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An intrepid investigation of the criminal world of wildlife trafficking--the poachers, the traders, and the customers--and of those fighting against it Journalist Rachel Nuwer plunges the reader into the underground of global wildlife trafficking, a topic she has been investigating for nearly a decade. Our insatiable demand for animals -- for jewelry, pets, medicine, meat, An intrepid investigation of the criminal world of wildlife trafficking--the poachers, the traders, and the customers--and of those fighting against it Journalist Rachel Nuwer plunges the reader into the underground of global wildlife trafficking, a topic she has been investigating for nearly a decade. Our insatiable demand for animals -- for jewelry, pets, medicine, meat, trophies, and fur -- is driving a worldwide poaching epidemic, threatening the continued existence of countless species. Illegal wildlife trade now ranks among the largest contraband industries in the world, yet compared to drug, arms, or human trafficking, the wildlife crisis has received scant attention and support, leaving it up to passionate individuals fighting on the ground to try to ensure that elephants, tigers, rhinos, and more are still around for future generations. As Reefer Madness (Schlosser) took us into the drug market, or Susan Orlean descended into the swampy obsessions of TheOrchid Thief, Nuwer--an award-winning science journalist with a background in ecology--takes readers on a narrative journey to the front lines of the trade: to killing fields in Africa, traditional medicine black markets in China, and wild meat restaurants in Vietnam. Through exhaustive first-hand reporting that took her to ten countries, Nuwer explores the forces currently driving demand for animals and their parts; the toll that demand is extracting on species across the planet; and the conservationists, rangers, and activists who believe it is not too late to stop the impending extinctions. More than a depressing list of statistics, Poached is the story of the people who believe this is a battle that can be won, that our animals are not beyond salvation.


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An intrepid investigation of the criminal world of wildlife trafficking--the poachers, the traders, and the customers--and of those fighting against it Journalist Rachel Nuwer plunges the reader into the underground of global wildlife trafficking, a topic she has been investigating for nearly a decade. Our insatiable demand for animals -- for jewelry, pets, medicine, meat, An intrepid investigation of the criminal world of wildlife trafficking--the poachers, the traders, and the customers--and of those fighting against it Journalist Rachel Nuwer plunges the reader into the underground of global wildlife trafficking, a topic she has been investigating for nearly a decade. Our insatiable demand for animals -- for jewelry, pets, medicine, meat, trophies, and fur -- is driving a worldwide poaching epidemic, threatening the continued existence of countless species. Illegal wildlife trade now ranks among the largest contraband industries in the world, yet compared to drug, arms, or human trafficking, the wildlife crisis has received scant attention and support, leaving it up to passionate individuals fighting on the ground to try to ensure that elephants, tigers, rhinos, and more are still around for future generations. As Reefer Madness (Schlosser) took us into the drug market, or Susan Orlean descended into the swampy obsessions of TheOrchid Thief, Nuwer--an award-winning science journalist with a background in ecology--takes readers on a narrative journey to the front lines of the trade: to killing fields in Africa, traditional medicine black markets in China, and wild meat restaurants in Vietnam. Through exhaustive first-hand reporting that took her to ten countries, Nuwer explores the forces currently driving demand for animals and their parts; the toll that demand is extracting on species across the planet; and the conservationists, rangers, and activists who believe it is not too late to stop the impending extinctions. More than a depressing list of statistics, Poached is the story of the people who believe this is a battle that can be won, that our animals are not beyond salvation.

30 review for Poached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    "Poached" is a powerful investigation into why and how people kill and traffic endangered animals. It is also a story as filled with hope as it is with horror, because Nuwer doesn't only show us the despicable crimes inflicted upon elephants and pangolins (to name only two of the remarkable animals in her story), she also brings to life the work of the rangers, investigators, and conservationists working hard to protect them. "Poached" is a powerful investigation into why and how people kill and traffic endangered animals. It is also a story as filled with hope as it is with horror, because Nuwer doesn't only show us the despicable crimes inflicted upon elephants and pangolins (to name only two of the remarkable animals in her story), she also brings to life the work of the rangers, investigators, and conservationists working hard to protect them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carla (Carla's Book Bits)

    Wow, did I really read the entirety of this book over just 2 days? If that doesn't say anything about how engaging Rachel Love Nuwer writes this history, then I don't know what does. Poached contains a very detailed history of.. well, animal poaching. It covers animals from the iconic African elephants and rhinos, to the more lesser-known (at least to me) pangolins and monitor lizards. Not surprisingly, Africa and Asia are revealed as some of the most notorious continents for illegal animal t Wow, did I really read the entirety of this book over just 2 days? If that doesn't say anything about how engaging Rachel Love Nuwer writes this history, then I don't know what does. Poached contains a very detailed history of.. well, animal poaching. It covers animals from the iconic African elephants and rhinos, to the more lesser-known (at least to me) pangolins and monitor lizards. Not surprisingly, Africa and Asia are revealed as some of the most notorious continents for illegal animal trade, but Nuwer does a good job of approaching this subject in a unique light. Meeting hunters, rangers, and of course the authorities dedicated to preserving endangered species, I soon realized that things are never this black and white. There are so many things that factor into why harmful practices stick. And the question often gets as complicated as, "How can we change entire cultural viewpoints in order to change the world?" The heart and emotion put into this book reminds me of the feel behind Susan Casey's books. I can see this pulling SO many heartstrings with fellow armchair conservationists. Thank you to NetGalley & Perseus Books for letting me read this gem before publication.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Costanza

    Interesting subject, tedious read

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Cardon

    Poached is a compelling, disturbing read. Before picking up this book, I knew very little about wildlife trafficking aside from what I pick up via mainstream media headlines and commercials narrated by Susan Sarandon. I began reading this book expecting to learn more about the trade, to understand the culprits, and to feel a little guilty that I haven't been more invested in the issues surrounding endangered species. I am giving this book five stars for the following reasons: 1) Nuwer's writing st Poached is a compelling, disturbing read. Before picking up this book, I knew very little about wildlife trafficking aside from what I pick up via mainstream media headlines and commercials narrated by Susan Sarandon. I began reading this book expecting to learn more about the trade, to understand the culprits, and to feel a little guilty that I haven't been more invested in the issues surrounding endangered species. I am giving this book five stars for the following reasons: 1) Nuwer's writing style: The book is beautifully narrated, with seamless transitions between contextualizing information and Nuwer's engaging personal narrative. While Nuwer displays her extensive research of the organizations like TRAFFIC and CITES, governmental policies in the Asian and African nations she visits, scholarship written about the trade, and the animals herself, the story never gets so mired in these details that they distract from her own journey. Nuwer writes with a personable, self-effacing (at times borderline dorky) sense of humor––the line "Appendix II species are those that are not deemed threatened with extinction, but––should they be freely traded––may enter the danger zone (in the threatened-with-extinction sense, not the Kenny Loggins one)" come to mind. 2) Nuwer's sleuthing: A part of Nuwer's self-effacing narrative voice is her account of her sleuthing efforts, including visiting back-alleys of traditional medicine trade markets, sneaking into a high-profile international conference, shadowing a hunter in rural Vietnam, and dining at restaurants with endangered species special menus. Her personal research, the months of travel to remote parts of the world, at times putting her own life at risk, really emblematizes her investment in this project and really understanding the complexity of the wildlife trade. She acknowledges when she goes into an interview or an excursion with preconceived expectations, and clarifies how the experience deviated from those expectations (in this way, often shattering the reader's assumptions as well). Her personality also comes through in these encounters––particularly her wit, her sense of adventure, and her clear love of animals... basically, she comes across as someone you want to hang out with. 3) Nuwer's non-preachy tone: Because of Nuwer's clear love and advocacy for animals, I think I expected this book to be at least minimally didactic, pointing the finger at the various culprits responsible for dwindling elephant, rhino, and pangolin populations (among others). But instead, in revealing how complex the world of wildlife trafficking is, Nuwer also reveals how difficult it is to assign blame or, for that matter, come up with a clear solution. In one chapter she may reveal the damage (to people and animals) wrought by poachers, but in another she will zoom in on the individual story of a poacher for whom a single kill means feeding his family for a year. When she visits a rhino ranch in South Africa (where rhinos are bred and their horns, which grow back, are removed for trade), she manages to relate the arguments for and against legal trade with a degree of objectivity, pushing back against any biases the reader may have. I found this approach refreshing. While it is frustrating not to have one clear culprit or one clear fix, it's also valuable to have this insider's exposure of the reasons and values motivating different individuals enmeshed in the wildlife trafficking world. Overall, I would absolutely recommend this book. It's a substantial read and at times a disturbing one, but it's also engaging and beautifully written.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lukas Anthony

    ‘Poached’ is a creation that works on a multitude of levels, being not only good old’ hard-hitting journalism, but a nuanced telling of the current climate when it comes to the state of animal trafficking on a global scale.    Whether it be the Ivory trade, wildlife restaurants, or the concept of traditional Chinese medicine, Nuwer comes at each subject from all angles - giving great insight into why things are the way they are, how we can change them, and even (depressingly) why some things may n ‘Poached’ is a creation that works on a multitude of levels, being not only good old’ hard-hitting journalism, but a nuanced telling of the current climate when it comes to the state of animal trafficking on a global scale.    Whether it be the Ivory trade, wildlife restaurants, or the concept of traditional Chinese medicine, Nuwer comes at each subject from all angles - giving great insight into why things are the way they are, how we can change them, and even (depressingly) why some things may not ever change. (I’ll give you a hint, it’s about the money).     Focusing on a variety of topics, Nuwer encapsulates an element of trafficking around a specific animal and explores in detail why the animal is currently endangered - why, for instance, are pangolins currently the most poached animal in the world? What role do their scales play in Chinese medicine? How easy are they to obtain? Nuwer truly investigates all these aspects, down to patrolling the streets of Vietnam to see how easy it is to obtain illegal scales on the black market.     It’s an interesting insight and creates a more personal element, making Nuwer a voice in the story - sometimes adding lighter touches to the text - such as being part of a mass pangolin release party, or focusing on darker elements - like visiting Vietnamese restaurants to see if they have pangolin on the menu. This ‘on the ground’ style emphasises just what goes into protecting these animals and also how much the laws that are created really need policing.    Nuwer takes us on the journey of the ugly truth in ‘Poached’, emphasising what an on-going battle the fight against trafficking will be, and giving us all the information we need to be more enlightened on the topic, and that is all I can ask for from my non-fiction. 5 stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    5 stars “An intrepid investigation of the criminal world of wildlife trafficking-- the poachers, the traders, and the customers and of those fighting against it. Journalist Rachel Nuwer plunges the reader into the underground of global wildlife trafficking, a topic she has been investigating for nearly a decade. “ Enlightening, educational, enraging and emotional. Poached pushed a number of emotional buttons in me. I am just having a hard time dealing with the injustice of losing so many animal l 5 stars “An intrepid investigation of the criminal world of wildlife trafficking-- the poachers, the traders, and the customers and of those fighting against it. Journalist Rachel Nuwer plunges the reader into the underground of global wildlife trafficking, a topic she has been investigating for nearly a decade. “ Enlightening, educational, enraging and emotional. Poached pushed a number of emotional buttons in me. I am just having a hard time dealing with the injustice of losing so many animal lives and species to poachers. I do not care about the “reasoning” people give for poaching. It is just plain wrong. I seldom have such an emotional response to a book. I truly appreciate the work it took to research and write this book. This is one of those books that will touch the heart of anyone who reads it. I truly believe Poached should be mandatory reading for high school and college students across the globe. The author has done an astonishing job of showing every aspect of the “poaching trade”. Every student or for that matter; person who reads this book will be changed and educated by the stories within it. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher and NetGalley. The views given are my own. #NetGalley #Poached

  7. 4 out of 5

    Patrícia

    This book is full of interesting information, but the first-hand experiences of the author ensure that it doesn't get boring. I liked that it was very well balanced and different points of view were presented. The world of wildlife crime was presented with many nuances rather than a clear black and white fight of good and evil, which makes it much more realistic and believable. I would say it also had a good balance between describing all of the problems and challenges, while also keeping a heal This book is full of interesting information, but the first-hand experiences of the author ensure that it doesn't get boring. I liked that it was very well balanced and different points of view were presented. The world of wildlife crime was presented with many nuances rather than a clear black and white fight of good and evil, which makes it much more realistic and believable. I would say it also had a good balance between describing all of the problems and challenges, while also keeping a healthy dose of optimism by presenting potential or realised solutions. Overall, I think the author has managed to paint a very broad image of the global wildlife crime and has managed to do so in a compelling way. More people should learn about this stuff.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Captain Easychord

    Poached is both an important and engaging read. The author does a great job of explaining both the scope and damage of the illegal wildlife trade. And she does it not only by explaining the big picture global consequences and the stark statistics, but also by drawing us into different local communities and into the lives of those involved. This really provides insight into how all of the pieces of this complex puzzle fit together from the causes of demand to the conditions driving people to prov Poached is both an important and engaging read. The author does a great job of explaining both the scope and damage of the illegal wildlife trade. And she does it not only by explaining the big picture global consequences and the stark statistics, but also by drawing us into different local communities and into the lives of those involved. This really provides insight into how all of the pieces of this complex puzzle fit together from the causes of demand to the conditions driving people to provide the supply. It results in a picture that is more ethically complicated and resistant to easy fixes than I had previously thought. And she manages to do all of this while weaving in wonderful and often funny stories of her travels around the world to uncover all of it. Highly recommended!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Great work of journalism by Rachel Love Nuwer. The journey of this book took her all over the world, and as an animal lover I was particularly appalled and disturbed by so many people’s lack of empathy for the suffering of innocent creatures. As Rachel found out, and is quoted in the book “people want something special. If the species is going extinct all the better, it means you are influential enough to have gotten ahold of one of the last”. Used to people hunted dying species for sustenance a Great work of journalism by Rachel Love Nuwer. The journey of this book took her all over the world, and as an animal lover I was particularly appalled and disturbed by so many people’s lack of empathy for the suffering of innocent creatures. As Rachel found out, and is quoted in the book “people want something special. If the species is going extinct all the better, it means you are influential enough to have gotten ahold of one of the last”. Used to people hunted dying species for sustenance as survival was necessary but in the 21st century the slaughter of animals has moved towards satiating the appetites of the upper middle class and wealthy. Speaking of wealthy, I read this book with a fond heart and memory for the recently departed Microsoft co founder Paul Allen. His charity’s work was featured and it’s touching to see how much good Paul did, and hopefully will continue to do in his legacy. I’m leaving for Laos this weekend to do volunteer work at an animal sanctuary who specializes in rehabilitating animals who have been trafficked so I appreciated the chapter My Tiger Wine Is Corked, as it was eye opening to see the cultural behaviors for animal conservation in this part of the world. Overall this book was informative and peppered with Rachel’s wit and insight. 5/5

  10. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Hunt

    Wishes, Lies, and Dreams This bit of investigative journalism delves into the world of wildlife trafficking. It does contain a few violent scenes where animals are mistreated. The author speaks of poaching and the inherent problems with trade in products that come directly from the harvested body of wild animals. In most of the cases, she refers to animals that are slaughtered simply for one body part; like rhino horns or elephant tusks. In some of the chapters she talks about endangered animals Wishes, Lies, and Dreams This bit of investigative journalism delves into the world of wildlife trafficking. It does contain a few violent scenes where animals are mistreated. The author speaks of poaching and the inherent problems with trade in products that come directly from the harvested body of wild animals. In most of the cases, she refers to animals that are slaughtered simply for one body part; like rhino horns or elephant tusks. In some of the chapters she talks about endangered animals that are on the menu illegally in some countries. In some places, like in Vietnam, one can have these endangered animals killed at the table, to verify having eaten the real article. I gave that information just to be clear what the topic is about. The poaching she mentions takes place in South Africa, Sudan, South Sudan, Kenya, and much of China and Vietnam. Overall, she covers the topic thoroughly. But, the book lacks any treatment of the geography and/ or politics of the area... of which she seems a bit unaware at times. To fill the book up, I suppose, she mentions such details as how the carpet squishes under her feet when entering conference rooms at conventions... things that I really felt added nothing to the topic. And, she abuses metaphors and similes almost to the point of distraction, like her skin becoming a 'Donald Trump shade of orange.' (She does this all through the book.) And, she shares jokes and cultural references, like that of an incompetent act being compared to watching Irishmen screw in a light-bulb. She discusses the problems with traditional Eastern medicines and their dependency on such products. Unfortunately, this book would serve as well if used as a guidebook for where to make money in wildlife trafficking. She admits at one point that even her reporting on the problem contributes to the demand for these products. She goes into many of the 'grey areas' of the problems. She speaks of the government corruption that is involved. "People will search for rhino horn until there's just one rhino left in the world." It would be easy to make the mistake of looking at only a small part of the problem, by assuming animals are being poached just for food by the hungry. That is actually a small portion of the problem, like with the disappearance of forests on islands. More of the problems come from people who are making money in amounts equal to the price of a car for part of a rhino horn. But, on the other hand, poaching is not the only problem here. What is often overlooked in her work is that the people in these very regions often find drugs, slavery, and wildlife trafficking to be the most ready sources of income in countries with weak government controls to stop such economic tactics. This is why government officials condone it by silence. The author speaks realistically when she says that the best approach is to stop the market for these products. I would go a bit farther and wish for stability in these countries so that they see a translated value for keeping the wildlife alive. The book reminded me of a book I read years ago titled, Wishes, Lies, and Dreams; simply because wildlife protection often amounts to that. Often rhinos are obtained by proxy hunting license, like getting a hunting license for prostitutes, and taking them along for the hunt. She makes a good point in the case that wildlife crimes should simply be called crime; because often the same people committing these crimes are also dealing in drugs and human trafficking. The author uses a few techniques for her 'journalism' that I felt were a bit yellow.* I hate to be critical of a topic that does need to be treated honestly. But, she admits to lying to get interviews, disguising her purpose in the interview, lying to get into wildlife conventions, and many other shady tactics. She seems to enjoy irritating people. She has an abrasive tone frequently. (*Please note that these are my own views. The author has provided a rebuttal in the comments below.) The sad fact of the matter is though, that one day there will be no elephants or rhinos left. They are some of the earliest animals that children learn about when they learn to talk. And, they are peaceful creatures. It is sad that we can not manage to protect them. It is even sadder that the biggest threat to wildlife is often the very people hired to protect them. I read this book (concurrently with another book on a politically sensitive topic) for my stop in South Sudan. It is not a book that can be read in one setting, unless you can tolerate such things for a long time. I had to read a bit each day, and then do something else for awhile to take my mind off of the subject, before continuing with the book. This took me about two weeks to finish that way. I would like to read some of the books she mentions in this book, as I believe they may be better written. My next stop will be Uganda, where I will ride The Lunatic Express; and then Rwanda where I will read Gorillas in the Mist, which is waiting quietly on my coffee table beside Jane Goodall's In the Shadow of Man. Those promise to share some of the beauty of wildlife.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Just excellent. It was both well researched and a riveting read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bruceyoungsolutions.Co.Za

    What a great read! Engaging, accessible, informative and moving – from cover to cover! It's a tough, complex subject about a harsh, dark world, but Nuwer presents an engrossing and entertaining overview with the perfect balance of detail for this reader. A real page-turner that kept me wanting to know more, in spite of the sometimes overwhelming suffering and sadness in so many of the animals that she tells us about. What helped enormously was that I felt as though I would like Nuwer as a person What a great read! Engaging, accessible, informative and moving – from cover to cover! It's a tough, complex subject about a harsh, dark world, but Nuwer presents an engrossing and entertaining overview with the perfect balance of detail for this reader. A real page-turner that kept me wanting to know more, in spite of the sometimes overwhelming suffering and sadness in so many of the animals that she tells us about. What helped enormously was that I felt as though I would like Nuwer as a person. Her intelligence, wit, humor and razor-sharp insights, coupled with her beautifully balanced writing style are clearly what have contributed to her being an award-winning journalist. I'm most grateful to her for having written this book and have recommended it to all I know who might be even vaguely interested in learning more about the creatures who we share the planet with. It is a sobering look at what sort of future many of them face as a result of the depraved ignorance and greed of many men and women.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    First of all, thank god this book ended with an optimistic story, because boy is it dark. But it was very captivatingly written, and was almost narrative in many ways. She is an incredible writer, and though she has a lot of expertise, she still shares a lot of the horror that the reader feels when exposed to some of the facts of the wildlife trade and wildlife crime. Additionally, she interviews those who engage in the trade, including those who break the law to hunt endangered animals, and I g First of all, thank god this book ended with an optimistic story, because boy is it dark. But it was very captivatingly written, and was almost narrative in many ways. She is an incredible writer, and though she has a lot of expertise, she still shares a lot of the horror that the reader feels when exposed to some of the facts of the wildlife trade and wildlife crime. Additionally, she interviews those who engage in the trade, including those who break the law to hunt endangered animals, and I greatly respect her devotion to getting multiple points of view. She doesn't paint every hunter as a bad person, and recognizes that many of them commit wildlife crimes because the money is so important to their impoverished family. Anyway, this was an incredibly eye-opening book and I highly recommend it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Konet

    This made me sad, sickened and angry all at the same time. This book delves deep into the illegal animal trade as well as the slaughter for-sale black market all for big money. The illegal trade thrives due to these skilled poachers who are so greedy, they will stop at nothing. On their list: tigers for their teeth and fur; elephants, rhinos and hippos for their ivory and skin; the list goes on. The horrors these animals face is just cruel and that's why some are critically endangered. I wish so This made me sad, sickened and angry all at the same time. This book delves deep into the illegal animal trade as well as the slaughter for-sale black market all for big money. The illegal trade thrives due to these skilled poachers who are so greedy, they will stop at nothing. On their list: tigers for their teeth and fur; elephants, rhinos and hippos for their ivory and skin; the list goes on. The horrors these animals face is just cruel and that's why some are critically endangered. I wish someone would hunt the poachers and treat them the say way! I gave this a high rating even with the disturbing contents within because it was well written and there was a slight glimmer of hope in the closing chapters. Another must-read for the Donald.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeimy

    I cannot believe this book is almost 400-pages long! This book is an expose on animal poaching and illegal wildlife trade, but it is almost a travelogue as Nuwer takes the reader to various countries in Asia (and even Africa) as she delves into the world of poachers, sellers, and consumers. The subject is heavy, but the writing style is accessible (not academic). In fact, the book reads almost like a memoir.

  16. 4 out of 5

    The Inquisitive Biologist

    A thorough and wide-ranging piece of investigative journalism looking at the many sides of wildlife trafficking. See my full review at https://inquisitivebiologist.com/2018... A thorough and wide-ranging piece of investigative journalism looking at the many sides of wildlife trafficking. See my full review at https://inquisitivebiologist.com/2018...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul Spence

    The author breathes life, humour, and a sense of adventure into the heavy but important topic of the illegal wildlife trade. In addition to the requisite numbers and research, there is a ton of critical on-the-ground reporting--the author personally dives deep and travels extensively for interviews and to see the ins and outs of this world for herself, and paints a vivid picture of the environments she encounters and characters she meets. All sides are represented, from those fighting the trade, The author breathes life, humour, and a sense of adventure into the heavy but important topic of the illegal wildlife trade. In addition to the requisite numbers and research, there is a ton of critical on-the-ground reporting--the author personally dives deep and travels extensively for interviews and to see the ins and outs of this world for herself, and paints a vivid picture of the environments she encounters and characters she meets. All sides are represented, from those fighting the trade, to the perpetrators (and consumers and bureaucrats who enable them), and while it's clear where the author's sympathies justifiably lie, the interviews and field trips with the latter two are important in illuminating the hows and whys of the trade. It's a starkly honest account--there's no sugarcoating the reality--but moments of hope are found, and not simply shoehorned in for their own sake, largely in the success stories and the inspiring people that drive them. Entertaining characters and slices of adventure run throughout the book, making for a quick read that was hard to put down.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Scribe Publications

    A revelation of a book: Rachel Nuwer pulls back the curtain of dry statistics to reveal the illegal and sordid world of wildlife trafficking as well as the valiant efforts to stem the tide. A firsthand account that is hard to put down. Thomas E. Lovejoy, President, International Union of the Conservation of Nature – US Poaching has reached crisis proportions, and Rachel Nuwer pursues this story to places few journalists go. The result is a vivid and urgent book. Elizabeth Kolbert, Author of The Six A revelation of a book: Rachel Nuwer pulls back the curtain of dry statistics to reveal the illegal and sordid world of wildlife trafficking as well as the valiant efforts to stem the tide. A firsthand account that is hard to put down. Thomas E. Lovejoy, President, International Union of the Conservation of Nature – US Poaching has reached crisis proportions, and Rachel Nuwer pursues this story to places few journalists go. The result is a vivid and urgent book. Elizabeth Kolbert, Author of The Sixth Extinction Our planet’s most iconic species — particularly African elephants — are facing devastating declines because of poaching. This is an important book that should inspire all of us to action. Paul G. Allen, Microsoft Co-Founder and Philanthropist Fellow animal-lovers, don't be deterred: This is not a book of despair. It will make you angry as hell — but then give you hope. Read about the brave people fighting the poaching syndicates. Learn what's working, what's not, and why. This extensively researched, personal, and riveting book is badly needed. Read it and act! SY Montgomery, Author of The Soul of an Octopus A must-read. The Revelator Nuwer’s intimate look at different poaching industries is educational and overall heartfelt. Library Journal Nuwer’s engaging and immersive reporting style ... illuminates and animates the larger forces driving the trade that’s wiping out our remaining wildlife. Sierra Nuwer, a conservation biologist turned science journalist, traces at first hand the front lines across the globe in her hard-hitting, wince-inducing report. Nature Remember the kid in your classroom who was passionate about stopping poaching and saving the elephants? Rachel Nuwer is that kid, now grown up and writing devastating, deeply impactful pieces. Thrive Global, ‘Women to Watch in 2018 Nuwer writes with breathless urgency about some of the most poached animals on the planet ... Poached overflows with information — Nuwer definitely did her homework — while remaining readable for non-scientists. Edge Effects, Kaitlin Stack Whitney Poached gives readers an up-front look at the vulnerability of endangered animals that are worth more dead than alive … But these anecdotes aren’t just for shock value. Nuwer also documents the political, cultural, and economic factors driving wildlife trafficking … her takeaway is abundantly clear: This business has major consequences … Nuwer … show[s] how obsession, especially when profit is involved, can be a dark force. Will Gordon, Outside Not only is the book thoroughly researched, featuring interviews with hunters, conservationists, traders, collectors and users of illegal animal products, but it has a quirky, personal touch. The Refresh It’s easy to criticise the poachers, but we have no understanding of the desperation of the poor in Africa and Asia – and Nuwer does not turn away from that, nor from the excruciating realities of the trade. 4.5 STARS Robyn Douglas, Adelaide Advertiser The optimism expressed in Poached … is refreshing and much-needed. Simon Caterson, Sydney Morning Herald The most important book published this year is Poached ... Brilliantly researched, Poached exposes the full horrific absurdity of the global trade in endangered animals as well as portraying the heroes doing what they can to save them before they vanish forever. Weekend Australian, ‘Books of the Year’, Simon Caterson Reads like a thrilling piece of fiction — which makes it even more heartbreaking when you remember the events are true. Earther

  19. 4 out of 5

    -RadioactiveBookworm-

    "Poached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking" by Rachel Love Nuwer is exactly what it sounds like. A book mainly focusing on the elephant, rhino, bear and tiger aspects of it, the author first goes to places like Vietnam, Africa, and China, to speak to not only animal hunters, but also wildlife ranger in the area's to really see what's going on. There are a few pictures scattered throughout the book, and it's really an eye opening journey. I think everyone should read this book. Check "Poached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking" by Rachel Love Nuwer is exactly what it sounds like. A book mainly focusing on the elephant, rhino, bear and tiger aspects of it, the author first goes to places like Vietnam, Africa, and China, to speak to not only animal hunters, but also wildlife ranger in the area's to really see what's going on. There are a few pictures scattered throughout the book, and it's really an eye opening journey. I think everyone should read this book. Check out the rest of my review here! https://radioactivebookreviews.wordpr...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    I feel like this book didn't pick up for me until she started talking about the smuggling trade. I'm not entirely sure why, other than the fact that she repeats herself often and has a writing style that didn't really jive with my reading style. It is a slightly depressing book once you realize how many animals have been killed and how corrupt a lot of the people involved in either saving them or prosecuting the poachers. I received a free copy of this book for a fair review, all opinions are my I feel like this book didn't pick up for me until she started talking about the smuggling trade. I'm not entirely sure why, other than the fact that she repeats herself often and has a writing style that didn't really jive with my reading style. It is a slightly depressing book once you realize how many animals have been killed and how corrupt a lot of the people involved in either saving them or prosecuting the poachers. I received a free copy of this book for a fair review, all opinions are my own.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Noorilhuda

    Despite the manner in which the author handled much of her 'research' (lackadaisical, happy-go-lucky, irresponsible methods, sketchy statistics, to downright cringeworthy behavior, apart from her lack of objectivity, lack of proper interviews with subjects / users of illegal trafficked animal products and lack of right questions with the ones she does get around to), it is an eye-opening book on a subject I had just cursory knowledge of. Thanks to the publisher for the ARC. Despite the manner in which the author handled much of her 'research' (lackadaisical, happy-go-lucky, irresponsible methods, sketchy statistics, to downright cringeworthy behavior, apart from her lack of objectivity, lack of proper interviews with subjects / users of illegal trafficked animal products and lack of right questions with the ones she does get around to), it is an eye-opening book on a subject I had just cursory knowledge of. Thanks to the publisher for the ARC.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nad

    This is one of the hardest book for me to finish. It pains me to know just how cruel human can be to wildlife animals. There is hope though. I hope human can sort things out so we won’t have any species listed as “extinct”.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Hummingbird

    A well-written and researched piece, presenting the nuances of wildlife trafficking and the issues surrounding it in an approachable, conversational style. I'm impressed by the author's fortitude and commitment despite the graphic and emotional details. A well-written and researched piece, presenting the nuances of wildlife trafficking and the issues surrounding it in an approachable, conversational style. I'm impressed by the author's fortitude and commitment despite the graphic and emotional details.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Colby

    I’d give this 3.5 stars if I could. Nice insights into this issue which is often overlooked even by those who work on wildlife trade. Lively writing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alysa Morley

    This was a difficult read, but seemed really well researched, easy to read, and covered the topic of poaching from a lot of different angles. I'm really glad I read it! This was a difficult read, but seemed really well researched, easy to read, and covered the topic of poaching from a lot of different angles. I'm really glad I read it!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ryanspaperadventures

    This is one of those books that struck a cord with me. After writing my thesis on elephant poaching and the ivory trade, I was always looking for ways to get involved and trying to learn as much as I could. Poached, by Rachel Love Nuwer is everything I could have asked for in a book, not only does she go into the causes of illegal wildlife trafficking, but also speaks to the sources. This book provides numerous different perspectives, Rachel Nuwer puts herself in oftentimes sticky situations to This is one of those books that struck a cord with me. After writing my thesis on elephant poaching and the ivory trade, I was always looking for ways to get involved and trying to learn as much as I could. Poached, by Rachel Love Nuwer is everything I could have asked for in a book, not only does she go into the causes of illegal wildlife trafficking, but also speaks to the sources. This book provides numerous different perspectives, Rachel Nuwer puts herself in oftentimes sticky situations to get an undercover and insider look on why these animals are sought after. She even talks about potential solutions that have been put in place and whether or not they have been successful. There are even two supplementary chapters on her website that go into even more detail. If you’re looking for an eye-opening read about an issue that only seems to be growing in the media, this is the book for you! This was by far one of my favorite reads, her journalistic work is remarkable and I look forward to reading whatever else she ends up writing in the future.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Daniela Diekmann

    Extremely eye-opening book. I enjoyed the fact that it wasn't written in a way where it just involved putting facts and statistics to paper, but actually describing the author's experiences as she travelled to the various destinations and observed the gruelling world of wildlife trafficking. This book left me feeling extremely sad, but also challenged and certainly more aware of the gruelling experiences animals go through merely for the pleasure of certain humans. In a world where people truly Extremely eye-opening book. I enjoyed the fact that it wasn't written in a way where it just involved putting facts and statistics to paper, but actually describing the author's experiences as she travelled to the various destinations and observed the gruelling world of wildlife trafficking. This book left me feeling extremely sad, but also challenged and certainly more aware of the gruelling experiences animals go through merely for the pleasure of certain humans. In a world where people truly respect the wild and assume the position of nature's guardian, this would NOT be where we are today. Appalling to say the least.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    A well written and researched book that balances journalistic investigations with personal insights. This book was quickly paced, interesting and at times highly gripping. I found this a personally gratifying and professionally useful. I highly recommend it for those who are interested in natural history, wildlife conservation, or human/wildlife conflict.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Roberts

    Excellent and easy to read summary story-telling of the global poaching crisis

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ben Goldfarb

    Some courageous and extraordinarily thorough reporting here.

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