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A hilarious and heartwarming rampage through the world of self-care Marianne Power was a self-help junkie. For years she lined her bookshelves with dog-eared copies of definitive guide after definitive guide on how to live your best life. Yet one day she woke up to find that the life she dreamed of and the life she was living were not miles but continents apart. So she set A hilarious and heartwarming rampage through the world of self-care Marianne Power was a self-help junkie. For years she lined her bookshelves with dog-eared copies of definitive guide after definitive guide on how to live your best life. Yet one day she woke up to find that the life she dreamed of and the life she was living were not miles but continents apart. So she set out to make a change. Or, actually, to make every change. Marianne decided to finally find out if her elusive perfect life—the one without debt, anxiety, hangovers or Netflix marathons, the one where she healthily bounced around town with perfect teeth to meet the cashmere-sweater-wearing man of her dreams—lay in the pages of those books. So for a year she vowed to test a book a month, following its advice to the letter, taking the surest road she knew to a perfect Marianne. As her year-long plan turned into a demented roller coaster where everything she knew was turned upside down, she found herself confronted with a different question: Self-help can change your life, but is it for the better?


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A hilarious and heartwarming rampage through the world of self-care Marianne Power was a self-help junkie. For years she lined her bookshelves with dog-eared copies of definitive guide after definitive guide on how to live your best life. Yet one day she woke up to find that the life she dreamed of and the life she was living were not miles but continents apart. So she set A hilarious and heartwarming rampage through the world of self-care Marianne Power was a self-help junkie. For years she lined her bookshelves with dog-eared copies of definitive guide after definitive guide on how to live your best life. Yet one day she woke up to find that the life she dreamed of and the life she was living were not miles but continents apart. So she set out to make a change. Or, actually, to make every change. Marianne decided to finally find out if her elusive perfect life—the one without debt, anxiety, hangovers or Netflix marathons, the one where she healthily bounced around town with perfect teeth to meet the cashmere-sweater-wearing man of her dreams—lay in the pages of those books. So for a year she vowed to test a book a month, following its advice to the letter, taking the surest road she knew to a perfect Marianne. As her year-long plan turned into a demented roller coaster where everything she knew was turned upside down, she found herself confronted with a different question: Self-help can change your life, but is it for the better?

30 review for Help Me!: One Woman’s Quest to Find Out if Self-Help Really Can Change Her Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Esil

    3.75 stars In an odd way, this memoir reminded me of a Sophie Kinsella novel — in a good way. Marianne Power recounts her year of living according to a different self help book each month. Each book contains a different set of instructions: do one thing that scares you every day, get a handle on your debts and finances, say f*ck it and do what feels good, find your personal angel, seek out rejection from one person each day, etc... The concept seems designed for a lot of humour. But it turns out 3.75 stars In an odd way, this memoir reminded me of a Sophie Kinsella novel — in a good way. Marianne Power recounts her year of living according to a different self help book each month. Each book contains a different set of instructions: do one thing that scares you every day, get a handle on your debts and finances, say f*ck it and do what feels good, find your personal angel, seek out rejection from one person each day, etc... The concept seems designed for a lot of humour. But it turns out to be a bit more complicated than a lighthearted poke at self help books. Which gets me back to the Kinsella style heroine. Power approaches her task with humour, but also with a fair bit of sincerity. I laughed but was left with some food for thought. Do self help books make people too self-centered? Is there any way in which advice books can be helpful? It depends on the book and the person is the pretty obvious answer. But Power’s sincerity and self-deprecating humour made it worth the ride. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for an opportunity to read an advance copy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Help Me! is an effervescent and thoughtful look at self help and why we crave it, based on author Marianne Power's attempt to spend a year following a different self help book or idea each month. I thought Help Me! was going to be a fairly dry account of various self help books because even though the jacket/marketing information says it's funny--well. Big pinch of salt, right? Turns out Help Me! really is funny--it reminded me, at many points, of Bridget Jones's Diary, with our heroine, Ms. Power Help Me! is an effervescent and thoughtful look at self help and why we crave it, based on author Marianne Power's attempt to spend a year following a different self help book or idea each month. I thought Help Me! was going to be a fairly dry account of various self help books because even though the jacket/marketing information says it's funny--well. Big pinch of salt, right? Turns out Help Me! really is funny--it reminded me, at many points, of Bridget Jones's Diary, with our heroine, Ms. Power, finding herself with all her friends having "proper" homes and lives while she's a paycheck-to-overdraft thirty-something freelance journalist who pays way too much rent for a basement flat where she spends most of her weekends watching reality tv, drinking wine, and vowing to get herself in better shape physically, financially, and emotionally. And she has a weakness for self help books. So, after one such weekend, she decides to actually try using one of those self help books. Better yet, she decides, twelve, one for every month for a year. So from facing her fears--running from parallel parking to nude modeling--to embracing rejection, to organizing her finances, to trying to date more, and yes, embracing everything from Tony Robbins to The Secret to the F*ck It movement, she's off on a journey to better herself. The results are genuinely funny in places--her no-nonsense mother's reactions to her attempts are especially amusing--and surprisingly thoughtful in others (her realization that all her attempts at self improvement have turned her into more than a bit of a navel gazing ass) The inevitable moment when she realizes that all the self help she's doing can't stave off, and may in fact be increasing, a bout of depression is eloquent and moving. The results of her self help experiment are pretty much what you'd expect, but it's done with such cheekiness and candor (Ms. Power manages to poke just as much, if not more, fun at herself than at some of the more out there self help methods) that it's a real pleasure to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amy Bruestle

    This book was given to me through a giveaway in exchange for an honest review... All I’m going to say is....I am seriously surprised that I was able to make it through to the end of this book. The concept was interesting, but way to repetitive and quite boring.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Outwardly Marianne Power’s life was fine, but deep down she felt unhappy and unfulfilled. An Irish freelance journalist living in London, she was 36 and single. “There has to be more than just working and paying bills and buying crap we don’t need,” she felt. She’d been an obsessive reader of self-help books for years – Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway inspired her to leave her temp job at age 24 – but she realized that she’d never implemented most of the books’ lessons. So instead of just reading Outwardly Marianne Power’s life was fine, but deep down she felt unhappy and unfulfilled. An Irish freelance journalist living in London, she was 36 and single. “There has to be more than just working and paying bills and buying crap we don’t need,” she felt. She’d been an obsessive reader of self-help books for years – Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway inspired her to leave her temp job at age 24 – but she realized that she’d never implemented most of the books’ lessons. So instead of just reading self-help, she set out to do self-help, one book per month, for a year (though it ended up being longer) to see if she could truly change her life. January was a baptism of fire. Jumping in with that old favorite, Jeffers’s Feel the Fear, Power listed things she was afraid of and then did one per day: an outdoor swim on New Year’s Day, nude modeling for an art class, parallel parking, standup comedy, and skydiving. In subsequent months she tackled her disastrous finances (Money, A Love Story), tested out the law of attraction (The Secret), practiced lots of rejection therapy, worked on relinquishing control (F**k It), attended a Tony Robbins “Unleash the Power Within” seminar, and imagined what she’d want said at her funeral (The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People). There came a point in the year when Power had to admit she was physically rundown and emotionally shattered. Months spent focusing on herself had alienated her from friends and family – even her mum, a wonderfully matter-of-fact character who believes in just getting on with life instead of moaning about it. A trio of truly useful books (The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle, Daring Greatly by Brené Brown and You Can Heal Your Life by Louise Hay) started to turn the tide, helping Power counter negative thoughts with positive affirmations and reminding her that self-help is futile because you can never go it alone. Being with other people who understand you, volunteering and exercise: these are the things that really help. I have a particular weakness for year-challenge books, and Power’s is written in an easy, chatty style, as if Bridget Jones had given over her diary to testing self-help books for 16 months (“Do a budget, make a plan. Two phrases that made me break into a cold sweat”). If I have one tiny complaint, it’s that I might have liked a little more context on the books she chose. Help Me! is self-deprecating and relatable, with some sweary Irish swagger thrown in. I can recommend it to self-help junkies and skeptics alike. Favorite passage: “The dangerous expectation that can be created by self-help books is that if you’re not walking around like a cross between Mary Poppins, Buddha and Jesus every day you’re doing it wrong. You must try harder. … The higher I was setting my standards the more I was feeling like a failure.” (I also loved the pep talk from a taxi driver who got depressed when doing a PhD on Thomas Hardy!) Full disclosure: Marianne and I are Facebook friends and she arranged for me to be sent a proof copy of Help Me! Originally published on my blog, Bookish Beck.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Allison

    I loved this book. I’m not a self help reader but this really struck a chord with me and my generations’ hopeless pursuit of perfection. Laugh and cried throughout but what a great read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Suad Shamma

    I really enjoyed reading this book, way more than I thought I would. The reason I bought it in the first place was because of my severe dislike of self-help, life-coaching books. I've said this many times in the past, but I find self-help books useless, and just a marketing tactic to for people to make money based on BS that anyone can come up with. Self-help books is an easy way out for average, non-skilled writers, to publish books. I don't believe that you need a "book" to help you find happi I really enjoyed reading this book, way more than I thought I would. The reason I bought it in the first place was because of my severe dislike of self-help, life-coaching books. I've said this many times in the past, but I find self-help books useless, and just a marketing tactic to for people to make money based on BS that anyone can come up with. Self-help books is an easy way out for average, non-skilled writers, to publish books. I don't believe that you need a "book" to help you find happiness and positivity and peace in your life. Your whole life is a series of experiences, good and bad, you have to fail to experience success, and what one person experiences or gets out of a situation, is completely different than what another would. No two people will ever get the same result or outcome, so these books - they're a waste of time. Now, what I loved about this book? Marianne proved me right! This is actually a "self-help" book in a very indirect way. Marianne, who has hit rock bottom in her life, decides to resort to self-help books to "heal" her. She decides to read one self-help book a month for a year, and follow every single instruction and advice given. What it does, is it ends up messing her up a lot more than when she had started. She becomes so caught up with herself that she pushes the closest people to her away. The conclusion at the end, in fact, is that she never really needed self-help books. She just needed to learn to accept herself, and love herself, as she is, and rely on those around her to pick her up when she's down. Another thing I really enjoyed about this book is the way it was written. It reads like a chick-lit almost (minus the romance), making it a really easy-to-read book. Very well written, and very enjoyable! Probably the only "self-help" book I'd ever recommend!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Forsyth

    Marianne Power has written a real winner here - completely charming and unfailingly relatable. I found myself smiling through most of the book, and even laughed out loud several times (sorry fellow public transit riders). There’s real heart here too, about love and friendship and family, that escalated the whole thing out of the zany Bridget Jones territory. I’m not sure I’ll ever read THE POWER OF NOW, but this book does an excellent job separating the useful from the snake oil salespeople, and Marianne Power has written a real winner here - completely charming and unfailingly relatable. I found myself smiling through most of the book, and even laughed out loud several times (sorry fellow public transit riders). There’s real heart here too, about love and friendship and family, that escalated the whole thing out of the zany Bridget Jones territory. I’m not sure I’ll ever read THE POWER OF NOW, but this book does an excellent job separating the useful from the snake oil salespeople, and for that alone, I’d recommend it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Katie P.

    I adored every second of this book! Heartwarming, endearing, occasionally gutting, and utterly relatable. Marianne Power holds nothing back and invites the reader on every euphoric high and devastating low on her self-help journey. Inspiring and eye-opening.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cassidy (Reminders of the Changing Time)

    Review available at https://bit.ly/2Ug3P9j Review available at https://bit.ly/2Ug3P9j

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ameema Saeed

    This was a very enjoyable read. It read very much like the Bridget Jones of self-help books, with a funny, self-deprecating main character, who gets herself into awkward and hilarious situations. Charming and unashamedly self-aware, this book was much more thoughtful and emotionally resonant than I originally thought it would be. I found myself cheering on Marianne as she put herself out there, and worked hard on her “self”, but I also found myself groaning out loud, during her many missteps. I This was a very enjoyable read. It read very much like the Bridget Jones of self-help books, with a funny, self-deprecating main character, who gets herself into awkward and hilarious situations. Charming and unashamedly self-aware, this book was much more thoughtful and emotionally resonant than I originally thought it would be. I found myself cheering on Marianne as she put herself out there, and worked hard on her “self”, but I also found myself groaning out loud, during her many missteps. I had a lot of fun with this one, and I think you will too!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Haylz

    I read this book in one sitting and it’s the first time in ages I’ve thought you know what it’s okay to be me? A little bit messed up but working on it I’m so glad this book was written and the author for putting her story out there it helped a lot!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lgordo

    Frothy beach read. Basically a self-depricating "did something weird for a year so I could write a book" genre memoir. I didn't actually finish it because the "fuck it" chapter reminded me that I had "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck" to read instead. Frothy beach read. Basically a self-depricating "did something weird for a year so I could write a book" genre memoir. I didn't actually finish it because the "fuck it" chapter reminded me that I had "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck" to read instead.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Not usually a fan of nonfiction, but enjoy a good Sophie Kinsella book? This book might be a perfect fit! Marianne Power brings to mind some of Kinsella's characters, though of course in this case, it's all true. Power decides to finally put to use the advice in the self help books she loves, actually acting on the advice and not just thinking about it. Each month focuses on one book and we get to follow along as she puts the advice to use. Some advice "works" for her while other advice is less Not usually a fan of nonfiction, but enjoy a good Sophie Kinsella book? This book might be a perfect fit! Marianne Power brings to mind some of Kinsella's characters, though of course in this case, it's all true. Power decides to finally put to use the advice in the self help books she loves, actually acting on the advice and not just thinking about it. Each month focuses on one book and we get to follow along as she puts the advice to use. Some advice "works" for her while other advice is less successful. The author shares her experiences, both good and bad, in an honest and entertaining way. Well worth giving this one a chance! Thank you to Grove Atlantic and NetGalley for the opportunity to read this fun book in exchange for my honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Pesta

    This book was enlightening, refreshing and fun to read. Marianne takes us on a journey through her experience through 12 different self help books, and shows us how she changes after reading them. I appreciated her honesty about the selfishness of the self help world, and about a lot of the ridiculous things she put herself through. Her writing was funny and frank and I loved hearing about her experiences.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gali

    I saw quite a lot of potential going into this book and it should have been right up my alley but the writing style frustrated me quite a few times and made me skip over whole sections. No deep revelations from the author, not for herself and not for her readers, but I don't know why I expected some to happen... I saw quite a lot of potential going into this book and it should have been right up my alley but the writing style frustrated me quite a few times and made me skip over whole sections. No deep revelations from the author, not for herself and not for her readers, but I don't know why I expected some to happen...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Loved Marianne’s voice and humour and honesty. Read it in a couple of days. Laughed out loud a number of times. A great read for anyone who has ever dipped a toe into the world of self help.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    In her mid-thirties, journalist Marianne Power finds herself suffering from a pervasive unhappiness with her life. It’s not that life is bad - she has a job, a family, friends. But she’s chronically single, doesn’t have her own home and her finances are a mess. A long-term reader (if not follower) of self help books, Marianne challenges herself to not only read them - one per month - but do everything they say... in order to see how her life changes as a result. It all starts off well enough - Mar In her mid-thirties, journalist Marianne Power finds herself suffering from a pervasive unhappiness with her life. It’s not that life is bad - she has a job, a family, friends. But she’s chronically single, doesn’t have her own home and her finances are a mess. A long-term reader (if not follower) of self help books, Marianne challenges herself to not only read them - one per month - but do everything they say... in order to see how her life changes as a result. It all starts off well enough - Marianne pushes herself out of her comfort zone by (among other things) performing stand-up comedy and doing a parachute jump, inspired by Susan Jeffers’ classic Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway. The following month she finally starts to get a grip on her disastrous finances, courtesy of Kate But after that things start to get a bit stranger. Dabbling in Rhonda Byrne’s The Secret, Marianne expresses perfectly what many of us probably think (that it’s clearly an old load of utter rubbish, but...... what if it isn’t?). (Spoiler: it is. Setting goals is fine but sticking a label over the display on your scales showing the weight you want to be isn’t, in the absence of any actual effort, going to make a lot of difference.) Moving on (via Tony Robbins, angels, F**k It, The Power of Now and more), it turns out to be a year which will severely challenge her relationships, her finances and her self image. Marianne’s life is changing, certainly, but is it for the better? Where on earth will it all end? There’s a very real danger that self-help addicts can become self-obsessed and at risk of disappearing into their own navels. First world problems, and all that. Fortunately Marianne has her mum on hand, who’s always ready with a pithy reality check. (I loved Marianne’s mum, she was great.) Help Me is written in a very honest and engaging style. It’s not quite what I expected - a neat month-by-month foray into various categories of self help - perhaps unsurprisingly, it all goes a bit more haywire than that. But it’s never less than highly entertaining. And informative. And eye-opening, at times. A great read. By the way, while stalkerishly googling Marianne Power (I wanted to know what she looks like - she’s lovely), I stumbled upon a YouTube video of her speech to the Camberley Toastmasters. Worth a look!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Six reasons this book on audio gets 5*s. 1. It’s funny. Much of the humour comes from The author’s ability to laugh at herself. If you’re writing about developing self-awareness, you’d be forgiven for thinking this crucial, yet many self-help books are so po-faced it’s like ploughing through porridge. 2. It’s interesting. Marianne Power is intelligent; for all her susceptibility to self-help books, she can spot a ludicrous premise. She thinks The Secret is silly and she’s right. 3. It’s a standalo Six reasons this book on audio gets 5*s. 1. It’s funny. Much of the humour comes from The author’s ability to laugh at herself. If you’re writing about developing self-awareness, you’d be forgiven for thinking this crucial, yet many self-help books are so po-faced it’s like ploughing through porridge. 2. It’s interesting. Marianne Power is intelligent; for all her susceptibility to self-help books, she can spot a ludicrous premise. She thinks The Secret is silly and she’s right. 3. It’s a standalone read so no previous self-help-book experience is needed. I’ve written books in a similar genre (though about specific topics like anxiety and the menopause) so I’ve read most of the books Marianne tries to live by but as most on her list have sold in their millions, the odds are you’ll be familiar with at least one too. But even if you haven’t read any, Marianne’s take is helpful. She provides a good summary of each approach which will save wading through the difficult or daft books she tries out and she is far from dismissive of several titles. Her insights are savvy and perceptive. 4. She is honest. Sometimes brutally so. This means ‘Help Me’ is deeper than and more moving than I’ll admit I expected from the brightly coloured cover and some of the other reviews. Marianne Power writes about having a major depressive episode which makes the book much more than just a comic memoir. It will resonate with others who’ve suffered from bouts of poor mental health and I’m sure will prove useful to those caught up in anxiety or depression right now. 5. Help Me is heartwarming, without being twee. The emphasis on friendships and their importance to Marianne is refreshing and, in my experience, bang on. 6. It’s narrated by the author, with interjections from her mum. The mother/daughter relationship added to the intimacy of the audio experience and I relished the short shrift her mother gave to some of Marianne’s more self-indulgent musings. Clearly they’re close but not cloyingly so. In summary, I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Steph ✨

    "I'm just tired,' I said. Tired. How many times had I said that word when I didn't know what else to say? When I didn't know how to say I'm lost, I'm scared, I'm lonely, I feel like I'm losing it...?" - @marianne_power_writer 🌙 Thank you so much to @tandemcollectiveuk for bringing this book to my attention. With your Readalong, I probably would have missed this one completely. Help Me is following Marianne Power on a journey of self discovery through self help books. You see the highs and lows tha "I'm just tired,' I said. Tired. How many times had I said that word when I didn't know what else to say? When I didn't know how to say I'm lost, I'm scared, I'm lonely, I feel like I'm losing it...?" - @marianne_power_writer 🌙 Thank you so much to @tandemcollectiveuk for bringing this book to my attention. With your Readalong, I probably would have missed this one completely. Help Me is following Marianne Power on a journey of self discovery through self help books. You see the highs and lows that following these books can bring through this fascinating, hilarious but also heartbreaking story. I absolutely fell in love with this book. Never has something related to me so much in my life. I had the toughest year last year with my mental health and this book has come at the best time for me. I found myself frustrated (sorry my love) with some of the decisions Marianne was making with her journey and but I also fully respected her dedication and how self-aware she became. I feel like I've been on this huge journey with her (without throwing myself out of a plane or jumping into a lake naked) and it has honestly cleared my head a lot. Its given me so much to think about. I would highly recommend this book, especially to those around my age (late twenties, early-mid thirties) and those of you who have been struggling a lot with mental health, self care, and self discovery. Huge 5 stars from me! Thank you, Marianne, for writing such an amazing, through provoking and eye opening book. You're an angel, and I wish you all the best for the future ❤️✨

  20. 4 out of 5

    Niamh

    I was very kindly given an e-ARC of this book through Netgalley and Picador publishing in exchange for an honest review. It's a self-help book about self-help. This paradox of a book is actually a very sweet, very honest take on how self-help can often not be worth the paper it's printed on, but in some cases can make you take a sincere look at your life and consider what you need to do. It talks frankly about depression and mental illness, in particular how the voice in your head can tell you c I was very kindly given an e-ARC of this book through Netgalley and Picador publishing in exchange for an honest review. It's a self-help book about self-help. This paradox of a book is actually a very sweet, very honest take on how self-help can often not be worth the paper it's printed on, but in some cases can make you take a sincere look at your life and consider what you need to do. It talks frankly about depression and mental illness, in particular how the voice in your head can tell you constant lies that gives you unhealthy behaviours and actions. It's something I'm endlessly guilty of, and to read someone elses account of it and put it into words was very cathartic for me. Power jumps between moments of grand wisdom, to more intimate moments considering her relationships with her friends and family. I don't think I've ever read a book- fiction or non fiction- that so accurately appears to portray depression and a negative brain in the way I have experienced. This is a really interesting read and I hope others pick it up when it's published. 'Help Me! One Woman's Quest to Find Out if Self-Help Really Can Change Her Life' is published by Picador and will be released in the UK on September 6th, 2018.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chantal Côté

    3 stars Finding myself in need of self-help, I picked this book in my ever growing TBR. What better way as I will get a glimpse of 12 self-help books, I told myself.. « But self-help is a business - a big one. And it’s selling the same thing that clothes companies, food companies and booze companies are: happiness. » At approximately half of this book, I stopped believing this was a true story, when the author went on a retreat in a Italy... Also, when she paid for multiple days of conference with 3 stars Finding myself in need of self-help, I picked this book in my ever growing TBR. What better way as I will get a glimpse of 12 self-help books, I told myself.. « But self-help is a business - a big one. And it’s selling the same thing that clothes companies, food companies and booze companies are: happiness. » At approximately half of this book, I stopped believing this was a true story, when the author went on a retreat in a Italy... Also, when she paid for multiple days of conference with Guru Anthony Robbins. From then on, it became a hard read. Did the author really apply the concepts she learned? I don’t think so. It started great but then she stopped believing and so did I. She just gave up and it miraculously led her to a happier life? I’ll let you find out on your own... Reading her note at the end, I did doubt she really lived it with no embellishment for a book deal... One good thing though she made me realize is no matter how many self-help bookshop you read, they all say the same and yes, it is a huge business! Unless you want an opinion on self-help books, I would not recommend. On to the next...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Candice

    I cannot even say how much I enjoyed this book. It is relevant, insightful, funny, honest and bold. I loved getting glimpses into twelve different self help programs, I loved getting to see how they impacted Marianne and most of all, I loved her brutal honesty in how her life changed (good and bad) as she gave them all her best try. I found myself moving back and forth between inspired and reflective - really considering how the different self help books I've dabbled in in the past have impacted I cannot even say how much I enjoyed this book. It is relevant, insightful, funny, honest and bold. I loved getting glimpses into twelve different self help programs, I loved getting to see how they impacted Marianne and most of all, I loved her brutal honesty in how her life changed (good and bad) as she gave them all her best try. I found myself moving back and forth between inspired and reflective - really considering how the different self help books I've dabbled in in the past have impacted me. I think this is a really incredible perspective on the entire self help industry as a whole, and a refreshing view on how self help can be truly motivating, and equally destroying if not wielded carefully. A must read for anyone who has every dived into self help looking to improve their lives.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    All the stars. This book is everything. Highly recommended to fans of self-help, but anyone who enjoys stories with heroines who are vivacious, haphazard, a little frustrating, but so lovable she feels like your best friend. Fans of Confessions of a Shopaholic, Bridget Jones, and Douglas Coupland's Eleanor Rigby will adore this. (I received an ARC) All the stars. This book is everything. Highly recommended to fans of self-help, but anyone who enjoys stories with heroines who are vivacious, haphazard, a little frustrating, but so lovable she feels like your best friend. Fans of Confessions of a Shopaholic, Bridget Jones, and Douglas Coupland's Eleanor Rigby will adore this. (I received an ARC)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Malie

    This book surprised me. Recommended by a friend, it looked like a fun, funny read that I might be able to identify with (as someone who’s often on a quest for self-improvement myself). And it is that, mostly, but it has surprising depth, and her breathtaking honesty lifts this for me above the usual ‘a year of’ type books.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    First part was great - funny, with lots of ideas, fresh. The next one... "I am so poor, I hate myself, noone likes me" almost all the time. It should be ended after 200 pages - it would be really great part of reading. First part was great - funny, with lots of ideas, fresh. The next one... "I am so poor, I hate myself, noone likes me" almost all the time. It should be ended after 200 pages - it would be really great part of reading.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christine Dober

    I had hoped this would be funnier than it was. At times the tone was a bit too “Bridget Jones” for me. I did appreciate the author’s honesty and willingness to share the hard times she endured during this experiment.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anya

    I started reading that book because I have always been interested in self-help books but never properly read one of them. I'm not just that much into non fiction in general, and I don't like to spend time reading a whole book just to get a couple of maybe-enlightening phrases. So this book was perfect for me. The author, Marianne Power, wrote some sort of auto biography about her reading and really practising twelve self help books. I was really interested in knowing how did it worked out in the I started reading that book because I have always been interested in self-help books but never properly read one of them. I'm not just that much into non fiction in general, and I don't like to spend time reading a whole book just to get a couple of maybe-enlightening phrases. So this book was perfect for me. The author, Marianne Power, wrote some sort of auto biography about her reading and really practising twelve self help books. I was really interested in knowing how did it worked out in the end! So I have two different comments on the book. One, on the book itself: it was entertaining, easy to read, funny and unputdownable even while being non fiction which I usually don't like to read. The second comment is on the self help thing per se. I still don't know if self help books are for me or not... was the author better than before she began that crazy trip inside hersef? Probably yes, she was feeling better with herself, and thus being happier, but what a nightmare it was to get there! I don't know if I would ever do it! Luckily I'm quite at ease with myself already! Anyway, you have courage Marianne Power, a lot!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    A funny and insightful look at what self help books can or rather cannot do for you!!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten M Mead

    I loved this book at first...then didn’t...then finished loving it. It summed up what I’d been trying to decide for myself about self help for the longest time so well! Worth a read, for sure!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Very good! Highly recommend!!

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