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Death of a Pilgrim

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Praise for the Lord Powerscourt series: “Excellent.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review) “Dickinson textures his canvas with historical detail as thick as the oil paint on one of his favorite paintings by Turner.”—Kirkus Reviews 1905. A pilgrim is killed in Le Puy-en-Velay, France, and Lord Francis Powerscourt is summoned to investigate. More deaths plague pilgrims travelin Praise for the Lord Powerscourt series: “Excellent.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review) “Dickinson textures his canvas with historical detail as thick as the oil paint on one of his favorite paintings by Turner.”—Kirkus Reviews 1905. A pilgrim is killed in Le Puy-en-Velay, France, and Lord Francis Powerscourt is summoned to investigate. More deaths plague pilgrims traveling to Santiago de Compostela, Spain, before Powerscourt solves the murders. David Dickinson has an honors degree in classics from Cambridge. He is a BBC editor and the author of eight mysteries in the Lord Powerscourt series. He lives in Barnes, West London, United Kingdom.


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Praise for the Lord Powerscourt series: “Excellent.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review) “Dickinson textures his canvas with historical detail as thick as the oil paint on one of his favorite paintings by Turner.”—Kirkus Reviews 1905. A pilgrim is killed in Le Puy-en-Velay, France, and Lord Francis Powerscourt is summoned to investigate. More deaths plague pilgrims travelin Praise for the Lord Powerscourt series: “Excellent.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review) “Dickinson textures his canvas with historical detail as thick as the oil paint on one of his favorite paintings by Turner.”—Kirkus Reviews 1905. A pilgrim is killed in Le Puy-en-Velay, France, and Lord Francis Powerscourt is summoned to investigate. More deaths plague pilgrims traveling to Santiago de Compostela, Spain, before Powerscourt solves the murders. David Dickinson has an honors degree in classics from Cambridge. He is a BBC editor and the author of eight mysteries in the Lord Powerscourt series. He lives in Barnes, West London, United Kingdom.

30 review for Death of a Pilgrim

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Not bad but not good enough to make me go out of my way to get the others of the series. I didn't find any characters I could particularly like and most were thoroughly unpleasant. I found it interesting how many characters sought to make very commercial bargains with God buying their salvation. Also interesting were the parallel stories of gross selfishness that framed the motive for the murders. I won't say more because I don't want to be a spoiler. Not bad but not good enough to make me go out of my way to get the others of the series. I didn't find any characters I could particularly like and most were thoroughly unpleasant. I found it interesting how many characters sought to make very commercial bargains with God buying their salvation. Also interesting were the parallel stories of gross selfishness that framed the motive for the murders. I won't say more because I don't want to be a spoiler.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    Only resiliance that maybe it would improve keep me going, otherwise a long laborious read interspersed by another book halfway. If the key investigator was skilled in anyway then there wouldnt have been a story. No insights to the pleasant views,walking, food or countryside except long descriptions of a couple of religious buildings.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Spuddie

    I really had to slog through this one to finish it, and I can't tell why. I've enjoyed the other books in this series so far, but this one just didn't interest me much and found the writing and story to be rather boring. and skimming through parts of it. Not sure I will continue in the series, I'll probably get the next one from the library and start it and see how it goes. I really had to slog through this one to finish it, and I can't tell why. I've enjoyed the other books in this series so far, but this one just didn't interest me much and found the writing and story to be rather boring. and skimming through parts of it. Not sure I will continue in the series, I'll probably get the next one from the library and start it and see how it goes.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ty

    “My advice is very simple. Call off your pilgrimage. Go home, separately I should advise, once the police have completed their inquiries. Go home and see your loved ones. Go home safely for this gathering is currently one of the most dangerous places in Europe.” Pg 151

  5. 5 out of 5

    Beverley Cole

    Get passed the first couple of chapters. As soon as Lord P gets involved it's as usual a good read. Get passed the first couple of chapters. As soon as Lord P gets involved it's as usual a good read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    William

    I haven't been a big fan of this series, but I really enjoyed this book. I haven't been a big fan of this series, but I really enjoyed this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A return to form. A completely bonkers set up and no boring real history.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Janine

    A group goes on a pilgrimage to Europe, but there are a number of deaths occurring whilst abroad. The book had you guessing right up to when the killer was revealed. A good novel.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Becky Rippel

    It was wonderful. In 2011 Helmut and I visited his cousin in Gingen, Germany. In one of their parks, they had made a miniature walk of the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela which goes through Gingen. Although this book starts their pilgrimage in Le Puy in France, it was very interesting to read about the route and customs. At the parks visitor's center, they sell pottery shells as mementos of your walk and the shell is the symbol of the pilgrimage. The book opens with the illness of James Dela It was wonderful. In 2011 Helmut and I visited his cousin in Gingen, Germany. In one of their parks, they had made a miniature walk of the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela which goes through Gingen. Although this book starts their pilgrimage in Le Puy in France, it was very interesting to read about the route and customs. At the parks visitor's center, they sell pottery shells as mementos of your walk and the shell is the symbol of the pilgrimage. The book opens with the illness of James Delaney, only son and surviving family member of the very wealthy Michael Delaney. During his deathbed watch, Michael returns to his Catholic upbringing and notices a picture of Saint James the Greater, who was a disciple and martyr. According to legend, his body was taken to the coast of Spain in a stone boat. When it was discovered centuries later, St. James became the patron saint of Spain. During the Middle Ages it became one of the most popular pilgrimage destinations in the known world. James Delaney did not die and in his honor, his father arranged a pilgrimage from LePuy, France to Santiago de Compostla for all Delaneys in the world. While the pilgrims got to LePuy without mishap, one of them was missing. During dinner the second night his body was brought to the hotel for identification. The police confined all pilgrims to the hotel and began a lengthy investigation. After hiring Lord Powerscourt, they were finally released and escorted to the next town on their way. Unfortunately, another body appears and in the next town still another body. Hysteria reigns! Why are they being murdered one by one? Using resources in the U.S., Ireland and England, Powerscourt and his wife, Lucy, gather all the background they can find. The culprit is finally discovered when Powerscourt is caught in the Bull Run in Pamplona!! This is an exciting read from start to finish!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Ellis

    American multimillionaire Michael Delaney organizes a family pilgrimage through France to Spain to show his thanks for the miraculous healing of his son. Delaneys from America, England, and Ireland are brought together, and immediately upon arrival in France, John Delaney is murdered. His is only the first of several murders accomplished before Lord Francis Powerscourt, his wife Lucy, and his friend Johnny Fitzgerald manage to discover the murderer. I thought this was great fun, for lack of a be American multimillionaire Michael Delaney organizes a family pilgrimage through France to Spain to show his thanks for the miraculous healing of his son. Delaneys from America, England, and Ireland are brought together, and immediately upon arrival in France, John Delaney is murdered. His is only the first of several murders accomplished before Lord Francis Powerscourt, his wife Lucy, and his friend Johnny Fitzgerald manage to discover the murderer. I thought this was great fun, for lack of a better term, even though the reviews were not quite as enthusiastic as those for his previous books. I love the characters and the way the author is able to transport the reader to the early 20th Century.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    A wealthy Irish American robber baron wants to give thanks, and does so by sponsoring a pilgrimage to Compostela for his relatives. Unfortunately, one of the pilgrims is killed almost immediately, so Michael Delaney hires Lord Francis Powerscourt. As the killings continue, Francis becomes more and more convinced that the crimes have their roots in the past, but nobody's talking about the family's past. 1909 setting, full of evocative descriptions. A wealthy Irish American robber baron wants to give thanks, and does so by sponsoring a pilgrimage to Compostela for his relatives. Unfortunately, one of the pilgrims is killed almost immediately, so Michael Delaney hires Lord Francis Powerscourt. As the killings continue, Francis becomes more and more convinced that the crimes have their roots in the past, but nobody's talking about the family's past. 1909 setting, full of evocative descriptions.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Lord Francis Powerscourt is a former Army intelligence officer who is now a private investigator. In this book, a wealthy American tycoon arranges a family pilgrimage to give thanks for saving his son's life. While I enjoy this series, Dickinson's books are not easy reads. They have a lot of description and detail and I think of them as heavy going. I like Francis, his wife, and his best friend. But a lot of the other people in this book were not particularly likeable. Lord Francis Powerscourt is a former Army intelligence officer who is now a private investigator. In this book, a wealthy American tycoon arranges a family pilgrimage to give thanks for saving his son's life. While I enjoy this series, Dickinson's books are not easy reads. They have a lot of description and detail and I think of them as heavy going. I like Francis, his wife, and his best friend. But a lot of the other people in this book were not particularly likeable.

  13. 5 out of 5

    ShanDizzy

    I'm glad that I FINALLY finished this story. It wasn't the best LFP case to read through, I think because one of the prominent characters was too smarmy and greedy for my taste. But I know I'll finish the series. I'm glad that I FINALLY finished this story. It wasn't the best LFP case to read through, I think because one of the prominent characters was too smarmy and greedy for my taste. But I know I'll finish the series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heather Lee

    This is an interesting detective series set in the early 1900's. one of my favorite series. This is an interesting detective series set in the early 1900's. one of my favorite series.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carol Kerry-green

    Ater a slow start, this book picked up, though I felt it dragged a little. Still I will look out for more Lord Francis Powerscourt books

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mary G.

    David Dickinson is one of my yearly must reads. This story was interesting because of a more up to date perspective of pilgrimages. The mystery was fun along with my favorite characters.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Hearn

    A good story with an interesting few twists. I did find myself confused among the characters periodically so I might have missed some clues, which made me feel a bit aggrieved at the end.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cece

    Much better than the last. We were in France and Spain, not Ireland. The mystery was again the most important part-not the politics of the author.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    Of the ones in the series I've read (4), this is easily the poorest. Maybe a bit over 1 star, but not much. Slopping writing and really poor plotting. Someone is getting laaaazy. Of the ones in the series I've read (4), this is easily the poorest. Maybe a bit over 1 star, but not much. Slopping writing and really poor plotting. Someone is getting laaaazy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joss

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fran

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alanna

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Eaton

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  26. 4 out of 5

    Julie Kaufman

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Chantler

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gary King

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mary Beth

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

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