web site hit counter Wild: Man Against Nature Moby Dick and The Bear - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Wild: Man Against Nature Moby Dick and The Bear

Availability: Ready to download

Two of the greatest hunting stories in American Literature, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick and William Faulkner’s “The Bear,” written not quite a hundred years apart, refl ect two different stages in man’s struggle against nature in the New World. In Melville’s novel nature, incarnate in the shape of a great albino whale, is invincible and believed to be immortal just as wild Two of the greatest hunting stories in American Literature, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick and William Faulkner’s “The Bear,” written not quite a hundred years apart, refl ect two different stages in man’s struggle against nature in the New World. In Melville’s novel nature, incarnate in the shape of a great albino whale, is invincible and believed to be immortal just as wild nature was believed to be inexhaustible in America at the middle of the nineteenth century. In Faulkner’s story Old Ben, the legendary Mississippi black bear, also symbolizes nature, but, unlike Melville’s white whale, the bear is mortal. What had seemed inconceivable to many at the middle of the nineteenth century had become all too clear by the middle of the twentieth: Man with his increased numbers, insatiable appetites and technological power had gained the ability to destroy wild nature. These stories by two great American writers are fi ction, but they confront the reader with a tragic reality: From the moment Columbus’ three small ships sighted the island of San Salvador in the Caribbean wild nature in America was doomed. The mad captain Ahab’s battle with Moby Dick was only an episode in the epic struggle that followed; the death of Old Ben with the knife of a wild man in his heart was the finale.


Compare

Two of the greatest hunting stories in American Literature, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick and William Faulkner’s “The Bear,” written not quite a hundred years apart, refl ect two different stages in man’s struggle against nature in the New World. In Melville’s novel nature, incarnate in the shape of a great albino whale, is invincible and believed to be immortal just as wild Two of the greatest hunting stories in American Literature, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick and William Faulkner’s “The Bear,” written not quite a hundred years apart, refl ect two different stages in man’s struggle against nature in the New World. In Melville’s novel nature, incarnate in the shape of a great albino whale, is invincible and believed to be immortal just as wild nature was believed to be inexhaustible in America at the middle of the nineteenth century. In Faulkner’s story Old Ben, the legendary Mississippi black bear, also symbolizes nature, but, unlike Melville’s white whale, the bear is mortal. What had seemed inconceivable to many at the middle of the nineteenth century had become all too clear by the middle of the twentieth: Man with his increased numbers, insatiable appetites and technological power had gained the ability to destroy wild nature. These stories by two great American writers are fi ction, but they confront the reader with a tragic reality: From the moment Columbus’ three small ships sighted the island of San Salvador in the Caribbean wild nature in America was doomed. The mad captain Ahab’s battle with Moby Dick was only an episode in the epic struggle that followed; the death of Old Ben with the knife of a wild man in his heart was the finale.

5 review for Wild: Man Against Nature Moby Dick and The Bear

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rick smith

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

  3. 4 out of 5

    Friedrick

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dave Gardenr

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hamis Juma

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.