading more genres I don’t typically read, so I’m now on the lookout for more graphic novels! —Amanda (excerpted from Bookish's Staff Reads)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Licha

    Love that they did this in a graphic novel format. It's been years since I've read the actual novel, but from what I remember they seem to have gotten the heart of it. I think for someone who is reading this story for the first time, you must do the novel first. This book means so much more if you have already read the book first. I love the clean, neat artwork. The story made me cry and it also made me angry all over again at the injustices in this small town. I would definitely buy this to shelv Love that they did this in a graphic novel format. It's been years since I've read the actual novel, but from what I remember they seem to have gotten the heart of it. I think for someone who is reading this story for the first time, you must do the novel first. This book means so much more if you have already read the book first. I love the clean, neat artwork. The story made me cry and it also made me angry all over again at the injustices in this small town. I would definitely buy this to shelve right along with the novel.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Jem looked like Jem, Scout looked like Scout, but Atticus didn't look like Gregory Peck. Still very well done.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    To Kill a Mockingbird is one of my favorite stories. I first read the novel in high school, and then acted in a stage production of it one summer, have watched the move once or twice, and have revisited the book every so often. I'm very familiar with it, and I think it's a masterpiece of American storytelling. I wouldn't have been especially interested in a graphic novel adaptation (I've read a number of bland adaptations of literary classics), except that I kept hearing really good things about To Kill a Mockingbird is one of my favorite stories. I first read the novel in high school, and then acted in a stage production of it one summer, have watched the move once or twice, and have revisited the book every so often. I'm very familiar with it, and I think it's a masterpiece of American storytelling. I wouldn't have been especially interested in a graphic novel adaptation (I've read a number of bland adaptations of literary classics), except that I kept hearing really good things about Fred Fordham's recent edition. So I checked it out from the library to see what it's like. First, I was impressed by the heft of the volume. At 273 pages, this wasn't going to be an unabridged version of the original, but it was certainly going to be more substantial than I'd expected. I was next relieved to open to the first page and see the very familiar opening lines, verbatim from the novel. Those words are set against a striking image that brings something from the end of the story right up to the beginning, for those who know the book already. So far as I can tell, all of the words in the graphic novel are directly from Lee's original (though the graphic novel does not have all the words of the novel; it is an abridgement). Fordham's note at the end of the book says that he only changed words from the book when absolutely necessary. I know the book really well, and nothing in this adaptation stood out to me as new or out of place, so he's done a great job. The artwork is beautiful all throughout. Fordham uses somewhat limited color palettes and washed-out tones to convey a sense of place and history. I really loved it. He even ages the kids just slightly as the story progresses. I've never felt that the original book needed anything other than the words, but this edition is quite pleasant, and the imagery enhances the words nicely. The last line of the graphic novel is, of course, that famous last line of the book, so all is well. This adaptation surprised me with its care and beauty. It's no substitute for reading Lee's original, but for those of us who cherish that book, this one is a wonderful new way to go back to that story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Drawing upon some of richest source material in American literature, Fred Fordham delivers a reverential adaptation. While the art can be a bit stiff and conservative, the story remains as powerful as ever in this new form. I gulped it down in one sitting.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Petergiaquinta

    Five stars for Harper Lee. Three stars for this decent enough adaptation of the novel, which tries but fails to capture the richness of the original. It's okay, but if you don't know the novel, if you don't understand the power contained in this book, Fred Fordham's retelling won't do much for you. Zero stars for the teachers and administrators who have already begun to replace Lee's beautiful book with this meager alternative. Shame on you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Different Is Beautiful

    I am definitely going to finish reading the original version of the book and also this four stars is a very very strong four stars

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sonali Dabade

    As amazing as it was the first time around! I love the graphic novel even more because it was easier to read and the visuals just about broke my heart. LOVE!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)

    To Kill A Mockingbird should need no introduction.  It is an American classic and arguably the most important work in American literature in the 20th century. I was thrilled to learn that it was being adapted into a graphic novel, which could make the story more accessible to young readers by combining visual art and language to share this enduring story. The story of a black man wrongly accused of a crime by a white woman in the Deep South of the 1930's and the neighborhood legend of a man named To Kill A Mockingbird should need no introduction.  It is an American classic and arguably the most important work in American literature in the 20th century. I was thrilled to learn that it was being adapted into a graphic novel, which could make the story more accessible to young readers by combining visual art and language to share this enduring story. The story of a black man wrongly accused of a crime by a white woman in the Deep South of the 1930's and the neighborhood legend of a man named Boo who never leaves his house are both compelling pieces of the tale surrounding the Finch family.   With the perfect innocence of childhood, Scout and Jem Finch navigate their small town of Maycomb that is starkly divided by race and class.  While most adults seem to believe these are complicated topics, Scout and Jem are learning right and wrong from their father, Atticus Finch, who has a wise way of imparting his values and beliefs without imposing them on his children. To Kill A Mockingbird is a frequently challenged or banned book due to its content and language.  For me, it is an accurate and heartbreaking portrayal of a time period in the American South told with unflinching honesty through the innocence of a child.  It is timeless story that explores the complexities of human nature and the brutal injustices in our history. To Kill A Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel is an excellent adaptation that remains true to the story by faithfully following the plot of the novel (though obviously a condensed version) with many direct quotes and bright, emotive illustrations.  This is a perfect way to introduce young people to Harper Lee's classic novel and hopefully capture their hearts and minds and open a discussion on the many heavy but necessary subjects tackled in the story. Many thanks to Harper Collins and Edelweiss for providing me with a DRC in exchange for my honest review.  To Kill A Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel is scheduled for release on October 30, 2018. For more full reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com

  26. 4 out of 5

    steph

    If you are a fan of both graphic novels AND To Kill a Mockingbird, pick this up. This is a gorgeous graphic novel first and foremost. Fordham’s artwork is well done, very effective and quite faithful to the book. There are plenty of direct quotes from the book and in places that he has edited or adapted, the panels move the story along quite well. I am a big fan of TKaM and I was a little leery of reading a graphic novel version of it but when it come in from the library I was blown away by how b If you are a fan of both graphic novels AND To Kill a Mockingbird, pick this up. This is a gorgeous graphic novel first and foremost. Fordham’s artwork is well done, very effective and quite faithful to the book. There are plenty of direct quotes from the book and in places that he has edited or adapted, the panels move the story along quite well. I am a big fan of TKaM and I was a little leery of reading a graphic novel version of it but when it come in from the library I was blown away by how beautiful the artwork is. And then once I started reading I saw how faithful to the book it was. It is adapted, so some things are left out but I only saw one scene while reading that I knew for a fact had been edited (granted though, it's been awhile since I've read TKaM so there might be more). I love the fact that this book is hardcover and the binding is top notch (You wouldn't believe the amount of children's/teen's graphic novel I order at work that fall apart in less than 6 months because the binding is non-existent :sigh:). Honestly this graphic novel was a absolute joy to read. I would not recommend reading it in place of the novel (read the novel first!) but as a companion to the book I would completely recommend or for a individual that is on the fence about TKaM or has trouble with long novels etc. Pick this up. I will definitely be on the lookout for more of Fordham's work. He did an amazing job here.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bookish

    I read the original version more than twenty years ago so it’s not from that perspective that I choose to review the graphic novel. Rather, my review is on the merits of the adaptation. Unfortunately I didn’t really encounter anything that tipped me over from a perch on the solidly good. Maybe its the distinctly lackluster way I‘m feeling at the moment, or maybe its the breadth of works I‘ve read by authors like Toni Morrison that have just done a better job at conveying that gut punch. I‘m not I read the original version more than twenty years ago so it’s not from that perspective that I choose to review the graphic novel. Rather, my review is on the merits of the adaptation. Unfortunately I didn’t really encounter anything that tipped me over from a perch on the solidly good. Maybe its the distinctly lackluster way I‘m feeling at the moment, or maybe its the breadth of works I‘ve read by authors like Toni Morrison that have just done a better job at conveying that gut punch. I‘m not sure, but either way, this is where I‘m at at the moment.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    I enjoyed this new take on one of my favorite books. It is not as good as the novel by Harper Lee but I really did enjoy it. Definitely pick it up if it interests you.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jaksen

    The classic story as a graphic novel. Pretty straightforward, follows Ms. Harper's novel faithfully. I missed all the 'words,' though and had to get in 'graphic novel mood' in order to read it. I guess I'm more a 'more words is better than not more words' kind of reader... But seeing the book in pictures gave it a more somber mood, imo. (Seriously, except for moments here and there, it's not exactly an 'upbeat' book to begin with.) I also thought Atticus Finch looked sort of smallish to me in thi The classic story as a graphic novel. Pretty straightforward, follows Ms. Harper's novel faithfully. I missed all the 'words,' though and had to get in 'graphic novel mood' in order to read it. I guess I'm more a 'more words is better than not more words' kind of reader... But seeing the book in pictures gave it a more somber mood, imo. (Seriously, except for moments here and there, it's not exactly an 'upbeat' book to begin with.) I also thought Atticus Finch looked sort of smallish to me in this form, not the Gregory Peck kind of man I envisioned him as. (And I read the book BEFORE I saw the movie. I watched it one afternoon when I was in my 20's and remember thinking, yep, that's just how I saw Atticus. Mr. Peck nailed it.) Anyhow, a lot of us would come to this story with all these preconceptions because we read the book, or saw the movie, or maybe we discussed the book in high school or college, etc. etc. But I do love Scout, love her outlook on the world, on life, on how people should behave and so often do NOT. And how often, when we were children, the adults in our life often disappoint us. One lesson I did take away from the book - and it's in this graphic novel, too - is how, if you get one grown-up in your life who treats you with respect and doesn't try to change you, (even if you need some changing), but takes you for who you are, then damn, you're lucky. We all don't get that. I was lucky. I got it in spades, and so, it's one of the reasons this is one of my fav. books. Four stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Valmir Almagro

    To talk about this Pulitzer Prize-winning novel is to reveal a world fraught with gender issues, racism and lack of civil rights. Every time one reads this American Classic a new issue is revealed. Fred Fordham was able to take the essence and beauty of Harper Lee’s unforgettable book in this amazingly well-designed graphic novel.

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