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Hitmen for hire, drugs for sale. Inside the dangerous world that lurks beneath the bright, friendly light of your internet screen. Dark... A kingpin willing to murder to protect his dark web drug empire. A corrupt government official determined to avoid exposure. The death of a dark web drugs czar in mysterious circumstances in a Bangkok jail cell, just as the author arrives Hitmen for hire, drugs for sale. Inside the dangerous world that lurks beneath the bright, friendly light of your internet screen. Dark... A kingpin willing to murder to protect his dark web drug empire. A corrupt government official determined to avoid exposure. The death of a dark web drugs czar in mysterious circumstances in a Bangkok jail cell, just as the author arrives there. Who is Variety Jones and why have darknet markets ballooned tenfold since authorities shut down the original dark web drugs bazaar, Silk Road? Who are the kingpins willing to sell poisons and weapons, identities and bank accounts, malware and life-ruining services online to anyone with a wallet full of Bitcoin? Darker… A death in Minnesota leads detectives into the world of dark web murder-for-hire where hundreds of thousands of dollars in Bitcoin is paid to arrange killings, beatings and rapes. Meanwhile, the owner of the most successful hitman website in history is threatening the journalists who investigate his business with a visit from his operatives - and the author is at the top of his list. Darkest… People with the most depraved perversions gather to share their obscene materials in an almost inaccessible corner of the dark web. A video circulates and the pursuit of the monsters responsible for 'Daisy's Destruction' lead detectives into the unimaginable horror of the world of hurtcore. There's the world wide web - the internet we all know that connects us via news, email, forums, shopping and social media. Then there's the dark web - the parallel internet accessed by only a select few. Usually, those it connects wish to remain anonymous and for good reason. Eileen Ormsby has spent the past five years exploring every corner of the Dark Web. She has shopped on darknet markets, contributed to forums, waited in red rooms and been threatened by hitmen on murder-for-hire sites. On occasions, her dark web activities have poured out into the real world and she has attended trials, met with criminals and the law enforcement who tracked them down, interviewed dark web identities and visited them in prison. This book will take you into the murkiest depths of the web's dark underbelly: a place of hitmen for hire, red rooms, hurtcore sites and markets that will sell anything a person is willing to pay for - including another person. The Darkest Web.


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Hitmen for hire, drugs for sale. Inside the dangerous world that lurks beneath the bright, friendly light of your internet screen. Dark... A kingpin willing to murder to protect his dark web drug empire. A corrupt government official determined to avoid exposure. The death of a dark web drugs czar in mysterious circumstances in a Bangkok jail cell, just as the author arrives Hitmen for hire, drugs for sale. Inside the dangerous world that lurks beneath the bright, friendly light of your internet screen. Dark... A kingpin willing to murder to protect his dark web drug empire. A corrupt government official determined to avoid exposure. The death of a dark web drugs czar in mysterious circumstances in a Bangkok jail cell, just as the author arrives there. Who is Variety Jones and why have darknet markets ballooned tenfold since authorities shut down the original dark web drugs bazaar, Silk Road? Who are the kingpins willing to sell poisons and weapons, identities and bank accounts, malware and life-ruining services online to anyone with a wallet full of Bitcoin? Darker… A death in Minnesota leads detectives into the world of dark web murder-for-hire where hundreds of thousands of dollars in Bitcoin is paid to arrange killings, beatings and rapes. Meanwhile, the owner of the most successful hitman website in history is threatening the journalists who investigate his business with a visit from his operatives - and the author is at the top of his list. Darkest… People with the most depraved perversions gather to share their obscene materials in an almost inaccessible corner of the dark web. A video circulates and the pursuit of the monsters responsible for 'Daisy's Destruction' lead detectives into the unimaginable horror of the world of hurtcore. There's the world wide web - the internet we all know that connects us via news, email, forums, shopping and social media. Then there's the dark web - the parallel internet accessed by only a select few. Usually, those it connects wish to remain anonymous and for good reason. Eileen Ormsby has spent the past five years exploring every corner of the Dark Web. She has shopped on darknet markets, contributed to forums, waited in red rooms and been threatened by hitmen on murder-for-hire sites. On occasions, her dark web activities have poured out into the real world and she has attended trials, met with criminals and the law enforcement who tracked them down, interviewed dark web identities and visited them in prison. This book will take you into the murkiest depths of the web's dark underbelly: a place of hitmen for hire, red rooms, hurtcore sites and markets that will sell anything a person is willing to pay for - including another person. The Darkest Web.

30 review for The Darkest Web: Drugs, Death and Destroyed Lives... The Inside Story of the Internet's Evil Twin

  1. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Online investigative journalism at its finest. The Darkest Web delves deep into the deprave's darkest desires bringing to light heinous acts of cruelty better left in the shadows of humanity. The topical nature of the non-fiction peak-behind-the-curtain account of dark web warriors is not for the squeamish. The structure of the book leads the reader down a rabbit hole of murderous and unspeakable acts growing progressively darker as the digital depths of disgust unfold. Whilst the subject matter Online investigative journalism at its finest. The Darkest Web delves deep into the deprave's darkest desires bringing to light heinous acts of cruelty better left in the shadows of humanity. The topical nature of the non-fiction peak-behind-the-curtain account of dark web warriors is not for the squeamish. The structure of the book leads the reader down a rabbit hole of murderous and unspeakable acts growing progressively darker as the digital depths of disgust unfold. Whilst the subject matter isn't for everyone, I really enjoyed The Darkest Web. The writing was easy flowing and the structure of the book gives the reader plenty of 'outs'. Author Eileen Ormsby doesn't shy away from the confronting nature of the book and clearly defines sections of the book which contain the escalating 'darker' material. My rating: 5/5 stars. If you've got an interest in learning more of the web outside the world we live in, this is for you.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bri Lee

    This book, in my humble opinion, is a triumph of narrative journalism. Ormsby's first book, Silk Road, looked at the marketplaces on the dark web and the people who created and maintained their illegal trading. The Darkest Web goes further. Broken into three parts (Dark, Darker, and Darkest) I was both entertained and educated. The first section is about the legacy of the Silk Road marketplace (most famous for selling any and all drugs) and what marketplaces now look like online. Darker is about This book, in my humble opinion, is a triumph of narrative journalism. Ormsby's first book, Silk Road, looked at the marketplaces on the dark web and the people who created and maintained their illegal trading. The Darkest Web goes further. Broken into three parts (Dark, Darker, and Darkest) I was both entertained and educated. The first section is about the legacy of the Silk Road marketplace (most famous for selling any and all drugs) and what marketplaces now look like online. Darker is about hitmen for hire. Darkest is about horrific child pornography on the dark web and the international law enforcement agencies teaming up to fight it. Each section has a gripping narrative arc, and just when you finish one you say, 'Oh my god, it gets even more intense!?' and dive into the next.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian Gebski

    1. It's not Tor tutorial ;P 2. It's not an end-to-end analysis. 3. It's not a story of Darknet. 4. It's a collection of 3 separate "stories" (threads?) that represent "dark", "darker" & "the darkest" face of Darknet - they are quite selective, based on particular stories, cases, people (real ones) 5. The flow (within each of the 3 parts) is generally chronological, so they almost feel like a story. 6. Part 1 is about the Silk Road, so if you've read "American Kingpin" you won't learn anything new. 7. 1. It's not Tor tutorial ;P 2. It's not an end-to-end analysis. 3. It's not a story of Darknet. 4. It's a collection of 3 separate "stories" (threads?) that represent "dark", "darker" & "the darkest" face of Darknet - they are quite selective, based on particular stories, cases, people (real ones) 5. The flow (within each of the 3 parts) is generally chronological, so they almost feel like a story. 6. Part 1 is about the Silk Road, so if you've read "American Kingpin" you won't learn anything new. 7. Part 2 is about hitmen for hire, it's the most interesting one, but at some point it loses it's tempo & I just got bored - but I appreciate the level of detail, especially when it comes to interactions with Yura & the story of Stephen 8. Part 3 is fucking disgusting & can make you hate & despise humanity. Even if descriptions weren't really picturesque I had moments when I wanted to puke. The author admitted she had moments when she wanted to skip this part - I can easily understand why. This part is about hardcore pedophilia & so-called hurt-core. Would I read it again if I knew how I feel after reading it? I'm not sure. Did I learn something about Darknet? Not really. Did I learn something about humanity & how it can use an unlimited freedom (vide various kinds of libertarians)? I think so, but I'm not so sure I like it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Fen'Harel

    Really loved this book as it is something new and quite dangerous to write about! An in-depth look at the dark web from the perspective of a journalist who spends her time trying to take down these websites was invaluable. I would highly recommend this book to people interested in the dark web and the catching of criminals through cyber security. This novel was set into three parts: Dark, Darker and Darkest. Dark. This part of the book was really interesting and a great starting point. I loved hear Really loved this book as it is something new and quite dangerous to write about! An in-depth look at the dark web from the perspective of a journalist who spends her time trying to take down these websites was invaluable. I would highly recommend this book to people interested in the dark web and the catching of criminals through cyber security. This novel was set into three parts: Dark, Darker and Darkest. Dark. This part of the book was really interesting and a great starting point. I loved hearing about the drug trade and the slow descent into evil of the owner. Who goes from making a website for weed selling to suddenly hiring hitmen? While it started off with good intentions, discussing the Silk Road and the drug trade that occurred, it began to hit dull notes when discussing small details of what happened to the men and women after they were caught. This chapter could have easily been cut in half to maintain interest. But altogether, it was very interesting and I could see how much the author actually began to care for these people and I could see some of her personal opinions leaking through - which I loved! Darker. This chapter was when everything became very interesting. Focusing on the case study of the Allwine murder, we get a look at the types of people looking to hire hitmen online. It was sort of comforting to know that these hitmen sites aren't real (at least not the ones the author looked into) and it was interesting to see the types of messages that were passed between the owner and potential buyers. The whole case was fascinating and had me looking into further research - which is when I realised something was missing. When doing a case study like this, would you not use images? A picture of the family house, a picture of the Besa Mafia website, or even a picture of the murderer or victim? It was difficult to imagine when a lack of detail was received. Perhaps this book could do with some gloss pages with images or even just printed in black and white amongst the words? Even if it was a recreation of the website main page or emails that were sent between people. BUT, I understand this would be difficult to maintain when it came to the next section so maybe some gloss pages in the middle with some photos of Silk Road and such? I know the author got photos with some of the men. I feel like this was the most complete section of this book. The story of all of these people were over and nothing more could be added and I didn't end up with a whole heap of questions. Darkest. I enjoyed (if that's the right word to use) this section the most. The darkness on this side of the 'internet' is scary to think about and how quickly something created for the US military is turned into the hunting ground for paedophiles. It's disgusting and shows what kind of opportunists these creeps are. Lux was definitely the best part of this chapter. To learn that he was from my country and doing such depraved things when he's only a couple years older than me is terrifying. He was running an empire at such a young age - to the point where the police didn't even consider him! This was the juiciest part of the book - where we got into the real gritty sides of the dark web. I was severely disappointed in the size of this chapter. When writing about something as dark as paedophilia on the dark web, you can't shy away from the topic. The parts she did add made me angry though. Reading about what they thought about children, the aiding in creating monstrous videos and hearing about 'Daisy's Destruction' had me furious. Then, of course, to hear Lux would still be young when he got out of jail had my blood boiling. It really makes me think our system is failing our children when I read things like this. It also seemed to me like the author had purposely separated herself from what she was writing - as if it were all things she had heard of and was writing as if she'd only seen a secondary source. Obviously she would not look and watch the images and video on these sorts of websites (that's completely understandable) but she went so in-depth with a family halfway across the world in 'Darker' while she has people like Lux sitting on her doorstep seemed a tad of an oversight. How did they catch Lux? Who were the detectives looking into it? What did they have to deal with? What do the lawyers working with him think? I ended up with more questions than answers, so if that's a hint at a sequel I am there!! I really enjoyed this book and I thought the author had guts to write about a topic that could be quite dangerous for her. Just revealing 'Besa Mafia' as a fraud had her hit with death and rape threats. Publishing a book on all of this? It seems very dangerous and I really think the author is amazing for doing that. I found this book left me with too many questions, as if a lot of these stories were not even close to finished. Maybe the author will go back and write more about people like Lux and Scully as more is revealed? Maybe she'll interview Lux and write a novel about him? (I would read that!) I also would have liked to have heard more about the guy who was arrested for 'Besa Mafia' when he was catching predators online. What happened to him??

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Dudley-Nicholson

    This book turns the Dark Web into a page-turner and complex, sordid issues involving many players into a focused narrative you can easily follow. The chapter on Silk Road and the corruption of its founder is fascinating, the hitman chapter is expertly researched and focused, but I will admit to skimming through the grottier parts of the darkest section. Otherwise well worth reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chad Mew

    I was very excited to read this book following reviews and mentions in prominent newspapers. I really must diverge from the direction of most reviews thus far in the sense that I felt this book was written in a very average way. This may not be a popular opinion, however I thought it was a little anticlimactic. Many stories featured were already widely published in mainstream media or readily available on the “clear web”. I did not think it was necessary to spend 1/3 of the book to go through th I was very excited to read this book following reviews and mentions in prominent newspapers. I really must diverge from the direction of most reviews thus far in the sense that I felt this book was written in a very average way. This may not be a popular opinion, however I thought it was a little anticlimactic. Many stories featured were already widely published in mainstream media or readily available on the “clear web”. I did not think it was necessary to spend 1/3 of the book to go through the Silk Road again. For these reasons, I felt this book had so much potential but was executed in a slightly lack lustre way. For its journalism work, I enjoyed the depth of investigation and commend Ormsby on her personal contribution. I think overall, it was a brave story to tell. I think for me it just wasn’t juicy enough.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David Sodergren

    Unbelievably fascinating book for the first two-thirds, easily the best I’ve read all year. However, the last section — on the “darkest” web — I wish I’d never read. Utterly harrowing and depressing — there aren’t enough trigger warnings in existence to prepare you for this. Approach with serious, serious caution.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    Fascinating read. Truly insightful and very well written- i found it hard to put this book down despite some of the content.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    I picked this up after reading the Wired piece about Besa Mafia and Chris Monteiro. It’s a fascinating account of a world I know very little about and Ormsby does a great job of making it accessible and adding her own personal experience/insights. I probably should have skipped the (mercifully short) third section, Darkest. I’m still thinking about those horrors days later.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Keen

    Ormsby is back getting her teeth into the dark net, through Tor or ‘Onionland’ as many of its users refer to it as. A lot of this, particularly in the first section, has been covered more extensively in her previous book, the excellent, “Silk Road”, which is understandable to an extent, but what we really end up with is a lot of the same information being re-used. I am not sure why she thought the very brief recap of these same events was necessary in the second section?... What Ormsby’s findings Ormsby is back getting her teeth into the dark net, through Tor or ‘Onionland’ as many of its users refer to it as. A lot of this, particularly in the first section, has been covered more extensively in her previous book, the excellent, “Silk Road”, which is understandable to an extent, but what we really end up with is a lot of the same information being re-used. I am not sure why she thought the very brief recap of these same events was necessary in the second section?... What Ormsby’s findings tend to reveal is that a disproportionate amount of the disturbing behaviour going on in the dark net, seems to be coming from Australians, living at home or abroad. Interestingly enough Andrew O’Hagan’s fascinating “The Secret Life” also focused on two other Aussies and their notorious computer careers. Taking the place of the deceased Silk Road we find places like AlphaBay and Hansa filling the vacuum. One of the sites explored in some depth is Besa Mafia, where alleged hitmen can be hired. Spoiler alert it is a myth. There are some really intriguing stories in here and also some disturbing ones, particularly in the closing pages. The stories of “3 Guys 1 Hammer” and “1 Lunatic 1 Icepick” do not make for comfortable reading, let alone an ideal Friday night in. I didn’t find this as enjoyable as her last outing, she seemed to cover too much of the same ground and too often we got misleading stories which ran into dead ends or went flat. This is a revealing and thought provoking book, but at times it did feel padded out.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    The Darkest Web is a superbly researched and written insight into the deep web. It has both analytical depth and clarity, which is difficult to accomplish at the best of times, let alone about a topic that is so complex and foreign to many. It provides a great amount of factual information and also weaves stories into it, which is a difficult balance to strike. Ormsby doesn't just account what the dark web is, but looks at the evolution of its various elements in the context of society, including The Darkest Web is a superbly researched and written insight into the deep web. It has both analytical depth and clarity, which is difficult to accomplish at the best of times, let alone about a topic that is so complex and foreign to many. It provides a great amount of factual information and also weaves stories into it, which is a difficult balance to strike. Ormsby doesn't just account what the dark web is, but looks at the evolution of its various elements in the context of society, including the history in the offline world of many of the things that are now on the deep web. Her handling of the "darkest" section, on the greatest horrors on there, provides enough detail for it to be understood without becoming in any way gratuitous. I can only imagine how much effort and time went in to gathering all the information to write the book, let alone putting it together in a readable form, and the result is something both accessible and invaluable to understanding a significant part of the world today.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Erin Stewart

    The fact that so much of our lives is played out online provides an interesting challenge for writers: how do you make a text engaging when many key events involved someone typing onto their computer and/or accessing websites? It's not exactly a captivating image. But this book is super-engaging, Eileen Ormsby has found a way for the virtual to be rendered undoubtedly real and compelling. The book focuses on some very dark stories from the dark web (sorted into dark, darker, and darkest, and give The fact that so much of our lives is played out online provides an interesting challenge for writers: how do you make a text engaging when many key events involved someone typing onto their computer and/or accessing websites? It's not exactly a captivating image. But this book is super-engaging, Eileen Ormsby has found a way for the virtual to be rendered undoubtedly real and compelling. The book focuses on some very dark stories from the dark web (sorted into dark, darker, and darkest, and given that 'dark' involves kill for hire schemes and the workings of an online drug empire, you better believe that the stuff discussed in both 'darker' and 'darkest' are truly dark). It's an impressive book: the amount of work that would have been involved in researching these stories and fashioning them into clear narratives is astounding. Plus, it's important ground to cover. Not many people know about the workings of the dark web, but given its applications in all kinds of crime, we probably should be better informed.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Natalia Özaydınlı Gyacheva

    I added this book to my shelf based on positive comments: but I didnt like it personally. Some chapters were too long and I was so bored that I had to skip them. For example, the information about some characters could take a couple of pages, but it took over 1:3 of the book. Some detailes were so ugly and I think it was not necessary to mention about, especially the last part of the book. Ok, she investigated but the information is disgustish. And she covered only 3-4 topics, that is is the whole b I added this book to my shelf based on positive comments: but I didnt like it personally. Some chapters were too long and I was so bored that I had to skip them. For example, the information about some characters could take a couple of pages, but it took over 1:3 of the book. Some detailes were so ugly and I think it was not necessary to mention about, especially the last part of the book. Ok, she investigated but the information is disgustish. And she covered only 3-4 topics, that is is the whole book about.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bo Grimes

    Fast-paced and interesting, but a lot of it is obviously blog/articles hastily (or sloppily) patched together and edited. There are three parts: Dark (drugs), Darker (hitmen), and Darkest (snuff and child torture). You can get by reading the first two and get the gist of third. There were sections of the third I had to skip. Good overview of a fairly obscure, but increasingly less so, corner of the Internet.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Veith

    Very interesting read. As you progress through the book the deeds get darker (obviously) but some of it makes you cringe. Just deprived people out there. Reads sort of like a very large newspaper article at times. Also can be a bit repetitive at times, and more so from one section to the next. It references what you already read but acts like you didn't read it. Overall a very interesting read Very interesting read. As you progress through the book the deeds get darker (obviously) but some of it makes you cringe. Just deprived people out there. Reads sort of like a very large newspaper article at times. Also can be a bit repetitive at times, and more so from one section to the next. It references what you already read but acts like you didn't read it. Overall a very interesting read

  16. 5 out of 5

    LUCHI

    Ok, that was a LOT to process. The book tackles three very different aspects of the dark web; drug market, hitman, and pedophilia(& snuff). The stories get darker, just as the titles suggest. The first two stories are explored and explained in a very detailed way. Hence, the last and most horrifying part felt a bit disappointing to me. I wouldn't have been able to stomach more details on the acts but I really wanted to know more about Lux; how he got busted, his own thoughts during the trial, an Ok, that was a LOT to process. The book tackles three very different aspects of the dark web; drug market, hitman, and pedophilia(& snuff). The stories get darker, just as the titles suggest. The first two stories are explored and explained in a very detailed way. Hence, the last and most horrifying part felt a bit disappointing to me. I wouldn't have been able to stomach more details on the acts but I really wanted to know more about Lux; how he got busted, his own thoughts during the trial, and maybe even his family's since they stood by him during the trial. The whole thing feels like a fever dream, it's hard to imagine people starting huge illegal empires from there bedroom with just codes and clicks, and scary af when you process that it's all real and even though these guys are busted there's a high chance history will or might already be repeating itself. It was too much to read in one go, not because it was boring or something but more because the topics disgusted me so much. Also, why was Yura's incarceration not explained? Overall, it's really well researched for about 85-90% of it but the last story was vague and I felt she tried to cut it down mostly because she wouldn't be able to stomach it which is very much understandable.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Hosford

    An incredibly enlightening read, well written by a brave investigative journalist about a subject I knew nothing about. Despite being warned about the contents, I did read the last chapter and was shocked and disturbed by it. Not for the feint hearted but certainly well informed.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dhruv Saggar

    Ormsby's dive into the dark web had potential to be very good, but I found the overall experience to be inconsistent. It was not so much investigative journalism than a more in-depth summary into the more controversial aspects of the dark web. The first part of the book (Dark Web) explores the Silk Road investigation. The section was informative, to be sure, but I didn't find that Ormsby put her stamp on the part by providing her own perspective enough. There were some examples of this, but it fe Ormsby's dive into the dark web had potential to be very good, but I found the overall experience to be inconsistent. It was not so much investigative journalism than a more in-depth summary into the more controversial aspects of the dark web. The first part of the book (Dark Web) explores the Silk Road investigation. The section was informative, to be sure, but I didn't find that Ormsby put her stamp on the part by providing her own perspective enough. There were some examples of this, but it feels like information I could have received by looking at the internet. Ormsby then goes into the Besa Mafia website in the second part (Darker Web). This is the strongest section. Ormsby raises questions of morality on the internet, and offers her own unique information as to Besa Mafia. I found this a very captivating section and was lamenting that it was not reflected in the other two parts. The last section (Darkest Web) is the weakest of the book. Like the first section, it consists of information you could get online, but lacks a coherent structure or end point. It is written to shock and is covered at a very surface level. You will learn things from reading the book, but apart from the excellent Part 2, a lot of this book can be summarised elsewhere.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Read for the Problem Facing Society Today prompt of the 2018 Popsugar Challenge. O M G I loved this book so much. Who isn't fascinated by crime and drugs and the seedy underbelly of the internet? (Seriously, is there anyone?) This book was as addictive as anything you could buy off the Silk Road - I could not put it down! The author intersperses the facts with her own personal experiences on the dark web and anecdotes of her travels and interviews with major players in the dark web world. These s Read for the Problem Facing Society Today prompt of the 2018 Popsugar Challenge. O M G I loved this book so much. Who isn't fascinated by crime and drugs and the seedy underbelly of the internet? (Seriously, is there anyone?) This book was as addictive as anything you could buy off the Silk Road - I could not put it down! The author intersperses the facts with her own personal experiences on the dark web and anecdotes of her travels and interviews with major players in the dark web world. These side stories were so interesting and the author's way of writing is totally engaging - I absolutely had to know what happened next! Section I, Dark, discusses the rise and fall of the Silk Road marketplace and other places to buy drugs online. It was very interesting and Ormsby was very well-integrated into that scene so she knew personally many of the major players involved in the operation. Her travels take her to Thailand and beyond to meet with some of these people (or attend their trials). Section II, Darker, covered the murky territory or murder-for-hire sites on the dark web. The author maintains in the beginning of the chapter that she has never believed any of these sites to be legitimate. She writes about her and another journalist, Chris Monteiro's experience with the most prolific of these sites and all that that entails - this was really fascinating! Section III, Darkest, was pretty brutal to get through. It describes the worst part of the dark web, the hidden havens for child predators and all that goes along with that. Ormsby walks the fine line between getting you to fully comprehend how sick and horrific these people are without being so graphic that its just a shock read. She talks about the trials of some big names in the 'hurtcore' part of the dark web. It was tough to get through, but it was still worth reading - monsters are real. My only issue with this book is A: that it's hard to get. I had to order it from Australia and that was the only way to get it, no e-book or Amazon ordering, so I had to wait f o r e v e r for it to show up, and B: some of the kerning is way off on the text. On some pages it is so bad that it looks like the line is all one huge run-on word - surely there could be some other adjustment of text versus cramming it together like that. Pet peeve.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Giuffrida

    A really fascinating and engaging read. Each part had me more hooked than the last in both intrigue and disgust. Ormsby positions her non-fiction findings in the form of a narrative which makes you lost in the story as you read on. Highly recommended for any true crime/technology buffs!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

    A true, very dark account indeed, written by Eileen Ormsby; lawyer, author and freelance journalist who spent the last 5 years ‘exploring every corner of the Dark Web’. Ormsby’s Introduction includes facts that under-pin the whole book so that we have a basic understanding of just how the dark web came about. The technology originated from the US military. Known as TOR it guarantees secrecy, anonymity and access to hidden services. The dark web uses crypto currency; that is, Bitcoin. The Dark We A true, very dark account indeed, written by Eileen Ormsby; lawyer, author and freelance journalist who spent the last 5 years ‘exploring every corner of the Dark Web’. Ormsby’s Introduction includes facts that under-pin the whole book so that we have a basic understanding of just how the dark web came about. The technology originated from the US military. Known as TOR it guarantees secrecy, anonymity and access to hidden services. The dark web uses crypto currency; that is, Bitcoin. The Dark Web originated with the establishment of the ‘Silk Road’ which was the very first illicit on line drug market dating from February 2011. From here it grew exponentially into billions. As more administration was increasingly needed, so to the complications with theft from within and increasing extortion. At this point I asked myself, “do I really want to read all the sordid details and intricacies?” It was great to read that the Silk Road was demolished by the FBI after a very long, problematic operation that is really quite fascinating. However, in November 2013 Silk Road 2.0 was launched. This is an objective account from the author and for me she does not establish feeling, therefore I was not particularly interested. Some information is also repetitious. This is now the scene that leads to the next chapter, Darker. Objectivity remains but I am suddenly more interested (about one third the way in) and involved emotionally with a compulsion to read on as different personalities emerge. From the Dark chapter we are taken to Darker. Mainly to the establishment of the Besa Mafia. Actual conversations are exposed. The language is in exactly in the same spirit of bullying; something we are trying to stamp out in schools but is so alive and well in the Darker and not so dark world. I am disappointed in our author Eileen Ormsby who is also “sucked in” by one character in particular. Besa Mafia is, in fact, a scam and I quote, “I kindly ask you to remove your articles and allow us to keep scamming bad people who want to do murder”. I feel quite sick as Part III reveals ‘Darkest’ and these horrors are all too real. Again I quote our author. “The child pornography and exploitation market is the most disturbing aspect of the dark web.” No wonder Ormsby found it difficult to write. I cheered when, on the 15th February 2019, as reported by Channel Nine, Cody Ward (in Australia) was arrested for selling drugs disguised as lollies and distributed through Australia Post. A mere seventeen million worth. A nice blow against the dark web. Unfortunately another will take its place! To me, reading the sordid details was a little too much. I believe the message would have still been loud and clear if the author had been more succinct. I wonder what other readers will feel or think?

  22. 4 out of 5

    AngelaC

    I chose this book because I knew nothing about the "dark web" of which we hear so much in the media. It is divided into three sections (Dark, Darker, Darkest) covering online drug dealing, murder for hire and child pornography. Eileen Ormsby has already written a book about Silk Road, the drug-dealing website that was dismantled a few years ago, and focussed on it again in the first section of this new book. This was by far the longest section of the book, a fact that will probably be a disappoi I chose this book because I knew nothing about the "dark web" of which we hear so much in the media. It is divided into three sections (Dark, Darker, Darkest) covering online drug dealing, murder for hire and child pornography. Eileen Ormsby has already written a book about Silk Road, the drug-dealing website that was dismantled a few years ago, and focussed on it again in the first section of this new book. This was by far the longest section of the book, a fact that will probably be a disappointment to those who have already read her previous work on the subject. I had a feeling that it was probably a bit of a re-hash. I also thought that she knew a huge amount about the subject but was unable to whittle all her knowledge down and make the setup easily understandable for neophytes like me who know nothing about either drug dealing or the dark web. The second section, while focusing on the grim subject of contract killing, reads like something of a Whitehall farce as the administrator of the website merrily scams his way to huge sums of Bitcoins while ensuring that nobody meets their end and providing the would-be contractors with the most outlandish excuses for non-completion of the agreed task. It is the third section that is by far the most disturbing and it carries a warning to that effect. This was the section that was most clearly written, giving a peek into a world that most of us, thank heavens, could not even begin to imagine. I came away with greater insight into the dark web from reading this book and was interested in the comment that Bitcoin had greatly facilitated the use of the web for nefarious purposes, because it almost guarantees the anonymity of the people involved.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Lake

    Ormsby is a brilliant writer with a pitch-perfect approach to a desperately dark subject matter. The world she takes the reader into is twisted often beyond belief, and her recounting often succeeds as a morality tale without being in the least moralistic. She genuinely cares for her subjects and her subject, without compromising the often brutal, despicable acts they are involved with. At her hand, the dark web appears filled with fraud and exploitation—often the defrauders themselves being spe Ormsby is a brilliant writer with a pitch-perfect approach to a desperately dark subject matter. The world she takes the reader into is twisted often beyond belief, and her recounting often succeeds as a morality tale without being in the least moralistic. She genuinely cares for her subjects and her subject, without compromising the often brutal, despicable acts they are involved with. At her hand, the dark web appears filled with fraud and exploitation—often the defrauders themselves being spectacularly defrauded along the way!—in pursuit of their untrammeled desires. That’s the morality tale part of it for me: the graphic awareness I experienced of the wickedness that lurks within the human heart if we consistently feed our inwardly turned, self-oriented desires...which the Internet gloriously succeeds in letting us do! Instead of desire going forth from itself in fruitful, life-giving, other loving and other blessing ways, we have here a most powerful portrait of desire’s downward trajectory when it seeks only to be one with itself. In these dark passageways of our selves and the world we would create lie selfishness, greed and lust of increasingly violent and despicable proportions, snaring all in its sinister web. The victims are destroyed along with victimizers. No one masters evil. It masters you. I am grateful to Ormsby, a sure-handed guide, for taking me on this tour, as grotesque and horrific as it often was. There are parts of this I will never forget. So it is not for the faint-hearted, but well worth the read to understand the depths of depravity enabled by our high-tech connectivity. We live in a truly dangerous world.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lucybelle

    Honestly, I picked this book up expecting nothing more than a bit of sensationalised nonsense. I was way off base. Eileen Ormsby is a mythbuster and a meticulous researcher, and the book is thrilling and disturbing but also firmly dismissive of all the gruesome urban legends and tabloidesque hysteria that so often accompany the topic. There's some stuff I sort of wish I could unread. The murder of Amy Allwine was a jarring horror in the midst of what was otherwise a rollicking tale of Bitcoin sca Honestly, I picked this book up expecting nothing more than a bit of sensationalised nonsense. I was way off base. Eileen Ormsby is a mythbuster and a meticulous researcher, and the book is thrilling and disturbing but also firmly dismissive of all the gruesome urban legends and tabloidesque hysteria that so often accompany the topic. There's some stuff I sort of wish I could unread. The murder of Amy Allwine was a jarring horror in the midst of what was otherwise a rollicking tale of Bitcoin scammers and theatrical fake hitmen. The whole third section is about child abuse rings and it's almost unreadably dark. That was the one case out of everything where the reality is even worse than the myths. But stories like those need telling, and I think a lot of courage and good journalism went into telling them here. In the end I couldn't put the book down.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Very interesting book overall. Part one covered drug dealing site Silk Road. Too much "the making of this book" content. ie several pages about the difficulty of getting an interview, only to have the interview itself reveal nothing useful. Lost a star on this. This is why it took me two months to finish the book. More about the actual drug trading through Silk Road would be better - ie follow a buyer and seller who used the site. Part two covered hitman site BesaMafia and the Allwine family trage Very interesting book overall. Part one covered drug dealing site Silk Road. Too much "the making of this book" content. ie several pages about the difficulty of getting an interview, only to have the interview itself reveal nothing useful. Lost a star on this. This is why it took me two months to finish the book. More about the actual drug trading through Silk Road would be better - ie follow a buyer and seller who used the site. Part two covered hitman site BesaMafia and the Allwine family tragedy. Fascinating story, told perfectly. This is how you write investigative journalism. Part three - child porn - Lux's PedoEmpire. Mercifully short section. So disturbing to read. Must be incredibly difficult to investigate this.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    4.5 stars "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, that are dreamt of in your philosophy." There is so much that I don't know and, after reading this, wish I still don't know. In the beginning of the book, there was a warning about the content of the book, especially the last part. I should have heeded that warning. It's like the book version of "Abandon all hope all ye who enter". But curiosity got the better of me and I finished the book. The first part was OK, the second part can in 4.5 stars "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, that are dreamt of in your philosophy." There is so much that I don't know and, after reading this, wish I still don't know. In the beginning of the book, there was a warning about the content of the book, especially the last part. I should have heeded that warning. It's like the book version of "Abandon all hope all ye who enter". But curiosity got the better of me and I finished the book. The first part was OK, the second part can induce paranoia and the last part is just pure evil. It disturbed me, it seriously did. And to think the author said she already sanitised it for the book! I need something super lighthearted after this one and even then I don't think it can erase what I've just read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sweeroy

    when I started reading this book I was maybe a little callous, thinking that I had a strong enough stomach to handle the contents. I was not correct. the first section is a discussion and history of the Silk Road, and it’s interesting to see how behind the bluster and bravado, the tough guys we’re just kinda nerdy dipshits in the second chapter, the tough guys turned out to be nerdy dipshits, except for the nerdy dipshit who turned out to be extremely cold blooded the last chapter is, bluntly, an when I started reading this book I was maybe a little callous, thinking that I had a strong enough stomach to handle the contents. I was not correct. the first section is a discussion and history of the Silk Road, and it’s interesting to see how behind the bluster and bravado, the tough guys we’re just kinda nerdy dipshits in the second chapter, the tough guys turned out to be nerdy dipshits, except for the nerdy dipshit who turned out to be extremely cold blooded the last chapter is, bluntly, an indictment on the human race. it’s a very, very hard read. to quote the author “Nevertheless it is safe to say that I never want to return to that part of the dark web again. I wish I could say that I exaggerated the horrors but if anything, I sanitised them”

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rainie Semmens

    Wow, I really have been thinking alot about this & I still don't really know what to write the contents in this book blew me away, there are some super sick people out there so you really need to have a strong stomach and not get easily spooked out as this is your all time real Horror Story, This book was super informative, well researched & very well written. it was the first book in about six months that I even finished and I love reading. So it definitely had me hooked from the very start. I' Wow, I really have been thinking alot about this & I still don't really know what to write the contents in this book blew me away, there are some super sick people out there so you really need to have a strong stomach and not get easily spooked out as this is your all time real Horror Story, This book was super informative, well researched & very well written. it was the first book in about six months that I even finished and I love reading. So it definitely had me hooked from the very start. I'm glad I read it, I just wish there weren't so many sick people out there especially in the third part.i

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alia Brownhill

    To say this was an easy read would not quite be true; whilst the writing style and general layout of the book lends itself to quick reading, the content is dark. I cried a little in the last section. It is an excellently researched book. If you are interested in tech and the internet's evil twin, it will give you a good understanding of some of the biggest dark web scandals, as well as explaining some of the technical aspects. This being said, do not read this book if you are sensitive. It goes To say this was an easy read would not quite be true; whilst the writing style and general layout of the book lends itself to quick reading, the content is dark. I cried a little in the last section. It is an excellently researched book. If you are interested in tech and the internet's evil twin, it will give you a good understanding of some of the biggest dark web scandals, as well as explaining some of the technical aspects. This being said, do not read this book if you are sensitive. It goes into some detail about truly horrifying content and people. My heart genuinely goes out to the aithor- it could not have been easy to write.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    Not Curious Anymore I'm sure I'm not the only one curious about the Dark Web, but have read enough about it or watched videos that have been frightening. I've not ever been on the Dark Web. This book has satisfied any curiosity i have had. The book is very detailed and researched. Nothing really shocks me anymore, more disturbing. The depravity and the vile actions of people is just nauseating. This book is filled with enough information and stories of the Dark Web, I don't need to know anymore o Not Curious Anymore I'm sure I'm not the only one curious about the Dark Web, but have read enough about it or watched videos that have been frightening. I've not ever been on the Dark Web. This book has satisfied any curiosity i have had. The book is very detailed and researched. Nothing really shocks me anymore, more disturbing. The depravity and the vile actions of people is just nauseating. This book is filled with enough information and stories of the Dark Web, I don't need to know anymore or want to. I'm out!

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