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Forest Bathing: The Power of Trees to Relieve Stress, Boost Your Mood, and Improve Your Health

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The definitive guide to the therapeutic Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku, or the art and science of how trees can promote health and happiness Forest bathing, or shinrin-yoku, is the Japanese secret to health and happiness, and it's right in your own backyard. As a society we suffer from nature deficit disorder. But studies have shown that backing away from your computer The definitive guide to the therapeutic Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku, or the art and science of how trees can promote health and happiness Forest bathing, or shinrin-yoku, is the Japanese secret to health and happiness, and it's right in your own backyard. As a society we suffer from nature deficit disorder. But studies have shown that backing away from your computer screen and stepping outside to spend mindful, intentional time in nature can reduce your stress levels and blood pressure, strengthen your immune and cardiovascular systems, and boost your energy, mood, creativity, and concentration. It can even help you live longer: the phytoncides, or chemical compounds, produced by trees can help your body produce more of the white blood cells that fight cancer. Forest bathing is more than just a walk in the woods. Unlike hiking, there is no particular destination and no physical exertion required; it is an exercise for the mind, not the body. By observing how a tree sways in the wind, running your hand over its bark, or noticing the particular citrusy scent of a forest, you will learn how to lose yourself in the beauty of your surroundings, leave everyday stress behind you, and reach a place of greater calm and wellness. Illustrated with more than 100 color photographs, this beautiful guide to forest bathing will introduce you to the healing power of trees.


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The definitive guide to the therapeutic Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku, or the art and science of how trees can promote health and happiness Forest bathing, or shinrin-yoku, is the Japanese secret to health and happiness, and it's right in your own backyard. As a society we suffer from nature deficit disorder. But studies have shown that backing away from your computer The definitive guide to the therapeutic Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku, or the art and science of how trees can promote health and happiness Forest bathing, or shinrin-yoku, is the Japanese secret to health and happiness, and it's right in your own backyard. As a society we suffer from nature deficit disorder. But studies have shown that backing away from your computer screen and stepping outside to spend mindful, intentional time in nature can reduce your stress levels and blood pressure, strengthen your immune and cardiovascular systems, and boost your energy, mood, creativity, and concentration. It can even help you live longer: the phytoncides, or chemical compounds, produced by trees can help your body produce more of the white blood cells that fight cancer. Forest bathing is more than just a walk in the woods. Unlike hiking, there is no particular destination and no physical exertion required; it is an exercise for the mind, not the body. By observing how a tree sways in the wind, running your hand over its bark, or noticing the particular citrusy scent of a forest, you will learn how to lose yourself in the beauty of your surroundings, leave everyday stress behind you, and reach a place of greater calm and wellness. Illustrated with more than 100 color photographs, this beautiful guide to forest bathing will introduce you to the healing power of trees.

30 review for Forest Bathing: The Power of Trees to Relieve Stress, Boost Your Mood, and Improve Your Health

  1. 4 out of 5

    Beth Bonini

    Six months ago I moved full-time to London after years of living in the English countryside. I had lived very near a large woodland, and walking in it was part of my weekly - and seasonal - routine. Snowdrops, then crocuses, daffodils, then drifts of bluebells represented the spring; the summer was a canopy of green, cool even in the hottest weather; and autumn was glorious with burnished colour. Even in winter, because of the high concentration of conifers, the woodland had a dark green density Six months ago I moved full-time to London after years of living in the English countryside. I had lived very near a large woodland, and walking in it was part of my weekly - and seasonal - routine. Snowdrops, then crocuses, daffodils, then drifts of bluebells represented the spring; the summer was a canopy of green, cool even in the hottest weather; and autumn was glorious with burnished colour. Even in winter, because of the high concentration of conifers, the woodland had a dark green density to it. I was aware that those woodland walks were beneficial to me - not just in terms of my physical health, but also mental and emotional - but in some sense it was also something I took for granted. I am fortunate to live, now in London, very near Hampstead Heath - because despite the many large parks in London, the Heath is one of the few places in that sprawling metropolis where a person can actually find ‘nature’ of a wilder, less cultivated kind. During the autumn, I found myself taking long walks - rambles, really, where I would quite deliberately ‘lose’ myself - and the beauty of the landscape was a kind of ecstasy that was a very dramatic counterpoint to the depression that I often felt after ending my long marriage and living alone for the first time in 25 years. At some point during this time, I first heard the Japanese term ‘Shinrin-Yoku’ (or Forest-Bathing) and it made complete sense to me. I realised that I had been going to the forest, sinking into it, in much the same way I might seek relief in a hot bath after a long, aching day. Dr. Qing Li, the author of this Penguin Life edition, has written a very accessible explanation of what exactly Forest-Bathing is, and why it is an important way of combating stress in the modern world. The author has spent much of his academic career substantiating what most people intuitively know, and have always known: that being in nature does us good. There is a lot of science in it, but it is always expressed in the clearest and simplest of terms. One of the interesting bits of research that Dr. Li shares is that there is plentiful scientific evidence suggesting that looking at trees or water - even through a window, or in a photograph - has some of the same calming effects (on the nervous system) that actually being in a forest or near water does. My point is that even reading this book is a very calming experience. There is a large, easy-to-read text, photographs on nearly every page, and a very simple prose style. “We are reassured by green on a very primitive level,” says Dr. Ling, and unsurprisingly, there is a lot of green to look at in this grown-up picture book. At times, I felt that I was reading a meditation, either of ‘new age’ or ‘ancient’ style (depending on how you look at it. “Drink in the flavour of the forest and release your sense of joy and calm. This is your sixth sense, a state of mind.” One of the most delightful aspects of the book, for me, was Dr. Ling’s descriptions of Japanese culture and landscape. Although it is well-known that trees are necessary for the beauty and health of our world, the Japanese revere nature (and specifically trees) in a particular way. My daughter is visiting Japan this summer, and she was fascinated by this book and almost fighting me to read it. Although much of the book focuses on the Japanese culture of Forest Bathing, going into some detail about specific forests where you can take part in Shinrin-Yoku programmes, the author is also at some pains to bring the rest of the world into it. The last third of the book is mostly devoted to ways in which cities can improve the living/breathing quality of life for its citizens, or how individuals can bring the benefits of the forest into their home and office. Offshoots of Shinrin-Yoku, one might say. I was already convinced of the benefits of Forest Bathing, but it was very interesting to learn more about why I feel these benefits. I shall be breathing deeply of phytoncides from now on. I might even walk barefoot on the floor of the forest this summer. Thanks very much to Penguin Life for an Advance Copy of this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    "Shinrin-yoku means bathing in the forest atmosphere, or taking in the forest through our senses. This is not exercise, or hiking, or jogging. It is simply being in nature, connecting with it through our sense of sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch." pg 12 Nature lovers or those aspiring to be nature lovers will find much to enjoy in Shinrin-Yoku: The Art and Science of Forest Bathing. Qing Li reminds readers that the human race is a part of this world even if we have walled ourselves up in ci "Shinrin-yoku means bathing in the forest atmosphere, or taking in the forest through our senses. This is not exercise, or hiking, or jogging. It is simply being in nature, connecting with it through our sense of sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch." pg 12 Nature lovers or those aspiring to be nature lovers will find much to enjoy in Shinrin-Yoku: The Art and Science of Forest Bathing. Qing Li reminds readers that the human race is a part of this world even if we have walled ourselves up in cities and covered the ground in concrete. Through various scientific studies, he proves again and again that by taking a time out and forest bathing people can sleep more deeply, experience less stress and think more clearly. "We may not travel very far on our forest walk but, in connecting us with nature, shinrin-yoku takes us all the way home to our true selves." pg 15 Not convinced? He provides evidence that patients at hospitals heal faster if the view outside their window includes a tree rather than a wall. People who exercise outside report the exertion they need to complete the workout is less and they enjoy the time more than those who churn out the miles on a treadmill. "The average sleep time of participants after a two-hour forest walk increased by 15 percent, or fifty-four minutes. Participants were significantly less anxious after a two-hour walk in the forest." Forest bathers have reported higher levels of creativity, writers find relief from the dreaded block, and the sense of connection caused by the practice has been known to increase feelings of gratitude. "The researchers concluded that there 'is a real, measurable cognitive advantage to be realized if we spend time truly immersed in a natural setting', and found that spending time in nature can boost problem-solving ability and creativity by 50 per cent. Is it any wonder that Buddha found enlightenment sitting under a tree?" pg 106 Is there anything that forest bathing doesn't help? How about your health or physical age? "A group of Canadian, American and Australian researchers studying tree density and health in Toronto found that... having eleven more trees on a block lowered cardio-metabolic illnesses, like high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity, comparable to the effects on well-being conferred by being given a $20,000 a year pay rise or being 1.4 years younger." pg 116 In addition to the information about forest bathing, this book contains beautiful photos of forests every couple of pages. Qing Li gives readers the instructions so, if they desired, they could hold their own traditional tea ceremony in the woods. He includes anecdotal information about aromatherapy, tips on how to bring the forest into your home, advice on how to incorporate beneficial natural sounds into your daily life and more. I enjoyed this book very much. Highly recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    7jane

    What is forest-bathing? It's time spent in forests/parks, walking, sitting, eating, practicing tea ceremony etc. for the good of your physical/mental health, appreciating nature's beauty. The author is an expert on this subject; there are many, many pictures of the forests here, so you can probably use *them* also to get some experience. This book talks about forests especially in Japan, but one can easily apply this form of nature-enjoyment, and the tips within, to other places around the world What is forest-bathing? It's time spent in forests/parks, walking, sitting, eating, practicing tea ceremony etc. for the good of your physical/mental health, appreciating nature's beauty. The author is an expert on this subject; there are many, many pictures of the forests here, so you can probably use *them* also to get some experience. This book talks about forests especially in Japan, but one can easily apply this form of nature-enjoyment, and the tips within, to other places around the world (some non-Japanese parks are shown in the map at the end). Even a small amount of time there works, though the author recommends longer times for a bigger effect. In Japan, forest-bathing (since 1982) is quite popular. There is a religious and folkloric connection to it, and further things like using scents, having onsen-baths near them, having centres dedicated to forest-bathing information in certain places, and so on. The author talks about various ways the forest/park helps us through our senses: smell (using scents through oil, incense, the wood material), taste (making tea or food out of certain plants), touch (touching trees, walking barefoot), hearing (nature sounds), sight (forest view speeding healing, the colors, the fractal patterns). There's also talk about how to use it inside (houseplants, scenting, medicinally), and at work (putting up pictures, a view out of the window, having plants, going out briefly to a park during breaks). And finally there's talk about the future of forests and parks, how important they are for us. How cities plan their trees and nature-places, and how children benefit from being near trees. Finally we have a mood-test for measuring how our moods change when we go walking in the forest/park, and a list of further reading (mostly internet addresses). Forests and parks are important to our well-being, physically and mentally. The more we go and enjoy them, the more benefits we get. This should give us motivation to support having them. This books is worth owning just for the pictures alone, but the information and opinions within makes it more than a good picture book, and is quite uplifting.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    My review of this book could be summed up in one hyphenated word: Life-changing. Shinrin-yoku is the practise of taking time out of our technologically overloaded and overstimulated lives and allowing the power of nature's presence to consume and calm us. The benefits of doing so can impact every area of our lives and this book delivers startling figures and scientific discoveries that prove just how. The prosaic writing style was enough to convince me, but this book also delivers written testimo My review of this book could be summed up in one hyphenated word: Life-changing. Shinrin-yoku is the practise of taking time out of our technologically overloaded and overstimulated lives and allowing the power of nature's presence to consume and calm us. The benefits of doing so can impact every area of our lives and this book delivers startling figures and scientific discoveries that prove just how. The prosaic writing style was enough to convince me, but this book also delivers written testimonies, a multitude of studies to back the initial hypotheses, and a string of data to convert the most analytically-minded or disbelieving of readers. Asides from guiding the reader to a life lived closer to nature's pacifying presence, this book is also a helpful instructional guide on scents and their specific effect on the body, species of tree and the aid they can give to humans, essential oils and their properties, and a whole host of other interesting information that had me note jotting throughout my reading of this. As one who was already in the process of allowing nature to creep its way in to my everyday life, this book was preaching to the converted. I can, however, not foresee any individual being immune to the breath-taking imagery and the lush prose that helped to demonstrate the power of forest-bathing. Dr Qing Li has expertly made the process of reading feel like a an act of nature, itself. Turning every page filled me with joy as I anticipated the sublime photography of dappled sunlight on falling leaves or written depictions of some of Japan's most breath-taking natural spaces that were to greet me. The joy of this book is not to be found solely in chronology. This is one I read from cover-to-cover, over the course of less than a week, but I have since found myself already flicking to pages at random, eager to get my fix of its awe-inspiring beauty. It has already affected my life so much, with its infusion of the natural, and has guided me to a life more fulfilled as I continue to venture out of doors.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    How sad and ironic that a book about the benefits of trees should waste so much paper, where the text on each page uses only 1/4-1/3 of the space and also used a large font. I found it too anecdotal and not very linear in its topic. Pretty pictures of forests though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Libraryassistant

    I was torn between 3 & 4 stars, but I enjoyed this book and some of the science included to back up what is clearly an evangelical subject to the author. Some of the writing is a little naive, but Dr. Li does make me want to get out into the natural world. I took a walk in the nearby orchard instead of a coffee break today!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michelle (Sherbet Lemon)

    Of course it helped that this book started with a premise I agreed with. I was nodding along for a really long time and so happy that the author was able to give real life scientific examples to support what he was saying. Then...the pseudoscience happened. So much pseudo-science. Now I did find the actual research based bits about essential oils kind of interesting, but it went on for way too long and some of what he was saying was pseudo-science or simply anecdotal. Then there was the positive Of course it helped that this book started with a premise I agreed with. I was nodding along for a really long time and so happy that the author was able to give real life scientific examples to support what he was saying. Then...the pseudoscience happened. So much pseudo-science. Now I did find the actual research based bits about essential oils kind of interesting, but it went on for way too long and some of what he was saying was pseudo-science or simply anecdotal. Then there was the positive and negative ions from earth bit. Yeah, I want to see your research on that bud. Then, despite the fact that this is supposed to be for an international audience there were way too many examples of how this is done in Japan, and way too much acting like we the readers could just go to Japan and see for ourselves. Why not, instead talk about how different countries might set up their own nature bathing areas, such as Japan has? I also love trees and greenery, don't get me wrong, but I would have found it interesting for him to address the connection to nature that people have up in the tundra above the tree line and also in desert areas. Having lived in Qatar I can say that they people there have a history with and connection to the desert. Is their connection any less because, for the most part, no trees are present? I mean I couldn't connect to the desert the same way as the locals, but these are questions I had having lived there. So honestly at the end of the day this book was too pseudo-science, to incomplete and not global enough for a global audience. *sigh* C'est la vie, but I was hoping to love this one more!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    I grew up in a forest. I got married in a forest. I live in a house surrounded by trees. I'm a tree person. How lovely, then, to read this book that shares all the many benefits of trees on our lives. Note: this is a library book, but I'd now like to get a copy of my own so that I can think more carefully about trees. I grew up in a forest. I got married in a forest. I live in a house surrounded by trees. I'm a tree person. How lovely, then, to read this book that shares all the many benefits of trees on our lives. Note: this is a library book, but I'd now like to get a copy of my own so that I can think more carefully about trees.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    As someone who lives in a large city, I have to make a conscious effort to get out into nature a few times each week, so it was interesting to read about the whole forest bathing movement in Japan. I am a bit skeptical of some of the health claims, but otherwise a good an relaxing read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Korey

    A book about a hobby. I enjoyed learning about the practice of forest bathing or Shinrin-Yoku. The different between hiking and forest bathing is hiking sets out with a purpose or destination, where as forest bathing has no end point in mind. Instead it encourages the utilization of your five senses to be present in the moment to heal your body and mind. This book gave me the tools to be able to go into the forests’ of Colorado and practice Shinrin-Yoku.

  11. 4 out of 5

    GONZA

    As the topic was total unknown to me, I found the book very interesting even if a little bit naive and simplistic, still it was a subject that the author handled with a lot of experience and love. I love everything Japan so this was also a bonus for me. Siccome l'argomento di questo libro mi era totalmente sconosciuto, ho trovato questo volume molto interessante anche se a volte un po semplicistico. ma si vede come l'autore sia un appassionato della materia e come l'ami profondamente. Inoltre sic As the topic was total unknown to me, I found the book very interesting even if a little bit naive and simplistic, still it was a subject that the author handled with a lot of experience and love. I love everything Japan so this was also a bonus for me. Siccome l'argomento di questo libro mi era totalmente sconosciuto, ho trovato questo volume molto interessante anche se a volte un po semplicistico. ma si vede come l'autore sia un appassionato della materia e come l'ami profondamente. Inoltre siccome mi piacciono tutte le cose che hanno anche un minimo riferimento al Giappone, questo per me era un punto in piú. THANKS NETGALLEY FOR THE PREVIEW!

  12. 4 out of 5

    penny shima glanz

    I am excited to see science supporting the practice of shinrin-yoku (森林浴). I have always headed out to the woods to recharge and reset (and rest) and now I better understand why. In _Forest Bathing_, Li has written a helpful guide for those curious about how to practice and why. Included are the results (and general process) of multiple scientific studies. These investigated the effects forest bathing had on stress, sleep, mood, the immune system, and more. This book offers practical advice for t I am excited to see science supporting the practice of shinrin-yoku (森林浴). I have always headed out to the woods to recharge and reset (and rest) and now I better understand why. In _Forest Bathing_, Li has written a helpful guide for those curious about how to practice and why. Included are the results (and general process) of multiple scientific studies. These investigated the effects forest bathing had on stress, sleep, mood, the immune system, and more. This book offers practical advice for those beginning the practice of forest bathing. It also includes ideas on ways to extend the benefits indoors. The explanations of shinrin-yoku are straightforward, without jargon or buzzwords. You learn how the forest can help you reduce anxiety, lower blood pressure, reduce depression, improve sleep, and more. While it focuses on the forests and trees of Japan, Li's book is a useful resource no matter where you live. The appendix features a map that highlights 40 beautiful forests throughout the world. This is an essential handbook for those who want to understand and make shinrin-yoku a part of their life. I received an eARC of this title from NetGalley in exchange for a review. The FTC wants you to know.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ioan Pan

    Being found of peace and quiet, wandering in the woods helped me both, to understand myself and also to be conscious of the connection we have with everything alive. This book reminded me that in the forest, where songs of birds, floating wind through leaves, smell of the ground and so many other mesmerizing images, made us feel present and free, with plenty of benefits on mental and physical level. I would highly recommend the book to everyone, and after reading it, go straight in the woods, you' Being found of peace and quiet, wandering in the woods helped me both, to understand myself and also to be conscious of the connection we have with everything alive. This book reminded me that in the forest, where songs of birds, floating wind through leaves, smell of the ground and so many other mesmerizing images, made us feel present and free, with plenty of benefits on mental and physical level. I would highly recommend the book to everyone, and after reading it, go straight in the woods, you'll know why.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    Excellent read! Everyone should read this book and then take a walk in a green space!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Femke

    This is excactly the same book as Shinrin-Yoku: the art and science of forest bathing by Qing Li, but with a different (nicer) cover. So I’ve now read this book twice 😅 nevertheless is it a really interesting book with beautiful photos of forests in Japan.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I love walking through forests and listening to the trees move and sway. As a kid, my favorite reading spot was the branch of a tree. The author provided evidence backed research to prove that "forest bathing" reduces stress and promotes mindfulness. I hope to visit Japan soon to experience shinrin-yoku in the author's native land. I love walking through forests and listening to the trees move and sway. As a kid, my favorite reading spot was the branch of a tree. The author provided evidence backed research to prove that "forest bathing" reduces stress and promotes mindfulness. I hope to visit Japan soon to experience shinrin-yoku in the author's native land.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erica Clou

    This is a short book, but it's chockful of information. I couldn't tell how strictly scientific the advice is but it seems worth a shot to connect with nature and give it a try. Since the author discusses a number of Japanese forests I think this book is especially helpful for someone living in or visiting Japan. There are also many tips that can be applied even if you're not in Japan though. This is a short book, but it's chockful of information. I couldn't tell how strictly scientific the advice is but it seems worth a shot to connect with nature and give it a try. Since the author discusses a number of Japanese forests I think this book is especially helpful for someone living in or visiting Japan. There are also many tips that can be applied even if you're not in Japan though.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    It's always the best surprise when a book turns out to be more engaging and reads less like a textbook when it is a class requirement. It reads like a well researched and and easy to digest research paper instead. It's really informative. It's a convincing argument for forest bathing as well that champions for the importance and preservation of forests for the health of humanity. As Dr. Qing Li said, "when trees die, we die." It's always the best surprise when a book turns out to be more engaging and reads less like a textbook when it is a class requirement. It reads like a well researched and and easy to digest research paper instead. It's really informative. It's a convincing argument for forest bathing as well that champions for the importance and preservation of forests for the health of humanity. As Dr. Qing Li said, "when trees die, we die."

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jay Wilson

    You lost me at "essential oils" and "negative ions." It's a very pretty book though. You lost me at "essential oils" and "negative ions." It's a very pretty book though.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeb Boyt

    An engaging, scientific examination of the health and wellness benefits of forest bathing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This book was so calming. It made me feel relaxed just reading it for fun. Dr. Qing Li provides his thoughts on his research with respect to the body and mind after "Forest Bathing." He uses examples through studies that he has performed in Japan. He goes on to talk about the different parks in Japan that seem to have some sort of Forest Bathing programs. It was almost dream like and when he described the different trails and parks I envisioned myself there. What was important in this book wasn't This book was so calming. It made me feel relaxed just reading it for fun. Dr. Qing Li provides his thoughts on his research with respect to the body and mind after "Forest Bathing." He uses examples through studies that he has performed in Japan. He goes on to talk about the different parks in Japan that seem to have some sort of Forest Bathing programs. It was almost dream like and when he described the different trails and parks I envisioned myself there. What was important in this book wasn't just being introduced to the topic of Forest Bathing but the data behind it and how to recreate the forest in your home for ultimate relaxation. I rated this book a 4 star because it got repetitive towards the end.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Hill

    I first noticed the Japanese term Shinrin-Yoku on a Facebook post. After losing four large ash trees in my backyard due to the invasive emerald ash borer, I couldn't believe how the loss permeated my existence. I felt compelled to learn more about the ash trees and in doing so the surviving trees taught me so much about the world around me. It didn't surprise me that for Mother's Day my family gifted me this book on Forest Bathing by Dr. Qing Li, chairman of the Japanese Society for Forest Medic I first noticed the Japanese term Shinrin-Yoku on a Facebook post. After losing four large ash trees in my backyard due to the invasive emerald ash borer, I couldn't believe how the loss permeated my existence. I felt compelled to learn more about the ash trees and in doing so the surviving trees taught me so much about the world around me. It didn't surprise me that for Mother's Day my family gifted me this book on Forest Bathing by Dr. Qing Li, chairman of the Japanese Society for Forest Medicine. However, what surprised me was that about a third of the way into the book, the author even discussed a study about the relationship between trees and human health as the result of the emerald ash borer's destructive path through America. In bold letters, he wrote on page 113 "When trees die, people die." Dr. Qing Li provides numerous examples of how trees can improve our lives and his book advocates for more green space and trees in our ever-growing urban communities. As some point, I would like to write a blog praising this book: how it is written to attract the general population but also includes study references for those more academically inclined, how scientists have proven the value of forests, how to practise Shinrin-Yoku, how to bring the forest indoors, and how it's important to think about the future. It's even illustrated with forest scenes to tempt the reader outdoors. Originally, I hesitated to give this book 5 stars as I noticed it is one of a cluster of new books on Shinrin-Yoku being released in 2018 and I would like to compare the books at some point. However, for now, the five stars stands for excellence in presenting a topic that all urban planners and politicians should consider when designing healthy living spaces for the future. Perhaps it will encourage another person to plant a tree. Perhaps it will inspire a Canadian developer to create Canadian cities with more forested areas for citizens to practice Shinrin-Yoku! According to a chart in Li's book: Vancouver is ranked the second city in the world with the most green space. It has 25.9 percent coverage behind the top city Singapore with 29.3 percent coverage. And finally, if you're indoors reading this on your computer, Dr. Li encourages you to shut off the electronics, walk to the nearest park and discover what nature can do for you.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    wonderful book essentially about nature worship, and the positive effects on us that being in nature engenders. I have known the feelings for years, as I learned long ago to intentionally take periods of rest/forest bathing along hikes, but this book was a lovely recitation of why it feels so very good to be in nature, in forests, and breathing it all in.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Harley

    Forest Bathing (Shinrin-Yoku) is about connecting with nature, particularly trees. Dr. Qing Li's thesis is that spending time in a forest can enhance one's health and he provides the research to support it. Forest Bathing (Shinrin-Yoku) is about connecting with nature, particularly trees. Dr. Qing Li's thesis is that spending time in a forest can enhance one's health and he provides the research to support it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mick D

    Nice simple overview of the importance of spending time in nature. Attractive photos and accessible content.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amena

    The writer of this book, Dr Li, is a man after my own heart. He investigates the science behind why we feel so much better in nature, SO much happier and healthier when surrounded by trees. It's a feeling that is so hard to put into words and describe. Although walking anywhere reduces anxiety, depression, anger and confusion, it is only walking in a forest environment that has a positive effect on vigour and fatigue. The photography in the book is breathtakingly stunning. It made me want to jum The writer of this book, Dr Li, is a man after my own heart. He investigates the science behind why we feel so much better in nature, SO much happier and healthier when surrounded by trees. It's a feeling that is so hard to put into words and describe. Although walking anywhere reduces anxiety, depression, anger and confusion, it is only walking in a forest environment that has a positive effect on vigour and fatigue. The photography in the book is breathtakingly stunning. It made me want to jump into the book and be in Japan already. Swipe across to take a look for yourself! Just looking at them made me feel relaxed and calm, exactly how I feel when I am surrounded by nature itself. Two thirds of Japan is covered in forest. Many Japanese traditions and festivals are rooted in nature. In Spring, they have 'flower-viewing', where parties are held beneath the cherry blossom. Sounds completely and utterly heavenly. So yeah. The plan is not only to visit Japan, but to visit in the Spring!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    It's a good book and full of interesting information, but it's extremely anecdotal and mostly facts more than anything else. Which is fine, I'm not sure what else I would've expected from it. However, it makes me sad that I live in the desert since most forests here are pretty far out and require a drive to get to, it makes me appreciate the trees we have around and I felt myself looking for trees in town after reading it, wondering how healthy my surroundings could be. But I don't think you can It's a good book and full of interesting information, but it's extremely anecdotal and mostly facts more than anything else. Which is fine, I'm not sure what else I would've expected from it. However, it makes me sad that I live in the desert since most forests here are pretty far out and require a drive to get to, it makes me appreciate the trees we have around and I felt myself looking for trees in town after reading it, wondering how healthy my surroundings could be. But I don't think you can practice Shinrin-Yoku the same way with desert hikes, where trees are few and far in-between and you're mostly accompanied by shrubs. Sure, the nature in the desert is just as relaxing, but you don't have the natural phytoncides from trees to boost your health... I also found the bits on essential oils interesting, and makes me want to get a oil diffuser all the more, but alas, I'm broke! I spend too much money on books...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Guarini

    I honestly think that the true reason I wanted to read this book was so that I could justify my so-called “need” to live in an area with trees...and after reading this book, I do feel that it is justifiable! This book is a very fast read! I wasn’t expecting all of the beautiful illustrations of trees, which was clever on the author’s part. Including these made reading the book incredibly relaxing. Honestly, I think most of us already know and believe what is written in these pages—which is that c I honestly think that the true reason I wanted to read this book was so that I could justify my so-called “need” to live in an area with trees...and after reading this book, I do feel that it is justifiable! This book is a very fast read! I wasn’t expecting all of the beautiful illustrations of trees, which was clever on the author’s part. Including these made reading the book incredibly relaxing. Honestly, I think most of us already know and believe what is written in these pages—which is that company amongst trees benefits our minds & bodies. But it is nice to read about how far some folks have gone to prove this to be true with science (although I didn’t follow up with the list of studies in the back to see *how* the studies were conducted). Some of this book seemed a bit “woo,” (like the sections about the medicinal properties of trees)—I’m not saying it’s not true, but again, I didn’t read all of those studies), but all-in-all this book was as a good reminder that it is more than OK to feel the need to run off into the forest.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Angie Shere

    I am already a believer in the healing power of spending time in the natural world. But after reading this book, I want to visit more forests, spend more of my time outside. I learned so many new things about forests and plants, and the outdoors. Now I am even more enamored. I would have loved to share this book with my Mom, a fellow "tree lover" who was a wood carver and understood the stories trees could tell. I donated a copy to our local library in memory of her. I am already a believer in the healing power of spending time in the natural world. But after reading this book, I want to visit more forests, spend more of my time outside. I learned so many new things about forests and plants, and the outdoors. Now I am even more enamored. I would have loved to share this book with my Mom, a fellow "tree lover" who was a wood carver and understood the stories trees could tell. I donated a copy to our local library in memory of her.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Fiza Pathan

    I loved this book. This is a book that should be read by everyone to change the way we look at our forests & the way we can change our lives for the better by practicing shinrin-yoku or forest bathing. One of the best reads this year. Those of you interested in forest oil essentials & aromatherapy like me can please read this amazing & uplifting book. A must read for all nature lovers out there. Kudos!

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