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The Mark on the Wall and Other Short Fiction

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The thrill Woolf got from these stories is readily apparent to the reader. She wrote them in defiance of convention, with a heady feeling of liberation and with a clear sense that she was breaking new ground. Indeed, if she had not made her bold and experimental forays into the short story in the period leading up to the publication of Jacob's room (1922), it seems certain The thrill Woolf got from these stories is readily apparent to the reader. She wrote them in defiance of convention, with a heady feeling of liberation and with a clear sense that she was breaking new ground. Indeed, if she had not made her bold and experimental forays into the short story in the period leading up to the publication of Jacob's room (1922), it seems certain that her arrival as a great modernist novelist would have been delayed.


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The thrill Woolf got from these stories is readily apparent to the reader. She wrote them in defiance of convention, with a heady feeling of liberation and with a clear sense that she was breaking new ground. Indeed, if she had not made her bold and experimental forays into the short story in the period leading up to the publication of Jacob's room (1922), it seems certain The thrill Woolf got from these stories is readily apparent to the reader. She wrote them in defiance of convention, with a heady feeling of liberation and with a clear sense that she was breaking new ground. Indeed, if she had not made her bold and experimental forays into the short story in the period leading up to the publication of Jacob's room (1922), it seems certain that her arrival as a great modernist novelist would have been delayed.

30 review for The Mark on the Wall and Other Short Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Florencia

    Woolf finds a small mark on the wall and transforms it into a deluge of thoughts – perfectly connected, exquisitely disjointed – that grabs one's soul and tears it asunder, just to repair it by the end of her story, of her interior monologue, leaving the scars of memory and possibility forever burning inside one's head. My favorite kind of writing. A writer gives you her thoughts, and the need for a complex plot vanishes into thin air. The tree outside the window taps very gently on the pane ... Woolf finds a small mark on the wall and transforms it into a deluge of thoughts – perfectly connected, exquisitely disjointed – that grabs one's soul and tears it asunder, just to repair it by the end of her story, of her interior monologue, leaving the scars of memory and possibility forever burning inside one's head. My favorite kind of writing. A writer gives you her thoughts, and the need for a complex plot vanishes into thin air. The tree outside the window taps very gently on the pane ... I want to think quietly, calmly, spaciously, never to be interrupted, never to have to rise from my chair, to slip easily from one thing to another, without any sense of hostility, or obstacle. I want to sink deeper and deeper, away from the surface, with its hard separate facts. But thoughts have no owner, they answer to no master. So when you can't think of trees, a pleasant thing to think about according to Woolf, don't worry, there’s no harm in putting a full stop to one’s disagreeable thoughts by looking at a mark on the wall. Only for a while, though. The thought of spending an entire life just looking at a mark on the wall, ah, what a dreadful thought. July 25, 16 * Also on my blog.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mohsin Maqbool

    I READ Virginia Woolf’s “The Mark on the Wall” early this morning and loved it immensely. Here I must tell you that I read Miss Woolf and George Orwell for the first time this year and fell instantly in love with both British writers. In fact, the more I read them, the more I fall under their spell. Miss Woolf is highly perturbed by this circular “mark” on the wall and keeps wondering what it might be. Her descriptions are astounding. Read the following paragraph from her story: “In certain lights I READ Virginia Woolf’s “The Mark on the Wall” early this morning and loved it immensely. Here I must tell you that I read Miss Woolf and George Orwell for the first time this year and fell instantly in love with both British writers. In fact, the more I read them, the more I fall under their spell. Miss Woolf is highly perturbed by this circular “mark” on the wall and keeps wondering what it might be. Her descriptions are astounding. Read the following paragraph from her story: “In certain lights that mark on the wall seems actually to project from the wall. Nor is it entirely circular. I cannot be sure, but it seems to cast a perceptible shadow, suggesting that if I ran my finger down that strip of the wall it would, at a certain point, mount and descend a small tumulus, a smooth tumulus like those barrows on the South Downs which are, they say, either tombs or camps. Of the two I should prefer them to be tombs, desiring melancholy like most English people, and finding it natural at the end of a walk to think of the bones stretched beneath the turf.... There must be some book about it. Some antiquary must have dug up those bones and given them a name.... What sort of a man is an antiquary, I wonder? Retired Colonels for the most part, I daresay, leading parties of aged labourers to the top here, examining clods of earth and stone, and getting into correspondence with the neighbouring clergy, which, being opened at breakfast time, gives them a feeling of importance, and the comparison of arrow-heads necessitates cross-country journeys to the county towns, an agreeable necessity both to them and to their elderly wives, who wish to make plum jam or to clean out the study, and have every reason for keeping that great question of the camp or the tomb in perpetual suspension, while the Colonel himself feels agreeably philosophic in accumulating evidence on both sides of the question.” On reading the above-mentioned extract you must have realised how Woolf jumps from one thing to another, from one description to another while sticking to the main theme at the same time. And the extract I have shown to you as an example is just two-thirds of the paragraph! However, you don’t feel bored even for a second but you rather enjoy it -- on the condition that you are able to grasp it fully. If not, I warn you, you will be put off. She loves colours and often uses them in her works. In fact, a two-paragraph piece from “Monday or Tuesday” has been titled “Blue & Green”. I will talk about that in detail some other time. In the following paragraph she uses red, blue and white so beautifully, and her descriptions are out of this world. “Yes, one could imagine a very pleasant world. A quiet, spacious world, with the flowers so red and blue in the open fields. A world without professors or specialists or house-keepers with the profiles of policemen, a world which one could slice with one’s thought as a fish slices the water with his fin, grazing the stems of the water-lilies, hanging suspended over nests of white sea eggs....” She has studied Nature and its marvels in minute detail like Mr Orwell has studied life and its miseries by staying overnight in the casual ward of a workhouse (colloquially known as a "spike") and getting himself purposefully arrested and staying in a prison cell for two nights. Please mark also how she uses the colour green in this one. Miss Woolf writes: “Wood is a pleasant thing to think about. It comes from a tree; and trees grow, and we don’t know how they grow. For years and years they grow, without paying any attention to us, in meadows, in forests, and by the side of rivers—all things one likes to think about. The cows swish their tails beneath them on hot afternoons; they paint rivers so green that when a moorhen dives one expects to see its feathers all green when it comes up again.” Often when you read Miss Woolf, you don’t feel that you are reading prose but poetry instead. Take the following lines for instance: “I can’t remember a thing. Everything’s moving, falling, slipping, vanishing.... There is a vast upheaval of matter.” Short sentences used stupendously. Could prose ever be more beautiful than this! You might also get the feeling on reading the conclusion that she has made a mountain out of a molehill. However, no ordinary person can make the kind of mountain she does out of a mole. In short, what a whale of a tale she weaves with “The Mark on the Wall”!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Zanna

    3.75 stars I am always willing to read Woolf as I am always willing to eat yummy vegan cake; I know I'm going to enjoy it in the moment, in the act, not only after some mental mastication. Kew Gardens for example, is so dazzling, such prosepoem painting lozenges of light stained by the times, the war. I have read it four times with undiminished delight The very funny satirical story 'A Society' whets the appetite marvellously for the searing feminist polemic of A Room of Ones Own and 'Lappin and L 3.75 stars I am always willing to read Woolf as I am always willing to eat yummy vegan cake; I know I'm going to enjoy it in the moment, in the act, not only after some mental mastication. Kew Gardens for example, is so dazzling, such prosepoem painting lozenges of light stained by the times, the war. I have read it four times with undiminished delight The very funny satirical story 'A Society' whets the appetite marvellously for the searing feminist polemic of A Room of Ones Own and 'Lappin and Lapinova' seems to me a radical literary critique of the cult of masculinity, or at least of the atomising materialist zeitgeist of the era, very much associated with the highly gendered thrust of 'progress' I valued highly the introduction to this edition and thorough notes, which guided me in understanding the allusions to sex work in 'The Shooting Party' and addressed the problematic piece 'The Duchess and the Jeweller'. It was also interesting to read how Woolf wrote her short fiction, very rapidly, while slogging at her novels (though he does not mention that she claimed in letters to be writing Orlando in the same manner - as a treat for herself, while working on heavier material) The only point I want to disagree with Bradshaw on is the ending of the title story, when I think the snail, with its hidden curve of vanishing infinitestimal chambers, far from being a disappointingly mundane end to the reverie, is highly symbolic in the context of memory and daydream.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    The first Virginia Woolf I have not whole-heartedly loved yet still can find an appreciation for it. This short tale was reminiscent of The Yellow Wallpaper, in that our protagonist finds her thoughts strangely focused upon a small mar in her surroundings, both named in the titles. This tale is a far less chilling and a far more philosophical affair. A series of almost stream-of-consciousness style thoughts barrage the reader, as the protagonist contemplates the meaning and cause of the unknown m The first Virginia Woolf I have not whole-heartedly loved yet still can find an appreciation for it. This short tale was reminiscent of The Yellow Wallpaper, in that our protagonist finds her thoughts strangely focused upon a small mar in her surroundings, both named in the titles. This tale is a far less chilling and a far more philosophical affair. A series of almost stream-of-consciousness style thoughts barrage the reader, as the protagonist contemplates the meaning and cause of the unknown mark. All are interconnected and reveal much about both the central character and society in general. There is much to unpack concerning her musings about her life and the shape the mark upon the wall takes, but I found that actual enjoyment of the piece was somehow missing for me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    The short story conveys various themes within the first anonymous female narrator. The narrator started with simple and obvious explanation for the mark on the wall, which is the snail based on the time the story was written in January. While the narrator was concentrating on the person or the thing that cause the mark, she thought of the reflection this mark has on her live and how it become one of the concerning issue in her life. She jump from an idea to another, which expanded the imagination The short story conveys various themes within the first anonymous female narrator. The narrator started with simple and obvious explanation for the mark on the wall, which is the snail based on the time the story was written in January. While the narrator was concentrating on the person or the thing that cause the mark, she thought of the reflection this mark has on her live and how it become one of the concerning issue in her life. She jump from an idea to another, which expanded the imagination of the reader and gives a wider and more comfortable space to wonder and imagine. She thought of different explanation referring to nature, war, the role of women and men in this world, As I noticed that the story was written in the 1917, during the ww1, which forced the writer to escape to a more comfortable world of relaxation that gives her the time to realize the pain people suffer from this mark on the wall. Despite the fact that the writer try to insist on, that there must be an explanation for this mark on this wall, she tries to analyze her role as human, or female, within what is happening in that time, war. Moreover, the way she deals with the themes she discussed as if she just remember her life when she was young experiencing nature, society, and walking through the roads. I think that the mark signify war and how it dirt the whole wall, which can indicate the world. And the wall, or the world, is bigger and wider than this small dirty mark. Therefore, her emphasis on the world, people, nature, relationship … etc. she insisted on abstract and concrete things to clarify the means to change her and others life to remove this mark from their sight. I thought of the word "mark", why she did not used spot or dirt.. I think because unlike dirt or spot that can easily be removed, the Mark is very difficult to removed, it must be changed. The pain of losing people in war cannot be removed easily, just like the mark, so the owner of the house have to change the wall and the place which can be referred to changing war into peace, a completely different situation. By the end of the story, sadly, she is grasped deeply from the truth that war is still on and the newspaper is the only mean of having connection with life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Yousif Al Zeera

    Mind-Stimulating. It keeps your mind wandering into several topics and ideas (of social, political, psychological and philosophical aspects) but keeps it connected as well to the damned mark on the wall. Such a marvelous piece of writing that does this to the mind.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chrissie

    Chapter 5 in a collection of short stories by Virginia Woolf. It is available free online at Librivox, here: https://librivox.org/short-story-coll... You are in the head of a woman sitting by the fireside on a cold winter’s day. She spots some sort of mark on the wall, five or six inches above the mantelpiece. How did it get there? What could it be? Comfortable where she is, she has not the energy nor the desire to get up and check it out. Her thoughts wander, leaving that little mark behind. Sha Chapter 5 in a collection of short stories by Virginia Woolf. It is available free online at Librivox, here: https://librivox.org/short-story-coll... You are in the head of a woman sitting by the fireside on a cold winter’s day. She spots some sort of mark on the wall, five or six inches above the mantelpiece. How did it get there? What could it be? Comfortable where she is, she has not the energy nor the desire to get up and check it out. Her thoughts wander, leaving that little mark behind. Shakespeare, freedom, the illusiveness of knowledge, the world outside, nature—all this she contemplates. Her meandering recollections of nature are what I like best. A person enters the room. In a flash, the dreamy atmosphere is gone. What that mark on the wall is, is revealed too. It’s (view spoiler)[a snail (hide spoiler)] ! Elizabeth Klett reads this marvelously. Four stars for the narration. Thank you, Eileen, for telling me of this. ******************** Jacob's Room 4 stars Mrs. Dalloway 4 stars Night and Day 3 stars The Voyage Out 3 stars To the Lighthouse 3 stars Kew Gardens 3 stars The Mark on the Wall 3 stars A Room of One's Own 1 star The Waves 1 star

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joel

    This is one of my favorite short stories of all time. I admit, part of that might be due to the fact that this was one of my first tastes of well-executed stream of consciousness. I love the flow. While some might find it boring and pointless on the grounds that it doesn't really describe any paramount experience I love it BECAUSE it is its own experience. This is one of my favorite short stories of all time. I admit, part of that might be due to the fact that this was one of my first tastes of well-executed stream of consciousness. I love the flow. While some might find it boring and pointless on the grounds that it doesn't really describe any paramount experience I love it BECAUSE it is its own experience.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amira K.

    "Why, if one wants to compare life to anything, one must liken it to being blown through the Tube at fifty miles an hour—landing at the other end without a single hairpin in one's hair! Shot out at the feet of God entirely naked!" To make sense of this brilliant short story I had to relax with a large cup of coffee and read slower than usual. Not being so familiar with Woolf's style It's utterly peculiar nothing simple and straight-forward like Chekhov, it's rather dense and philosophical! The rea "Why, if one wants to compare life to anything, one must liken it to being blown through the Tube at fifty miles an hour—landing at the other end without a single hairpin in one's hair! Shot out at the feet of God entirely naked!" To make sense of this brilliant short story I had to relax with a large cup of coffee and read slower than usual. Not being so familiar with Woolf's style It's utterly peculiar nothing simple and straight-forward like Chekhov, it's rather dense and philosophical! The reader follows Woolf's stream of conciseness, I just loved how she captures the flow of thoughts, it's exactly like being inside someone's head. *Woolf's head* "I wish I could hit upon a pleasant track of thought, a track indirectly reflecting credit upon myself, for those are the pleasantest thoughts, and very frequent even in the minds of modest mouse-coloured people, who believe genuinely that they dislike to hear their own praises. They are not thoughts directly praising oneself; that is the beauty of them." "I'm dressing up the figure of myself in my own mind, lovingly, stealthily, not openly adoring it, for if I did that, I should catch myself out, and stretch my hand at once for a book in self-protection. Indeed, it is curious how instinctively one protects the image of oneself from idolatry or any other handling that could make it ridiculous, or too unlike the original to be believed in any longer. Or is it not so very curious after all? It is a matter of great importance." Woolf Muses on whether to lose grasp on reality *the half-phantom reality* or not worshipping reality, worshipping the impersonal world which is a proof of some existence other than ours. It quiet transfixed me and I absolutely LOVED IT! My favourite part: "Suppose the looking glass smashes, the image disappears, and the romantic figure with the green of forest depths all about it is there no longer, but only that shell of a person which is seen by other people—what an airless, shallow, bald, prominent world it becomes! A world not to be lived in. As we face each other in omnibuses and underground railways we are looking into the mirror that accounts for the vagueness, the gleam of glassiness, in our eyes. And the novelists in future will realize more and more the importance of these reflections, for of course there is not one reflection but an almost infinite number"

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Read online at Project Gutenberg Australia. Opening lines: Perhaps it was the middle of January in the present that I first looked up and saw the mark on the wall. In order to fix a date it is necessary to remember what one saw. So now I think of the fire; the steady film of yellow light upon the page of my book; the three chrysanthemums in the round glass bowl on the mantelpiece. Read online at Project Gutenberg Australia. Opening lines: Perhaps it was the middle of January in the present that I first looked up and saw the mark on the wall. In order to fix a date it is necessary to remember what one saw. So now I think of the fire; the steady film of yellow light upon the page of my book; the three chrysanthemums in the round glass bowl on the mantelpiece.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bill Khaemba

    The tree outside the window taps very gently on the pane ... I want to think quietly, calmly, spaciously, never to be interrupted, never to have to rise from my chair, to slip easily from one thing to another, without any sense of hostility, or obstacle. I want to sink deeper and deeper, away from the surface, with its hard separate facts. Still one of my favorite short story ever

  12. 5 out of 5

    antiquarian reverie

    After a Goodreads friend (Amira K.) reviewed this short piece, (*see her review) I wanted to get a taste of Virginia Woolf and not knowing actually when I will read her, this seemed a perfect chance. I like things that are "stream of consciousness" and find them quite interesting, and this did not disappoint. I had to read it extra slow, so my mind could grasp what was thrown at me. She talked of life, death, conformity, self, men of action and the past but when I saw it was written in 1917, the After a Goodreads friend (Amira K.) reviewed this short piece, (*see her review) I wanted to get a taste of Virginia Woolf and not knowing actually when I will read her, this seemed a perfect chance. I like things that are "stream of consciousness" and find them quite interesting, and this did not disappoint. I had to read it extra slow, so my mind could grasp what was thrown at me. She talked of life, death, conformity, self, men of action and the past but when I saw it was written in 1917, then it became clearer to me, that the war was on and life questions were on her mind as well as the uselessness of moving from her chair to see what "The Mark on the Wall" really was and the uselessness of ignoring reality. That was my take.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Edita

    How readily our thoughts swarm upon a new object, lifting it a little way, as ants carry a blade of straw so feverishly, and then leave it... * Why, if one wants to compare life to anything, one must liken it to being blown through the Tube at fifty miles an hour — landing at the other end without a single hairpin in one’s hair! Shot out at the feet of God entirely naked! Tumbling head over heels in the asphodel meadows like brown paper parcels pitched down a shoot in the post office! With one’s h How readily our thoughts swarm upon a new object, lifting it a little way, as ants carry a blade of straw so feverishly, and then leave it... * Why, if one wants to compare life to anything, one must liken it to being blown through the Tube at fifty miles an hour — landing at the other end without a single hairpin in one’s hair! Shot out at the feet of God entirely naked! Tumbling head over heels in the asphodel meadows like brown paper parcels pitched down a shoot in the post office! With one’s hair flying back like the tail of a race-horse. Yes, that seems to express the rapidity of life, the perpetual waste and repair; all so casual, all so haphazard...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    What is this mark on the wall, this mind-boggling, thought provoking, thought envoking mark?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    A brief stream of consciousness made interesting by Woolf's beautiful writing. She hits the nail on the head several times throughout her narrator's musings... But it isn't a nail she can see on the wall, is it? A brief stream of consciousness made interesting by Woolf's beautiful writing. She hits the nail on the head several times throughout her narrator's musings... But it isn't a nail she can see on the wall, is it?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Trav Rockwell

    The mark on the wall turns into many ramblings and overthinking. Putting too much thought into meaningless things of unimportance. I see what Virginia Woolf was trying to do though not as effective as it could have been.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    I actually read these writings in a book with a different title. It felt like a more authentic experience - reading the collection of short stories in the sequence in which they were published. This was important to me. Please take a look at my review of A Haunted House and Other Short Stories here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show.... However, readers should note that this collection publishes three short compositions not included in the aforementioned, reviewed and favoured book. This boo I actually read these writings in a book with a different title. It felt like a more authentic experience - reading the collection of short stories in the sequence in which they were published. This was important to me. Please take a look at my review of A Haunted House and Other Short Stories here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show.... However, readers should note that this collection publishes three short compositions not included in the aforementioned, reviewed and favoured book. This book also includes: Blue and Green; A Society; and, In The Orchard, an extensive introduction, a chronology of Virginia Woolf, and some explanatory notes. Leonard Woolf's introduction is not included. I am, nevertheless, pleased to have read the three short pieces, of which I most appreciated In The Orchard for its daydream-like, mind-wandering, phantasmagoric qualities.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sevgi

    "How readily our thoughts swarm upon a new object, lifting it a little way, as ants carry a blade of straw so feverishly, and then leave it. ..." (Long ago) I used to find Woolf's sentences too long and hard to understand. So I had to give up reading some of her novels. I knew that it wasn't over though, it could not be. Now after reading this brilliant story without any regret or boredom, I can sense that it's my time to fall in love with her. Loong sentences, lots of ideas between, a great dea "How readily our thoughts swarm upon a new object, lifting it a little way, as ants carry a blade of straw so feverishly, and then leave it. ..." (Long ago) I used to find Woolf's sentences too long and hard to understand. So I had to give up reading some of her novels. I knew that it wasn't over though, it could not be. Now after reading this brilliant story without any regret or boredom, I can sense that it's my time to fall in love with her. Loong sentences, lots of ideas between, a great deal of commas around.. they all seemed in a great harmony to me this time. I wanted to quote something, note it somewhere but couldn't prefer anything to another (I could come up with the one above, for now) Surely I still have lots to grab from her works... Happy to be a part of her fans. If you don't/didn't like her works, maybe you still need time like I needed. Don't have any bias. She is good. I am not giving you anything from the story. Just read it!

  19. 4 out of 5

    MiMi

    "The Mark on the wall" the simplest title I've ever come across YET...Yet...yet..THE philosophies in this short story have burned every damn grey cell in an attempt to understand what's between the lines. I give stars only to books i do fully understand so i can judge and criticize which i cannot do for such a piece. the only thing i was able to grasp had amazed me which is how this author could capture perfectly the swarming thoughts in a wandering-mind and spill them in an ORIGINAL work that pro "The Mark on the wall" the simplest title I've ever come across YET...Yet...yet..THE philosophies in this short story have burned every damn grey cell in an attempt to understand what's between the lines. I give stars only to books i do fully understand so i can judge and criticize which i cannot do for such a piece. the only thing i was able to grasp had amazed me which is how this author could capture perfectly the swarming thoughts in a wandering-mind and spill them in an ORIGINAL work that proves her uniqueness. This short piece have implications that are extremely hard to understand unless you did fully understand characteristics of modernism. creative.....original.....piece.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    'The Mark on the Wall' was written about 1921. In this classic short story the narrator sees a mark on the wall. This stimulates them to meditate on what the mark on the wall might possibly mean. Short story also found at: online-literature.com 'The Mark on the Wall' was written about 1921. In this classic short story the narrator sees a mark on the wall. This stimulates them to meditate on what the mark on the wall might possibly mean. Short story also found at: online-literature.com

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Pretty interesting, read it for my modern globalization class

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erica Liu

    cheating on my reading challenge cause i read this in class and im in a huge slump fite me

  23. 4 out of 5

    Arisarah

    For all those who are wondering, this is how "overthinking" is like. U know when and how it starts but u never know when and how it will stop. U go on and on about something that is not even what u think. At first, maybe this story seems pointless and stupid to u but I really recommend u to pay attention to the setting. It's wartime. U can clearly see the effects of war on narrator's thoughts and she simply seeks some kind of distraction. By the way, Virginia Woolf is my main girl. For all those who are wondering, this is how "overthinking" is like. U know when and how it starts but u never know when and how it will stop. U go on and on about something that is not even what u think. At first, maybe this story seems pointless and stupid to u but I really recommend u to pay attention to the setting. It's wartime. U can clearly see the effects of war on narrator's thoughts and she simply seeks some kind of distraction. By the way, Virginia Woolf is my main girl.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Keely

    I’ve always had a chaotic relationship with steam of consciousness prose but Virginia Woolf does it like no other. It was fascinating to read this one, her first published story. My head is still spinning with everything she managed to cover in a small space.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Just a damn fun downpour of stream of consciousness. Read for a modern lit class

  26. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Virginia Woolf was a genius, this one is a lovely, simple, disjointed steam-of-consciousness story and I really really liked it

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed

    Oh! dear me, the mystery of life; The inaccuracy of thought! The ignorance of humanity! To show how very little control of our possessions we have—what an accidental affair this living is after all our civilization." Woolf It sheds light on the art of the novel. Interesting. More to be found in PC- Documents - to read - have read Oh! dear me, the mystery of life; The inaccuracy of thought! The ignorance of humanity! To show how very little control of our possessions we have—what an accidental affair this living is after all our civilization." Woolf It sheds light on the art of the novel. Interesting. More to be found in PC- Documents - to read - have read

  28. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    Virginia, I'd never Woolf whistle at you because 1) I've never done that to anyone in my life unless prompted and joking 2) you were a genius The mark on my wall, well, it leaves no trail Virginia, I'd never Woolf whistle at you because 1) I've never done that to anyone in my life unless prompted and joking 2) you were a genius The mark on my wall, well, it leaves no trail

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robyn

    So many snails in these short Hogarth Press pieces!

  30. 4 out of 5

    A

    I think I must've said and thought "holy shit" about a dozen times, because holy shit, Woolf was incredible and I have no words. I think I must've said and thought "holy shit" about a dozen times, because holy shit, Woolf was incredible and I have no words.

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