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The start of a brand new series from the global bestselling author of the DI Hillary Greene series. Oxford, 1960. There's a murderer on the loose and two unlikely heroes are poised to solve the case. Meet Probationary WPC Trudy Loveday – smart, enthusiastic and always underestimated. In the hope of getting her out of the way, Trudy’s senior officer assigns her to help coroner The start of a brand new series from the global bestselling author of the DI Hillary Greene series. Oxford, 1960. There's a murderer on the loose and two unlikely heroes are poised to solve the case. Meet Probationary WPC Trudy Loveday – smart, enthusiastic and always underestimated. In the hope of getting her out of the way, Trudy’s senior officer assigns her to help coroner Clement Ryder as he re-opens the case of a young woman's death. She can't believe her luck – she is actually going to be working on a real murder case. Meanwhile, the rest of the police force are busy investigating a series of threats and murders in the local community, and Clement can't help but feel it's all linked. As Trudy and Clement form an unlikely partnership, are they going to be the ones to solve these crimes before the murderer strikes again?


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The start of a brand new series from the global bestselling author of the DI Hillary Greene series. Oxford, 1960. There's a murderer on the loose and two unlikely heroes are poised to solve the case. Meet Probationary WPC Trudy Loveday – smart, enthusiastic and always underestimated. In the hope of getting her out of the way, Trudy’s senior officer assigns her to help coroner The start of a brand new series from the global bestselling author of the DI Hillary Greene series. Oxford, 1960. There's a murderer on the loose and two unlikely heroes are poised to solve the case. Meet Probationary WPC Trudy Loveday – smart, enthusiastic and always underestimated. In the hope of getting her out of the way, Trudy’s senior officer assigns her to help coroner Clement Ryder as he re-opens the case of a young woman's death. She can't believe her luck – she is actually going to be working on a real murder case. Meanwhile, the rest of the police force are busy investigating a series of threats and murders in the local community, and Clement can't help but feel it's all linked. As Trudy and Clement form an unlikely partnership, are they going to be the ones to solve these crimes before the murderer strikes again?

30 review for A Fatal Obsession

  1. 4 out of 5

    Linda Strong

    4.5 Stars Hang onto your socks! This is the first in a new series by Faith Martin, the author of the DI Hillary Greene series. The time is 1960 ... no cellphones, no DNA, no CSI. WPC Trudy Loveday is on probation. She's young and smart and the only woman in her team. She's mostly relegated to the files and making coffee. Her boss has 'let' her out to patrol the streets on occasion and she's done well. She's arrested a couple of pickpockets and a flasher. But her supervisor doesn't seem to know wha 4.5 Stars Hang onto your socks! This is the first in a new series by Faith Martin, the author of the DI Hillary Greene series. The time is 1960 ... no cellphones, no DNA, no CSI. WPC Trudy Loveday is on probation. She's young and smart and the only woman in her team. She's mostly relegated to the files and making coffee. Her boss has 'let' her out to patrol the streets on occasion and she's done well. She's arrested a couple of pickpockets and a flasher. But her supervisor doesn't seem to know what to do with her. Clement Ryder is a coroner. He started out as a medical physician. When he was diagnosed with Parkinsons', he stopped practicing and took up the law. Now he holds court over possible murder cases and he consults with the police quite often. He has a sharp mind and a natural determination to find the truth. Ryder demands that he be given an officer who can question suspects, make arrests, etc.... since he doesn't have that authority. In the hope of getting her out of the way, Trudy’s senior officer assigns her to help coroner Clement Ryder as he re-opens the case of a young woman's death. She can't believe her luck – she is actually going to be working on a real murder case. The author has never disappointed me in her other series ... and this one is also not disappointing. This is a gripping, twisty crime novel with complex characters, suspects that are not what they seem to be, and an interesting plot. Many thanks to the author / HQ Digital / Netgalley for the advanced digital copy of this British Crime Fiction. Opinions expressed here are unbiased and entirely my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Icewineanne

    Great story! Just what I needed during these depressing days. Enjoyed this just as much as the Hillary Greene series. Faith Martin has definitely shot up on my must-read authors list. Terrific storytelling of what appears to be a simple case of murder, turns to be more complex as each chapter builds on the original murder, adding new facets to the mystery. And the master mentoring the student, makes for a fun, even if a bit predictable, pairing. I noticed that the next book (A Fatal Mistake) in t Great story! Just what I needed during these depressing days. Enjoyed this just as much as the Hillary Greene series. Faith Martin has definitely shot up on my must-read authors list. Terrific storytelling of what appears to be a simple case of murder, turns to be more complex as each chapter builds on the original murder, adding new facets to the mystery. And the master mentoring the student, makes for a fun, even if a bit predictable, pairing. I noticed that the next book (A Fatal Mistake) in this series takes place only 6 mths after this one. Very excited to jump unto Trudy & Clement’s next case. 4.5 ⭐️

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alan Cotterell

    Great start Having read a couple of her DI Hillary Greene series out of order, I was looking forward to reading the new series in order. Set in Oxford in 1960, follows a young wpc and the constraints and frustrations of being a policewoman in this very male dominated world. Until she is paired up with an elderly coroner who wishes to re investigate an old case. Now it could be that as the previous 3 or 4 books I have read were absolutely outstanding, I was expecting too much. But I found this to Great start Having read a couple of her DI Hillary Greene series out of order, I was looking forward to reading the new series in order. Set in Oxford in 1960, follows a young wpc and the constraints and frustrations of being a policewoman in this very male dominated world. Until she is paired up with an elderly coroner who wishes to re investigate an old case. Now it could be that as the previous 3 or 4 books I have read were absolutely outstanding, I was expecting too much. But I found this to be a little bit disappointing at first, then as the characters and storyline developed, there was a big improvement. The ending was good and I look forward to book 2, as I truly believe that there is potential in these characters.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Literary Redhead

    Best known for her addictive DI Hillary Greene crime thrillers, author Faith Martin debuts another electrifying series with THE FAITH OBSESSION. I really like her new MC ... Probationary WPC Trudy Loveday ... assigned to coroner Clement Ryder as they reopen a cold case involving the death of a young woman. This is one “I-can’t-put-this-down-even-to-pee” wild ride! 5 Stars Grateful to NetGalley and HQ Digital for the early read. Opinions are mine. #DoTheRightThing #NetGalley

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    What a pleasant little surprise this book turned out to be! To be honest, I wasn’t expecting much, mostly due to the sheer number of books Martin churns out. But this was really quite good. It’s 1960 and WPC Trudy Loveday is struggling with the idea that being female means she’ll never be considered anything more than a plod in the eyes of the general public as well as her superiors and co-workers. When a rich industralist receives threatening letters and a subsequent murder is committed, Loveday What a pleasant little surprise this book turned out to be! To be honest, I wasn’t expecting much, mostly due to the sheer number of books Martin churns out. But this was really quite good. It’s 1960 and WPC Trudy Loveday is struggling with the idea that being female means she’ll never be considered anything more than a plod in the eyes of the general public as well as her superiors and co-workers. When a rich industralist receives threatening letters and a subsequent murder is committed, Loveday guesses she’ll remain chasing flahsers and other petty criminals whilst the male police officers will investigate these juicy crimes. Meanwhile, ex surgeon and now coroner, Clement Ryder, thinks the new murder is linked with another coroner’s case he followed a few years previous. He arranges for a police officer to help him investigate the case and it’s Trudy who gets this [unwanted] assignment. Trudy and Clement have great chemistry. It’s nothing romantic (there’s a huge age difference) but they have a bit of a satisfying mentor/student vibe going on. There was enough characterisation of both to keep me happy. There’s also room for them to develop in future books. The mystery itself was pretty well done. It had some complexity and yet there was a chance for the reader and the characters to solve the case. I find with a lot of these types of books the police/detectives just take a wild guess and accuse everyone until they get lucky. And often there’s no way any reader could ever work out whodunnit. Martin, however, presented us the clues and gave us a chance to ‘play along’. Martin’s prose isn’t full of flowery descriptions but it isn’t pedestrian or basic by any means. She also kept all the characters and situations true to the time. The only thing I didn’t like is how often she swapped the point of view of characters. She should have probably just kept with Trudy and Clement’s throughout. I didn’t think I needed the inner thoughts of every character (especially considering there’s quite a lot of them to allow for an array of suspects). Sadly, the Oxford setting seemed a little wasted. It wasn’t particularly important and the book could have been set anywhere. Overall though Martin has produced a book of a pretty high standard and I’ll definitely be picking up the next books in this series. 4 out of 5

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and HQ Digital for an advance copy of A Fatal Obsession, the first novel to feature trainee WPC Trudy Loveday and Coroner Dr Clement Ryder, set in Oxford 1960. When local industrialist Sir Marcus Deering receives an anonymous letter threatening his son he calls in the police. With the station's attention on this threat DI Jennings doesn't have much time to spare for the coroner who wants to re-examine the verdict in the death of Gisela Fleet-Wright five years previ I would like to thank Netgalley and HQ Digital for an advance copy of A Fatal Obsession, the first novel to feature trainee WPC Trudy Loveday and Coroner Dr Clement Ryder, set in Oxford 1960. When local industrialist Sir Marcus Deering receives an anonymous letter threatening his son he calls in the police. With the station's attention on this threat DI Jennings doesn't have much time to spare for the coroner who wants to re-examine the verdict in the death of Gisela Fleet-Wright five years previously and needs a police liaison officer to facilitate his enquiries. Killing two birds with one stone, appeasing the overbearing Dr Ryder and getting an officer he doesn't know what to do with out of the way he appoints probationary WPC Loveday as liaison. Surprisingly the two of them hit it off and are soon involved in a twisty investigation where nothing is as it seems. I enjoyed A Fatal Obsession which has a clever plot and a most unexpected resolution, although the clues are all there (I just failed to pick up on them!). Given the era there are no forensics so investigators rely mostly on interviews, smart thinking and an ability to read people and know when they are lying. This latter trait is at the heart of the novel as it is full of lies and attempted misdirection. The plot is well developed as it moves from knowing nothing through several developments and twists to a conclusion. It would be impossible to pick up and read this novel without making comparisons to Ms Martin's very successful DI Hillary Greene series. It is completely different, not just in the setting but in tone. It lacks the warmth and humour between the characters of that series but I suspect that will come as both readers and characters acclimatise themselves to each other. It is a very promising start to a new series and I'm looking forward to reading more. The characters are well thought out and interesting. Trudy is young and naïve but makes up for it in intelligence and enthusiasm whereas "the old vulture" as he is known is crusty, world weary and not in perfect health but he still has an incisive, logical mind a burning desire for the truth. They work well together, in a teacher/ pupil way although Trudy sometimes surprises her mentor and I'm anticipating great things from this unlikely duo. The historical setting is interesting. Women had a hard time in the workplace, not just the police, in those days so Trudy doesn't have it easy and doesn't get the credit she deserves. It's the little details like her mum ignoring her desire for promotion and a career and trying to pressure her into marriage and kids which would mean giving up the job that give the novel authenticity. A Fatal Obsession is a fine start to a new series so I have no hesitation in recommending it as a good read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bill Kupersmith

    Had so expected to enjoy this story set in 1960, the period when I first travelled in England; the principal character Trudy Loveday (a Woman Police Constable as they were then styled) and I would have been near contemporaries. Surprisingly she forms a partnership with ‘Dr Clement Ryder’ a heart surgeon (shouldn’t he be addressed as Mr in England?) forced into a second career by hidden Parkinson’s Disease as a coroner. They investigate a cold case involving a young woman who died of an overdose Had so expected to enjoy this story set in 1960, the period when I first travelled in England; the principal character Trudy Loveday (a Woman Police Constable as they were then styled) and I would have been near contemporaries. Surprisingly she forms a partnership with ‘Dr Clement Ryder’ a heart surgeon (shouldn’t he be addressed as Mr in England?) forced into a second career by hidden Parkinson’s Disease as a coroner. They investigate a cold case involving a young woman who died of an overdose of medication. Was it accidental or deliberate? Personally, I love pairing an attractive ingenue with a crusty senior male character. Artistically the book is a disappointment, though. The author’s narrative technique shifts awkwardly between limited viewpoints and reading the characters’ minds to tell us what they think. The plot turns out to be so unlikely as never to succeed in real life (especially the stolen prescription) and the ultimate villain neither believable nor sufficiently motivated. Which is a shame, as this is the first volume of a series featuring the Loveday-Ryder partnership. But life is too short especially for someone my age to waste time reading disposable mystery stories. Despite the charming full title A Fatal Obsession: A Gripping Mystery Perfect for All Crime Fiction Readers, we are reminded of the days before such authors as P. D. James and Ruth Rendell taught us that crime fiction could be as artistic as ‘serious’ fiction. This story felt as if it should have had a green and white paper cover and been for sale at a railway-station newsagent.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    A new team is formed with policewoman Trudy Loveday and the coroner Clement Ryder solving murders, I liked it. Just a tad above a cosy mystery, although I did have it figured out.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    4 stars Trudy Loveday is a young (almost twenty), probationary PC. Her immediate boss is DI Jennings. She is chasing a bag snatcher down the street as the book opens in 1960’s London. A murder has occurred and DI Jennings is very busy. He doesn’t want to be distracted by pathologist Doctor Ryder’s request to review the evidence in a cold case. The death was of Gisela Fleet-Wright and it happened five years earlier. He solves his problem by assigning his newest recruit WPC Trudy Loveday to assist 4 stars Trudy Loveday is a young (almost twenty), probationary PC. Her immediate boss is DI Jennings. She is chasing a bag snatcher down the street as the book opens in 1960’s London. A murder has occurred and DI Jennings is very busy. He doesn’t want to be distracted by pathologist Doctor Ryder’s request to review the evidence in a cold case. The death was of Gisela Fleet-Wright and it happened five years earlier. He solves his problem by assigning his newest recruit WPC Trudy Loveday to assist Dr. Ryder in his investigation. At first put off by Dr. Ryder’s curmudgeonly manner, the two quickly begin to get along. Trudy is very excited to actually work on her first real murder case. This book was good and so completely different from Ms. Martin’s Hillary Green series. To begin with, it was set in the 1960’s when forensic techniques were unheard of and cops had to rely on witness statements and their own ability to tell who was lying and who was not. This reader had to keep reminding herself that there were no cell phones and the like to rely on. I didn’t like this book as much as I like Ms. Martin’s DI Hillary Greene series. Perhaps in time they will improve as WPC Trudy Loveday finds her feet. It had Ms. Martin’s trademark twists in it and there were surprises. A good entry, and I will be anticipating the next in the series to see if WPC Trudy attains her feet. I want to thank NetGalley and HQ Digital for forwarding to me a copy of this good book to read, enjoy and review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heike

    A female rookie cop in 1960s Oxford assists a coroner working on a cold case of the accidental death of a young, manic-depressive girl, while her colleagues investigate the murder of an ex-boyfriend of the dead 21year old. Both cases are not related to each other – or so it seems. While the base story was an interesting one, I had problems to connect with the protagonists and their sidekicks. The coroner fighting his angst of having Parkinson, the rookie cop (and she is only 19) dealing with her A female rookie cop in 1960s Oxford assists a coroner working on a cold case of the accidental death of a young, manic-depressive girl, while her colleagues investigate the murder of an ex-boyfriend of the dead 21year old. Both cases are not related to each other – or so it seems. While the base story was an interesting one, I had problems to connect with the protagonists and their sidekicks. The coroner fighting his angst of having Parkinson, the rookie cop (and she is only 19) dealing with her angst about being accepted by her much more experienced and (it’s the sixties!) male colleagues and superiors. There was quite a bit of unnecessary filler, mainly angst issues, but also descriptions of surroundings. While the characters of the main protagonists were fleshed out quite a bit (even if they still felt superficial), some side characters were thoroughly neglected. Like a colleague who was described as a vain beau and mentioned quite often, but I don’t think he ever had anything to say. The plot came together nice if not a bit farfetched and with some inconsistencies in the time line. To sum it up: A good read, and I would recommend it to certain friends who have a more cultured and serene taste than I do.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Puzzle Doctor

    An entertaining well-constructed mystery with much potential for the future. Full review at classicmystery.wordpress.com

  12. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    Book Description Oxford, 1960. There's a murderer on the loose and two unlikely heroes are poised to solve the case. Meet Probationary WPC Trudy Loveday – smart, enthusiastic and always underestimated. In the hope of getting her out of the way, Trudy’s senior officer assigns her to help coroner Clement Ryder as he re-opens the case of a young woman's death. She can't believe her luck – she is actually going to be working on a real murder case. My Thoughts I am a fan of Faith Martin's Murder series an Book Description Oxford, 1960. There's a murderer on the loose and two unlikely heroes are poised to solve the case. Meet Probationary WPC Trudy Loveday – smart, enthusiastic and always underestimated. In the hope of getting her out of the way, Trudy’s senior officer assigns her to help coroner Clement Ryder as he re-opens the case of a young woman's death. She can't believe her luck – she is actually going to be working on a real murder case. My Thoughts I am a fan of Faith Martin's Murder series and have followed DI Hillary Greene on her many adventures. I was intrigued to see that she is beginning a new series and excited to read A Fatal Obsession. The bar is always set so high for me when an author has written a great series and I wondered if she could create another compelling character. For me, this was a definite yes as I flipped pages as quickly as I have while reading the Murder series books, anxious to know how everything would come together. I don't know if Faith Martin plans to continue writing her Murder series books, but I do know that A Fatal Obsession was a very good read, and while the books are very different, her engaging writing style was still quite evident. Probationary WPC Trudy Love is a delightful character in many ways. She is smart, determined and though young, eager to learn and advance in her career. Trudy is surrounded by male colleagues who for the most part either barely tolerate her or give her trivial assignments that fail to challenge her or assist her in growing within the department. When her supervisor assigns her to work with one of the coroners, Clement Ryder, he has no idea that he has just inadvertently provided her a mentor. Ryder believes the verdict in an investigation 5 years ago was wrong and that a new murder case is connected to this prior one. Can this duo put all the pieces together before someone else dies? No spoilers here, you will want to read A Fatal Obsession and find out whodunit and why. I really enjoyed this book and look forward to reading more as they are released. Thank you, Faith Martin, HQ Digital and NetGalley for the complimentary digital ARC.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    This was the first in the series and I'll definitely be continuing. The two main investigators are a close-to-retirement coroner and a rookie WPC. It's set in 1960 and WPC Loveday's boss doesn't quite know what to do with her. She's keen and intelligent but she's a woman. So, for the most part, she's left on patrol in areas where she won't likely come to harm, or assigned filing and other paperwork. The other PCs treat her as a sort of pet and don't really take her very seriously. The Coroner, Dr This was the first in the series and I'll definitely be continuing. The two main investigators are a close-to-retirement coroner and a rookie WPC. It's set in 1960 and WPC Loveday's boss doesn't quite know what to do with her. She's keen and intelligent but she's a woman. So, for the most part, she's left on patrol in areas where she won't likely come to harm, or assigned filing and other paperwork. The other PCs treat her as a sort of pet and don't really take her very seriously. The Coroner, Dr. Ryder, is a former heart surgeon at pains not to let folks know he's in the early stages of Parkinson's -- which is the reason he left surgery, studied the law, and became a coroner. He's got keen intuition and isn't going to let a case be closed just 'cause that makes it easier for everyone; he's interested in justice. As things start, a prominent member of the community starts getting threatening letters telling him to 'do the right thing' but he can't figure out what they're referring to. And his son is threatened! Separately (?) there's a murder that's come before Dr. Ryder and he notices a woman in the gallery which reminds him of a case from 5 years before that he's sure was NOT settled correctly -- but it wasn't his case. To satisfy his own curiosity he requests the help of the police in re-interviewing some witnesses in that old case and, as he's known as a pretty shrewd character, the DCI assigns WPC Loveday to assist. He's not convinced there's anything to it, but he's also not convinced there's NOT, and this gets the WPC out of the way as they focus on investigating the current murder. Loveday isn't sure whether or not to be happy about being seconded to Dr. Ryder, but at least he seems to respect her as a person. The investigation proceeds logically; the characters are likeable -- though, in this first installment, not too deeply drawn, and the mystery is intriguing. Further, the solution hangs together quite well without any 11th hour surprises to make it work.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Liz Mc2

    The strength of this book is the fun investigative pairing of the young and eager WPC, Trudy Loveday, with the experienced coroner Dr. Ryder. I enjoyed their mentor-mentee relationship and his appreciation for her talents, something she doesn’t get from a lot of her colleagues as a WPC in 1960. The attitudes towards a woman working as a police officer and pop music references were the main things that located this in the early 60s—not a strong sense of the era, I thought. The book almost lost me The strength of this book is the fun investigative pairing of the young and eager WPC, Trudy Loveday, with the experienced coroner Dr. Ryder. I enjoyed their mentor-mentee relationship and his appreciation for her talents, something she doesn’t get from a lot of her colleagues as a WPC in 1960. The attitudes towards a woman working as a police officer and pop music references were the main things that located this in the early 60s—not a strong sense of the era, I thought. The book almost lost me at the start as the point of view shifted between a lot of seemingly unrelated characters. I get why mystery writers do that, but it can make it hard to get into the story, especially when the chapters are short—just when I got interested in someone, we moved on. Eventually they did all come together in some interesting ways and the second half was more focused and engaging. There was one big question about how the killer could have known a secret about the victim that victim didn’t even know: eventually this was answered, but it seemed implausible (or inexcusable) that Trudy and Ryder didn’t wonder about it earlier. Somewhat sloppy sentence-level writing: at one point it seemed that Martin’s favourite word must be “large,” as she repeated it about 6 times in 2 paragraphs, and she is rather prone to repeating words close together, which I find distracting. (Also once Ryder found his interest “peaked”). But either that smoothed out or I stopped noticing when I got drawn into the plot. Trudy is fun and I like the pairing. This was an enjoyable time-passer and I’ll probably read the next one.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I keep waiting for Faith Martin's writing to improve, but it hasn't happened. It's hard to say exactly what's wrong, but "plodding" and "pedestrian" are apt. There were some errors in setting in this one, not excusable when checking is so easy, such as when songs were released. The book is set late 1960, she mentions Connie Francis singing "Where the boys are" as her big hit from the previous summer, but it wasn't released till 1961. (That particularly stood out for me, as I remember going to se I keep waiting for Faith Martin's writing to improve, but it hasn't happened. It's hard to say exactly what's wrong, but "plodding" and "pedestrian" are apt. There were some errors in setting in this one, not excusable when checking is so easy, such as when songs were released. The book is set late 1960, she mentions Connie Francis singing "Where the boys are" as her big hit from the previous summer, but it wasn't released till 1961. (That particularly stood out for me, as I remember going to see the the movie as a pre-teen with my two older cousins, and I knew it was later than 1960.) The plot in this was fairly obvious, but Trudy is a bit more credible than Hilary Greene from the previous series - and thank goodness, doesn't have a "cutely" named car, (with the nauseating name repeated every time Hilary got into the damn vehicle!).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paul Thompson

    Detailed This bear good detailed observance of human nature and personality alongside an interesting plot. While it set within the world of the police it sits there loosely due to the main characters.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Charles Hooker

    A Fatal Obsession A page turned by this author.I feel sure that newcomers to this writer will find her other books just as enjoyable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pat K

    British police/ murder mystery. Good read, I will definitely read my of this author.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Zoe Radley

    What a jolly good romp, suspenseful and great characters as well as good tensions between them that fits with the period. Some faults but not too annoying. All in all a good mystery

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tony Hisgett

    At the start the story develops very slowly, almost to the point of becoming tedious. Fortunately when Trudy is paired up with Dr Ryder the whole thing takes a step forward. After being very careful with information, at about two thirds of the way through the author is a sudden generous with the clues and it is clear who is the perpetrator, however there are a number of twists that had me thinking twice. I had doubts early in the book and given her very lowly position I didn’t think Trudy was goin At the start the story develops very slowly, almost to the point of becoming tedious. Fortunately when Trudy is paired up with Dr Ryder the whole thing takes a step forward. After being very careful with information, at about two thirds of the way through the author is a sudden generous with the clues and it is clear who is the perpetrator, however there are a number of twists that had me thinking twice. I had doubts early in the book and given her very lowly position I didn’t think Trudy was going to be particularly interesting, however taking her out of the repressive chain of command and teaming her with Dr Ryder was brilliant. If possible I would have given 3.5 stars, I nearly gave four stars, but the first half of the book was hard work at times.

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Snape

    The start of Ryder and Loveday Two murders have been possible linked to each other. A recent death and a case that was closed with no answers. After Ryder wanted to reopen that closed cased, he took on a newcomer to the police force, Loveday and solve the mystery. Once the story took on the new partnership, the story got better and took shaped from a slow start. A very good ending from a feeling of a short story.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ted Tayler

    "Cunning collaboration" I loved the Hillary Greene series and was pleased to read of a new Faith Martin series. Ryder and Loveday should be like oil and water. The elderly curmudgeon and the bright young thing. In the hands of an expert weaver of crime mysteries I needn't have worried. This promises to be another long-running, page-turning, crime-solving, fun-filled experience. Onwards to Book #2. "Cunning collaboration" I loved the Hillary Greene series and was pleased to read of a new Faith Martin series. Ryder and Loveday should be like oil and water. The elderly curmudgeon and the bright young thing. In the hands of an expert weaver of crime mysteries I needn't have worried. This promises to be another long-running, page-turning, crime-solving, fun-filled experience. Onwards to Book #2.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Iza Brekilien

    Review coming up soon

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl M-M

    If you took a young Jane Tennison and a grumpy Judge John Deed and threw them in a police procedural together, then you would get the equivalent of Ryder and Loveday. Trudy is one of the first WPCs on the force, which means having to endure constant put-downs, sexism and just an overall attitude of not being wanted. The majority of her male colleagues think women are too weak and stupid to be able to work as a police officer. More often than not she finds herself delegated to the role of tea and If you took a young Jane Tennison and a grumpy Judge John Deed and threw them in a police procedural together, then you would get the equivalent of Ryder and Loveday. Trudy is one of the first WPCs on the force, which means having to endure constant put-downs, sexism and just an overall attitude of not being wanted. The majority of her male colleagues think women are too weak and stupid to be able to work as a police officer. More often than not she finds herself delegated to the role of tea and coffee lady, and never receives any recognition for the actual police work she does. Trudy jumps at the chance to work with Clement Ryder, a coroner with a keen nose for liars and hidden crimes. When a man, with a reputation to lose, receives threats that turn into actual crimes it reawakens the interest Clement had in an old case. He uses Trudy to do his digging, and she ends up creating a rockslide. Martin writes a pithy plot with characters readers will want to revisit. I particularly enjoyed the way Martin highlights the daily chauvinism and major obstacles Trudy has to overcome to be taken seriously, and to be seen as equal member of the police force. In the 21st century it’s hard for women who are lucky enough not to have the same obstacles, to be able to fathom how difficult it must have been over half a century ago for women entering male dominated careers. Not that there isn’t still a level of inequality or sexism in our day and age, but it’s nothing compared to then. Women like Trudy paved the path for others to walk upon. The author keeps it simple, and yet simultaneously intriguing with a flair of a popular television police procedural. It’s about good old footwork, questioning and overlooked evidence. Where Ryder and Loveday are concerned it’s all about the niggle of doubt, the flicker of suspicion, and of course the ability to prove your theory. No matter how outlandish it may seem. *I received an ARC courtesy of the publisher via NetGalley.*

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    A Fatal Obsession by Faith Martin is a fabulous police retro novel set in 1960. The book is evocative of a bygone age where crimes were solved by legwork, questions and a healthy dose of suspicion. A Fatal Obsession is a 'thinking man's' novel. Being set in Oxford conjured up familiar landscapes for me. As a fan of the television series Morse and WPC56, I found the novel to be reminiscent of a blend of both. An unlikely pairing of a young WPC and an aging coroner ensured the reader was entertaine A Fatal Obsession by Faith Martin is a fabulous police retro novel set in 1960. The book is evocative of a bygone age where crimes were solved by legwork, questions and a healthy dose of suspicion. A Fatal Obsession is a 'thinking man's' novel. Being set in Oxford conjured up familiar landscapes for me. As a fan of the television series Morse and WPC56, I found the novel to be reminiscent of a blend of both. An unlikely pairing of a young WPC and an aging coroner ensured the reader was entertained as the young woman learnt about crime solving from the master. Modern murder collided with a cold case and kept the reader intrigued as we journeyed from parlors to stately homes. The reader found that secrets resided behind locked doors, requiring digging to unearth them. Due to comprehensive descriptions, the characters were easily to picture and well drawn. The narrative held my attention as I tried to piece together all the clues. In an age of male dominance and female stereotyping, the fresh faced WPC was a breath of fresh air. Any television producers out there? I think A Fatal Obsession would make a marvelous ITV series that has the legs to run for years and years. Gripping, original and new. I loved it. I received this book for free from Net Galley. A favourable review was not required and all views expressed are my own.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mrs. Moira McGeough

    This was an OK read. The idea of a young female policewoman teamed with an much older, very experienced coroner was quite interesting, but to be honest most of the characters were flat stereotypes. There were some annoying mistakes too. The music mentioned didn't fit the release dates and WPC Trudy Loveday claimed not to have tasted a sweet until she was twelve. During post war rationing sweets were strictly rationed but they were available. I remember the agony of having to choose between favou This was an OK read. The idea of a young female policewoman teamed with an much older, very experienced coroner was quite interesting, but to be honest most of the characters were flat stereotypes. There were some annoying mistakes too. The music mentioned didn't fit the release dates and WPC Trudy Loveday claimed not to have tasted a sweet until she was twelve. During post war rationing sweets were strictly rationed but they were available. I remember the agony of having to choose between favourites with my two little coupons! Perhaps as the series goes on the characters will flesh out and become more rounded. I hope so.

  27. 4 out of 5

    P.R.

    This new book from Faith Martin moves away from her popular series set around DI Hillary Greene, and back into the past - although still in Oxford. Her new duo is an oddly matched couple: a rookie policewoman Trudy Loveday is assigned to work with a daunting coroner, one Dr. Ryder. Set against the city in the nineteen sixties, the pair are likeable and the plot for this first novel is intriguing. I enjoyed the book from the outset. I don't find it quite as well written as the HG series, but I'll This new book from Faith Martin moves away from her popular series set around DI Hillary Greene, and back into the past - although still in Oxford. Her new duo is an oddly matched couple: a rookie policewoman Trudy Loveday is assigned to work with a daunting coroner, one Dr. Ryder. Set against the city in the nineteen sixties, the pair are likeable and the plot for this first novel is intriguing. I enjoyed the book from the outset. I don't find it quite as well written as the HG series, but I'll definitely follow these two into further crime scenes. Four and a half stars, then. Would I read again? Yes.

  28. 4 out of 5

    David

    Having read all the Hilary Greene series I was interested to see how the new series would compare and I wasn't disappointed. The characters and atmosphere were just about right. Having been a teenager in the same era I found myself remembering some of the songs and other things mentioned. Having read all the Hilary Greene series I was interested to see how the new series would compare and I wasn't disappointed. The characters and atmosphere were just about right. Having been a teenager in the same era I found myself remembering some of the songs and other things mentioned.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gary Van Cott

    While the basic premise of this series is very similar to the Tennison books, the author's storytelling skills make this a very worthwhile read. While the basic premise of this series is very similar to the Tennison books, the author's storytelling skills make this a very worthwhile read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Ingvaldsen

    The first Ryder & Loveday mystery is a likeable introduction to the unlikely partnership of a novice police probationer and crusty coroner.

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