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Murder in Montparnasse

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Always enticing in divine twenties fashion, Phryne, one of the most exciting and likeable heroines in crime writing today, leads us through a tightly plotted maze of thrilling adventure set in 1920s Australia. The divine Phryne Fisher returns to lead another dance of intrigue. Seven Australian soldiers, carousing in Paris in 1918, unknowingly witness a murder and their prese Always enticing in divine twenties fashion, Phryne, one of the most exciting and likeable heroines in crime writing today, leads us through a tightly plotted maze of thrilling adventure set in 1920s Australia. The divine Phryne Fisher returns to lead another dance of intrigue. Seven Australian soldiers, carousing in Paris in 1918, unknowingly witness a murder and their presence has devastating consequences. Ten years later, two are dead ... under very suspicious circumstances. Phryne's wharfie mates, Bert and Cec, appeal to her for help. They were part of this group of soldiers in 1918 and they fear for their lives and for those of the other three men. It's only as Phryne delves into the investigation that she, too, remembers being in Montparnasse on that very same day. While Phryne is occupied with memories of Montparnasse past and the race to outpace the murderer, she finds troubles of a different kind at home. Her lover, Lin Chung, is about to be married. And the effect this is having on her own usually peaceful household is disastrous.


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Always enticing in divine twenties fashion, Phryne, one of the most exciting and likeable heroines in crime writing today, leads us through a tightly plotted maze of thrilling adventure set in 1920s Australia. The divine Phryne Fisher returns to lead another dance of intrigue. Seven Australian soldiers, carousing in Paris in 1918, unknowingly witness a murder and their prese Always enticing in divine twenties fashion, Phryne, one of the most exciting and likeable heroines in crime writing today, leads us through a tightly plotted maze of thrilling adventure set in 1920s Australia. The divine Phryne Fisher returns to lead another dance of intrigue. Seven Australian soldiers, carousing in Paris in 1918, unknowingly witness a murder and their presence has devastating consequences. Ten years later, two are dead ... under very suspicious circumstances. Phryne's wharfie mates, Bert and Cec, appeal to her for help. They were part of this group of soldiers in 1918 and they fear for their lives and for those of the other three men. It's only as Phryne delves into the investigation that she, too, remembers being in Montparnasse on that very same day. While Phryne is occupied with memories of Montparnasse past and the race to outpace the murderer, she finds troubles of a different kind at home. Her lover, Lin Chung, is about to be married. And the effect this is having on her own usually peaceful household is disastrous.

30 review for Murder in Montparnasse

  1. 4 out of 5

    CatBookMom

    This is one of the best of the series. You learn a great deal about how Phryne came to be such a strong, independent woman, with the reminiscences of her time in Paris immediately after leaving the ambulance service in 1918. There's a major crisis with Phryne's staff, and we meet Lin Chung's new wife. And Phyrne herself finally finds an old wound being healed. This is one of the best of the series. You learn a great deal about how Phryne came to be such a strong, independent woman, with the reminiscences of her time in Paris immediately after leaving the ambulance service in 1918. There's a major crisis with Phryne's staff, and we meet Lin Chung's new wife. And Phyrne herself finally finds an old wound being healed.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    *I received a copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review* I have been a fan of the TV show Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries since the very first episode. Set in Melbourne in the 1920s, featuring a strong, independent female lead, and a wonderful cast, the show is just fun to watch. I always promised myself I would one day read the books, which were, I was told, a bit different from the adaptation (Phryne is considerably younger and Det. Robinson happily married for examp *I received a copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review* I have been a fan of the TV show Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries since the very first episode. Set in Melbourne in the 1920s, featuring a strong, independent female lead, and a wonderful cast, the show is just fun to watch. I always promised myself I would one day read the books, which were, I was told, a bit different from the adaptation (Phryne is considerably younger and Det. Robinson happily married for example), and figured one of my favorite episodes would be a good place to start. (I wouldn't recommend the same for anyone unfamiliar with Phryne and her friends though, because the characters' relationships are already well established, and there is very little to no rehashing of anything that has happened prior to this.) The book is indeed a bit different from the episode with the same title, but even if the killer is still the same, it made for an excellent summer read! The wealth of historical knowledge and the historical figures which are featured (Picasso, Gertrude Stein, etc.) results in amazing atmosphere! Having been to Paris quite often, I could clearly picture Phryne walking along the streets of Montparnasse and the Quartier Latin, losing herself in the world of post-war Paris. I was a bit afraid that the only reason I loved Phryne so much was because of Essie Davis' brilliant performance, but she is an amazing character in her own right, too. Strong, but at the same time vulnerable, eccentric, charming, resourceful, and always helping those in need, she was a delight to read about. Her sad story revealed in this book about her time as an ambulance driver during the war and subsequent life as an artist's muse in Paris were as interesting as the murders and kidnapping she investigates. The only small quibble I had was that there were quite a lot of other things Phryne investigates while searching for the killer, and it took away the focus from the main story line a bit too much for my taste. As for the cases: Phryne is hired by her friends Cec and Bert to investigate the murders of two of their friends. It quickly becomes evident that they witnessed a murder in Paris after the war and that someone is now hunting down witnesses. Phryne is forced to one and for all confront her own demons from those days, realizing that she can only truly move on if she lets go of some of the most painful memories of her life. At the same time, she is is also searching for a missing girl. This was a bit less interesting to me as I felt it distracted a bit from the other case and Phryne's memories, but maybe that was the point and she chose this additional adventure to distract herself from those painful reminiscences. And then there's the small matter of finding a replacement for Mr. Butler (the butler) who threatens to quit if Phryne resumes her affair with the handsome, but about to be married, Mr. Lin... All in all, it was a wonderfully entertaining book! Having started the series, I will now definitely read all of it!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    Murder in Montparnasse by Kerry Greenwood is the 12th book in the Miss Fisher's murder mystery series. Bert and Cec hire Phrynne Fisher to find out who is killing their soldier friends. There seem to be connections to a murder they witnessed while partying in Paris. Another fabulous book where we find out a little about Miss Fishers work with the ambulance during the war and her stay in Paris afterwards working as an artists model. Plenty of happenings to keep you reading to the end. Phrynne is Murder in Montparnasse by Kerry Greenwood is the 12th book in the Miss Fisher's murder mystery series. Bert and Cec hire Phrynne Fisher to find out who is killing their soldier friends. There seem to be connections to a murder they witnessed while partying in Paris. Another fabulous book where we find out a little about Miss Fishers work with the ambulance during the war and her stay in Paris afterwards working as an artists model. Plenty of happenings to keep you reading to the end. Phrynne is amazing as always.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    I might need to take a break from Phryne for a while — just to make sure I don’t run out of her brilliance too soon, of course. Murder in Montparnasse shows us a younger Phryne, as well as the capable detective we’re used to: a Phryne who hasn’t yet learned to read men and situations and take care of herself. It is good to see her unsure of herself, and it’s also good to follow along with the mature Phryne as she negotiates Lin getting married, and becomes friends with his wife-to-be. It’s also n I might need to take a break from Phryne for a while — just to make sure I don’t run out of her brilliance too soon, of course. Murder in Montparnasse shows us a younger Phryne, as well as the capable detective we’re used to: a Phryne who hasn’t yet learned to read men and situations and take care of herself. It is good to see her unsure of herself, and it’s also good to follow along with the mature Phryne as she negotiates Lin getting married, and becomes friends with his wife-to-be. It’s also nice to get both Bert and Cec and Phryne’s adopted daughters playing a part in the mystery. Pretty much the whole team is involved here, including Hugh Collins, which is fun. I think the only drawback is that maybe I’ve been eating up these books too fast, and they’re losing some of their freshness. I think if I spaced them out more, it’d be okay; as it is, I found it a little too routine. Which isn’t bad, since this is the twelfth book and I’ve read all the eleven previous ones in quite a hurry. In case it bothered anyone else, spoiler: the Butlers don’t leave in the end. I was very worried they wouldn’t and that the lovely found-family feel was going to be lost a little — but nope, Mrs Butler sorted things out. Originally posted here.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    We're in flashback country for Phyrne in this installment. Events combine to make her remember her days as an ambulance driver in France during WW1 and its aftermath. Bert and Cece are the ones who need her help as they and their war buddies are in danger of death for a reason they can't even remember. Life is less than comfortable in the Fisher menage, as Lin Chung receives his bride-to-be from China and the Butlers threaten to resign. Is this the end of life as Phyrne knows it? While well-writ We're in flashback country for Phyrne in this installment. Events combine to make her remember her days as an ambulance driver in France during WW1 and its aftermath. Bert and Cece are the ones who need her help as they and their war buddies are in danger of death for a reason they can't even remember. Life is less than comfortable in the Fisher menage, as Lin Chung receives his bride-to-be from China and the Butlers threaten to resign. Is this the end of life as Phyrne knows it? While well-written, I do get tired of flashbacks in novels. It's a personal thing, I'm sure, but it gets confusing. We're back in Women's Issues class as Phryne deals with the memories of the man who broke her heart in Paris as she helps two young women take their own destinies in hand. To wed, or not to wed--though why Phryne, who is incapable of committing to a longterm relationship, should be the arbiter of anyone else's life choices is beyond me. And of course there's a good dollop of domestic violence thrown in--someone has serious issues and is dealing with them through writing, I guess, as it seems to be a leitmotif in the novels. There's some good use of the red herring in this installment, though the wrap was a bit odd, but I'm getting used to that. Oh--and just so you know...the word is "discomfited," not "discomforted." ETA: Upon re-reading, I see that once again the proofreaders failed the author. At first Phryne's daring Egyptian dress is made of "polished cotton." When she puts it on, suddenly "the linen fell in a straight line from her shoulder to the carpet." Huh? Never mind, when she gets to the ball it's a cotton dress again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mender

    I guess jumping in at book number 12 makes little sense, but honestly I never planned on jumping in at all. I listened to this on audiobook which is a style I usually hate, started six hours in to a seven and a half hour drive. By that point I'd reached desperation and my radio had lost reception. I know of Phryne because I've walked past my parents tv during some episodes, and I knew that both my sister and my folks loved these books. But I don't like murder mysteries much and I'd tried another I guess jumping in at book number 12 makes little sense, but honestly I never planned on jumping in at all. I listened to this on audiobook which is a style I usually hate, started six hours in to a seven and a half hour drive. By that point I'd reached desperation and my radio had lost reception. I know of Phryne because I've walked past my parents tv during some episodes, and I knew that both my sister and my folks loved these books. But I don't like murder mysteries much and I'd tried another Kerry Greenwood series and been severely underwhelmed. So I'd taken this book on cd when my mum had thrust it on me, oh, a good year ago, and it had sat there waiting for just such a moment of desperation. At least one star of this is for the wonderful narration. Stephanie Daniels does an amazing job, and brings out the character of Phryne perfectly. I never felt lost for a moment, all the characters seem charming, and it's a delight to listen to. There are several mysteries to solve and we delve into Phyrne's backstory. Everything is interesting and while some things are easy to predict, you are meant to predict them apparently and the story takes it in stride and goes on to reveal quite another layer entirely. And then happy endings all round which makes me extremely happy. Maybe I'll even give the rest of these audiobooks a try.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Classic Phryne - it described life in 1920s Melbourne, as always, but with flashbacks to France post-WWI. Always a good series to listen to with Stephanie Daniels’ wonderful voice and the excellent accents she does!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lil

    Phryne backstory. Hanging out with Alice B. Toklas. First lovers. Lots of Bert and Cec. What could be better?!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bea

    3.5 stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This volume delves into Phryne's past and explores part of what makes her what she is now. The story that takes up most of our time is not much of a mystery, it is obvious who the murder is from very early on, the second mystery is more, well, mysterious but given little more space in the book than Phryne's household affairs, which I'll admit I do not agree with, and it bothers me sometimes but the books are generally enough fun for me to read over those parts. Popsugar Reading Challenge 2020: A This volume delves into Phryne's past and explores part of what makes her what she is now. The story that takes up most of our time is not much of a mystery, it is obvious who the murder is from very early on, the second mystery is more, well, mysterious but given little more space in the book than Phryne's household affairs, which I'll admit I do not agree with, and it bothers me sometimes but the books are generally enough fun for me to read over those parts. Popsugar Reading Challenge 2020: A book with a main character in their 20s (Technically this has been true of all the Phryne Fisher series but I did not realize it until this one where her age is very clearly indicated.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    These books are fun and Greenwood keeps the tone light even when covering some darker topics. Makes me want to watch the TV series again.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Damaskcat

    Phryne Fisher's friends - Bert and Cec, taxi drivers and wharfies - are worried that some of their former army mates from the Great War are being murdered. Phryne agrees that there seems to be something odd going on and wonders whether it is linked to something they may have witnessed in Paris. Phryne herself was in Paris at the time but it is part of her life she really doesn't want to recall. Current circumstances force her to confront her fears and deal with the past. Phryne also has two other Phryne Fisher's friends - Bert and Cec, taxi drivers and wharfies - are worried that some of their former army mates from the Great War are being murdered. Phryne agrees that there seems to be something odd going on and wonders whether it is linked to something they may have witnessed in Paris. Phryne herself was in Paris at the time but it is part of her life she really doesn't want to recall. Current circumstances force her to confront her fears and deal with the past. Phryne also has two other cases to investigate - various attacks on a French restaurant whose owner refuses to pay protection money and a kidnapped girl who is about to marry the restaurant owner. Phyrne's adopted daughters Jane and Ruth play a part in this story with some very good detective work. I really enjoyed this book and I think it is probably my favourite in the series so far. The plot is complex and interesting and kept me guessing until all was revealed. I also enjoyed the update on Lin Chung's marriage plans and the twist that involves. I thoroughly recommend this series to anyone who likes crime and mystery stories which are a bit different from the norm. There are interesting characters and backgrounds and a touch of humour though this does not stop Phryne and her author, from tackling some complex and serious issues.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Another light and delightful Phryne Fisher offering. The quality of writing has improved immensely by this point in the series, and I just lay back and let myself be entertained. There are three major plot points to be solved, and while the story tends to focus completely on one, then completely on another, they are all given their proper dues and resolved satisfactorily. Greenwood has a mild tendency to give every character, no matter how minor, a sentence or two of backstory, mostly to explain Another light and delightful Phryne Fisher offering. The quality of writing has improved immensely by this point in the series, and I just lay back and let myself be entertained. There are three major plot points to be solved, and while the story tends to focus completely on one, then completely on another, they are all given their proper dues and resolved satisfactorily. Greenwood has a mild tendency to give every character, no matter how minor, a sentence or two of backstory, mostly to explain their behaviour but sometimes just to be cheeky. This has the annoying effect of omnipotence, which is mostly fine, but sometimes jars you out of the story a little too hard. Apart from this, I thoroughly enjoyed the book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Siria

    Another enjoyable installment in the Phryne Fisher series, with all of the strengths and weaknesses familiar from the earlier books—in other words, great literature this ain't, but it's ideal for reading on a train-and-plane trip. I do wish that Greenwood had toned down the historical cameos in this one a tad, though; having just come back from two months in Paris, her description of the city in 1918 felt especially two-dimensional. Another enjoyable installment in the Phryne Fisher series, with all of the strengths and weaknesses familiar from the earlier books—in other words, great literature this ain't, but it's ideal for reading on a train-and-plane trip. I do wish that Greenwood had toned down the historical cameos in this one a tad, though; having just come back from two months in Paris, her description of the city in 1918 felt especially two-dimensional.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    I enjoy Phryne and today this was excellent on a plane

  16. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Another great book!! This story allows us to learn more about Phryne's background. Another great book!! This story allows us to learn more about Phryne's background.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality For various reasons, some of which are detailed in this Facebook post, this week went to hell in a handcart. And a crappy handcart at that. As usual, when I can’t concentrate on much of anything else, I turn to my current comfort read, Phryne Fisher. Murder in Montparnasse swept me back in Phryne’s world for a few hours, where there is plenty of danger, but also lots of derring-do, where justice triumphs and evil gets righteously crushed. And where the ghosts Originally published at Reading Reality For various reasons, some of which are detailed in this Facebook post, this week went to hell in a handcart. And a crappy handcart at that. As usual, when I can’t concentrate on much of anything else, I turn to my current comfort read, Phryne Fisher. Murder in Montparnasse swept me back in Phryne’s world for a few hours, where there is plenty of danger, but also lots of derring-do, where justice triumphs and evil gets righteously crushed. And where the ghosts of memory are laid to their proper rest. For those who have watched the Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries series, Murder in Montparnasse was filmed, and broadcast in the middle of the first season. I recently re-watched it, so the story in the TV version is still pretty clear in my memory. It feels like the base story is the same in both versions. There are alterations in the details, as there usually are. The TV version includes Jack and Phryne’s first kiss, when Jack needs to distract Phryne and keep her from giving the game away to the villain. Jack in the books is absolutely nothing like Jack in the TV series, so many of the changes between versions involve Phryne’s long-term lover, Lin Chung, and the rather interesting arrangements for his upcoming marriage. But the two versions are the same at their heart. Bert and Cec, who served together in WW1 at Gallipoli and many other terrible places, come to Phryne with a problem. Two of their mates have been murdered in such a way that both deaths appeared to be accidents, at least on the surface. The circumstances in both cases were very definitely fishy, and should have been investigated properly, but weren’t due to police incompetence. Something that Jack in the book definitely has something to say about. Whatever he is or isn’t, he is always a good cop. Bert and Cec’s problem connects to a piece of Phryne’s past that she has tried to bury, mostly from herself. On leave at the end of the war, Bert and Cec and their mates were in Paris, and they witnessed the murder of the painter Sarcelle. Phryne modelled for Sarcelle (among others), and also knew that his death had been ruled an accident. Their description of the incident takes Phryne back to her own Parisian experience. She remembers everything all too well, especially the cold-hearted beast who seduced her, beat her, and expected her to keep on taking it until he was done. She ran before she could be broken. But she’s never forgotten the man who broke her heart even as he tried to break her body and spirit. The beast has come to Australia. At first, Phryne doesn’t know why. But she does know that whatever Rene Dubois is involved in this time, it must be far from the side of the angels. All Phryne has to do is figure out what, and if and why he has to do with the deaths of Bert and Cec’s friends, before he escapes justice yet again. This time Phryne, with the help of Bert and Cec and their mates, are going to see that the man who haunted her nightmares finally gets exactly what’s coming to him. No matter what it costs. Escape Rating A-: As a story, this one hangs together a bit better in the book than it did on TV. Even though there are multiple plot threads here, not just Phryne’s past and the deaths of Bert and Cec’s friends but also a kidnapped young woman, a different young woman who wants to get out of the marriage her parents have arranged for her, Lin Chung’s bride’s secrets and Mr. Butler’s resignation, the threads do connect and Phryne’s ghosts get expiated. The ending is very satisfying. We also see more of Phryne’s past and in more detail than TV could portray. The glimpses, through Phryne’s eyes, of the post-WW1 Paris that Hemingway called “a moveable feast” are evocative and poignant. And we get a much clearer picture of what Phryne thought and felt during that transitional, ephemeral time and place. It all goes a long towards explaining how Phryne got to be who she is at the point where the books begin. For this reader, at least, it feels like Phryne preserved more of her agency in the book version that her memories indicated in the TV version. And I always prefer that my heroines have all the agency they can grab. The ending of Murder in Montparnasse is far from tidy, but it feels incredibly right. Dubois gets exactly what he deserves. It is not a neat, clean or even legal result. But it is definitely justice. And it feels intensely satisfying to see it delivered. A little Murder in Montparnasse was just what I needed. I think I’m going to go and watch it again.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Murder in Montparnasse (Phryne Fisher, #12) by Kerry Greenwood Synopsis / The divine Phryne Fisher returns to lead another dance of intrigue. Seven Australian soldiers, carousing in Paris in 1918, unknowingly witness a murder and their presence has devastating consequences. Ten years later, two are dead ... under very suspicious circumstances. Phryne's wharfie mates, Bert and Cec, appeal to her for help. They were part of this group of soldiers in 1918 and they fear for their lives and for those of Murder in Montparnasse (Phryne Fisher, #12) by Kerry Greenwood Synopsis / The divine Phryne Fisher returns to lead another dance of intrigue. Seven Australian soldiers, carousing in Paris in 1918, unknowingly witness a murder and their presence has devastating consequences. Ten years later, two are dead ... under very suspicious circumstances. Phryne's wharfie mates, Bert and Cec, appeal to her for help. They were part of this group of soldiers in 1918 and they fear for their lives and for those of the other three men. It's only as Phryne delves into the investigation that she, too, remembers being in Montparnasse on that very same day. While Phryne is occupied with memories of Montparnasse past and the race to outpace the murderer, she finds troubles of a different kind at home. Her lover, Lin Chung, is about to be married. And the effect this is having on her own usually peaceful household is disastrous. My Thoughts / Murder in Montparnasse is book #12 in the Phryne Fisher series. In this Episode we have a LOT of subplots:- Subplot #1, Seven Australian soldiers, carousing in Paris in 1918, unknowingly witness a murder, with devastating consequences. Ten years later, two are dead…under very suspicious circumstances. Phryne is retained by Bert and Cec to investigate. Very quickly, it becomes evident that they unknowingly witnessed a murder in Paris after the Great War and that someone is now hunting down the remaining witnesses to that event (a.k.a: Who is murdering Bert and Cec’s friends?). In subplot #2, Phryne is forced to once and for all confront her own demons from the days in Paris in 1918. Phryne realises, she can only truly move on if she lets go of some of the most painful memories of her life (a.k.a: Who is Rene DuBois?). Subplot #3, At the same time, she is also searching for a missing girl (a.k.a: Where is Elizabeth and who kidnapped her?) AND…..subplot #4!!!!!!! – OMG! there's the small matter of finding a replacement for Mr. Butler who threatens to quit if Phryne resumes her affair with the handsome, but about to be married, Mr. Lin (a.k.a: Will Mr. and Mrs. Butler leave?). All my favourites are back – happy, happy days! Bert & Cec; Jane and Ruth (Phryne’s adopted daughters), Mr & Mrs B, Detective Inspector John ‘Call me Jack, everyone does’ Robinson, Dot and her beloved Constable Hugh Collins, along with Ember the cat and Molly the dog. Book #12 Quotes:- Jane and Ruth brought from the cupboard the large box of Haigh’s Superfine Assorted chocolates, awarded by Phryne for clever answers. Ruth got two and Jane one, and Phryne gave a peanut brittle to Dot because she looked so distressed. Ah Dot, you just make me lol. Too right, said the river-boat captain. My missus believes in all this food reform. Food fad, I call it. Nothing but poached chicken and steamed vegetables. Won’t even fry my Murray cod, and there’s good eating on a Murray cod, just out of the river, fried in butter in a hot pan. Man needs food that’ll stick to his ribs. But I go away from her tonight. She’s at the Country Women’s Association, probably leaning about new ways to grate carrot. Oh ouch that stings!! Here’s a little snippet about the CWA: It has approximately 44,000 members across 1855 branches. Its aims are to improve the conditions for country women and children and to try to make life better for women and their families, especially those women living in rural and remote Australia. The organisation is self-funded, nonpartisan and nonsectarian. Plus their recipes are totally awesome!! We’ve found that missing Bently, sir, he said mellifluously. I’m including this because, well, who doesn’t like to use the word mellifluously any chance they get! Ah, in that case, you suspect that peculation is taking place. Yet another awesome word “peculation” - to steal or take dishonestly (money, especially public funds, or property entrusted to one's care); embezzle. Bert new that some of the Sailor’s Rest young women had professions which might involve beds but did not involve making them. - included just for giggles.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Acquaviva

    Ah yes! I’ve finished another delectable Miss Phryne Fisher Mystery! I have to admit that I parse these out over time like treasured yet rare sweets because there are only so many of them and eventually I will run out. I was introduced to this wild and courageous 1920’s female detective when I was ambling through the Mystery Section if my local library looking for something different to read . This Series jumped off the shelf because of it’s highly colorful cover art and 1920’s subject matter (a Ah yes! I’ve finished another delectable Miss Phryne Fisher Mystery! I have to admit that I parse these out over time like treasured yet rare sweets because there are only so many of them and eventually I will run out. I was introduced to this wild and courageous 1920’s female detective when I was ambling through the Mystery Section if my local library looking for something different to read . This Series jumped off the shelf because of it’s highly colorful cover art and 1920’s subject matter (a personal favorite!). I haven’t been disappointed yet! Soon after finding the books, I also found the television series and that brought Phryne to life in a whole new way! Anyone who loves Phryne the way I do should check out the recently released movie Miss Fisher and the Crypt I’d Tears on Amazon Prime. It’s a feast for the eyes! Murder in Montparnasse is one of Phryne’s more interesting cases. She is initially approached by an old friend who owns a French Cafe, Chef Anatole, and asked to look into the disappearance of his fiancée, Miss Elizabeth Chambers. Supposedly Miss Chambers was kidnapped while out with a friend ( and we find out soon to be future stepmother) Julia Chivers. Both girls are just 18. As Phryne is pondering her investigative steps, Bert and Cec, her erstwhile soldier/taxi drivers/ helpers come to her with a mystery of their own. It seems two of their close friends have been murdered and another was attacked. They want Phryne to find the culprit. The two mysteries are gathering steam while domestically, Phryne’s longtime lover Lyn Chung is getting married and her butler, Mr. Butler is not too approving of Phryne continuing on the affaire du cour. The Butler’s give notice, Lyn brings his fiancée to dinner, and Phryne begins an investigation that starts to lead her down a dark path into her past. We learn more of Phryne’s history in this novel and what happened to her after WWI. The case of the soldiers is directly related to things in Phryne’s past. The young missing girl leads Phryne on a winding quest that takes some fancy footwork from her adoptive daughters Jane and Ruth to solve. There are snippets of information in the chapters that lead you to think they are about the young girl, but really apply to something else entirely. In the end, Phryne gets back a part of herself she thought she had lost and let’s go of some old traumas, the soldiers get their murderer and their revenge, an innocent young girl gains love, acceptance and some independence, while another gains freedom, and in pure Phryne fashion, everyone has a grand old time doing it! I absolutely love this series and would recommend it to anyone who loves the 20’s and likes a great diverting read! I’m getting close to the end so I have to save the next one until I can’t wait any longer! Enjoy!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Linda Baker

    Murder in Montparnasse takes us back to a time when Miss Fisher was more innocent and less worldly wise, despite her experience as an ambulance driver in WWI. Footloose in Paris, she is intimate with artistic and literary figures, earning her living as a much in demand artist's model, and generally enjoying her freedom. However, she meets a thoroughly evil individual named Rene DuBois and promptly falls for him. Despite warnings from her friends, Phyrne learns the hard way just how wicked Rene i Murder in Montparnasse takes us back to a time when Miss Fisher was more innocent and less worldly wise, despite her experience as an ambulance driver in WWI. Footloose in Paris, she is intimate with artistic and literary figures, earning her living as a much in demand artist's model, and generally enjoying her freedom. However, she meets a thoroughly evil individual named Rene DuBois and promptly falls for him. Despite warnings from her friends, Phyrne learns the hard way just how wicked Rene is. She escapes him, but the experience colors her memories of Paris ever after. Meantime, her future cronies in Australia, Cec and Bert, are also in Paris with five other soldiers. On a rowdy night, the seven soldiers witness a murder but are too drunk to do anything about it. Years later, two of the soldiers are dead in quick succession in Australia. The deaths are ruled accidents, but Cec and Bert know that can't be true. Phryne is working on another case, that of a kidnapped girl but also wants to help them. The intersection of the three cases brings about some rough Australian justice for all. I am reading the Miss Fisher Mysteries wildly out of order, but it seems to me that each one can be read as a stand-alone. No doubt it helps that I have seen all the episodes of the TV series. There are differences but nothing that is problematic, at least not for me. Each is a romp through a different time and place, with an unforgettable and unconventional heroine. I particularly enjoyed the integration of real historical figures like Djuna Barnes, Sylvia Beach, and Pablo Picasso. This Phryne Fisher story is a little darker than others I have read, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. Thanks to NetGalley and The Poisoned Pen for an advance digital copy. The opinions above are my own. RATING- 4 Stars

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Poisoned Pen Press for a review copy of Murder in Montparnasse, the twelfth outing for Phryne Fisher and her motley band of helpers set in 1928 Melbourne. Phryne has her hands full. M. Anatole, a French bistro owner, has asked her to try and discreetly find his missing fiancée, Bert and Cec, her communist taxi driving friends, have asked her to look into the recent, apparently accidental deaths of two of their close friends and the upcoming marriage of her para I would like to thank Netgalley and Poisoned Pen Press for a review copy of Murder in Montparnasse, the twelfth outing for Phryne Fisher and her motley band of helpers set in 1928 Melbourne. Phryne has her hands full. M. Anatole, a French bistro owner, has asked her to try and discreetly find his missing fiancée, Bert and Cec, her communist taxi driving friends, have asked her to look into the recent, apparently accidental deaths of two of their close friends and the upcoming marriage of her paramour, Lin Chung, is causing ructions in her household. As usual this is a fun read. Phryne cuts an impeccably dressed swathe through Melbourne as she pursues her enquiries although there is some sadness and many memories when her enquiries reveal the arrival in Australia of an old flame from her time in post war Paris. It is interesting to see Phryne in her younger days, ever unconventional and hedonistic, as it fills in some gaps in her history. The historical detail and characterisation are impeccable and interesting in their own right. The plot is not to be taken seriously but it is cleverly done and I admire Ms Greenwood ingenuity in keeping her plots fresh and inventive. I think her large cast of regular characters helps as it spreads the load. Phryne is never far away and is always the brains behind the investigation but a chapter here and there concentrating on the other characters' exploits gives the novel a broader perspective. I thoroughly enjoyed Murder in Montparnasse and have no hesitation in recommending it as a good read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Naty

    This review was originally posted at https://natysbookshelf.wordpress.com/ The Honorable Phryne Fisher isn’t your typical detective – she’s a sassy, smart and sophisticated private investigator. If you are new to her, her personality and lack of scruples might make you raise your eyebrows, and I particularly love it. Kerry Greenwood isn’t shy to address feminist concerns from 1928 that most times still apply for nowadays, and the irreverent Miss Fisher doesn’t measure words for it. With this book This review was originally posted at https://natysbookshelf.wordpress.com/ The Honorable Phryne Fisher isn’t your typical detective – she’s a sassy, smart and sophisticated private investigator. If you are new to her, her personality and lack of scruples might make you raise your eyebrows, and I particularly love it. Kerry Greenwood isn’t shy to address feminist concerns from 1928 that most times still apply for nowadays, and the irreverent Miss Fisher doesn’t measure words for it. With this book series, the main character is as important as the story: if you don’t like Miss Fisher, I doubt you will enjoy the mysteries. I love how romantic, decadent and interesting the setting of the books are, placed in Melbourne during the 1920s. In Murder in Montparnasse, there are a few storylines to follow: where is Elizabeth and who kidnapped her? Who is murdering Bert and Cec’s friends? Will Mr. and Mrs. Butler leave? Each storyline is independent from each other and are equally intriguing, in my opinion. There are a lot of flashbacks to Miss Fisher’s memories of Paris post-war. Although very interesting to see her background story as a young woman who served in the war, drove ambulances and was a muse for famous painters, the transition between present and past was a little to unclear and too frequent for me. It broke the rhythm of the story. I was, however, very pleased with the mysteries and their conclusions, loved Greenwood’s witty and sassy writing and the personality of each character. Despite being a light read, Greenwood doesn’t make light of serious issues at all and doesn’t romanticize poverty, abusive relationships and so on. And yet, that doesn’t make the reading heavy at all – just matter-of-fact. I really enjoyed that! The differences to the TV series rely on the characters as well as the plot: it’s like seeing an alternate universe of the episode with slightly different people and slightly different things going on. Phryne is younger in the books, Inspector Jack Robinson is a happily married man who doesn’t have a sharp jawline or smoldering looks, Hugh is a tall and strong young man, Mr. Butler has a wife who works in the house too, etc… I had a lot of fun with this novel, loved it a lot and this definitely convinced me to buy the books of my favorite stories from Miss Fisher. Veredict: I recommend this book very much! It was a fun and engaging read, Miss Fisher has a vibrant, sassy personality and the 1920s in Australia is a wonderful setting. If you’re interested in her novels, maybe start with another book though, as this one has many flashbacks to Phryne’s past, which is more interesting if you’re invested in the character already. Trigger warnings: abusive relationships, physical abuse. I don’t indicate it for a young audience.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    Reading this a second time, I liked it more; I think my theory the first time I read it that it’d lost some of its freshness because I’d been reading too many Phryne books in a row was probably true. It gives us a glimpse of a different Phryne, and the experiences that made her the person she was, covering her life in Paris just after the war, and that’s pretty interesting — you can see it informing the way she chooses her lovers in the present-day of the books, and how she really became tough a Reading this a second time, I liked it more; I think my theory the first time I read it that it’d lost some of its freshness because I’d been reading too many Phryne books in a row was probably true. It gives us a glimpse of a different Phryne, and the experiences that made her the person she was, covering her life in Paris just after the war, and that’s pretty interesting — you can see it informing the way she chooses her lovers in the present-day of the books, and how she really became tough as nails. It’s also nice because the book gives us a little more focus on Bert and Cec — a little more of a glimpse at their history and their bond, and some of their friends. Against that, the plot with the girl who was going to marry a chef feels very light, almost inconsequential. It does help keep the book moving along when there’s a lot of other emotions that could make it heavy-going, but it’s not memorable or especially interesting in itself. Reviewed for The Bibliophibian.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    We have another wonderful mystery featuring our favorite sleuth, Phryne Fisher. While Murder in Montparnasse is a cozy mystery, it also has such bittersweet events of memory for Phryne. There are several issues which are going on in Phryne’s life during this book. She has been asked to help locate a young woman who was betrothed to marriage, but is now missing. Bert and Cec have come to her for assistance in a matter of life or death. Five men remain of the seven comrades who were together in Par We have another wonderful mystery featuring our favorite sleuth, Phryne Fisher. While Murder in Montparnasse is a cozy mystery, it also has such bittersweet events of memory for Phryne. There are several issues which are going on in Phryne’s life during this book. She has been asked to help locate a young woman who was betrothed to marriage, but is now missing. Bert and Cec have come to her for assistance in a matter of life or death. Five men remain of the seven comrades who were together in Paris 1918 after the war. Two have died in suspicious circumstances and ...oh no are dying! What did Bert, Cec and the other men see or know which puts them at risk years later? And our Dear Phryne... as she is remembering her time during the war and directly after, I felt so much emotion for her. You will read of heartbreak and learn so much about her life that we never read before. Her time in the war services at such a young age driving the ambulance is so heroic. We learn about the mystery man of her youth, her lover, her abuser, and now the hunter and the hunted! And Phryne’s Lin Chung... The event in his life she has dreaded is about to happen. How will this change the dynamic of her life? If you are a fan of Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries this book is NOT to be missed! I found it very emotional and read it twice!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A fabulous book! I really enjoyed this one, it was riveting and engaging without being tiresome. A good book to distract me from some recent unpleasantness. It is definitely one of the better ones in the series. Finally Miss Fisher's mysterious events of Paris are uncovered, and how perfect for it to coincide with a recent case brought to her by the ever entertaining Bert and Cec. Mr Lin will be well missed though, but his new soon to be wife seems well enough, while the Mr Butler incident, I foun A fabulous book! I really enjoyed this one, it was riveting and engaging without being tiresome. A good book to distract me from some recent unpleasantness. It is definitely one of the better ones in the series. Finally Miss Fisher's mysterious events of Paris are uncovered, and how perfect for it to coincide with a recent case brought to her by the ever entertaining Bert and Cec. Mr Lin will be well missed though, but his new soon to be wife seems well enough, while the Mr Butler incident, I found was very fitting and a good inclusion to the overall story. The girls were lovely as always but Ember will always be my favourite character, next to Dot that is.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cybercrone

    Good read as always. Even the kids get involved in the hijinks this time.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Smyth

    Enjoyed this book good story and easy to listen to (audio book)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Neil Plakcy

    Another great outing for Phyrne Fisher, and I loved the way Greenwood tied in Paris after WW I.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andree

    3.5 stars. A fun read, but nothing spectacular. Did like Phrynne meeting Jack's wife and some of the descriptions of post-war Paris. That was fun. 3.5 stars. A fun read, but nothing spectacular. Did like Phrynne meeting Jack's wife and some of the descriptions of post-war Paris. That was fun.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    What a coup! Phryne's past collides with her future, her staff is in revolt and of course she is camiknickers deep in several Mysteries. A very well-written and exciting story of 1920's Australia to be sure! What a coup! Phryne's past collides with her future, her staff is in revolt and of course she is camiknickers deep in several Mysteries. A very well-written and exciting story of 1920's Australia to be sure!

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